FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jethro Tull (band)
Jethro Tull
Origin Blackpool & Luton, England
Genre(s) Rock, Hard rock, Progressive rock, Folk rock
Years active 1968 – present
Label(s) Chrysalis Records
Eagle Records
Roadrunner Records
EMI
Capitol Records
Island Records
Members
Ian Anderson
Martin Barre
Doane Perry
David Goodier
James Duncan
John O'Hara
Former members
Mick Abrahams
Glenn Cornick
Clive Bunker
John Evan
Jeffrey Hammond
Barriemore Barlow
John Glascock
David Palmer
Dave Pegg
Mark Craney
Eddie Jobson
Gerry Conway
Peter-John Vettese
Don Airey
Maartin Allcock
Dave Mattacks
Andrew Giddings
Jonathan Noyce
Tony Iommi
Tony Williams
Matthew Pegg
Phil Collins
Steve Bailey

Jethro Tull are a Grammy Award winning English rock band that formed in 1967-1968.[1] Their music is marked by the distinctive vocal style and lead flute work of front man Ian Anderson. Initially playing blues rock with an experimental flavour, they have, over the years, incorporated elements of classical, folk and 'ethnic' musics, jazz and art rock. Eclectic influences, diverse instrumentation, and often elaborate song construction led them to be labelled as an archetypal "progressive rock" band. Jethro Tull Jethro Tull (born March 1672 in Basildon, Berkshire; died 21 February 1741 in Shalbourne, Berkshire (now Wiltshire)) was an English agricultural pioneer during the Industrial Revolution and the Agricultural Revolution. ... This article is about the town in England. ... It has been suggested that Culture in Luton be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Chrysalis logo (1987-2005) Chrysalis Records is a record label that was created in 1969. ... Eagle Records is a record label. ... Roadrunner Records is a major record label that concentrates on metal bands. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Island Records is a record label that was founded by British record producers in Jamaica. ... This article is about the lead singer of Jethro Tull. ... Martin Lancelot Barre (born 17 November 1946, in Kings Heath, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England) is an English rock musician. ... Doane Ethredge Perry (born June 16, 1954 in Mt. ... Michael Timothy Mick Abrahams (born 7 April 1943, in Luton, Bedfordshire, England) was the original guitarist for Jethro Tull. ... Glenn Cornick (born Glenn Douglas Barnard Cornick, 24 April 1947, in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria) was the first bass player in the rock band, Jethro Tull. ... Clive Bunker (born 30 December 1946, in Luton, Bedfordshire, England) was a drummer for the British band, Jethro Tull, between 1967 and 1971. ... John Evan (born March 28, 1948) played keyboards for Jethro Tull from 1970 to 1980. ... Jeffrey Hammond (born July 30, 1946, sometimes credited as Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond) was a bass player for the progressive rock band Jethro Tull. ... Barriemore Barlow Barriemore Barlow (born 10 September 1949, in Birmingham) best known as the drummer and percussionist for rock band Jethro Tull from 1972 to 1980. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Dee Palmer (born David Palmer on July 2, 1937, in London) is a British arranger and keyboardist best known for having been a member of the rock group Jethro Tull. ... Dave Pegg was born on 2 November 1947 in Birmingham, England. ... Mark Craney (born 26 August 1952, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA - died November 2005) was a drummer for the rock band Jethro Tull from June 1980 to May 1981. ... Eddie Jobson is a British keyboardist noted for his use of synthesizers. ... Gerry Conway (born September 11, 1947 in Kings Lynn, Norfolk) is an English rock drummer, best known for having performed with the band Jethro Tull during the 1980s. ... Peter-John Vettese (born 15 August 1956 in Scotland), also known as Peter Vettese, is a British keyboardist, songwriter and producer. ... Don Airey Don Airey (born June 21, 1948) is the keyboardist in the rock band Deep Purple since 2002, succeeding Jon Lord. ... Maartin Allcock (born 5 January 1957 in Middleton, Manchester, Lancashire, England) is a multi-instrumentalist. ... Dave Mattacks is a rock and folk drummer. ... Andrew Andy Giddings (born July 10, 1963 in Pembury, Kent) is an English keyboardist and has been a member of Jethro Tull since 1991. ... Jonathan Mark Thomas Noyce (born July 15, 1971 in Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire, England) is an English musician. ... Frank Anthony Tony Iommi (born February 19, 1948, in Aston, Birmingham, England) is a guitarist best known for his tenure in the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... Steve Jamming Steve Bailey is a bassist famous for his pioneering work with the six string fretless bass and was voted runnerup for Bass Player Of The Year in 1994 and 1996. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... â™  This article is about the family of musical instruments. ... This article is about the lead singer of Jethro Tull. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Art rock is a term used by some to describe rock music that is characterized by ambitious or avant-garde lyrical themes and/or melodic, harmonic, or rhythmic experimentation, often extending beyond standard modern popular music forms and genres, toward influences in jazz, classical, world music or the experimental avant... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ...

Contents

History

1963–1967: Origins

Ian Anderson's first band, started in 1963 in Blackpool, was known as The Blades. It had developed by 1966 into a seven-piece white soul band called the John Evan Band (later the John Evan Smash), named for pianist/drummer John Evans, who dropped the final "s" from his name to make it sound less ordinary.[citation needed] At this point, Barrie Barlow was the band's drummer, as he would later be for Tull itself. This article is about the town in England. ... White Soul was a style (as opposed to genre) of popular music in vogue in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... John Evan (born March 28, 1948) played keyboards for Jethro Tull from 1970 to 1980. ...


The band moved to the London area in search of more bookings, basing themselves in nearby Luton.They also traveled to Liverpool. However, money remained short and within days of the move most of the band quit and headed back north, leaving Anderson and bassist Glenn Cornick to join forces with blues guitarist Mick Abrahams and his friend, drummer Clive Bunker, both from the Luton-based band "McGregor's Engine".[2] At first, the new band had trouble getting repeat bookings and they took to changing their name frequently to continue playing the London club circuit. Band names were often supplied by the staff of their booking agents, one of whom, a history buff, eventually christened them Jethro Tull after the 18th-century agriculturist who invented the seed drill. This name stuck simply by virtue of the fact that they were using it the first time a club manager (namely, John Gee of the Marquee Club, London) liked their show enough to invite them to return. They were signed to the blossoming Ellis-Wright agency, and became the third band managed by the soon-to-be Chrysalis empire. It has been suggested that Culture in Luton be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Glenn Cornick (born Glenn Douglas Barnard Cornick, 24 April 1947, in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria) was the first bass player in the rock band, Jethro Tull. ... Michael Timothy Mick Abrahams (born 7 April 1943, in Luton, Bedfordshire, England) was the original guitarist for Jethro Tull. ... Clive Bunker (born 30 December 1946, in Luton, Bedfordshire, England) was a drummer for the British band, Jethro Tull, between 1967 and 1971. ... Jethro Tull Jethro Tull (born March 1672 in Basildon, Berkshire; died 21 February 1741 in Shalbourne, Berkshire (now Wiltshire)) was an English agricultural pioneer during the Industrial Revolution and the Agricultural Revolution. ... “Seeder” redirects here. ... The Marquee is a legendary music club first located at 165 Oxford Street, London, England when it opened in 1958 with a range of jazz and skiffle acts. ...


1968: Progressive Blues

After an unsuccessful single produced by Derek Lawrence (an Abrahams-penned pop tune called "Sunshine Day" on which the band's name was misspelled "Jethro Toe", making it a collector's item), they released the bluesy album This Was in 1968. In addition to music written by Anderson and Abrahams the album included the traditional "Cat's Squirrel", which highlighted Abraham's blues-rock style. The Rahsaan Roland Kirk-penned jazz piece "Serenade to a Cuckoo" gave Anderson a showcase for his growing talents on the flute, an instrument which he started learning to play only half a year before the release of the album. The overall sound of the group at this time was described in the Record Mirror by Anderson in 1968 as "a sort of progressive blues with a bit of jazz".[3] Derek Lawrence is a record producer, famous for his work for Joe Meeks Outlaws, Deep Purple, Machiavel and Wishbone Ash. ... This Was (1968) is the first album by the rock band Jethro Tull. ... Roland Kirk Rahsaan Roland Kirk (August 7, 1936 - December 5, 1977) was a blind American jazz multi-instrumentalist, playing tenor saxophone, flute and other reed instruments. ... Record Mirror was a British weekly music newspaper. ...


Following this album, Abrahams left and formed his own band, Blodwyn Pig. There were a number of reasons for his departure: he was a blues purist, while Anderson wanted to branch out into other forms of music; Abrahams and Cornick did not get along; and Abrahams was unwilling to travel internationally or play more than three nights a week, while the others wanted to be successful by playing as often as possible and building an international fan base. Blodwyn Pig were a British rock group founded by Mick Abrahams after he left Jethro Tull in 1968. ...


Earth/Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi took on guitar duties for a short time after the departure of Abrahams, appearing in The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus (in which the group mimed "A Song For Jeffrey") in 1968, but returned to Earth/Black Sabbath after the performance. For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Frank Anthony Tony Iommi (born February 19, 1948, in Aston, Birmingham, England) is a guitarist best known for his tenure in the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. ... For the album of the same name, see The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus (album) The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus is a film released in 1996 of a December 11, 1968 event put together by The Rolling Stones. ...


1969–1971: Developing their own style

After auditions for a replacement guitarist, Anderson chose Martin Barre, a former member of Motivation, Penny Peeps, and Gethsemane, who was playing with Noel Redding's Fat Mattress at the time. Barre impressed Anderson with his persistence more than anything else: he was so nervous at his first audition that he could hardly play at all, and then showed up for a second audition without a cord to connect his guitar to an amplifier. Nevertheless, Barre would become Abrahams' permanent replacement on guitar and the second longest-standing member of the band after Anderson. Martin Lancelot Barre (born 17 November 1946, in Kings Heath, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England) is an English rock musician. ... Look up Motivation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Garden of Gethsemane. ... Noel David Redding (25 December 1945 – 11 May 2003) was a rock & roll guitarist best known as the bassist for The Jimi Hendrix Experience. ...


This new line-up released Stand Up in 1969, the band's only UK number-one album. Written entirely by Anderson — with the exception of the jazzy rearrangement of J. S. Bach's Bourée (fifth movement from Suite for Lute in E minor BWV 996 (BC L166)) — it branched out further from the blues, clearly evidencing a new direction for the group, which would come to be categorised as progressive rock alongside such diverse groups as King Crimson, Genesis, The Nice and Yes. The "Living in the Past" single of the same year reached number three in the UK chart, and though most other progressive groups actively resisted issuing singles at the time, Tull had further success with their other singles, "Sweet Dream" (1969) and "The Witch's Promise" (1970), and a five-track EP, Life Is a Long Song (1971), all of which made the top twenty. In 1970, they added keyboardist John Evan (initially as a guest musician) and released the album Benefit. Stand Up is the second album by Jethro Tull. ... “Bach” redirects here. ... Bourrée in E minor, is a popular lute piece from Suite in E minor for Lute, BWV 996 written by Johann Sebastian Bach. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... This article is about the musical group. ... Genesis is an English rock band formed in 1967. ... Keith Emerson, Lee Jackson, Brian Davison, Davy OList, circa 1967-68. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... John Evan (born March 28, 1948) played keyboards for Jethro Tull from 1970 to 1980. ... Benefit is the third album by Jethro Tull. ...


Bassist Cornick left following Benefit, replaced by Jeffrey Hammond, a childhood friend of Anderson whose name appeared in the songs "A Song for Jeffrey", "Jeffrey Goes to Leicester Square", "For Michael Collins, Jeffrey, and Me", and who also is the writer and narrator of "The Story of the Hare Who Lost His Spectacles" featured in the A Passion Play album. Jeffrey was often credited on Tull albums as "Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond", but the extra "Hammond" was an inside joke regarding the fact that Hammond's mother's maiden name was also "Hammond", no relation to his father. Jeffrey Hammond (born July 30, 1946, sometimes credited as Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond) was a bass player for the progressive rock band Jethro Tull. ... A Passion Play is a concept album released by Jethro Tull. ...


This line-up released Tull's best-known work, Aqualung in 1971. On this album, Anderson's writing voiced strong opinions about religion and society. Though consisting of distinct tracks, there is a common narrative thread leading some to label it as a concept album. The title character of Aqualung is a disreputable tramp, wandering the streets and "eyeing little girls with bad intent"; the focus of the song "Cross-Eyed Mary" is an underage prostitute. "My God" - written before Benefit and already a staple of the band's live act before Aqualung's release[4] - is a full-frontal assault on ecclesiastic excesses: "People what have you done/locked Him in His golden cage/Made Him bend to your religion/Him resurrected from the grave..." In contrast, the gentle acoustic "Wond'ring Aloud" is a love song. The title track and "Locomotive Breath" remain staples of US classic rock stations and, to this day, are rarely left out of Tull's live act. ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... John Everett Millais The Blind Girl: vagrant musicians See also vagrancy (biology) for an alternative use of the term. ...


1972–1976: Progressive rock

Thick as a Brick concept album.

Because of the heavy touring schedule and his wish to spend more time with his family, drummer Bunker left the band after the Aqualung album, and was replaced by Barriemore Barlow in early 1971. Barlow first recorded with the band for the EP Life Is a Long Song and made his first appearance on a Jethro Tull album with 1972's Thick as a Brick. This was conceived as a concept album consisting of a single track running 43:28 (an innovation previously unheard of in rock music[5]), split over the two sides of the LP, with a number of movements melded together and some repeating themes. The first movement with its distinctive acoustic guitar riff received some airplay on rock stations at the time (and occasionally turns up in modern classic-rock programming as a "deep" or "rare" cut). Thick as a Brick was the first true progrock offering by the band, as well as the first Jethro Tull album to reach number one on the (U.S.) Billboard Pop Albums chart (the following year's A Passion Play being the only other). This album's quintet – Anderson, Barre, Evan, Hammond, and Barlow – endured until the end of 1975. Image File history File links Thick as a Brick album cover This image is the cover of an album or single. ... Barriemore Barlow Barriemore Barlow (born 10 September 1949, in Birmingham) best known as the drummer and percussionist for rock band Jethro Tull from 1972 to 1980. ... Alternate cover The cover of the 1995 25th anniversary re-release. ... In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... Alternate cover The cover of the 1995 25th anniversary re-release. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... A Passion Play is a concept album released by Jethro Tull. ...


1972 also saw the release of Living in the Past, a double-album compilation of remixed singles, B-sides and outtakes (including the entirety of the Life Is a Long Song EP, which closes the album), with a single side recorded live in 1970 at New York's Carnegie Hall. Fans regard the album as arguably the band's best compilation. The title track remains one of their more enduring singles, though Anderson reportedly wrote it in 5/4 time with the intent of preventing its ascent to the pop charts. Living in the Past is a quasi-greatest hits collection by Jethro Tull which contains some unreleased songs. ...


In 1973, the band attempted to record a double album in tax exile at France's Château d'Hérouville studios (something the Rolling Stones and Elton John among others were doing at the time), but supposedly they were unhappy with the quality of the recording studio and abandoned the effort, subsequently mocking the studio as the "Chateau d'Isaster." (An 11-minute excerpt from these recordings was released on the 1988 20 Years of Jethro Tull boxed set, and the complete sessions were finally released on the 1993 compilation Nightcap, with the contemporarily overdubbed flute lines where the vocal parts were missing.) Instead they returned to England and Anderson rewrote, quickly recorded, and released A Passion Play, another single-track concept album, and their second pure prog release, with very allegorical lyrics focusing on the afterlife. A Passion Play continued the diverse instrumentation introduced in Thick As a Brick, and added saxophones to the mix. A Passion Play sold well but received generally poor reviews, including a particularly damning review of its live performance by Chris Welch of Melody Maker.[6] This article is about the rock band. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Nightcap : The Unreleased Masters 1972-1991 (1993) is a Jethro Tull double CD album released on 22 November 1993 with older and previously unreleased material. ... A Passion Play is a concept album released by Jethro Tull. ... For the Swedish political music movement, see progg. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored instrument of the woodwind family. ...


Around this time, the band's popularity with critics began to wane, but their popularity with the public remained strong. 1974's War Child, an album originally intended to be a companion piece for a film, reached number two on the Billboard charts and received some critical acclaim, and produced the radio mainstays "Bungle in the Jungle" and "Skating Away (On the Thin Ice of the New Day)". It also included a song, "Only Solitaire", allegedly aimed at L.A. Times rock music critic Robert Hilburn, who was one of Anderson's harsher critics. For other uses, see War Child. ...


In 1975, the band released Minstrel in the Gallery, an album which resembled Aqualung in that it contrasted softer, acoustic guitar-based pieces with lengthier, more bombastic works headlined by Barre's electric guitar. Written and recorded during Anderson's divorce from his first wife Jenny, the album is characterised by introspective, cynical, and sometimes bitter lyrics. Critics gave it mixed reviews, but the album came to be acknowledged as one of the band's best by longtime Tull fans, even as it generally fell under the radar to listeners familiar only with Aqualung. Following this album, bassist Hammond left the band, retiring from music altogether to pursue painting (which had always been his intention). John Glascock, who earlier was playing with flamenco-rock band Carmen, a support band on the previous Jethro Tull tour, was tabbed as the band's new bassist. Minstrel in the Gallery (1975) is an album by British band Jethro Tull. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance involving vigorous movements, such as hand-clapping and foot-stamping. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


1976's Too Old to Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young to Die! was another concept album, this time about the life of an aging rocker. Anderson, stung by critical reviews (particularly of A Passion Play), responded with more sharply-barbed lyrics. The press seemed oblivious to the ploy, and instead asked if the title track was autobiographical — a charge Anderson hotly denied. Curiously, the sleeve for the album featured a comic strip with a lead character (Ray Lomas) that looked very similar to Anderson.[7][8]


1977–1979: Folk rock trilogy

The band closed the decade with a trio of folk rock albums, Songs from the Wood, Heavy Horses, and Stormwatch. Songs from the Wood was the first Tull album to receive unanimously positive reviews since the release of Benefit and Living in the Past. Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Songs from the Wood (1977) is an album by Jethro Tull, the first of a trio of folk rock albums, Songs from the Wood, Heavy Horses and Stormwatch. ... Heavy Horses is an album released by Jethro Tull on April 10, 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Stormwatch (1979) is an album by the rock group Jethro Tull - the third in a trilogy of albums mixing traditional British Isles folk harmonies with more conventional pop rock music. ...


The band had long had ties to folk rockers Steeleye Span. Although not formally considered a part of the folk rock movement (which had actually begun nearly a decade earlier with the advent of Fairport Convention), there was clearly an exchange of musical ideas among Tull and the folk rockers. Also, by this time Anderson had moved to a farm in the countryside, and his new bucolic lifestyle was clearly reflected on these albums. A stellar example is the title track of Heavy Horses, a paean to draught horses. Steeleye Span are a British folk-rock band, formed in 1969 and remaining active today. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Heavy Horses is an album released by Jethro Tull on April 10, 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... A draft horse or draught horse is a large, strong horse breed for heavy work rather than speed. ...


The band continued to tour, and released a live double album in 1978. Entitled Bursting Out it featured dynamic live performances from the lineup that many Tull fans consider comprising the golden era of the band. It also features Anderson's often-ribald stage banter with the audience and band members. ("David's gone for a piss. Ah, he's back. Did you give it a good shake?") The vinyl LP contains three tracks not found on the initial U.S. single-disc CD edition: Martin Barre's guitar solo tracks "Quatrain" and "Conundrum" (which had an extended drum solo from drummer Barriemore Barlow) and a version of the 1969 UK single hit, "Sweet Dream". (These tracks were included on the original two-CD U.K. edition, and were restored in a globally released re-mastered two-CD edition released in 2004.) During the USA tour, because of health problems, John Glascock was replaced by Anderson's friend and former Stealers Wheel bassist Tony Williams. Bursting Out (1978) is Jethro Tulls first exclusively live album. ... Stealers Wheel Debut Album Stealers Wheel was a Scottish folk/rock band formed in Paisley, Scotland in 1972 by former school friends Joe Egan (born 16 April 1944, in Paisley, Scotland) and Gerry Rafferty (born 18 October 1947, Paisley, Scotland). ...


In 1977, David Palmer (now known as Dee Palmer), who had long been the band's orchestra arranger, formally joined the band on keyboards. Bassist Glascock left the band in the summer of 1979 due to collapsing health and in the autumn of the same year died following heart surgery. Stormwatch was completed without him (Anderson contributed bass on most tracks). The following tour featured Dave Pegg of Fairport Convention on bass guitar. After this tour, Anderson decided to record his first solo album. Also after this tour, Barriemore Barlow, deeply upset by Glascock's death, decided to leave the band. Dee Palmer (born David Palmer on July 2, 1937, in London) is a British arranger and keyboardist best known for having been a member of the rock group Jethro Tull. ... Dee Palmer (born David Palmer on July 2, 1937, in London) is a British arranger and keyboardist best known for having been a member of the rock group Jethro Tull. ... See also: Musical groups established in 1979 Record labels established in 1979 1979 in music (UK) 1970s in music // Stevie Wonder uses digital audio recording technology in recording his album Journey through the Secret Life of Plants. ... Dave Pegg was born on 2 November 1947 in Birmingham, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Evolution of live shows during the 1970s

During the early 1970s Tull went from a progressive blues band to one of the largest concert draws in the world. In concert, the band was known for theatricality and long medleys with brief instrumental interludes. While early Tull shows featured a manic Anderson with bushy hair and beard dressed in tattered overcoats and ragged clothes, as the band became bigger he moved towards varied costumes. This culminated with the War Child tour's oversized codpiece and colourful costume. Henry VIII wearing a codpiece A codpiece (< Middle English codpece = cod bag, scrotum + pece piece) is a flap or pouch that attaches to the front of the crotch of mens trousers to provide a covering for the genitals. ...

Jethro Tull in concert in Naples, 1998.

Other band-members joined in the dress-up and developed stage personae. Bassist Glenn Cornick always appeared in vest and headband. while his successor Jeffrey Hammond eventually adopted a black and white diagonally striped suit (and similarly striped bass guitar, electric guitar, and string bass). It was a zebra look, and at one point a two-manned zebra came out excreting ping pong balls into the audience while both performers moved forcefully around their stage areas. John Evan dressed in an all-white suit with a neck-scarf of scarlet with white polka-dots; described as a "sad clown" type with extremely oversized shoes, he joined in the theatrics by galumphing back and forth between Hammond Organ and grand piano (placed on opposite sides of the stage in the Thick as a Brick tour) or by such sight-gags as pulling out a flask and pretending to drink from it during a rest in the music. Barriemore Barlow's stage attire was a crimson tank-top and matching runner's shorts with rugby footgear, and his solos were marked by smoke-machines and enormous drumsticks. Martin Barre was the island of calm amongst the madmen, with Anderson (and sometimes Evan) crowding him and making faces during his solos. Image File history File links Jethro_tull_1998. ... Image File history File links Jethro_tull_1998. ... For other uses, see Naples (disambiguation). ... Glenn Cornick (born Glenn Douglas Barnard Cornick, 24 April 1947, in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria) was the first bass player in the rock band, Jethro Tull. ... Jeffrey Hammond (born July 30, 1946, sometimes credited as Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond) was a bass player for the progressive rock band Jethro Tull. ... John Evan (born March 28, 1948) played keyboards for Jethro Tull from 1970 to 1980. ... Barriemore Barlow Barriemore Barlow (born 10 September 1949, in Birmingham) best known as the drummer and percussionist for rock band Jethro Tull from 1972 to 1980. ... Martin Lancelot Barre (born 17 November 1946, in Kings Heath, Birmingham, Warwickshire, England) is an English rock musician. ...


The band's stage theatrics peaked during the Thick As A Brick tour, a performance distinguished by stage hands wearing the tan trench-coat/madras cap ensemble from the album art, extras in rabbit suits running across stage and an extended interlude during which Barre and Barlow entered a beach-tent onstage and swapped pants.


A Passion Play was planned to have a full-length film to go with the stage theatrics. However, from this effort, it seems that only a few excerpts have survived to be re-released on recent commemorative videos of the band, including the interlude "The Story of the Hare Who Lost His Spectacles."


A similar multi-media effort had been planned for Too Old To Rock and Roll... but was not completed. Thereafter, the emphasis on theatrics was reduced but never eliminated. In 1982's Broadsword and the Beast concerts, the entire stage was transformed into a viking ship. Anderson often dressed as a country squire on tours in the late 1970s, with the rest of the band adopting the style during their folk phase. The A tour featured the same white jumpsuit uniforms worn by the band on the album cover. Certain routines from the 1970s have recently become ensconced in concerts, such as having a song interrupted by a phone call for an audience member (which Anderson now takes on a cell) and the climactic conclusion of shows including bombastic instrumentals and the giant balloons which Anderson would carry over his head and toss into the crowd.


1980–1984: Electronic rock

Tull's first album of the 1980s, A, was originally intended to be Ian Anderson's first solo album. Anderson retained Barre on electric guitar, and added Dave Pegg (Fairport Convention) on bass, Mark Craney on drums, and special guest keyboardist/violinist Eddie Jobson (ex-Roxy Music, UK, Frank Zappa). Highlighted by the prominent use of synthesisers, it contrasted sharply with the established "Tull sound". After pressure from Chrysalis Records, Anderson decided to release it as a Jethro Tull album. Entitled A (taken from the labels on the master tapes for his scrapped solo album, marked simply "A for Anderson"), it was released in mid-1980. A is an album by Jethro Tull. ... Dave Pegg was born on 2 November 1947 in Birmingham, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Mark Craney (born 26 August 1952, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA - died November 2005) was a drummer for the rock band Jethro Tull from June 1980 to May 1981. ... Eddie Jobson is a British keyboardist noted for his use of synthesizers. ... Roxy Music are an English art rock group founded in the early 1970s by art school graduate Bryan Ferry (vocals and keyboards). ... Frank Vincent Zappa[1] (December 21, 1940 – December 4, 1993) was an American composer, musician, and film director. ... Chrysalis logo (1987-2005) Chrysalis Records is a record label that was created in 1969. ... A is an album by Jethro Tull. ...


In keeping with the mood of innovation surrounding the album, Tull made an early foray into the emerging genre of music video with Slipstream, a film which takes place at London's Hammersmith Odeon (which was used for exterior scenes). However, the main concert footage was actually from an American performance in Los Angeles, California at the Los Angeles Sports Arena (as heard on the Magic Piper ROIO) featuring the A lineup filmed in November of 1980. The video was directed by David Mallet, who has directed numerous music videos including the pioneering "Ashes to Ashes" video for David Bowie. The electronic style of the album was even more pronounced in these live performances and was used to striking effect on some of the older songs, including "Locomotive Breath". The more familiar Tull sound was brought to the fore in an all acoustic version of "Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day" featuring Pegg on mandolin. "Slipstream", long a rarity on VHS, was included as a bonus DVD with the 2004 remastered edition of the A album. Slipstream Slipstream (1981) is a video by Jethro Tull, recorded during the 1980 A tour. ... The Apollo, Hammersmith, London has been a rock venue for decades, and was originally known as the Hammersmith Odeon. ...


Jobson and Craney departed following the A tour and Tull entered a period of revolving drummers: Gerry Conway, Phil Collins (who played with the band at the first Prince's Trust concert in 1982 as a fill-in drummer for the then recent departed Gerry Conway), Paul Burgess (for the US leg of the Broadsword and the Beast tour), and Doane Perry. The year of 1981 was the first year in their album career that the band did not release an album; however some recording sessions took place (Anderson, Barre, Pegg, and Conway, with Anderson playing the keyboards). Some of these tracks were released on the Nightcap compilation in 1993. In 1982, Peter-John Vettese joined on keyboards, and the band returned to a somewhat folkier sound – albeit with synthesisers – for 1982's Broadsword and the Beast. The ensuing concert tour for the album was well-attended and the shows featured what was to be one of the group's last indulgences in full dress theatricality: the stage was built to resemble a Viking longship and the band performed in traditional medieval regalia. Gerry Conway (born September 11, 1947 in Kings Lynn, Norfolk) is an English rock drummer, best known for having performed with the band Jethro Tull during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... Paul Burgess (born in Manchester, England, UK in 1950) is a UK-based rock drummer, notable for his association with a wide range of British rock and folk-rock bands, most of which have sizable cult followings. ... Doane Ethredge Perry (born June 16, 1954 in Mt. ... Nightcap : The Unreleased Masters 1972-1991 (1993) is a Jethro Tull double CD album released on 22 November 1993 with older and previously unreleased material. ... Peter-John Vettese (born 15 August 1956 in Scotland), also known as Peter Vettese, is a British keyboardist, songwriter and producer. ... Broadsword and the Beast is an album released by Jethro Tull on April 10, 1982 (see 1982 in music) and according to Ian Anderson in the liner notes of the remastered CD, contains some of Jethro Tulls best music. ...


An Anderson solo album (which was in fact an Anderson-Vettese effort) appeared in 1983, in the form of the heavily electronic Walk into Light. Although the album featured electronic soundscapes and synthesiser voicings advanced for its time, as well as cerebral lyrics about the alienating effects of technology, the release failed to resonate with longtime fans or with new listeners. However, as with later solo efforts by Anderson and Barre, some of the Walk Into Light songs, such as "Fly By Night", "Made in England" and "Different Germany", later made their way into Tull live sets. Walk Into Light (1983) is the first solo effort by Jethro Tull frontman Ian Anderson. ...


In 1984, Tull released Under Wraps, a heavily electronic album with no "live" drummer (instead, as on Walk into Light, a drum-machine was used). Although the band was reportedly proud of the sound, the album was not well-received, particularly in North America. However, the video for "Lap of Luxury" did manage to earn moderate rotation on the newly influential MTV music video channel. Also, the acoustic version of the title track, Under Wraps 2, found some favour over the years and a live instrumental version of the song was included on the "A Little Light Music" concert CD of 1992. Some longtime Tull fans regard Under Wraps as one of the band's weaker efforts; however, Martin Barre considers it his favourite. As a result of the throat problems Anderson developed singing the demanding Under Wraps material on tour, Tull took a three-year break, during which Anderson continued to oversee his salmon farm which he founded in 1978.[9] Under Wraps is the name of an album by the band Jethro Tull, released in 1984. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ...


1987–1991: Hard rock

Tull returned strongly with 1987's Crest of a Knave. With Vettese absent (Anderson contributed the synth programming) and the band relying more heavily on Barre's electric guitar than they had since the early 1970s, the album was a critical and commercial success. Shades of their earlier electronic excursions were still present, however, as three of the album's songs again utilized a drum machine. The band won the 1989 Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance, beating the favourite Metallica and their ...And Justice For All album. The award was particularly controversial as many did not consider Jethro Tull hard rock, much less heavy metal. Under advisement from their manager, who told them they had no chance of winning, no one from the band attended the award ceremony.[10] In response to the criticism they received over the award, the band took out an advert in a British music periodical with a picture of a flute lying amid a pile of iron re-bars and the line, "THE FLUTE IS A HEAVY METAL INSTRUMENT."[11] In 2007, the win was named one of the ten biggest upsets in Grammy history by Entertainment Weekly[12] (In 1992, when Metallica finally won the Grammy in the category, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich joked, "First thing we're going to do is thank Jethro Tull for not putting out an album this year."). Crest of a Knave is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1987. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental was awarded at the Grammy Awards of 1989 for music released in the previous year. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... ...And Justice for All is American heavy metal band Metallicas fourth studio album released August 25, 1988, by Elektra Records. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...


The style of Crest has been compared to that of Dire Straits, in part because Anderson no longer seemed to have the vocal range he once possessed. Two songs in particular -- "Farm on the Freeway" and "Steel Monkey" -- got heavy radio airplay. The album also contained the popular live song "Budapest", which depicts a backstage scene with a shy local female stagehand. Although "Budapest" was the longest song on that album (longer than ten minutes), "Mountain Men" became more famous throughout Europe, depicting a scene from World War II in Africa. Ian Anderson referred to the battles of El Alamain and the Falkland Islands, drawing historic parallels of the angst that women left behind by their warrior husbands might have felt:
This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

died in the trenches at El Alamain,
died in the Falklands on TV - from Mountain Men

1988 was notable for the release of 20 Years of Jethro Tull, a five-LP themed set (also released as an unthemed three-CD set, and as a truncated single CD version on 20 Years of Jethro Tull: Highlights) consisting largely of rarities and outtakes from throughout the band's history, as well as a variety of live and remastered tracks. It also included a booklet outlining the band's history in detail. Now out of print, it has become a collector's item, although many (but not all) of the outtakes have been included as bonus tracks on the remasters of the band's studio albums. 20 Years of Jethro Tull is a (1988) boxed set which spans the first 20 years of Jethro Tull. ...


Multi-instrumentalist Martin (Maart) Allcock, who as a member of Fairport Convention, had played with Tull at the Cropredy festival the previous year. He joined the band mainly as keyboard player, starting with the 20th Anniversary tour. Maartin Allcock (born 5 January 1957 in Middleton, Manchester, Lancashire, England) is a multi-instrumentalist. ...


In 1989, the band released Rock Island, which met with less commercial and critical success than Crest of a Knave. The lead-off track, "Kissing Willie," featured bawdy double entendre lyrics and over the top heavy metal riffing that seemed to take a satiric view of the group's recent Grammy award win. The song's accompanying video found difficulty in receiving rotation because of its sexual imagery. Although Rock Island was something of a miss for the group, a couple of fan favourites did emerge from the album. "Big Riff and Mando" reflects life on the road for the relentlessly touring musicians, giving a wry account of the theft of Barre's prized mandolin by a stage-struck fan. "Another Christmas Song", an upbeat number celebrating the humanitarian spirit of the holiday season, stood out against the brooding and sombre mood of many of the songs on the album and was well-received at concerts. It was re-recorded for the 2003 Jethro Tull Christmas Album release. Rock Island is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1989. ...


1991's Catfish Rising was a more solid album than Rock Island. Despite being labelled as a "return to playing the blues," the album actually is marked by the generous use of mandolin and acoustic guitar and much less use of keyboards than any Tull album of the Eighties. Notable tracks included "Rocks on the Road", which highlighted gritty acoustic guitar work and hard-bitten lyrics about urban life and "Still Loving You Tonight", a bluesy low-key ballad. Catfish Rising is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1991. ...


Allcock, who had played on the Catfish Rising tour although not the album itself, left the band at the end of the year.


1992–1994: Touring and Compiling

In 1992, Tull embarked on a tour titled A Little Light Music, with most of the show focusing on acoustic songs, many of which they had not played live for years, if at all. A live CD was recorded on this tour and released under the same title later in that year. This was well received by fans because of its different takes on many past compositions, as well as a rendition of the folk song "John Barleycorn". As documented by these live performances, Ian's voice had clearly improved since his vocal cord injury in the mid-Eighties. After the CD release, the tour continued as a show of two halves, the Light and Dark Tour. ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


1993 was marked as the 25th Anniversary of Jethro Tull by the release of various new products, as well as an extensive Anniversary Tour, which started in May 1993 and lasting nearly a year. In keeping with the anniversary theme, this tour again revived a number of older songs.


The 25th Anniversary Box was a four-CD set including new and vintage live recordings, remixed and remastered songs from earlier albums, and re-recordings of old songs by the 90s band. A two-CD Anniversary Collection compilation was also released, containing original tracks remastered, and a video collection included new interviews, promo videos and archive material. The remixed single, Living in the (Slightly more Recent) Past, reached #32 in the UK singles chart. A planned second boxed set of outtakes and rare tracks was scaled down to two discs and released towards the end of the year under the title Nightcap. Nightcap : The Unreleased Masters 1972-1991 (1993) is a Jethro Tull double CD album released on 22 November 1993 with older and previously unreleased material. ...


1995-present: World music influences

After the 1992 tour, Anderson had re-learned how to play the flute, and begun writing songs that heavily featured world music influences. Dave Pegg also left the band at this time to concentrate on his work with Fairport Convention. He was replaced by Jonathan Noyce. 1995's Roots to Branches and 1999's J-Tull Dot Com are less rock-based than Crest of a Knave or Catfish Rising. These most recent original Tull efforts reflect the musical influences of decades of performing all around the globe. In songs such as "Out of the Noise" and "Hot Mango Flush", Anderson paints vivid pictures of third-world street scenes. These albums have reflected Anderson's coming to grips with being an old rocker, with songs such as the pensive "Another Harry's Bar", "Wicked Windows" (a meditation on reading glasses), and the gruff "Wounded, Old, and Treacherous". Roots to Branches is the name of an album by the band Jethro Tull, released on September 12, 1995. ... Categories: Album stubs | Jethro Tull albums | 1999 albums ... Crest of a Knave is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1987. ... Catfish Rising is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1991. ...


In 1995, Anderson released his second solo album, Divinities: Twelve Dances with God, an instrumental work comprised of twelve flute-heavy pieces pursuing varied themes with an underlying motif. The album was recorded with current Tull keyboard player Andrew Giddings and orchestral musicians. Anderson released two further song-based solo albums, The Secret Language of Birds and Rupi's Dance in 2000 and 2003, respectively. The Secret Language of Birds (2000) is the 3rd solo album by Jethro Tull frontman Ian Anderson. ... Rupis Dance (2003) is a solo album by Jethro Tull frontman Ian Anderson. ...

Jethro Tull, early 2000s. Left to right: Martin Barre, Andrew Giddings, Jonathan Noyce, Doane Perry, Ian Anderson

2003 saw the release of The Jethro Tull Christmas Album, a collection of traditional Christmas songs together with old and new Christmas songs written by Jethro Tull. Image File history File links Jethro Tull today - promotional image. ... Image File history File links Jethro Tull today - promotional image. ... The Jethro Tull Christmas Album is an album by Jethro Tull. ...


An Ian Anderson live double album and DVD was released in 2005 called Ian Anderson Plays the Orchestral Jethro Tull. In addition, a DVD entitled Nothing Is Easy: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970 and a live album Aqualung Live (recorded in 2004) were released in 2005. Ian Anderson Plays the Orchestral Jethro Tull (2005) is an album and DVD by Jethro Tull frontman Ian Anderson, featuring the Neue Philharmonie Frankfurt, conducted by John OHara. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


Ian Anderson performed a cover version of the song "The Thin Ice," on the 2005 Pink Floyd tribute album Back Against The Wall. Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Back Against The Wall is an album released in 2005 by a number of progressive rock artists as a tribute to Pink Floyds album The Wall. ...


2006 saw the release of a dual boxed set DVD "Collectors Edition", containing two DVD's "Nothing Is Easy" and "Living With The Past". Included on "Nothing is Easy" is footage from the 1970 Isle of Wight festival, considered by many Tull fans to be a classic Tull performance. "Living With The Past" includes a documentary that features the band on tour, in Britain and America, in 2001. It also has footage of a reunion of Jethro Tull's first line up - Anderson, Abrahams, Cornick and Bunker - filmed playing in a pub.


March 2007 saw the release of The Best of Acoustic Jethro Tull, a 24-song set of Tull and Ian Anderson acoustic performances taken from various albums. Included are a new live acoustic version of "One Brown Mouse" and a live performance of the traditional song (attributed to Henry VIII), "Pastime With Good Company." The Best of Acoustic (2007) is a greatest hits album by Jethro Tull. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ...


In September 2007, Jethro Tull released CD/DVD Live At Montreux 2003. The concert was recorded on the July 4, 2003 and featured, among others, "Fat Man", "With You There To Help Me" and "Hunting Girl".


In addition to another busy tour schedule in 2007, Tull are also in the studio recording some new material for a new CD which is expected to be released in the summer of 2008. If it is released it will be the band's first proper new album in 8 years. Some of the new songs were performed live during the recent UK acoustic tour.


As of the end of 2006, the website www.ministry-of-information.com. has logged 2789 Tull concerts since 1968 (which averages about 73 concerts per year for 38 years)!


Band member history

  • Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi played guitar for Jethro Tull briefly in 1968 following the departure of Mick Abrahams. The only recording of him with Jethro Tull is on The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus although his guitar is not heard as all of the music (excepting Ian Anderson's vocals and flute) was dubbed in afterwards. He had already quit the band before the Rock and Roll Circus and it was his final performance with the band. He was soon replaced by Martin Barre.
  • After his departure from Jethro Tull in 1971, original drummer Clive Bunker played in a short-lived group called Jude with former Procol Harum guitarist Robin Trower.
  • Barriemore Barlow replaced Clive Bunker on drums. His second gig for the band was the infamous outdoor concert at Red Rocks Amplitheatre near Denver, Colorado on 10 June, 1971 in which gate-crashing fans rioted with police who dropped tear gas from helicopters. The band played on through their tears in what was described as a brilliant gig; but no rock concerts were held at Red Rocks for years thereafter.[13]
  • Genesis' Phil Collins was Jethro Tull's drummer for only one gig: the Prince's Trust Gala on July 7, 1982 at London's Dominion Theatre. During this time, Jethro Tull had the position of drummer to fill after Barriemore Barlow left the band. Phil Collins played a three songs set, and two of them ("Jack in the Green" and "Pussy Willow") are on an official video release of the Prince's Trust Gala--though it may not have been released in all countries.
  • A significant number of Jethro Tull former supporting players like Dave Pegg, Martin Allcock, Dave Mattacks and Gerry Conway have been in the core of in the influential folk rock band Fairport Convention. Dave Pegg - a core member of Fairport and the bassist with the longest tenure in Tull (1979-1995) — alternated his career between the two. When Jethro Tull toured the USA in 1987, Fairport Convention was the opening act, with Pegg playing in both bands at each concert.
  • Ex-drummer Mark Craney, from the short-lived 1980-81 line-up, died of diabetes and pneumonia on November 26, 2005. He had suffered through a history of health problems including kidney ailments, stroke paralysis, and a heart condition. A number of Tull members contributed to the 1997 charity album, Something With a Pulse, to help Craney pay medical bills.
  • Bassist Tony Williams filled in for the remainder of the tour when John Glascock's health failed.
  • Bassist Matthew Pegg— Dave's son — is credited with playing bass on Catfish Rising when his father was "washing hair."
  • David Palmer, who arranged orchestras and instruments along with being a member of Jethro Tull, became Dee Palmer in 2003 and transitioned from a male to a female in 2004. She is very open about it and plans on releasing a solo album.

For other uses, see Black Sabbath (disambiguation). ... Frank Anthony Tony Iommi (born February 19, 1948, in Aston, Birmingham, England) is a guitarist best known for his tenure in the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus is the fifth release of Rolling Stones music by former manager Allen Kleins ABKCO Records (who usurped control of the bands Decca/London material in 1970) after the bands departure from Decca and Klein. ... Procol Harum is an English rock band, formed in the 1960s, who built a heavy foundation for what would become progressive rock. ... Robin Leonard Trower (born March 9, 1945 in Catford, South East London, England) is a preeminent English rock guitarist who achieved success with Procol Harum during the 1960s, and then again as the leader of his own Hendrixesque power trio. ... For other uses, see Phil Collins (disambiguation). ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Mark Craney (born 26 August 1952, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA - died November 2005) was a drummer for the rock band Jethro Tull from June 1980 to May 1981. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Catfish Rising is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1991. ... Steve Jamming Steve Bailey is a bassist famous for his pioneering work with the six string fretless bass and was voted runnerup for Bass Player Of The Year in 1994 and 1996. ... Roots to Branches is the name of an album by the band Jethro Tull, released on September 12, 1995. ... Dee Palmer (born David Palmer on July 2, 1937, in London) is a British arranger and keyboardist best known for having been a member of the rock group Jethro Tull. ...

In popular culture

  • The song "Aqualung" is briefly joked about in the Will Ferrell comedy Anchorman. Ferrell's character, Ron Burgundy, plays a jazz flute solo and suddenly plays the main riff from "Aqualung" and then shouts, "Hey Aqualung!"
  • In a season ten episode of Friends, "The One With Ross's Grant", Rachel and Monica find Jethro Tull listed in Phoebe's black book of men that she has slept with. Rachel asks, "Isn't Jethro Tull a band?", to which Phoebe replies "Yes. Yes, they are."
  • Anderson has attributed the marked difference between their music and the music of their contemporaries to the group's avoidance of illegal recreational drugs.[citation needed] Anderson actually stated most of his early lyrics were Lowenbrau-fueled whilst his contemporaries used 'other inspiration'
  • In the 1997 debut album of Blackmore's Night (Shadow of the Moon), Ian takes the flute solo on "Play Minstrel Play".
  • In an episode of The Simpsons, Martin is given the award for best flautist. He plays the flute and begins to sing "Thick as a Brick" until he's hit on the head with a chair by Lisa.
  • In an episode of King of the Hill entitled "The Incredible Hank", part of "Aqualung" is played while Hank lifts weights in his garage.
  • In the song "Virus Alert" by "Weird Al" Yankovic, one of the effects of the titular virus is to "make your iPod only play Jethro Tull."
  • In an episode of That '70s Show, the character Steven Hyde says that if he was rich he'd have Jethro Tull playing at his house.
  • In the movie Big Daddy, when Sonny Koufax is asked what he was doing instead of going to his aunt's funeral he replies, "Jethro Tull had a reunion concert, so I caught that."
  • In the movie Armageddon, Oscar Choi (Owen Wilson) states that he hates when people think that Jethro Tull is just the name of a member in the band.
  • In Stephen King's The Dark Tower series, in The Gunslinger, Tull is the name of the last city before the desert. Stephen King says that he took the name from Jethro Tull in Song of Susannah, when speaking to Roland Deschain and Eddie Dean.
  • In an episode of Everybody Loves Raymond, a flashback to Raymond and Robert's teenage years refers to Robert starting a fight with someone who refused to agree that "Bungle in the Jungle" was the best song ever written.

Breaking the Waves is a 1996 film, set in the Scottish Highlands in the 1970s, which tells the story of Bess McNeill, who marries oil-man Jan, despite the apprehensions of her community and Calvinist church. ... mikaela magee is sooo fricken pist mikaela is . ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Almost Famous is a 2000 film written and directed by Cameron Crowe and released in 2000. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American comedian, impressionist, writer and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ... Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy is an American comedy film which was released on July 9, 2004. ... For friendship, see friendship. ... Blackmores Night is a Renaissance-inspired folk rock band led by Ritchie Blackmore (electric guitar and acoustic guitar) and Candice Night (lyricist and lead vocals). ... Simpsons redirects here. ... This article is about the television program. ... This article is about the musician himself. ... That 70s Show is an American television sitcom that centers on the lives of a group of teenagers living in Point Place, Wisconsin, a fictional suburb of either Kenosha or Green Bay[1] from May 17, 1976 to December 31, 1979. ... Everybody Loves Raymond is an American sitcom originally broadcast on CBS from 1996 to 2005. ... Jim DeRogatis (born 1964 in Jersey City, New Jersey) is a U.S. music critic. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... The Crane Wife is an album by The Decemberists, released in 2006. ... The Decemberists are a five-piece indie pop band from Portland, Oregon, fronted by singer/songwriter Colin Meloy . ... Heavy Horses is an album released by Jethro Tull on April 10, 1978 (see 1978 in music). ...

Lineups

Jethro Tull Band Members (By Year)

1967 - 1968
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, harmonica, acoustic guitar, piano
  • Mick Abrahams - guitar, vocals
  • Glenn Cornick - bass
  • Clive Bunker - drums, percussion

1968 - 1969
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, harmonica, acoustic guitar, keyboards, mandolin
  • Martin Barre - guitar, flute
  • Glenn Cornick - bass
  • Clive Bunker - drums, percussion

1969 - 1970
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar, vocals
  • Glenn Cornick - bass, vocals
  • Clive Bunker - drums, percussion, vocals
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano, vocals

1970 - 1971
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar, flute, recorder
  • Jeffrey Hammond - bass, recorder, vocals
  • Clive Bunker - drums, percussion
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano

1971 - 1975
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, soprano saxophone, violin
  • Martin Barre - guitar, lute
  • Jeffrey Hammond - bass, vocals
  • Barriemore Barlow - drums, percussion
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano, synthesiser

1975 - 1976
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • John Glascock - bass, vocals
  • Barriemore Barlow - drums, percussion
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano

1976 - 1978
1978 - 1979
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, tin whistle
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • John Glascock - bass, vocals
  • Barriemore Barlow - drums, percussion
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano
  • David Palmer - keyboards, synthesiser

1978
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, tin whistle
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Tony Williams - bass
  • Barriemore Barlow - drums, percussion
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano
  • David Palmer - keyboards, synthesiser

1979 - 1980
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Barriemore Barlow - drums, percussion
  • John Evan - keyboards, piano
  • David Palmer - keyboards, synthesiser

1980 - 1981
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Mark Craney - drums
  • Eddie Jobson - keyboards, violin

1981
  • band inactive; musicians taking part in recording sessions:
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, keyboards
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Gerry Conway - drums

1982
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Gerry Conway - drums
  • Paul Burgess - drums
  • Peter - John Vettese - keyboards

1984 - 1985
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Gerry Conway - drums
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Peter - John Vettese - keyboards

1985 - 1987
  • band inactive; musicians taking part in occasional appearances and recording sessions:
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, guitar, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Gerry Conway - drums
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Peter - John Vettese - keyboards
  • Eddie Jobson - keyboard, violin
  • Ric Sanders - violin

1987 - 1988
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Don Airey - keyboards

1988 - 1991
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, harmonica, mandolin
  • Martin Barre - guitar, mandolin
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Maartin Allcock - keyboards, acoustic guitar

1991 - 1992
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Dave Mattacks - drums
  • Maartin Allcock - keyboards
  • Andrew Giddings - keyboards

1992 - 1995
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, harmonica
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin, vocals
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Andrew Giddings - keyboards

1995 - 2006
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, mandolin, mandocello, harmonica, bamboo flute
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • Jonathan Noyce - bass
  • Doane Perry - drums
  • Andrew Giddings - keyboards

2007
  • Ian Anderson - lead vocals, flute, acoustic guitar, mandolin, mandocello, harmonica, bamboo flute
  • Martin Barre - guitar
  • David Goodier - bass
  • James Duncan / Doane Perry - drums
  • John O'Hara - keyboards

Discography

Main article: Jethro Tull discography

This is the discography for the British band Jethro Tull. ...

Studio albums

This Was (1968) is the first album by the rock band Jethro Tull. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stand Up is the second album by Jethro Tull. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Benefit is the third album by Jethro Tull. ... Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Alternate cover The cover of the 1995 25th anniversary re-release. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Passion Play is a concept album released by Jethro Tull. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... For other uses, see War Child. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Minstrel in the Gallery (1975) is an album by British band Jethro Tull. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Songs from the Wood (1977) is an album by Jethro Tull, the first of a trio of folk rock albums, Songs from the Wood, Heavy Horses and Stormwatch. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Heavy Horses is an album released by Jethro Tull on April 10, 1978 (see 1978 in music). ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Stormwatch (1979) is an album by the rock group Jethro Tull - the third in a trilogy of albums mixing traditional British Isles folk harmonies with more conventional pop rock music. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... A is an album by Jethro Tull. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Broadsword and the Beast is an album released by Jethro Tull on April 10, 1982 (see 1982 in music) and according to Ian Anderson in the liner notes of the remastered CD, contains some of Jethro Tulls best music. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Under Wraps is the name of an album by the band Jethro Tull, released in 1984. ... This article is about the year. ... A Classic Case (1985) is Jethro Tulls only orchestral album, featuring the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Palmer. ... This article is about the year. ... Crest of a Knave is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1987. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Rock Island is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1989. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Catfish Rising is an album by the British progressive rock group Jethro Tull, released in 1991. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Roots to Branches is the name of an album by the band Jethro Tull, released on September 12, 1995. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Categories: Album stubs | Jethro Tull albums | 1999 albums ... This article is about the year. ... The Jethro Tull Christmas Album is an album by Jethro Tull. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Biography on official Jethro Tull web site. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  2. ^ Melody Maker, 12 July 1969, reproduced on Tullpress.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-07.
  3. ^ Record Mirror, 12 Oct 1968, reproduced on Tullpress.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  4. ^ New Musical Express, 21 Mar 1971, reproduced on Tullpress.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  5. ^ Smith, Bradley (1997). Billboard Guide to Progressive Music, First printing, Billboard Books, p. 113. ISBN 0-8230-7665-2. 
  6. ^ Crime of passion. Melody Maker. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  7. ^ Too Old to Rock'n'Roll (cartoon). Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  8. ^ part 2. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  9. ^ Isle of Skye Business Community. Ian Anderson. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  10. ^ Artist Wiki: Jethro Tull
  11. ^ Advert. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  12. ^ Grammy's 10 Biggest Upsets. Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved on 2007-02-13.
  13. ^ Los Angeles Free Press, 18 June 1971; Rolling Stone Magazine, 8 July 1971
  14. ^ "Positively prog", Jim DeRogatis, Chicago Sun-Times, Nov 5, 2006

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jethro Tull (band) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4197 words)
Jethro Tull is a rock band that formed in Blackpool, England in the 1960s.
Band names were often supplied by the staff of their booking agents, one of whom, a history buff, eventually christened them Jethro Tull after the 18th-century agriculturist who invented the seed drill.
The only recording of him with Jethro Tull is on The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus although his guitar is not heard as all of the music (excepting Ian Anderson's vocals and flute) was dubbed in afterwards.
Jethro Tull Biography (380 words)
Jethro Tull is not the name of the high-stepping, long-haired, jester-dressed flutist who leads the band.
Jethro Tull, organized in 1967 by Anderson, Glenn Cornick, Mick Abrahams and Clive Bunker, by the '90s had enlisted a large number of rock musicians who came and went.
Jethro Tull's live shows in major arenas showed a propensity for visuals, which over the years have become as much a part of rock's show biz attitude as the music.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m