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Encyclopedia > Jesus College, Oxford
Colleges and Halls of the University of Oxford
Jesus College

The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (852x525, 119 KB) Summary I took this photo myself and I am happy for it to be released into the public domain. ...

                           
College name Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation
Named after Jesus Christ
Established 1571
Sister college Jesus College, Cambridge
Principal The Lord Krebs
JCR President Paolo Wyatt
Undergraduates 340
MCR President Jahan Zahid
Graduates 160
Location Turl Street, Oxford


Location of Jesus College within central OxfordCoordinates: 51°45′12″N 1°15′25″W / 51.753422, -1.256968
College Website
Boatclub Website

Jesus College (in full: Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. It is the eighth wealthiest college, with closing reserves and endowments of £79,700,391 (2003).[1] The main entrance is on the west side of Turl Street. It is flanked by Ship Street to the north and Market Street to the south. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... Full name The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge Motto Facias Prosperum Iter Named after Jesus Lane & Jesus Parish Previous names - Established 1496 Sister College(s) Jesus College, Oxford Master Prof. ... Professor John Richard Krebs, Baron Krebs FRS (born 1945) is a world leader in zoology and more specifically bird behaviour. ... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... In some universities in the United Kingdom—particularly collegiate universities—the student body is organised into one or more of the following: A Junior Common Room (JCR) A Middle Common Room (MCR) A Senior Common Room (SCR) In addition to this, each of the above phrases may also refer to... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 370 pixelsFull resolution (360 × 370 pixel, file size: 156 KB, MIME type: image/png) Small map of central Oxford This map may be incomplete, and may contain errors. ... Image File history File links Blue_pog. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies Inflation 3. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Looking south along Turl Street towards All Saints with Lincoln College on the left. ... The Saxon tower of St Michael at the Northgate at the eastern end of Ship Street. ... Map of the Covered Market, with Market Street to the north and the High Street to the south. ...


Jesus has been called "the first Protestant College in Oxford",[2] and was founded by Elizabeth I in 1571 for the education of clergy, though students now study a broad range of secular subjects. A major driving force behind the establishment of the college was Hugh Price (or Aprice), a churchman from Brecon in Wales, and the college continues to be associated informally with Wales to this day.[3] Today the college has around 500 students, and the Principal is Lord Krebs.[4] Elizabeth I redirects here. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal basin at Brecon, the starting point of the Taff Trail. ... This article is about the country. ... Professor John Richard Krebs, Baron Krebs FRS (born 1945) is a world leader in zoology and more specifically bird behaviour. ...

Contents

History

The college's founder, Queen Elizabeth I, shown in a portrait in the college hall.
The college's founder, Queen Elizabeth I, shown in a portrait in the college hall.

Jesus College was founded in 1571, occupying in part the site of the earlier White Hall, which had existed for several hundred years from the 13th century up until 1570, just before Jesus began. Jesus was founded by eight commissioners, of whom Hugh Price is usually credited as the main force, and received its Royal Charter from Elizabeth I. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (867x1448, 228 KB) العربية | Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (867x1448, 228 KB) العربية | Česky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Românǎ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Hugh Price (c. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


The college was originally intended primarily for the education of clergymen. The particular intention was to satisfy a need for dedicated, learned clergy to promote the Elizabethan Religious Settlement in the parishes of England, Ireland and Wales. The college has since broadened the range of subjects offered, beginning with the inclusion of medicine and law, and now offers almost the full range of subjects taught at the university. The letters patent[5] issued by Elizabeth I made it clear that the education of a priest in the 16th century included more than just theology, however: The Elizabethan Religious Settlement was Elizabeth I’s response to the religious divisions created over the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I.This response was set out in two acts of parliament. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as...

...to the Glory of God Almighty and Omnipotent, and for the spread and maintenance of the Christian religion in its sincere form, for the eradication of errors and heresies, for the increase and perpetuation of true loyalty, for the extension of good literature of every sort, for the knowledge of languages, for the education of youth in loyalty, morality, and methodical learning, for the relief of poverty and distress, and lastly for the benefit and well-being of the Church of Christ in our realms, [...] we have decreed that a College of learning in the sciences, philosophy, humane pursuits, knowledge of the Hebrew, Greek and Latin languages, to the ultimate profession of Sacred Theology, to last for all time to come, be created, founded, built, and established....

—Elizabeth I, Dated 27 June 1571.

Hugh Price continued to be closely involved with the college after its foundation. On the strength of a promised legacy, worth £60 a year on his death, he requested and received the authority to appoint the new college's Principal, Fellows and Scholars. He financed early building work in the college's Front Quadrangle, but on his death in 1574 it transpired that the college received only a lump sum of around £600. quadrangle is a good name for a mathlete team. ... Lump sum is a one-time payment of money, as opposed to a series of payments. ...

Monument to Sir Eubule Thelwall, 1630. Female figures draw back a curtain revealing a kneeling figure.
Monument to Sir Eubule Thelwall, 1630. Female figures draw back a curtain revealing a kneeling figure.

Significant benefactions in the 17th century placed the college on a more secure financial footing. One Herbert Westfaling, Bishop of Hereford, left enough property to support two fellowships and scholarships (with the significant proviso that "my kindred shallbe always preferred before anie others").[6] Sir Eubule Thelwall, principal from 1621-1630, spent much of his own money on the construction of a chapel, hall and library for the college. This library, constructed above an overly-weak colonnade, was pulled down under the principalship of Francis Mansell (1630-49), who also built two staircases of residential accommodation to attract the sons of Welsh gentry families to the College. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x787, 103 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Eubule Thelwall Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x787, 103 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Eubule Thelwall Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Monument to Sir Eubule Thelwall, 1630, in Jesus College Chapel, Oxford. ... Herbert Westfaling (also spelled Westphaling), 1531/2–1602, was Anglican Bishop of Hereford and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford. ... The Bishop of Hereford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Hereford in the Province of Canterbury. ... Monument to Sir Eubule Thelwall, 1630, in Jesus College Chapel, Oxford. ...

Front door of the Principal's Lodgings, showing the shell-hood of c.1700.
Front door of the Principal's Lodgings, showing the shell-hood of c.1700.

It was Leoline Jenkins, whose 1661-73 principalship followed Mansell's brief reinstatement, who secured the long-term viability of the college. On his death in 1685 he bequeathed a large complex of estates, acquired largely by lawyer friends from the over-mortgaged landowners of the Restoration period. These estates allowed the college's sixteen Fellowships and Scholarships to be filled for the first time (officially, sixteen of each had been supported since 1622, but the college's income was too small to keep all occupied simultaneously).[7] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x653, 110 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x653, 110 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Sir Leoline Jenkins (1625 - 1 September 1685) was a lawyer and diplomat, originally from Cowbridge in south Wales. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ...


In the inter-war years (1918-1939) Jesus was seen by some as a small college and something of a backwater; it attracted relatively few pupils from the public schools traditionally seen as the most prestigious.[8] The college did, however, attract many academically able entrants from the grammar schools (particularly those in northern England and Scotland). Among these grammar-school boys was Harold Wilson, who would later become Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.[9] An independent school or private school in the United Kingdom is a school relying for all of its funding upon private sources. ... A Grammar school is one of several different types of school in the history of education in Britain. ... Northern England, The North or North of England is a rather ill-defined term, with no universally accepted definition. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


In 1974, Jesus was among the first group of five men's colleges to admit women as members, the others being Brasenose, Wadham, Hertford and St Catherine's. Five women's societies (Lady Margaret Hall, Somerville, St Hugh's, St Hilda's and St Anne's) had been granted full collegiate status fifteen years earlier in 1959. and of the Brasenose College College name The Kings Hall and College of Brasenose Latin name aula regia et collegium aenei nasi Named after Bronze door knocker Established 1509 Sister college Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge Principal Prof. ... College name Wadham College Named after Nicholas Wadham Established 1610 Sister College Christs College Warden Sir Neil Chalmers JCR President Ben Jasper Undergraduates 460 MCR President David Patrikarakos Graduates 180 Homepage Boatclub Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England, located at the southern... College name Hertford College Named after Elias de Hertford Established 1282 Sister College None Principal Dr John Landers JCR President Stephanie Johnston Undergraduates 376 Graduates 224 Homepage Boatclub Hertford College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Full name St Catherines College Motto Nova et Vetera The New and the Old Named after Previous names St. ... Star Trek Long-term Medical Hologram, see Emergency Medical Hologram. ... Full name Somerville College Motto Donec rursus impleat orbem Named after Mary Somerville Previous Names Somerville Hall Established 1879 Sister College Girton College Principal Dame Fiona Caldicott JCR President Simon Bruegger MCR President Allen Middlebro Location Woodstock Road, Oxford Undergraduates 396 Graduates 88 Homepage Boat Club Somerville College is one... College name St Hughs College Named after Saint Hugh, bishop of Lincoln Established 1886 Sister College Clare College, Cambridge Principal Andrew Dilnot JCR President Alistair Wrench Undergraduates 166 Homepage St Hughs College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England, located in St... College name St Hildas College, Oxford Named after Established 1893 Principal Lady English JCR President Olivia Bailey Undergraduates 420 MCR President Sarah-Jane Fenton Graduates 86 Homepage St Hildas College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. ... St Annes College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


Jesus' long-standing rivalry with nearby Exeter College reached a peak in 1979, with seven police vehicles and three fire engines involved in dealing with trouble in Turl Street.[10] The University of Oxford comprises 39 Colleges and 7 religious Permanent Private Halls (PPHs), which are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university. ... College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Simon Heawood Undergraduates 299 MCR President Meredith Riedel Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Exeter College...


Location and Buildings

Front of Jesus College, largely refaced in 1854, chapel window on right.
Front of Jesus College, largely refaced in 1854, chapel window on right.

Jesus is located on Turl Street in the centre of Oxford, on a comparatively small site by the standards of many Oxford colleges, and is one of the three Turl Street colleges along with Lincoln College and Exeter College. Much of what are considered the original buildings date from the 17th century, although parts date back to the college's foundation. Most of these earlier buildings have undergone some degree of restoration, although this is not generally obvious, and parts of the rear of the college are much more modern. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (751x1050, 284 KB) Summary I took this last August. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (751x1050, 284 KB) Summary I took this last August. ... Turl Street is a street in Oxford, England near the centre of the town. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister college Downing College, Cambridge Rector Prof. ... College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Simon Heawood Undergraduates 299 MCR President Meredith Riedel Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Exeter College... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...

The chapel in 1814. Note the narrow chancel arch before Street's alterations, and the painting of St Michael as the altarpiece.
The chapel in 1814. Note the narrow chancel arch before Street's alterations, and the painting of St Michael as the altarpiece.

The main college buildings include the chapel (in the First Quadrangle) which was built in the early seventeenth century in Jacobean-Gothic style under Thelwall, and extended at the east end in 1636. It has a fine barrel vaulted roof, a late seventeenth-century ante-chapel screen and an early seventeenth-century pulpit. The chancel arch was widened in 1864 by George Edmund Street. The stone flooring and much of the woodwork also date from Street's alterations. The chancel features a Victorian stained-glass window and stone altarpiece, as well as a large copy of Guido Reni's St Michael subduing the Devil. This last item was given to the college by Thomas James Bulkeley, 7th Viscount Bulkeley (a student in 1769), who acquired it in Rome during his Grand Tour. The organ, by the organ builder William Drake, was installed in 1994. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x674, 94 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x674, 94 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... George Edmund Street (20 June 1824 – 18 December 1881), English architect, was born at Woodford in Essex. ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Sta. ... quadrangle is a good name for a mathlete team. ... Monument to Sir Eubule Thelwall, 1630, in Jesus College Chapel, Oxford. ... Barrel vault In architecture, a barrel vault is an extrusion of a single curve (or pair of curves, in the case of a pointed barrel vault) along a given distance. ... Ante-chapel is the term given to that portion of a chapel which lies on the western side of the choir screen. ... George Edmund Street (20 June 1824 – 18 December 1881), English architect, was born at Woodford in Essex. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... Autoportrait Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 Guido Reni (November 4, 1575, Calvenzano di Vergato, near Bologna - August 18, 1642, Bologna) was a prominent Italian painter of high-Baroque style. ... The title of Viscount Bulkeley was created in the Peerage of Ireland on 19 January 1644 for Thomas Bulkeley, the son of Sir Richard Bulkeley of Beaumaris and a supporter of King Charles I of England. ... The interior of the Pantheon in the 18th century, painted by Giovanni Paolo Panini In the 18th century, the Grand Tour was a kind of education for wealthy British noblemen, wherein the primary educational value was exposure to the cultured artifacts of antiquity and the Renaissance as well as the... William Drake, Organ Builder is a manufacturer of pipe organs based out of the town of Buckfastleigh, Devon in the United Kingdom. ...

St Michael subduing the Devil, by Guido Reni (original version, Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini, Rome).
The chapel in 2006. Note the 19th century stone altarpiece, flooring and stained glass. The flag hanging from the roof is the Garter Banner of Lord Wilson of Rievaulx.
The chapel in 2006. Note the 19th century stone altarpiece, flooring and stained glass. The flag hanging from the roof is the Garter Banner of Lord Wilson of Rievaulx.

The college Hall, accessed from the screens passage that links the two main quadrangles, contains a fine full-length portrait of the college's Founder, Elizabeth I, attributed to Nicholas Hilliard or his school. This was presented to the college in 1687 by James Jeffreys, brother of George Jeffreys, the "Hanging Judge". Other portraits to be found here include contemporary likenesses of Charles I and Charles II, as well as numerous other benefactors, former Principals and alumni including T. E. Lawrence and Harold Wilson. St. ... St. ... Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini, or Our Lady of the Conception of the Capuchins, is a church in Rome, Italy, commissioned by Pope Urban VIII, whose brother, Antonio Barberini, was a Capuchin. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x640, 96 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x640, 96 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... A great hall was the main room of a royal palace, a noblemans castle or a large manor house in the Middle Ages, and in the country houses of the 16th and early 17th centuries. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Self-portrait, 1577. ... George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys Bt (May 15, 1645 – April 18, 1689), better known as The Hanging Judge, became notorious during the reign of King James II, rising to the position of Lord Chancellor (and serving as Lord High Steward in certain instances). ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... // T. E. Lawrence in the white silk robes of the Sherifs of Mecca. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ...


The college library provides an extensive lending collection, primarily for undergraduates, and supplements the (often reference-only) University libraries including the Bodleian. There is also an important Celtic collection. Notable antiquarian holdings include the Red Book of Hergest (one of two manuscript sources for the Mabinogion), a copy of the laws of Hywel Dda, and one of two manuscript copies of The Owl and the Nightingale. Some of these can be viewed online as part of the University's Early Manuscripts Imaging Project.[11] Entrance to the Library, with the coats_of_arms of several Oxford colleges Oxford University Libraries Service (OULS) comprises over 30 of the University of Oxfords central and faculty libraries: from the world famous Bodleian Library, established 400 years ago, to the modern digital library ventures. ... The Red book of Hergest (Welsh: Llyfr coch Hergest) is one of the most important medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... The Mabinogion is a collection of prose stories from medieval Welsh manuscripts. ... Codified by Hywel Dda (Hywell the Good) in the early 10th century, the laws of the Welsh Princes were significantly more complex than would be found in other ares of Western Europe for centuries. ... Howell the Good (880?–950; Welsh: Hywel Dda or Hywel ap Cadell) is listed amongst the kings of Gwynedd. ... The Owl and the Nightingale is a poem written in Middle English detailing a debate between an owl and a nightingale as overheard by the poems narrator. ...


In recent years the college has also built two annexes for student accommodation in the north and east of the city (named Stevens Close and Herbert Close respectively). Many students continue to live on the main central site, which remains the hub of the social and academic life of the college. The Herbert Close annexe, at which the college sports grounds are located, is also known as "Barts", after nearby Bartlemas. West entrance to St Bartholomews Chapel. ...


Student life

The college has a reputation within Oxford for being a friendly, close-knit community.[12] Some have attributed this to the relatively small physical size of the main college site, where first-year students live in close proximity to one-another and form strong bonds of friendship and a keen sense of college spirit. The college has a reputation for apathy when it comes to Oxford Union and OUSU student politics. The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society in the city of Oxford, whose membership is drawn primarily but not exclusively from the University of Oxford. ... Student politics is a broad term that can mean either, 1) The politics engaged in by students (also know as the Student movement or student activism), which may mean street protests, sit-ins, or a student strike. ...


Students from the college participate in a variety of extracurricular activities, their successes not being limited to any one field in particular. Some contribute to student journalism for Cherwell or The Oxford Student. In the Arts, the annual Turl Street Arts Festival is of particular note. This week-long student-organised event is held annually in conjunction with Exeter and Lincoln colleges. The festival, which takes place in Fifth Week of Hilary term, includes exhibitions, plays and concerts. Although the college does not award Choral Scholarships, the Chapel Choir is well-attended by enthusiastic college members and others. The choir is non-auditioning for college members, and is run by one or more undergraduate Organ Scholars. Extracurricular activities are activities performed by students that fall outside the realm of the normal curriculum of school or university education. ... Cherwell newspaper is a student newspaper published by and for students of Oxford University. ... The Oxford Student is a newspaper produced by and for members of the University of Oxford; it is known locally as The OxStu. The paper was established in 1992 by Oxford University Student Union as an alternative to the Cherwell, the independent Oxford University Newspaper. ... The Turl Street Arts Festival is an annual week-long festival held in February, involving students from the three Turl Street Colleges in Oxford: Jesus College, Exeter College and Lincoln College. ... College name Exeter College Latin name Collegium Exoniense Named after Walter de Stapledon, Bishop of Exeter Established 1314 Sister college Emmanuel College, Cambridge Rector Ms Frances Cairncross JCR President Simon Heawood Undergraduates 299 MCR President Meredith Riedel Graduates 150 Location of Exeter College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Exeter College... College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister college Downing College, Cambridge Rector Prof. ... Hilary term is the second academic term of Oxford Universitys academic year. ... A choral scholar is a student either at an university or private school who receives a scholarship in exchange for singing in the school or universitys choir. ... An organ scholar is a young man or woman who is employed as a part-time assistant organist in a cathedral or collegiate church. ...

Doorway of staircase XII. Chalk markings celebrate the success of the Men's 2nd VIII in the 2006 Torpids.
Doorway of staircase XII. Chalk markings celebrate the success of the Men's 2nd VIII in the 2006 Torpids.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x684, 107 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (480x684, 107 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... At Oxford University, Torpids is one of two bumping races held in the year, the other being Eights. ...

Sports

In common with many Oxford colleges, Jesus is well provided with sporting facilities. These include extensive playing fields at the east Oxford Bartlemas site for (association and Rugby) football, field hockey, cricket, tennis etc., and modern squash courts at a separate city-centre site on St Cross Road. In addition, the college provides students with membership of the university's Iffley Road gym and swimming pool.[4] A playing field is a field used for playing sports or games. ... West entrance to St Bartholomews Chapel. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A rugby union scrum. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Bowler Shaun Pollock bowls to batsman Michael Hussey. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... St Cross Road is a road in Oxford, England. ... Iffley Road is a major arterial road in Oxford, England. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ... A swimming pool, sometimes also referred to in some countries as a swimming bath(German. ...


The college boat house on the Isis is home to the Jesus College Boat Club. The club is one of the oldest rowing clubs in the world, and competed in Oxford's first Head Race (against Brasenose College Boat Club) in 1815. Boathouse Row on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia, USA. Rowing boats stored inside a boathouse in Israel. ... The Isis, after the Egyptian goddess, is the name given locally to the River Thames in Oxford, England, especially in association with rowing within the University. ... The blade colours of Jesus College Boat Club Jesus College Boat Club (commonly abbreviated to JCBC) is a rowing club for members of Jesus College, Oxford. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... A head race is a type of rowing race. ... Brasenose College Boat Club (BNCBC) is the rowing club of Brasenose College, Oxford in Oxford, England. ...


Welsh connection

Stained glass window in the college chapel, showing St David. Late 19th century.
Stained glass window in the college chapel, showing St David. Late 19th century.

Although it accepts students from all over the United Kingdom and indeed the world, Jesus has a particular association with Wales and is often referred to as "the Welsh college". The college is home to the university's Professor of Celtic, and a specialist Celtic library in addition to the college's normal library. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (640x684, 159 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (640x684, 159 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jesus College, Oxford Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The Flag of Saint David. ... This article is about the country. ... The Jesus Professorship of Celtic is a professorship at the University of Oxford. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ...


To reflect this connection, the college's undergraduate gossip sheet is entitled The Sheepshagger in allusion to a racist joke about Welsh people's supposed penchant for sheep. Furthermore, the Welshness of the College is self-perpetuating, as Welsh students will often apply to Jesus because it is seen as the Welsh college. Old members recall the college having a majority of Welsh members until well into the 20th century;[13] today, however, around 15% of undergraduates come from Wales.[3] For comparison, the Welsh comprise around 5% of UK population.[14] Leda and the Swan, a 16th century copy after a lost painting by Michelangelo. ...


St. David's Day

In modern times, the Welsh roots of the college come to the fore most prominently on Saint David's Day. The feast is marked by a choral Evensong in the chapel, decorated for the occasion with the inevitable Daffodils. The service, including music, is conducted entirely in Welsh (despite only a small minority of the choir usually being native speakers of the language). It is generally well attended by members of the Welsh community in Oxford.[3] Saint Davids Day (Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant) is the feast day of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, and falls on March 1 each year. ... Evening Prayer is a liturgy used in the Anglican Communion (and other churches in the Anglican tradition, such as the Continuing Anglican Movement) used in the late afternoon or evening. ... Species ????? Daffodils are a group of large flowered members of the genus Narcissus. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... “Native Language” redirects here. ...


The college's annual St. David's Day Dinner traditionally culminates with the serving of Sir Watkin Williams-Wynn's Pudding. The name recalls the Welsh politician and prominent Jacobite who attended the college early in the eighteenth century.
Watkin Williams-Wynn, Bart. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ...


Silverware

Like many of the older Oxford colleges, Jesus has an impressive collection of silver. The most notable single item is a massive silver gilt punch bowl, presented by Sir Watkin Williams-Wynn in 1732.[15] The bowl, which weighs more than 200 ounces (roughly 5.7 kg) and holds 10 gallons, was most famously used at a dinner held in the Radcliffe Camera in 1814, to celebrate what was supposed to be the final defeat of Napoleon. Those present at the dinner included the Tsar, the King of Prussia, Blücher, Metternich, the Prince Regent, the Duke of York and the Duke of Wellington.[16] General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Standard atomic weight 107. ... A gilded Tibetan Vajrasattva Gilding is the art of applying metal leaf (most commonly gold or silver leaf) to a surface. ... Watkin Williams-Wynn, Bart. ... The ounce is the name for a number of different units of mass (oz), and also of two units of fluid volume (fl oz) and of one unit of force, the ounce-force (ozf). ... The U.S. National Prototype Kilogram, which currently serves as the primary standard for measuring mass in the U.S. It was assigned to the United States in 1889 and is periodically recertified and traceable to the primary international standard, The Kilogram, held at the Bureau International des Poids et... The Imperial units are an irregularly standardized system of units that have been used in the United Kingdom and its former colonies, including the Commonwealth countries. ... The Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, England, was built by James Gibbs between 1737 and 1749 to house the Radcliffe Science Library. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Aleksandr I Pavlovich (Russian: Александр I Павлович) (December 23, 1777–December 1, 1825?), was Emperor of Russia from 23 March 1801-1 December 1825 and Ruler of Poland from 1815–1825, as well as the first Grand Duke of Finland. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher. ... Klemens Wenzel von Metternich Klemens Wenzel Nepomuk Lothar Fürst von Metternich-Winneburg-Beilstein (May 15, 1773 – June 11, 1859) was an Austrian politician, statesman and one of the most important diplomats of his era. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... The Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany (Frederick Augustus) (16 August 1763 - 5 January 1827) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest child, and second son of King George III. From 1820 until his death in 1827, he was the heir presumptive to his elder... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...

Coat of Arms of Jesus College, Oxford

Image File history File links Jesus_oxford_crest. ... Image File history File links Jesus_oxford_crest. ...

Coat of Arms

The source of Jesus College's coat of arms is unknown. The arms were in use at the college by 1590, but unlike those of most Oxford colleges they are not known to have been adapted from those of a significant figure in the early years of the college's existence (for example, the founder). A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


In heraldic terminology: Vert, three stags trippant argent attired or.[17] Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ...


The arms, which originally had a blue field but later began to be used with the present green, depict three stags in profile with their right legs raised. The arms appear to be linked to those of the Green family.[18] The stag is the motif on the college crested tie.


College Prayers

The Founder's Prayer

This prayer, which gives thanks for Jesus College's foundation and benefactions, expresses the early hope that the college would produce graduates capable of providing leadership for both Church and State:

We praise and thank thee, O Lord, for thy servant, Elizabeth, Queen of England, our founder, and other our benefactors; humbly beseeching thee, that as they have charitably bestowed thy gifts to our relief, so both we may fruitfully use them to their due end, and other by such examples may be moved to provide for the maintaining of good learning; so that thy Church may be plentifully furnished with true preachers and dispensers of thy holy Word and Sacraments, and the Commonwealth well served in all necessities with godly and learned ministers; that we and our posterity may enjoy sincere religion with just government, and praise thy name forever.

The College Prayer

O God, by whose manifold grace all things work together for good for them that love thee; establish we pray thee, the good work thou hast begun in us, and make this College like a field that the Lord hath blessed; that whatsoever things are pure, true, lovely, and of good report, may here forever flourish and abound, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Graces

The preprandial grace is read by a Scholar of the college at Formal Hall (the second, more elaborate sitting of dinner) on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. It is relatively unusual for the grace after dinner to be read, as the custom is for those not dining on High Table to retire after finishing dinner, the Scholar who read the first grace having first requested permission from the Principal or the senior Fellow present. St Johns College, Cambridge hall during a formal meal Churchill College, Cambridge dining hall prepared for a formal Formal Hall is the name given to a formal evening meal at any college in the universities of Oxford, Cambridge or Durham open to all members of the college and their guests. ... At Oxford and Cambridge colleges, and more traditional academic institutions, High Table is a table on a raised platform at the end of the dining hall for the use of fellows (members of the Senior Common Room) and their guests. ...


Grace to be said before Dinner

Nos miseri et egentes homines pro cibo quem ad alimoniam corporis sanctificatum nobis es largítus, ut eo utamur grati tibi, Deus omnipotens, Pater caelestis, gratias reverenter agimus, simul obsecrantes ut cibum angelorum, verum panem caelestem, verbum Dei aeternum, Dominum nostrum Iesum Christum nobis impertiaris, ut illo mens nostra pascatur et per carnem et sanguinem eius foveamur, alamur et corróboremur.

We wretched and needy men reverently give thee thanks, almighty God, heavenly Father, for the food which thou hast sanctified and bestowed for the sustenance of the body, so that we may use it thankfully; at the same time we beseech thee that thou wouldst impart to us the food of angels, the true bread of heaven, the eternal word of God, Jesus Christ our Lord, so that our mind may feed on him and that through his flesh and blood we may be nourished, sustained and strengthened.

Grace after Dinner

Quandoquidem nos, Domine, donis tuis, omnipotens et misericors Deus, exsatiasti, effice ut posthac quid per nos fieri aut secus velis diligenter observemus, atque illud animo sincero effectum praestemus, per Iesum Christum Dominum nostrum.


VERSICLEDomine, salvam fac Reginam. A versicle is the first half of one of a set of preces, said or sung by an officiant or cantor and answered with a said or sung response by the congregation or choir. ...


RESPONSEEt exaudi nos in die qua invocaverimus te. A response is the second half of one of a set of preces, the said or sung answer by the congregation or choir to a versicle said or sung by an officiant or cantor. ...


Deus, in cuius manu sunt corda regum, qui es humilium consolator et fidelium fortitudo et protector omnium in Te sperantium, da Reginae nostrae Elizabethae populoque Christiano triumphum virtutis tuae scienter excolere, ut per te semper reparentur ad gloriam, per Christum Dominum nostrum.[19]

Since, O Lord, almighty and most merciful God, thou hast satisfied us with thy gifts, ensure from henceforth that we may diligently regard what thou wishest to be done or left undone by usand cause this to be effected with sincere heart, through Jesus Christ our Lord.


VERSICLE — O Lord, keep the Queen safe.


RESPONSE — And hear us in the day in which we call on thee.


God in whose hands are the hearts of Kings, who art the consoler of the humble and the protector of all who hope in thee, grant to our Queen Elizabeth and to the Christian people to celebrate wisely the triumph of thy goodness so that they may be always renewed to glory through thee, through Jesus Christ our Lord.[20]

People associated with the College

Notable former students of the college have included politicians, scientists, writers, entertainers and academics. This is an incomplete list of notable people associated with Jesus College, Oxford, also known as Jesubites. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... A stilt-walker entertaining shoppers at a shopping centre in Swindon, England Entertainment is an event, performance, or activity designed to give pleasure or relaxation to an audience (although, for example, in the case of a computer game the audience may be only one person). ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ...

Perhaps the best-known single former Jesus student is T. E. Lawrence, better known as "Lawrence of Arabia", who is widely known for his soldiery and leadership during the Arab Revolt of 1916-18, and for his writings. He is remembered in college as a fine historian, and his thesis on Crusader castles (the fieldwork for which marked the beginning of his fascination with the Middle East) remains in the college library today.[21] Image File history File links Thomas_Edward_Lawrence-Lawrence_of_Arabia. ... Image File history File links Thomas_Edward_Lawrence-Lawrence_of_Arabia. ... // T. E. Lawrence in the white silk robes of the Sherifs of Mecca. ... // T. E. Lawrence in the white silk robes of the Sherifs of Mecca. ... Combatants Hashemite Arabs Great Britain Ottoman Empire Commanders Faisal T.E. Lawrence Ahmed Djemal Strength 5,000 (?) 25,000 (?) This article is about the Arab Revolt of 1916. ... Tooling on the cover of the first public printing, showing twin scimitars and the legend: the sword also means clean-ness + death Seven Pillars of Wisdom: A Triumph is the autobiographical account of the experiences of T. E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia) while serving as a liaison officer with rebel... Krak des Chevaliers, Syria This is a list of castles in the eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, founded or occupied during the crusades. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...

Jesubites made their mark on politics in the 20th century, both at home and abroad. Harold Wilson, Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1964–1970 and 1974–1976) was a Jesus man, as were Jamaican statesman Norman Washington Manley and Pixley ka Isaka Seme, founder and president of the African National Congress. Government portrait of Harold Wilson This work is copyrighted. ... Government portrait of Harold Wilson This work is copyrighted. ... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was one of the most prominent British politicians of the 20th century. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Norman Washington Manley (July 4, 1893 - September 2, 1969), was a Jamaican statesman. ... Pixley ka Isaka Seme (October 1, 1881-1951) was a founder and President of the African National Congress. ... For political parties with similar names in other countries, see Northern Rhodesian African National Congress and Zambian African National Congress. ...


The founders' hopes that their college would produce prominent Welsh clergy were fulfilled in no small measure when a former student, Alfred George Edwards, was elected the first Archbishop of the disestablished Church in Wales in 1920. Alfred George Edwards (1848-1937) was elected the first Archbishop of the disestablished Church in Wales. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ...

See also: Alumni of Jesus College, Oxford and Fellows of Jesus College, Oxford

References

  1. ^ Andrew Malcolm (March 2004). The Oxbridge College Accounts 2001-2005. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  2. ^ Laurence Hutton, quoting J.R. Green (1903). Literary Landmarks of Oxford: Jesus. Charles Scribner's Sons. Retrieved on 2006-08-24.
  3. ^ a b c Jesus College, Oxford (2007-02-13). Jesus College and Wales. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  4. ^ a b University of Oxford (2007-03-09). Jesus : 2008/9 Oxford University Undergraduate Admissions. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  5. ^ Baker, J.N.L. (1971). Jesus College Oxford 1571-1971. Oxford: Oxonian Press. ISBN 0950216402. 
  6. ^ Speight, Martin (2004). Westfaling, Herbert (1531/2–1602). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  7. ^ Jesus College, Oxford (2002-05-14). Benefactors. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  8. ^ Pimlott, Ben (1992). Harold Wilson. London: Harper Collins. ISBN 0002151898. 
  9. ^ Jesus College, Oxford (2002-07-18). The 20th Century. Retrieved on 2006-04-04.
  10. ^ Unknown (Trinity term 1999). Oxford at War?. The Oxford Student. Retrieved on 2007-03-22. 
  11. ^ Jesus College. Early Manuscripts at Oxford University. Retrieved on 2007-04-12.
  12. ^ OUSU (2005). Jesus. The Oxford Handbook. Oxford Student Services Limited. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  13. ^ Garnier, Edward (2003-01-23). Debate on Hunting Bill, House of Commons Standing Committee F. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  14. ^ List of United Kingdom nations by population
  15. ^ Glanville, Philippa (2004). A Treasured Inheritance. Oxford Today 16 (3). Retrieved on 2007-03-15. 
  16. ^ Popkin, Michael (November 2001). War and Peace. Oxford Inscriptions: Inscribed Stones and Plaques in Oxford. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  17. ^ Oxford University Calendar 2004-2005 (2004) p.255. Oxford University Press ISBN 0-19-951904-8.
  18. ^ Walker, David (2004). Price, Hugh. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  19. ^ Jesus College, Oxford (2002-06-24). Graces. Retrieved on 2007-03-28.
  20. ^ Adams, Reginald, The College Graces of Oxford and Cambridge The Perpetua Press, Oxford (1992) pp. 68 and 95. From a card for use by the scholar on duty, translations by J. G. Griffith, Fellow of the college and Public Orator from 1973 to 1980. ISBN 1-870882-06-7.
  21. ^ Jesus College, Oxford (2005-12-27). History. Jesus College Prospectus. Retrieved on 2007-03-29.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Richard Green John Richard Green (December 12, 1837 – March 7, 1883) was an English historian. ... Charles Scribners Sons is a publisher that was founded in 1846 at the Brick Church Chapel on New Yorks Park Row. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... Trinity Term is the name of the third and final term of Oxford Universitys academic year. ... The Oxford Student is a newspaper produced by and for members of the University of Oxford; it is known locally as The OxStu. The paper was established in 1992 by Oxford University Student Union as an alternative to the Cherwell, the independent Oxford University Newspaper. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... The Oxford University Student Union is the official student union of the University of Oxford, representing the interests of its members to the university and the outside world. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... Edward Henry Garnier QC (born 26 October 1952) is a barrister and politician in the United Kingdom. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... A list of United Kingdom nations (and English regions) by population as recorded by the 2001 Census: source: the 2001 census See also List of United Kingdom nations by area List of countries by population Population of England - historical population estimates National population register UK topics Categories: Demographics of the... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (75th in leap years). ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (89th in leap years). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jesus College, Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1246 words)
Jesus College (in full: Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
Jesus College was founded in 1571, occupying in part the site of the earlier White Hall, which had existed for several hundred years from the 13th century up until 1570, just before Jesus began.
Jesus is located on Turl Street in the centre of Oxford, on a comparatively small site by the standards of many Oxford colleges, and is one of the three Turl Street colleges along with Lincoln College and Exeter College.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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