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Encyclopedia > Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy

Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn at the 1988 Emmy Awards
Born June 7, 1909
Flag of United Kingdom London, England, UK
Died September 11, 1994, aged 85
Flag of United States Easton,Connecticut, USA
Spouse(s) Jack Hawkins (1932-1942)
Hume Cronyn (1942-1994)
Academy Awards
Best Actress
1989 Driving Miss Daisy
Emmy Awards
Outstanding Lead Actress - Miniseries/Movie
1988 Foxfire
Tony Awards
Best Leading Actress in a Play
1948 A Streetcar Named Desire
1978 The Gin Game
1983 Foxfire
Golden Globe Awards
Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical/Comedy
1990 Driving Miss Daisy
BAFTA Awards
Best Actress
1989 Driving Miss Daisy

Jessie Alice Tandy (June 7, 1909September 11, 1994) was a noted Academy Award-winning English/American theatre, film and TV actress. To this day, she remains the oldest person ever (at the age of 80) to receive a competitive acting Oscar. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 404 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (790 × 1172 pixel, file size: 87 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jessica Tandy Hume Cronyn User:Peregrine... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Easton is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... John Edward Jack Hawkins (September 14, 1910 - July 18, 1973) was a British film actor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... An Emmy Award. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie winners: 1974: Mildred Natwick - The Swoop Sisters 1975: Jessica Walter - Amy Prentiss 1976: Rosemary Harris - Notorious Woman 1977: Patty Duke - Captains and Kings 1978: Meryl Streep - Holocaust 1979: Bette Davis - Strangers... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... The Gin Game is a two-person, two-act play by D.L. Coburn. ... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actresses of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... See TV (disambiguation) for other uses and Television (band) for the rock band European networks National In much of Europe television broadcasting has historically been state dominated, rather than commercially organised, although commercial stations have grown in number recently. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Tandy, the last of three children, was born in Geldeston Road in the London Borough of Hackney[1] to Jessie Helen Horspool, the head of a school for mentally handicapped children, and Harry Tandy, a traveling salesman for a rope manufacturer.[2] Her father died when Tandy was twelve, and as a result her mother taught evening courses to increase the family's income. Tandy was educated at the Dame Alice Owen's School in the London Borough of Islington. The London Borough of Hackney is a London Borough in the east end of London and part of inner London. ... Dame Alice Owens School is a mixed grant-maintained school in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, England, founded in the London Borough of Islington brrapp brrapp big up london. ... Arms of Islington London Borough Council Islington Town Hall Islington is a borough of London to the north of the City of London, west of Hackney, east of Camden, and south of Haringey. ...


Career

After an acting career spanning some sixty-five years, Tandy found latter-day movie stardom in major studio releases and intimate dramas alike. From a young age she was determined to be an actress, and first appeared on the London stage in 1926, playing, among others, Katherine opposite Laurence Olivier's Henry V, and Cordelia opposite John Gielgud's "King Lear". She also worked in British films. Following the end of her first marriage (to Jack Hawkins), she moved to New York and met Canadian actor Hume Cronyn, who became her second husband and frequent partner on stage and screen. She made her American film debut in The Seventh Cross (1944). She also appeared in The Valley of Decision (1945), The Green Years (1946, ironically enough as Cronyn's daughter!), Dragonwyck (1946) starring Gene Tierney and Forever Amber (1947). After her Tony-winning performance as Blanche DuBois in the original Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, (she lost the film role to actress Vivien Leigh) she concentrated on the stage. She became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1952. For the next 30 years, she appeared sporadically in films such as The Light in the Forest (1957) and The Birds (1963). Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH (14 April 1904 – 21 May 2000), known as Sir John Gielgud, was an Emmy, Grammy, Tony and Academy Award-winning English theatre and film actor, and is generally regarded as one of the great British actors in history. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is generally regarded as one of William Shakespeares greatest tragedies. ... John Edward Jack Hawkins (September 14, 1910 - July 18, 1973) was a British film actor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... NY redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Seventh Cross is a 1944 film with Hume Cronyn. ... The Valley of Decision is a 1945 film which tells the story of a young house maid who falls in love with the son of the local coal mine owner. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Green Years is a 1946 film with Charles Coburn. ... This is a beautifully written work of historical fiction, set in 1840s New York. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gene Tierney (November 19, 1920 – November 6, 1991) was an American actress. ... Forever Amber is a romance novel by Kathleen Winsor that was made into a movie by 20th Century Fox. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known by the pseudonym Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright and one of the prominent playwrights of the twentieth century. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Vivien Leigh (November 5, 1913 – July 8, 1967) was an English actress. ... Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ... The Birds (1963) is a horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds (ISBN 0-582-41798-8) by Daphne du Maurier. ...

Jessica Tandy in Driving Miss Daisy, 1989.
Jessica Tandy in Driving Miss Daisy, 1989.

The beginning of the 1980s saw a resurgence in her film career, with character roles in The World According to Garp, Best Friends, Still of the Night (all 1982) and The Bostonians (1984), and the hit film Cocoon (1985), opposite Cronyn, with whom she reteamed for *batteries not included (1987) and Cocoon: The Return (1988). She and Cronyn had been working together more and more, on stage and television, to continued acclaim, notably in 1987's Foxfire which won her an Emmy Award (recreating her Tony winning Broadway role). However, it was her colorful performance in Driving Miss Daisy (1989), as an aging, stubborn Southern-Jewish matron, that made her a bonafide Hollywood star and earned her an Oscar. She was the oldest actor to ever win an Academy Award, beating out George Burns by less than a year. Image File history File links Photo_jessica_tandy. ... Image File history File links Photo_jessica_tandy. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... The World According to Garp book cover The World According to Garp is a novel by John Irving. ... Whitesnake, 1986 album by the British rock band of the same name (Whitesnake) was a major crossover hit and one of the top-selling albums in the hair metal genre, eventually selling over eight million copies (and thus going eight times platinum). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Cocoon is a 1985 science fiction film about a group of elderly humans who were rejuvenated by aliens. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... *batteries not included is a 1987 family film directed by Matthew Robbins. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 sequel to the feature film, Cocoon. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... An Emmy Award. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ...


Tandy was chosen by People magazine as one of the fifty Most Beautiful People in the world in 1990. She earned a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her work in the grassroots hit Fried Green Tomatoes (1992), and co-starred in The Story Lady (1991 telefilm, with daughter Tandy Cronyn), Used People (1992, as Shirley MacLaine's mother), To Dance with the White Dog (1993 telefilm, with husband Hume Cronyn), Nobody's Fool (1994), and Camilla (also 1994, with Cronyn). Camilla was to be her last performance, and it was bold in one way that she, at the age of about eighty-four and knowing that she was dying, had a brief nude scene, which could also be called "cheeky". People is a weekly American magazine of celebrity and human interest stories, published by Time Inc. ... Fried Green Tomatoes is a 1991 film based on the novel Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Shirley MacLaine (born Shirley MacLean Beaty April 24, 1934) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actress, well-known not only for her acting, but for her devotion to her belief in reincarnation. ... To Dance with the White Dog was a film based on a novel by Georgia author Terry Kay. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Nobodys Fool is a 1994 drama film which tells the story of an aging man whose estranged son comes back into his life at the same time that he faces challenges in his home and in his employment. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ...


Personal life

Tandy married twice:

  1. the British actor Jack Hawkins (1932-1942); one daughter Susan Hawkins (born 1934)
  2. the Canadian-American actor, Hume Cronyn from 1942 until her death in 1994; two children - daughter Tandy Cronyn (also an actress), son Christopher Cronyn.

In 1990, she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer which she battled fiercely for five years, during which she continued to work. She had previously been treated for angina and glaucoma. Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... John Edward Jack Hawkins (September 14, 1910 - July 18, 1973) was a British film actor of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Ovarian cancer is a malignant ovarian neoplasm (an abnormal growth located on the ovaries). ... The latin word angina refers to a painful constriction or tightness somewhere in the body. ...


She died at home on September 11, 1994, in Easton, Connecticut, of ovarian cancer at the age of eighty five. Prior to moving to Connecticut, she lived with Cronyn for many years in nearby Pound Ridge, NY on land adjacent to their dear friends (and Cronyn's cousin), the producer Robert Whitehead and actress Zoe Caldwell. September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Easton is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Ovarian cancer is a malignant ovarian neoplasm (an abnormal growth located on the ovaries). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Pound Ridge is a town located in Westchester County, New York. ... Zoe Caldwell, OBE (September 14, 1933) is an Australian actress, born in Melbourne [1] during the Great Depression [2]. She has won four Tony Awards [3] for her performances on Broadway in Slapstick Tragedy, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Medea and Master Class, in which she portrayed opera singer...


Awards

  • British Film Award
  • 1987 - Best Actress-Miniseries/Special, Foxfire
  • 1994 - Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement shared with her husband, Hume Cronyn
  • 1982 - Best Actress, Foxfire,
  • 1978 - Best Actress (Play), The Gin Game
  • 1948 - Best Actress (Dramatic), A Streetcar Named Desire
Awards
Preceded by
Ingrid Bergman for Joan of Lorraine & Helen Hayes for Happy Birthday
Tony Award - Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play
for A Streetcar Named Desire
tied with Judith Anderson for Medea
and Katharine Cornell for Antony and Cleopatra

1948
Succeeded by
Martita Hunt
for The Madwoman of Chaillot
Preceded by
Julie Harris
for The Belle of Amherst
Tony Award - Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play
for The Gin Game

1978
Succeeded by
Constance Cummings for Wings and Carole Shelley for The Elephant Man
Preceded by
Cloris Leachman
Sarah Siddons Award
1979
Succeeded by
Claudette Colbert
Preceded by
Zoe Caldwell for Medea
Tony Award - Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play
for Foxfire

1982
Succeeded by
Glenn Close for The Real Thing
Preceded by
Gena Rowlands
for The Betty Ford Story
Emmy Award - Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
for Foxfire

1988
Succeeded by
Holly Hunter
for Roe vs. Wade
Preceded by
Melanie Griffith
for Working Girl
Golden Globe Award - Best Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for Driving Miss Daisy
1989
Succeeded by
Julia Roberts
for Pretty Woman
Preceded by
Pauline Collins
for Shirley Valentine
BAFTA Award - Best Actress
for Driving Miss Daisy

1989
Succeeded by
Jodie Foster
for The Silence of the Lambs
Preceded by
Jodie Foster
for The Accused
Academy Award - Best Actress
for Driving Miss Daisy

1989
Succeeded by
Kathy Bates
for Misery

Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... An Emmy Award. ... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... The Sarah Siddons Society is an American non-profit organization founded in 1952 by prominent Chicago theatre patrons with the goal of promoting excellence in the theatre. ... See also: Chicago theatre, the theatre movement in the city of Chicago The Chicago Theatre is a famous theater landmark in the city of Chicago, Illinois located at 175 North State Street. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...   (pronounced in Swedish, but usually in English, IPA notation) (August 29, 1915 – August 29, 1982) was a three-time Academy Award-winning and two-time Emmy Award-winning Swedish actress. ... Joan of Lorraine is a 1946 play-within-a-play by Maxwell Anderson. ... Helen Hayes (October 10, 1900 – March 17, 1993) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress whose successful and award-winning career spanned almost 70 years. ... Happy Birthday may refer to: Happy Birthday to You, a traditional song Happy Birthday (1970 album), a record by Pete Townshend Happy Birthday (1980 song), a record by Stevie Wonder Happy Birthday (1981 album), a record by Altered Images Happy Birthday (1983 song), a song by Weird Al Yankovic Happy... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Dame Judith Anderson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Dame Judith Anderson, AC DBE (February 10, 1897–January 3, 1992), born Frances Margaret Anderson-Anderson, was an Tony award and Emmy winning stage and film actress who was also nominated for a Grammy and an Oscar. ... Medea by Evelyn De Morgan. ... Katharine Cornell, as Lucrece Katharine Cornell (February 16, 1893-June 9, 1974) was born on February 16, 1893 (although most sources cite the incorrect year of 1898) in Berlin, Germany to American parents, and raised in Buffalo, New York. ... Anthony and Cleopatra, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema. ... Martita Hunt (January 30 1900 - June 13 1969) was a theatre and film actress. ... The Madwoman of Chaillot is a 1969 satirical comedy-drama film made by Commonwealth United Entertainment and distributed by Warner Bros-Seven Arts. ... Actress Julie Harris photo taken by Carl Van Vechten 1952 Julie Harris (born Julia Ann Harris on December 2, 1925 in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan) is an American actress. ... The Belle of Amherst is a one-woman play by William Luce. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Gin Game is a two-person, two-act play by D.L. Coburn. ... Constance Cummings, CBE (May 15, 1910 – November 23, 2005) was an American-born British actress, known for her work on both screen and stage. ... The word wing or wings has more than one use: In aeronautics a wing is an apparatus used to create lift. ... Carole Shelley (born August 16, 1939) is a Tony Award-winning actress from London, England. ... Joseph Merrick, sometimes called John Merrick, known as The Elephant Man. ... Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an Academy Award, nine-time Emmy and Golden Globe winning American actress of stage, film and television. ... The Sarah Siddons Society is an American non-profit organization founded in 1952 by prominent Chicago theatre patrons with the goal of promoting excellence in the theatre. ... Claudette Colbert (September 13, 1903 - July 30, 1996) was an Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe-winning French-American actress in Hollywood film, stage, television and radio. ... Zoe Caldwell, OBE (September 14, 1933) is an Australian actress, born in Melbourne [1] during the Great Depression [2]. She has won four Tony Awards [3] for her performances on Broadway in Slapstick Tragedy, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Medea and Master Class, in which she portrayed opera singer... Medea by Evelyn De Morgan. ... The Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play is awarded to the actress who was voted as the best actress in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress. ... The Real Thing is: A music album by Faith No More -- see The Real Thing (album); A play by Tom Stoppard. ... Gena Rowlands (born June 19, 1930) is an American actress. ... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie winners: 1974: Mildred Natwick - The Swoop Sisters 1975: Jessica Walter - Amy Prentiss 1976: Rosemary Harris - Notorious Woman 1977: Patty Duke - Captains and Kings 1978: Meryl Streep - Holocaust 1979: Bette Davis - Strangers... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... Holly Hunter (born March 20, 1958 in Conyers, Georgia) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Holding Texas laws criminalizing abortion violated womens Fourteenth Amendment right to choose whether or not to continue a pregnancy. ... Melanie Griffith (born August 9, 1957 in New York City) is an American Academy Award nominated film actress. ... Working Girl is an Academy Award nominee for Best Picture and an Academy Award winner for Best Song (Let the River Run by Carly Simon), which tells the story of a Staten Island-raised secretary, Tess McGill, working in the mergers and acquisitions department of a Wall Street investment bank. ... The Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy was first awarded by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association as a separate category in 1951. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Julia Fiona Roberts (October 28, 1967) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former fashion model. ... Pretty Woman is a 1990 American romantic comedy motion picture. ... Pauline Collins (born September 3, 1940) is a British actress working extensively in movies and television. ... Shirley Valentine is a play by Willy Russell, first staged in 1986. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role has been presented to its winners since 1952 and actresses of all nationalities are eligible to receive the award. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director, and producer. ... The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 Academy Award-winning film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins. ... Jodie Foster (born November 19, 1962) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress, director, and producer. ... The Accused is a 1988 dramatic film starring Jodie Foster and Kelly McGillis, directed by Jonathan Kaplan. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actresses working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Kathleen Doyle Bates (born June 28, 1948) is an Academy Award-winning American theatrical, film, and television actress, and a stage and television director. ... Misery is a 1990 American horror/thriller film, based on the novel of the same name by Stephen King. ...

Selected Broadway credits

Hilda Crane, also known as The Many Loves of Hilda Crane, is a 1956 drama film made by 20th Century Fox. ... Publicity photo for the Broadway production of The Four Poster with, from left to right, director José Ferrer, stars Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn, and playwright Jan de Hartog The Fourposter is a play by Jan de Hartog. ... Five Finger Exercise is a 1962 drama film made by Columbia Pictures. ... A Delicate Balance is a play by Edward Albee was first produced in New York at the Martin Beck Theatre on September 12, 1966, and was revived at the Plymouth Theatre on April 21, 1996. ... The Gin Game is a two-person, two-act play by D.L. Coburn. ... Foxfire may refer to: FoxFire is also a report writer Foxfire Botanical Garden: a botanical garden in Wisconsin Foxfire, North Carolina: a small town Foxfire: the bioluminescence from a forest fungus. ... The Glass Menagerie is a play by Tennessee Williams. ...

Filmography

Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Seventh Cross is a 1944 film with Hume Cronyn. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Valley of Decision is a 1945 film which tells the story of a young house maid who falls in love with the son of the local coal mine owner. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This is a beautifully written work of historical fiction, set in 1840s New York. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Green Years is a 1946 film with Charles Coburn. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Forever Amber is a romance novel by Kathleen Winsor that was made into a movie by 20th Century Fox. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Conrad Richter is an award winning auther. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Birds (1963) is a horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds (ISBN 0-582-41798-8) by Daphne du Maurier. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A 1974 film starring Alan Bates, based on the play of the same name by Simon Gray. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The World According to Garp is 1982 feature film directed by George Roy Hill based on the novel of the same title by John Irving. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Whitesnake, 1986 album by the British rock band of the same name (Whitesnake) was a major crossover hit and one of the top-selling albums in the hair metal genre, eventually selling over eight million copies (and thus going eight times platinum). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Bostonians is 1984s Merchant Ivory Film, based on Henry James novel. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Cocoon is a 1985 science fiction film about a group of elderly humans who were rejuvenated by aliens. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... *batteries not included is a 1987 family film directed by Matthew Robbins. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... 1988 sequel to the feature film, Cocoon. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Driving Miss Daisy is a 1987 play by Alfred Uhry adapted into a 1989 Warner Bros. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe is the name of a novel by Fannie Flagg. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... A Century of Cinema is a 1994 documentary directed by Caroline Thomas about the art of filmmaking (coinciding with cinemas 100th anniversary), containing numerous interviews with some of the most influential characters of the twentieth century. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Nobodys Fool is a 1994 drama film which tells the story of an aging man whose estranged son comes back into his life at the same time that he faces challenges in his home and in his employment. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ...

References

  1. ^ Jessica Tandy's family to unveil plaque to commemorate star's Hackney birthplace 19 Nov 1998 accessed 10 May 2007
  2. ^ http://blog.oup.com/2007/02/the_academy_awa/

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jessica Tandy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (591 words)
Jessica Tandy, christened Jessie Alice Tandy (June 7, 1909 – September 11, 1994) was a noted Academy Award-winning British-American theatre, film and TV actress.
Tandy was born in London and she was educated at the Dame Alice Owen's School in Islington.
She is the mother of actress Tandy Cronyn, as well as a son, Christopher Cronyn, and was chosen by People magazine as one of the fifty Most Beautiful People in the world in 1990.
MMI Review: Jessica Tandy Tribute (539 words)
Tandy, who didn't receive the Hollywood seal of box office approval until she was eighty, treated those two impostors success and failure the same.
Tandy made three appearances on the Hitchcock series, always working with director Robert Stevens, but in 1963's "The Birds", she finally had a chance to work under the maestro with whom her husband had first starred in 1943's "Shadow Of A Doubt".
Tandy's enormous later successes are history, but she was not always the queen of Hollywood as one ditzy commentator with a short memory observed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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