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Encyclopedia > Jesse James (outlaw)
Jesse James
Jesse James
Born September 5, 1847
Clay County, Missouri, USA
Died April 3, 1882
St. Joseph, Missouri, USA

Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. Since his death, Jesse James has become a figure of folklore. He has at times, and mostly inaccurately, been labeled a gunfighter. Jesse James, from http://www. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Kearney is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Saint Joseph (also known as St. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... For other senses of this word, see outlaw (disambiguation). ... The James-Younger Gang was a legendary 19th century gang of American outlaws that included Jesse James. ... Gunslinger from The Great Train Robbery Gunslinger, also gunfighter, is a name given to men in the American Old West who had gained a reputation as being dangerous with a gun. ...

Contents

Pre-Civil War

Jesse Woodson James was born in Clay County, Missouri, near the future site of the town of Kearney. His father, Robert James, was a farmer and Baptist minister from Kentucky who helped found William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri. Robert James traveled to California to prospect for gold and died there while Jesse was three years old. After his father's death, his mother Zerelda remarried, first to James Simms, and then to a doctor named Reuben Samuel. After their marriage in 1855, Samuel moved into the James home. Kearney is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States. ... Robert Sallee James (17 July 1818 - 18 August 1850) was a pastor and father of four children including the James outlaws. ... A Baptist is a member of a Baptist church or any follower of Jesus Christ who believes that baptism is administered by the full immersion of a confessing Christian. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... William Jewell College is a private, four-year liberal arts college of 1,274 undergraduate students located in Liberty, Missouri. ... Liberty is a city in Clay County, Missouri. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Jesse Jamess mother Zerelda Samuel Zerelda James Samuel (previously Zerelda Cole James and Zerelda Simms) (January 29, 1825 - February 10, 1911) was the mother of outlaws Frank James and Jesse James. ... Dr. Reuben Samuel (12 January 1828 - 1 March 1908) Was the stepfather of American Outlaws Frank James and Jesse James. ...


In the tumultuous years leading up to the American Civil War, Zerelda and Reuben acquired a total of seven slaves and grew tobacco on their well-appointed farm. In addition to Jesse's older brother, Alexander Franklin "Frank" James and younger sister Susan Lavenia James, Jesse gained four half-siblings: Archie Peyton Samuel, John Thomas Samuel, Fannie Quantrell Samuel, and Sarah Louisa Samuel (sometimes Sarah Ellen.) Sarah later married a man named John C. Harmon. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Alexander Franklin James (January 10, 1843 – February 18, 1915) was an American outlaw and older brother of Jesse James. ...


Civil War

In 1863, at the age of sixteen, Jesse joined his brother Frank in Quantrill's Raiders. Quantrill's Raiders was an irregular guerrilla group of the Civil War that terrorized anti-slavery and pro-Union families and farms in Missouri, most notably in the 1863 massacre of 150 unarmed people in Lawrence, Kansas. Quantrills Raiders were Confederate guerrillas who followed and fought under William Clarke Quantrill, an Ohio schoolteacher who relocated to Kansas, and who transformed a motley group of Southern sympathizing farmers and townsmen living behind Union lines into one of the Confederacys most effective and electric guerrilla units. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Lawrence is a river city in Douglas County, Kansas, 41 miles (66 km) west by south of Kansas City, along the banks of both the Kaw and Wakarusa Rivers. ...


Bandit Career

The end of the Civil War left Missouri in shambles. The pro-Union Radical Republicans took control of the state government, barring former Confederates from voting or holding public office. Jesse himself was shot by Union cavalrymen a month after the war ended, leaving him badly wounded. During Jesse's recovery his first cousin, Zerelda "Zee" Mimms (named after his own mother), nursed him back to health and he started a nine-year courtship with her. Meanwhile, some of his old war comrades, led by Archie Clement, refused to return to peaceful life. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Radical Republicans were certain Republicans in Congress and other federal and state leaders during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras in U.S. history. ... For the fictional documentary about alternative history, see C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat are commonly known as cavalry (from French cavalerie). ...


In 1866 this group (possibly including Jesse, though he may still have been suffering from his wound) staged the first armed robbery of a bank in peacetime, holding up the Clay County Savings Association in the town of Liberty. They staged several more robberies over the next few years, though state authorities (and local lynch mobs) decimated the ranks of the older bushwhackers. Liberty is a city in Clay County, Missouri. ... Lynch mob redirects here. ...


By 1868 Frank and Jesse James had definitely joined their old friends in outlawry, when they joined Cole Younger in robbing a bank in Russellville, Kentucky. But Jesse did not become famous until December 1869, when he and Frank (most likely) robbed the Daviess County Savings Association in Gallatin, Missouri. The robbery netted little, but Jesse (it appears) shot and killed the cashier, mistakenly believing the man to be Samuel P. Cox, the militia officer who defeated and killed "Bloody Bill" Anderson during the Civil War. Jesse's self-proclaimed attempt at revenge for the Civil War, and the daring escape he and Frank made through the middle of a posse shortly afterward, put his name in the newspapers for the first time. A wounded Cole Younger, after his arrest in 1876 Cole Younger as a young man Thomas Coleman Younger (January 15, 1844 – March 21, 1916) a famous Confederate outlaw during and after the American Civil War. ... Russellville is a city located in Logan County, Kentucky. ... Gallatin is a city located in Daviess County, Missouri. ... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker A militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... William T. Anderson a. ...


The robbery marked Jesse's emergence as the most famous of the former guerrillas-turned-outlaws and it started an alliance with John Newman Edwards, a Kansas City Times editor who was campaigning to return the old Confederates to power in Missouri. Edwards published Jesse's letters and made him into a symbol of rebel defiance of Reconstruction through his elaborate editorials and praiseful reporting. Jesse James's own role in creating his rising public profile is debated by historians and biographers, though politics certainly surrounded his outlaw career and enhanced his notoriety. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Kansas City Times was a morning newspaper in Kansas City, Missouri, from 1867 to 1990. ... // Reconstruction was the process in US history, 1863–1877, that resolved the issues of the American Civil War when both the Confederacy and its system of slavery were destroyed. ...


Meanwhile, the James brothers, along with Cole Younger and his brothers, Clell Miller and other former Confederates—now constituting the James-Younger Gang—continued a remarkable string of robberies from Iowa to Texas and from Kansas to West Virginia. They robbed banks, stagecoaches and a fair in Kansas City, often in front of large crowds, even hamming it up for the audience. In 1873, they turned to train robbery, derailing the Rock Island train in Adair, Iowa. Their later train robberies had a lighter touch—in fact only twice in all of Jesse James's train hold-ups did he rob passengers, as he limited himself to the express safe in the baggage car. Such techniques fostered the Robin Hood image that Edwards was creating in his newspapers. A wounded Cole Younger, after his arrest in 1876 Cole Younger as a young man Thomas Coleman Younger (January 15, 1844 – March 21, 1916) a famous Confederate outlaw during and after the American Civil War. ... The James-Younger Gang was a legendary 19th century gang of American outlaws that included Jesse James. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) None See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Nickname: City of Fountains or Heart of America Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad (AAR reporting mark RI) was a Class I railroad in the United States. ... Adair is a city located in Adair County, Iowa. ... Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham. ...


Pinkertons engaged

The express companies turned to the Pinkerton National Detective Agency in 1874 to stop the James-Younger gang. The Chicago-based agency worked primarily against urban professional criminals such as counterfeiters, safe crackers, con men, and sneak-thiefs. The former guerrillas, supported by many old Confederates in Missouri, proved to be too much for them. One agent (Joseph Whicher) was dispatched to infiltrate Zerelda Samuel's farm and turned up dead shortly afterward. Two others (Louis J. Lull and John Boyle) were sent after the Youngers; Lull was killed by two of the Youngers in a roadside gunfight on March 17, 1874 (though he killed John Younger before he died). Allan Pinkerton, the Agency's founder and leader, took on the case now as a personal vendetta. Working with old Unionists around Jesse James's family's farm, he staged a raid on the homestead on the night of January 25, 1875. An incendiary device thrown inside by the detectives exploded, killing Jesse's half-brother Archie and wounding his mother Zerelda, forcing the amputation of her lower right arm. Pinkerton guards escort strikebreakers in Buchtel, Ohio, 1884 The Pinkerton National Detective Agency is a private U.S. security guard and detective agency established by Allan Pinkerton in 1850. ... The James-Younger Gang was a legendary 19th century gang of American outlaws that included Jesse James. ... This article is about Illinois largest city. ... A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ... A confidence trick, confidence game, also known as a con or scam, is an attempt to intentionally mislead a person or persons (known as the mark) usually with the goal of financial or other gain. ... 1. ... John Younger John Harrison Younger (1851-March 17, 1874) Was an American outlaw, he was the brother of outlaws Cole, Jim and Bob. ... Portrait of Allan Pinkerton from Harpers Weekly, 1884 Allan Pinkerton (August 25, 1819 – July 1, 1884) was a U.S. detective and spy, best known for creating the Pinkerton Agency, the first detective agency. ...


The bloody fiasco did more than all of Edwards's columns to turn Jesse James into a sympathetic figure for much of the public. A bill that lavishly praised the James and Younger brothers and offered them amnesty was only narrowly defeated in the state legislature. Former Confederates, now allowed to vote and hold office again, voted a limit on reward offers the governor could make for fugitives (when the only reward offers higher than the new limit previously made had been for the James brothers). But Frank and Jesse, both now married (Jesse to his cousin Zee Mimms), moved to the Nashville area—probably to save their mother from further assaults. Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806 Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area    - City 526. ...


Downfall of the gang

On September 7, 1876, the James-Younger gang attempted their most daring raid to date, on the First National Bank in Northfield, Minnesota. Cole and Bob Younger later stated that they selected the bank because of its connection to two Union generals and Radical Republican politicians: Adelbert Ames, the governor of Mississippi during Reconstruction, and Benjamin Butler, Ames's father-in-law and the stern Union commander in occupied New Orleans. Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ... Adelbert Ames (October 31, 1835 – April 12, 1933) was a Union general in the American Civil War, a Mississippi politician, and a general in the Spanish-American War. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (1795–1858) was a U.S. lawyer. ... Nickname: The Crescent City, The Big Easy, The City That Care Forgot, NOLA (acronym for New Orleans, LA) Location in the State of Louisiana and the United States Coordinates: Country United States State Louisiana Parish Orleans Founded 1718 Mayor Ray Nagin (D) Area    - City 350. ...


However, the robbery was thwarted when Joseph Lee Heywood refused to open the safe, falsely claiming that it was secured by a time lock even as they held a bowie knife to his throat and cracked his skull with a pistol butt. By this time, the citizens of Northfield had taken notice and were arriving with guns. Before leaving the bank, Frank shot the unarmed Heywood in the head. The bandits who had entered the bank exited with only a small amount of money, only to find the men standing guard outside, dead or wounded amid a hail of gunfire. Suspicious townsmen had confronted the bandits, ran to get their arms, and opened up from under the cover of windows and the corners of buildings. The gang barely escaped, leaving two of their number and two unarmed townspeople (including Heywood) dead in Northfield. A massive manhunt ensued. The James brothers eventually split from the others, and escaped to Missouri after a long and daring ride. The Youngers and one other bandit, Charlie Pitts, were soon discovered; a brisk gunfight left Pitts dead and the Youngers all prisoners. Except for Frank and Jesse James, the James-Younger Gang was destroyed. Joseph Lee Heywood (August 12, 1837 - September 7, 1876) was head teller at the First National Bank of Northfield, Minnesota at the time of its attempted robbery by Jesse James and his gang of outlaws. ... The plot of this low budget thriller movie is about a six-year old boy who is accidentally locked in a bank vault. ... Bowie knife is a term commonly used in modern times to refer to any large sheath knife. ...


Jesse and Frank returned to the Nashville area, where they went under the names of Thomas Howard and B.J. Woodson, respectively. They tried to live peacefully, as Zee had four children: Jesse Edwards, Mary, and twins who died soon after birth. Frank seemed to settle down, but Jesse remained restless. He recruited a new gang in 1879 and returned to crime, holding up a train at Glendale, Missouri, on October 8, 1879. The robbery began a spree of crimes, including the hold-up of the federal paymaster of a canal project in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, and two more train robberies. But the new gang did not consist of the old, battle-hardened guerrillas; they soon turned against each other or were captured, while Jesse grew paranoid, killing one gang member and frightening away another. The authorities grew suspicious, and by 1881 the brothers were forced to return to Missouri. In December, Jesse rented a house in Saint Joseph, Missouri, not far from where he had been born and raised. Frank, however, decided to move to safer territory, heading east to Virginia. Glendale is a city located in St. ... Muscle Shoals is a city located in Colbert County, Alabama, USA. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 11,924, and is included in The Shoals MSA. // Geography Muscle Shoals is located at 34°453 North, 87°391 West (34. ... Downtown St. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ...


Murder

Jesse James's home in St. Joseph where he was shot
Jesse James's home in St. Joseph where he was shot

With his gang depleted by arrests, deaths, and defections, Jesse thought he had only two men left whom he could trust: brothers Bob and Charley Ford. Charley had been out on raids with Jesse before, but Bob was an eager new recruit. To better protect himself, Jesse asked the Ford brothers to move in with him and his family. Little did he know that Bob Ford had been conducting secret negotiations with Thomas T. Crittenden, the Missouri governor, to bring in Jesse James. Crittenden had made the capture of the James brothers his top priority; in his inaugural address, he had spoken directly to the support they received from his fellow Democrats, declaring that no political motives could be allowed to keep them from justice. Barred by law from offering a sufficiently large reward, he had turned to the railroad and express corporations to put up a $10,000 bounty for each of them. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x850, 239 KB) Summary Jesse James home where he was shot in St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x850, 239 KB) Summary Jesse James home where he was shot in St. ... Thomas Theodore Crittenden (January 1, 1832–May 29, 1909) was a U.S. army officer and political figure. ...


On April 3, 1882, as Jesse prepared for yet another robbery, he climbed a chair to dust a picture. It was a rare moment: He had his guns off, having removed them earlier when the unusual heat forced him to remove his coat; as he moved in and out of the house, he feared the pistols would attract attention from the several passers-by. Seizing the opportunity, the Fords drew their revolvers. Bob was the fastest, firing a shot into Jesse's back.


The assassination proved a national sensation. The Fords made no attempt to hide their role; as crowds pressed into the little house in St. Joseph to see the dead bandit, they surrendered to the authorities, pleaded guilty, were sentenced to hang, and were promptly pardoned by the governor. Indeed, the governor's quick pardon suggested that he was well aware that the brothers intended to kill, rather than capture, Jesse James. (The Ford brothers, like many who knew James, never believed it was practical to try to capture such a dangerous man.) The implication that the chief executive of Missouri conspired to kill a private citizen startled the public, and helped create a new legend that would surround him in death.


The Fords received a portion of the reward (some of it also went to law enforcement officials active in the plan) and fled Missouri, which now fully embraced the outlaw who had long divided public opinion in the state. Zerelda, Jesse’s mother, appeared at the coroner’s inquest, deeply anguished, and loudly denounced Dick Liddil, a former gang member who was cooperating with state authorities. Charley Ford committed suicide in May 1884. Bob Ford was killed, by shotgun blast, in his saloon in Creede, Colorado, on June 8, 1892. (His killer, Edward Capehart O'Kelley, was sentenced to eight years in prison.) A coroner is either the presiding officer of a special court, a medical officer or an officer of law responsible for investigating deaths, particularly those happening under unusual circumstances. ... Robert Newton Ford (1860–June 8, 1892), was an outlaw sensationalized by his 1882 assassination of the infamous Jesse James. ... Creede is a town located in Mineral County, Colorado. ... Edward Capehart OKelley (1858 - January 13, 1904) will forever be remembered as the man who shot the man who shot Jesse James. ...


Jesse’s epitaph, selected by his mother, reads: In Loving Memory of my Beloved Son, Murdered by a Traitor and Coward Whose Name is not Worthy to Appear Here.


Family

Jesse married his cousin Zerelda Amanda Mimms(Zee, named after Jesse's mother). They had four children: Mary Susan James, Gould James, Montgomery James, and Jesse Edwards James.


Rumors of survival

Rumors of Jesse James's survival proliferated. Some said that Ford did not kill James, but someone else, in an elaborate plot to allow him to escape justice. Some stories say he lived in Guthrie, Oklahoma, as late as 1948, and a man named J. Frank Dalton, who claimed to be Jesse James, died in Granbury, Texas, in 1951 at the age of 103. Some stories claim the real recipient of Ford's bullet was a man named Charles Bigelow, reported to have been living with James's wife at the time. Generally speaking, however, these tales received little credence, then or now; Jesse's beloved wife, Zee, died alone and in poverty. The body buried in Missouri as Jesse James was exhumed in 1995 and, according to a report by Anne C. Stone, Ph.D.; James E. Starrs, L.L.M.; and Mark Stoneking, Ph.D. titled Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of the Presumptive Remains of Jesse James, does appear to be the remains of Jesse James. A court order was granted in 2000 to exhume and test Dalton's body, but the wrong body was exhumed. Guthrie is a city in Logan County, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma City Metroplex. ... from OUTLAW JESSE JAMES: ... Rumors have persisted that Ford did not kill James, but someone else. ... Granbury is a city in Hood County, Texas, in the United States. ...


Legacy

During his lifetime, Jesse James was largely celebrated by former Confederates, to whom he appealed directly in his letters to the press. Indeed, some historians credit him with contributing to the rise of Confederates to dominance in Missouri politics (by the 1880s, for example, both U.S. senators from the state had been identified with the Confederate cause). His return to crime after the fall of Reconstruction, however, was devoid of political overtones and Civil War divisions in Missouri's population, it helped cement his place in American memory as a simple but remarkably effective bandit. During the Populist and Progressive eras, he emerged as America's Robin Hood, standing up against corporations in defense of the small farmer (a role he never played during his lifetime). This image is still seen in films, as well as songs and folklore. Although he remains a controversial symbol in the cultural battles over the place of the Civil War in American History, he is regarded as a hero by the neo-Confederate movement. And his life clearly shows how the war divided the United States down to the grass roots over great issues that had personal repercussions, with consequences that last to this day. // Reconstruction was the process in US history, 1863–1877, that resolved the issues of the American Civil War when both the Confederacy and its system of slavery were destroyed. ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the... // In the United States, the Progressive Era was a period of reform which lasted from the 1890s through the 1920s. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Irish-American Lucchese Family associate Jimmy Burke named his two sons, Frank James Burke and Jesse James Burke, after the James brothers. Population density of people born in Ireland, 1870; these were mostly Catholics; the older Scots Irish immigration is not shown. ... The Lucchese Family, also known as the Melquist Family, formed one the most powerful organized crime families in the United States. ... Mugshot of James Jimmy the Gent Burke taken on April 12, 1979 not long after the Lufthansa Heist Jimmy Burke (July 5, 1931 – April 13, 1996), was an Irish-American gangster who is believed to have organized the Lufthansa heist in 1978. ... Frank James Burke ( Cypress Hills, Brooklyn 1960 - May 18, 1987 Queens, New York) was the son of Irish American mobster Jimmy Burke. ...


Jesse James in popular culture

A dime novel featuring Jesse James.
A dime novel featuring Jesse James.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (626x803, 162 KB) Summary A dime novel featuring Jesse James. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (626x803, 162 KB) Summary A dime novel featuring Jesse James. ... In the United States in the late 19th century and very early 20th century, a dime novel was a low-priced novel, typically priced at 10 cents (a dime). ...

Music and Literature

Jesse James has been the subject of many songs, books and articles throughout the years see Jesse James in Music, he is also often a Fictional character found in many Western novels, starting with some of the original dime novels, including some that were published while he was still alive. The historical figure of Jesse James became the basis of a hero of folklore even before he died in 1882. ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... i like western films The Western is an American genre in literature and film. ... In the United States in the late 19th century and very early 20th century, a dime novel was a low-priced novel, typically priced at 10 cents (a dime). ...


Movies and Television

  • In a memorable episode of The Twilight Zone (Showdown with Rance McGrew), an inept actor portraying a legendary Western marshal suddenly finds himself propelled back in time to the actual Old West era--and in confrontation with Jesse James, who introduces himself as "the real Jesse James, not that two-bit punk who's been play-acting me."
  • In an episode of The Brady Bunch, Bobby upsets his parents and teachers when he decides to idolize Jesse James as a hero. His father teaches him "the truth" about Jesse to put an end to it.
  • In an episode of Lois and Clark, Superman (Clark Kent) goes back in time and meets Jesse James.
  • In the episode of Little House on the Prairie titled The Aftermath, Jesse and Frank James take refuge in Walnut Grove after a failed robbery attempt. The arrival of pursuing bounty hunters precipitates a civic crisis in the town, whose leaders are reluctant to turn the James brothers over to a group bent on summarily executing them. The crisis escalates radically when the James brothers take Mary Ingalls hostage. (This episode also suggests, contrary to history, that Bob Ford was a law-abiding citizen who harbored a desire for revenge for Jesse and Frank's murder of his brother during Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas.)
  • In The Young Riders (1989-1992), Jesse James appears in the last season (91-92) as one of the Pony Express riders. In the show, it was before he turned into an outlaw.

Jesse Edwards James (31 August 1875 - 26 March 1951), commonly known as Tim, was the only surviving son of American outlaw Jesse Woodson James. ... Jesse James is a 1939 western movie directed by Henry King and starring Tyrone Power and Henry Fonda. ... Tyrone Power in Charles Laughtons production of John Browns Body, photo by Carl Van Vechten, March 3, 1953 Tyrone Edmund Power, Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert Selden Duvall (born January 5, 1931) is an Academy Award-winning American film actor and director. ... The Long Riders is a Western, produced by James Keach, Stacy Keach and Tim Zinnemann, and directed by Walter Hill, which told part of the story of the Jesse James gang. ... James Keach born (December 7, 1947 in Savannah, Georgia) is an American actor, producer, and director. ... Johnny Cash (born J. R. Cash, February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an influential American country and rock and roll singer and songwriter. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American entertainer and songwriter, born and raised in Abbott, Texas. ... Kristoffer Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... American Outlaws is a 2001 feature film. ... Colin James Farrell (born May 31, 1976) is an Irish actor known for appearing in a series of high-profile Hollywood films, as well as for his controversial off-screen lifestyle. ... The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford is an upcoming film directed by Andrew Dominik. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor. ... The Twilight Zones original opening The Twilight Zone was a television anthology series created (and often written) by its narrator and host Rod Serling. ... “Showdown With Rance McGrew” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... The United States Marshals Service, part of the United States Department of Justice, is the United States oldest federal law enforcement agency. ... Great Basin region, typical American West The Western United States has played a significant role in history and fiction. ... The Brady Bunch is an American television situation comedy, based around a large blended family. ... Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman was a live-action television series based on the Superman comic books. ... The following is a list of episodes for the television show Little House on the Prairie. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders No Union commander William C. Quantrill Strength Lawrence Union Militia, Unknown number Redlegs, 21 U.S. soldiers 14th Kansas Infantry Regt, 20 2nd Kansas Colored Infantry Regt Quantrill’s Raiders and other guerrillas Casualties 164 6 (at most) The Battle... The main characters of the Advanced Generation: Brock, Ash, May, Max, along with Mudkip, Treecko, Pikachu, and Torchic. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Young Riders is a dramatic western that aired from 1989-1992 and featured a fictionalized accounting of a group of young Pony Express riders. ... Jesse G. James Jesse Gregory James (born April 19, 1969) is an American and CEO of West Coast Choppers, a manufacturer of custom-made motorcycles, and the host of Motorcycle Mania and Monster Garage on the Discovery Channel. ... Monster Garage (2002–2006) was a popular television show for the Discovery Channel hosted by Jesse G. James. ... PBS re-directs here; for alternate uses see PBS (disambiguation) PBS logo The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is a non-profit public broadcasting television service with 349 member TV stations in the United States. ... American Experience (sometimes abbreviated AmEx) is a television program aired on the PBS network in the United States. ... Treehouse of Horror XIII is the first episode of The Simpsons fourteenth season, as well as the thirteenth Halloween episode. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...

Others

The card game Bang! character Jesse Jones is named after Jesse James. Bang! is a wild west themed card game designed by Emiliano Sciarra and released by Mayfair Games. ...


Museums

Museums devoted to Jesse James are scattered throughout the Midwest at many of the places where he robbed.

  • James Farm in Kearney, Missouri: The James farm in Kearney, Missouri, remained in private hands until 1974 when Clay County bought it and turned it into a museum.[1]
  • Jesse James Home Museum: the house where Jesse James was killed in south St. Joseph was moved in 1939 to the Belt Highway on St. Joseph's east side to attract tourists. In 1977 it was moved to its current location, near Patee House, which was the headquarters of the Pony Express. At its current location the house is two blocks from the home's original location and is owned and operated by the Pony Express Historical Association.[2]
  • First National Bank of Northfield: The Northfield Historical Society in Northfield, Minnesota, has restored the building that housed the First National Bank, the scene of the disastrous 1876 raid.[3]

Kearney is a city in Clay County, Missouri, United States. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... The Jesse James Home Museum is located directly behind Patee House Museum in St. ... Downtown St. ... The John Patee House was a hotel at 12th Street and Pennsylvania in St. ... Pony Express statue in St. ... Northfield is a city in Rice County, Minnesota. ...

References

These are various biographies, articles and books that address Jesse James:

  • Koblas, John J., Faithful Unto Death, Northfield Historical Society Press, 2001
  • Settle, William A., Jr.: Jesse James Was His Name
  • Settle, William A., Jr.: Fact and Fiction Concerning the Careers of the Notorious James Brothers of Missouri 1977
  • Yeatman, Ted P.: Frank and Jesse James: The Story Behind the Legend, Cumberland House, 2001
  • Stiles, T.J.: Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War, Alfred A. Knopf, 2002
  • Hobsbawm, Eric J.: Bandits, Pantheon, 1981
  • Slotkin, Richard: Gunfighter Nation: The Myth of the Frontier in Twentieth-Century America, Atheneum, 1985
  • Thelen, David, Paths of Resistance: Tradition and Dignity in Industrializing Missouri, Oxford University Press, 1986
  • White, Richard, "Outlaw Gangs of the Middle Border: American Social Bandits, Western Historical Quarterly 12, no. 4 (October 1981)
  • Stone, A.C., Starrs, J.E., Stoneking, M.: Mitochondrial DNA analysis of the presumptive remains of Jesse James, Journal of Forensic Sciences 46, (2001)

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