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Encyclopedia > Jesse Helms
Jesse Helms


In office
January 3, 1973 – January 3, 2003
Preceded by B. Everett Jordan
Succeeded by Elizabeth Dole

Born October 18, 1921 (1921-10-18) (age 85)
Monroe, North Carolina
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse Dorothy Helms
Religion Baptist

Jesse Alexander Helms, Jr. (born October 18, 1921) is a former five-term Republican U.S. Senator from North Carolina, and a former chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He is considered one of the leading figures of the modern "Christian right". On April 2, 2006, Helms's wife of sixty-three years, Dorothy Jane "Dot" Coble Helms, announced that he is afflicted with multi-infarct dementia and had been moved to a convalescent facility near their Raleigh home. http://bioguide. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Benjamin Everett Jordan September 8, 1896 - March 15, 1974 was a Democratic U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina from 1958 until 1973. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator representing the state of North Carolina. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Monroe is a city in Union County, North Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The term... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Multi-infarct dementia, also known as vascular dementia, is a form of dementia resulting from brain damage caused by stroke or transient ischemic attacks (also known as mini-strokes). ... Look up Convalescence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ...

Contents

Family and education

Helms was born in Monroe, North Carolina, where his father, called "Big Jesse," served as chief of police. Jesse and Dot Helms are the parents of three children: Jane, Nancy of Raleigh, and Charles Helms of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They have seven grandchildren. Monroe is a city in Union County, North Carolina, United States. ... Chief of Police is the title typically given to the head of a police department, particularly in the United States and Canada. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Incorporated 1766 (Salem) 1849 (Winston) 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ...


Helms never obtained a university degree. He attended Wingate Junior College (now Wingate University) and Wake Forest University but did not graduate. He holds honorary degrees from some universities including Bob Jones University, Grove City College, Campbell University, and Wingate University. Wingate University is a private four-year co-educational institution, founded in 1896. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Bob Jones University Bob Jones University (BJU) is a private, Protestant Fundamentalist, liberal arts[1] university located in Greenville, South Carolina. ... Grove City College is a very selective, private liberal arts college in Grove City, Pennsylvania, with a population of about 2,500 undergraduate students. ... Campbell University is a university in Buies Creek, North Carolina, US. Campbell is a coeducational, church-related (Baptist) university, and has an approximately equal number of male and female students. ... Wingate University is a private four-year co-educational institution, founded in 1896. ...


Early career

Helms's first full-time job after college was as a sports reporter with The News & Observer of Raleigh, North Carolina. There he met Dorothy Coble, who was the newspaper's society reporter. They married in 1942. During World War II, Helms served stateside as a recruiter in the United States Navy. After the war, he pursued his twin interests, journalism and politics (at this time, within the Democratic Party). Helms became the city news editor of the Raleigh Times, and later moved to radio and television. The News & Observer logo The front page of The News & Observer from January 26, 2005 The News & Observer is the regional daily newspaper of the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, USA. It is based in Raleigh and also covers Durham, Cary and Chapel Hill. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USN redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Raleigh Times was the afternoon newspaper in Raleigh, North Carolina. ...


Helms began his career in politics as an unofficial researcher for Willis Smith, a conservative Democratic lawyer who successfully ran for the U.S. Senate in 1950. Smith ran as an outspoken supporter of racial segregation. After the election, Senator Smith hired Helms to be his administrative assistant in Washington, D.C. In 1952, Helms worked on the presidential campaign of Senator Richard B. Russell, Jr., of Georgia, who was seeking the Democratic nomination. When Smith suddenly died in 1953, Helms left Washington and returned to Raleigh. Willis Smith (19 December 1887 - 26 June 1953) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1950 and 1953. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... A statue of Russell is placed in the rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. ...


From 1953 through 1960, Helms was executive director of the North Carolina Bankers Association. He went on to become the executive vice-president, vice chairman of the board, and assistant chief executive officer of the Raleigh-based Capitol Broadcasting Company, from 1960 until his election to the Senate. During his time at CBC, he gained fame as a conservative commentator through his daily editorials on WRAL-TV in Raleigh. The editorials, which he gave at the end of each night's local news broadcast, made Helms famous throughout eastern North Carolina. The editorials featured folksy anecdotes interwoven with vivid right-wing viewpoints. Many of the editorials were later used as evidence of Helms' racial intolerance. For example, in one editorial he labeled the University of North Carolina (UNC) the "University of Negroes and Communists." He also referred to The News and Observer, his former employer, as the "Nuisance and Disturber" for its promotion of liberal views. The University of North Carolina, which had a reputation as a bastion of liberalism in the state, was a frequent target of Helms' criticism: in one memorable editorial he suggested that a wall be erected around the campus to prevent the university's liberal views from "infecting" the rest of the state. Although his editorials created controversy, they also made him popular with conservative voters, and Helms won a seat on the nonpartisan Raleigh City Council in 1957. He served for four years. Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... WRAL-TV is a broadcast television station based in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina is a sixteen-university system which comprises all public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States. ... The News & Observer logo The front page of The News & Observer from January 26, 2005 The News & Observer is the regional daily newspaper of the Research Triangle area of North Carolina. ... In U.S. politics, nonpartisan denotes an election in which the candidates do not declare or do not formally have a political party affiliation. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


Helms worked on the unsuccessful 1960 Democratic primary gubernatorial campaign of I. Beverly Lake, Sr., who ran as a supporter of racial segregation. Lake was defeated by Terry Sanford, who ran as a racial moderate willing to implement the federal government's policy of school integration. Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ... Isaac Beverly Lake Sr. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... James Terry Sanford (August 20, 1917 – April 18, 1998) was a Southern Democratic politician. ...


In 1970, Helms, prodded by a daughter and disgruntled by the Democratic Party's position on civil rights, left the Democratic Party to become a Republican[citation needed]. Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...


Election victories

In 1972, Helms announced his candidacy for a seat in the United States Senate. He won the Republican primary with 60.1 percent of the vote and eliminated two intraparty opponents. Meanwhile, the Democrats retired the ailing Senator B. Everett Jordan, who lost his primary, 55.3 percent to 44.6 percent, to Congressman Nick Galifianakis of Durham. Benefiting from Richard Nixon's landslide re-election, Helms became the first Republican elected to the Senate from North Carolina in the 20th century. Helms polled 795,248 (54 percent) to Galifianakis' 677,293 (46 percent). Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Benjamin Everett Jordan September 8, 1896 - March 15, 1974 was a Democratic U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina from 1958 until 1973. ... Nick Galifianakis (born 22 July 1928) was a Democratic U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1967 and 1973. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Country United States State North Carolina County Durham County Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


In 1978, Helms successfully defended his seat against state Insurance Commissioner John Ingram in a low-turnout off-year election. Helms received 619,151 votes (54.5 percent) to Ingram's 516,663 (45.5 percent). Ingram carried the strong support of President Jimmy Carter. The 1978 election would give Helms his largest margin of victory in his five Senate campaigns. For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


In 1984, in the most expensive Senate campaign up to that time, Helms narrowly defeated powerful two-term Governor Jim Hunt, thanks in part to then-President Ronald Reagan's support and popularity in North Carolina. Helms polled 1,156,768 (51.7 percent) to Hunt's 1,070,488 (47.8 percent). Although this was a solid victory against a formidable opponent, it should be noted that President Reagan carried the state with 62 percent of the vote, and GOP gubernatorial candidate James G. Martin won with 54 percent. James Baxter Hunt Jr. ... James Grubbs Martin (born 11 December 1935) was a Republican governor of the state of North Carolina from 1985 to 1993. ...


In both 1990 and 1996, Helms won against Harvey Gantt, the former mayor of Charlotte. Both campaigns attracted major national attention not only because of Helms' national prominence and controversial positions on many issues, but also because Gantt was an African-American whose race and moderate-to-liberal political views provided a stark contrast to Helms. Helms' 1990 victory has been partially credited to a late-running television commercial that urged white voters to reject Gantt because of the Democratic candidate's support for affirmative action programs. The ad showed a white man's hands ripping up a rejection notice from a company that had not hired him due to affirmative action policies that had given the job to a black person. The ad was the brainchild of Dick Morris, who in the 1990's would become a key political advisor to President Bill Clinton. Helms won the 1990 election by 1,087,331 votes (52.5 percent) to Gantt's 981,573 (47.4 percent). In his 1990 victory statement, Helms mocked the major North Carolina newspapers for their unhappiness over his victory, quoting a line from "Casey at the Bat": "There's no joy in Mudville tonight." Harvey B. Gantt ( Born: 1943, Charleston, South Carolina) is an architect and politician. ... “Charlotte” redirects here. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Affirmative action refers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ... Dick Morris (born November 28, 1948 in New York City) is an American political author, newspaper columnist, and commentator who previously worked as a pollster, political campaign consultant, and general political consultant. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Casey at the Bat, subtitled A Ballad of the Republic Sung in the Year 1888, is a poem on the subject of baseball, written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer. ...


In 1996, Helms drew 1,345,833 (52.6 percent) to Gantt's 1,173,875 (45.9 percent). Helms supported his former Senate colleague Bob Dole for president, while Gantt endorsed Bill Clinton. § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Although Helms is generally credited with being the most successful Republican politician in North Carolina history, it is also worth noting that his largest margin of victory in any of his five elections was 54.5 percent of the vote. In North Carolina Helms was a polarizing figure, and he freely admitted that many people in the state strongly disliked him: "They (the Democrats) could nominate Mortimer Snerd and he'd automatically get 45 percent of the vote." Helms was particularly popular among older, conservative constituents and was considered one of the last "Old South" politicians to have served in the Senate. However, he also considered himself a voice of conservative youth, whom he hailed in the dedication of his autobiography. He is widely credited with helping to move North Carolina from a one-party state dominated by the Democratic Party into a competitive two-party state that usually votes Republican in presidential elections. Under Helms' banner many white conservative Democrats in eastern North Carolina switched parties and began to vote increasingly Republican. Edgar John Bergen (February 16, 1903 - September 30, 1978) was an American actor and radio performer, best known as a ventriloquist. ... Geographically, Old South is a subregion of the American South, differentiated from the Deep South as being the Southern States represented in the original thirteen American colonies, as well as a way of describing the former lifestyle in the Southern United States. ...


1976 Republican National Convention

During the 1976 Republican National Convention, Helms encouraged a movement to draft Senator James L. Buckley, as an effort to stop the nomination of Ronald Reagan for President, despite his earlier support during the North Carolina presidential primary. Reagan had announced that Pennsylvania Senator Richard Schweiker would be his running mate if picked; Helms believed that Schweiker was far too liberal. The "Draft Buckley" movement was mooted when President Gerald Ford very narrowly won the party's nomination on the first ballot.[1][2] The 1976 Republican National Convention was held in Kansas City, Missouri at Kemper Arena from August 16 to August 19. ... James Buckley James Lane Buckley (born March 9, 1923 in New York City) was a United States Senator from the Conservative Party of New York State from January 3, 1971 to January 3, 1977. ... “Reagan” redirects here. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Richard S. Schweiker Richard Schultz Schweiker (born June 1, 1926) is a former U.S. Congressman and Senator representing the state of Pennsylvania. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ...


Senatorial service

As a senator, Helms became one of the leaders of the increasingly influential conservative movement within the Republican Party, giving Ronald Reagan crucial support in 1976 in the pivotal North Carolina GOP primary that paved the way for Reagan's presidential election in 1980. This was accomplished in part through literature that claimed incumbent Republican President Gerald Ford might name liberal Senator Edward Brooke of Massachussetts (a black man) as his vice-presidential nominee.


Helms became chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee in the 1980s. He was also an advocate of the tobacco industry in Congress, since much of North Carolina's rural economy relies on tobacco. (Hubert Humphrey once said that, "I'll trade Jesse Helms his tobacco vote for my wheat support any day.") Tobacco companies such as R.J. Reynolds and Philip Morris have supported him, both directly and through donations to the Jesse Helms Center at Wingate University. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Richard Joshua R.J. Reynolds (1850-1918) was an American businessman and founder of the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. ... Altria Group, Inc. ...


When Republicans regained control of Congress after the 1994 elections, Helms became chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. In that role, he pushed for reform of the United Nations and blocked payment of UN dues by the United States. As he gained seniority and clout, Helms became known as "Senator No" because he would obstruct a variety of Democratic bills and presidential appointments. Helms reportedly delighted in the nickname. But Helms passed few laws of his own in part because of his bridge-burning style. Hedrik Smith's The Power Game depicts several senators specifically blocking Helms' goals as result of his intransigence. The 1960s conservative icon and fellow Republican senator Barry Goldwater once remarked that Helms was "off his rocker". [1] The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ...


Helms vehemently opposed granting MFN to China, citing human rights concerns. Most favoured nation (MFN), also called normal trade relations in the United States, is a status accorded by one nation to another in international trade. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Though a chairman of a major Senate committee, he regularly eschewed invitations to go on Sunday interview programs, claiming his constituents did not watch them. He also advised a young press aide not to write a letter to the New York Times after one of its editorials condemned Helms: again, since most of the constituency did not subscribe to the paper, there was no need for him to engage the paper in a dispute. The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Helms and the POW/MIA and KAL 007 Link

On December 5, 1991, Senator Helms wrote to Boris Yeltsin concerning U.S. servicemen who were POWs or MIAs. "The status of thousands and thousands of American servicemen who are held by Soviet and other Communist forces, and who were never repatriated after every major war this century, is of grave concern to the American people." Yeltsin would ultimately respond with a statement made on June 15, 1992, while being interviewed aboard his presidential jet on his way to the United States, "Our archives have shown that it is true — some of them were transferred to the territory of the U.S.S.R. and were kept in labor camps... We can only surmise that some of them may still be alive." On December 10, just five days after Senator Helms had written Yeltsin concerning American servicemen, he again wrote to Yeltsin, this time concerning KAL 007. "One of the greatest tragedies of the Cold War was the shoot-down of the Korean Airlines flight KAL-007 by the Armed Forces of what was then the Soviet Union on September 1, 1983. . . The KAL-007 tragedy was one of the most tense incidences of the entire Cold War. However, now that relations between our two nations have improved substantially, I believe that it is time to resolve the mysteries surrounding this event. Clearing the air on this issue could help further to improve relations [2]." Yeltsin would ultimately respond on January 8, 1992 by handing over to the International Civil Aviation Organization what the Russians had for so many years denied possessing: the tapes of the KAL 007's "Black Box" (its Digital Flight Data Recorder and Cockpit Voice Recorder) [3]. Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Korean Air Flight 7 (KAL007, KE007) was the flight number of a civilian airliner shot down by Soviet fighters on September 1, 1983, over Soviet territorial waters just west of Sakhalin island, killing all 269 passengers and crew. ...


Controversies

Helms was particularly viotriolic when speaking of gays and lesbians, blaming them for "the proliferation of AIDS," and stating that he disliked using the word "gay" to refer to them since, "...there's nothing gay about them."


Helms opposed the Martin Luther King holiday bill in 1983 on grounds that King had two associates with communist ties, Stanley Levison and Jack O'Dell; as well, he voiced disapproval of King's alleged philandering. “MLK” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Stanley David Levison was a Jewish New York radical lawyer best known as an advisor to Martin Luther King Jr. ... Jack ODell (aka Hunter Pitts ODell) is a prominent African-American member of the U.S. Civil Rights movement. ...


Helms once deeply offended a black colleague, Democratic Senator Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois, by singing part of "Dixie" on a Capitol elevator. Helms was in a battle with Moseley-Braun over the recognition of the Daughters of the Confederacy through symbolic legislation. Moseley-Braun won, in a memorable floor fight, and Helms was furious. However, it was later discovered that Helms' whistling of Dixie was in response to Moseley-Braun's "Black Power" clenched fist solute to him upon entering the elevator. Moseley-Braun filed a complaint on behalf of the incident that was thrown out upon the discovery of this detail. Following the incident, Helms hired Claude Allen, who is black, as his press secretary. James Meredith, who earned fame as the first African American student admitted to the University of Mississippi, also served on Helms' staff. Carol Moseley Braun (born August 16, American politician and lawyer, was the first (and to date only) black woman elected to the United States Senate (representing Illinois). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Sheet music cover, c. ... Claude Alexander Allen, Former Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy Claude Alexander Allen (born October 11, 1960) was the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy in George W. Bushs White House and a former nominee for a judgeship on the United States Court of Appeals for the... Meredith walking to class accompanied by U.S. marshals James Howard Meredith (born June 25, 1933) is an American civil rights movement figure, although he vocally prefers not to be regarded as such. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ...


While working on the 1950 campaign of Republican Willis Smith against Democrat Frank Porter Graham, Helms helped create an ad that read "White people, wake up before it is too late. Do you want Negroes working beside you, your wife and your daughters, in your mills and factories? Frank Graham favors mingling of the races." Another ad featured photographs Helms himself had doctored to illustrate the allegation that Graham's wife had danced with a black man. (FAIR 9/1/01, The News and Observer 8/26/01)


Helms was an ardent supporter of the late Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. [4] Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte[1] (November 25, 1915 – December 10, 2006) was a Chilean Dictator from 1974 to 1990. ...


When Roberta Achtenberg was appointed Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in 1993 by President Bill Clinton, Helms attempted to block her confirmation, stating that he refused to vote for "that damned lesbian". Roberta Achtenberg (born 1950) was the first openly lesbian or gay public official in the United States whose appointment to a federal position was confirmed by the United States Senate. ... The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, often abbreviated HUD, is a Cabinet department of the United States government. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


After a protest during his 1986 visit to Mexico, Helms opined: "All Latins are volatile people. Hence, I was not surprised at the volatile reaction." [5]


In 1994 spoke out against metal industrial band Marilyn Manson. Manson responded by painting an anti-gay slur on his chest during a show in Winston-Salem, in a sarcastic and critical display against Helms's social viewpoints.


Henrick Herztberg of the New Yorker noted in his memoirs that Helms had "the 'humorous habit'" of calling all black people "Fred".


Helms used racial issues in many elections; for instance, in 1990, he ran the famous "Hands" television ad in a tough re-election race. The ad has become legendary in Southern political circles as the most direct appeal to white backlash in modern American politics. The ad played upon white voters' fears that affirmative action policies might prevent them from getting a job that would go to a "less-qualified" black person (watch the ad). Affirmative action refers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ...


Helms opposed an amendment offering reparations to Japanese-Americans who had been interned during World War II; he proposed an amendment stipulating that no reparations would be made unless the Japanese government compensated the families of Americans killed at Pearl Harbor. Jerome Relocation Camp The Japanese American internment refers to the exclusion and subsequent removal of approximately 112,000 to 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans, officially described as persons of Japanese ancestry, 62% of whom were United States citizens, from the west coast of the United States during World War... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the actual attack. ...


In 1994, Helms created a sensation when, on the anniversary of John F. Kennedy's assassination, he told broadcasters Rowland Evans, Jr., and Robert Novak that Clinton was "not up" to the tasks of being commander-in-chief and suggested that Clinton had "better not show up around here [Fort Bragg] without a bodyguard". [6] John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Rowland Evans (?? - 2001) is an American journalist. ... Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator. ...


Helms was a strong supporter of drug prohibition, and opposed former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld's nomination as Ambassador to Mexico because Weld supported medical marijuana[7]. Helms often proposed bills that escalated the "war on drugs" [8]. Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Weld Gov. ... Cannabis sativa extract. ...


Helms once claimed that "The New York Times and Washington Post are both infested with homosexuals themselves. Just about every person down there is a homosexual or lesbian." [9]


Retirement

Because of recurring health problems, including bone disorders, prostate cancer and heart disease, Helms did not seek re-election in 2002. His Senate seat was won by Elizabeth Dole, wife of long-time colleague and former Senator Bob Dole. Helms remains to date the longest-serving popularly-elected U.S. senator in North Carolina history. Prostate cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. ... Heart disease is an umbrella term for a number of different diseases which affect the heart and as of 2007 it is the leading cause of death in the United States. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator representing the state of North Carolina. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ...


Since retiring from the Senate in 2003, Helms has been in poor health. In September 2005, Random House published his memoir Here's Where I Stand. Helms has also been recruited by pop star Bono for charity work. In 2004, he spoke out for the election of Republican U.S. Representative Richard Burr, who, like Elizabeth Dole two years earlier, defeated the Democrat Erskine Bowles to win the other North Carolina Senate seat. Helms has designated Wingate University as the repository of the official papers and historical items from his Senate career. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... For other uses, see Bono (disambiguation). ... A charitable organization (also known as a charity) is a trust, company or unincorporated association established for charitable purposes only. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Erskine Boyce Bowles is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Wingate University is a private four-year co-educational institution, founded in 1896. ...


Jerry Falwell's Liberty University opened the Jesse Helms School of Government in 2005. Helms was present at the dedication ceremony. This article is about Jerry Falwell, Sr. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...


In April 2006 news reports disclosed Helms has multi-infarct dementia, which leads to failing memory and cognitive function, as well as a number of physical difficulties. He has since been moved into a convalescent center near his home. His wife was quoted to have said that "he has his good days and his bad days. He still sees friends. Company is good for him. He is still signing books. But he is not able to conduct any business or make any speeches."[3] This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Multi-infarct dementia, also known as vascular dementia, is a form of dementia resulting from brain damage caused by stroke or transient ischemic attacks (also known as mini-strokes). ... For other uses, see Memory (disambiguation). ... Wiktionary has a definition of: Cognition The term cognition is used in several different loosely related ways. ...


References in popular culture

  • During the 1996 MTV Video Music Awards, host Dennis Miller announced that Helms was in the audience, followed by a close-up of a pig. The pig was actually the pig used to portray the title role in the movie Babe.
  • Helms is pointedly targeted in a satiric comedy routine by Bill Hicks, in which Hicks says anyone that far to the right is hiding a dark secret, and suggests Helms will commit suicide and afterward the skins of small children will be found in his attic.
  • Musician Todd Rundgren wrote a song about Helms entitled "Jesse".
  • Loudon Wainwright III wrote a song about Helms entitled "Jesse don't like it".
  • Nerdcore hip-hop artist MC Hawking released a song in MP3 format called "Why Won't Jesse Helms Just Hurry Up and Die?"
  • In 1993, Roy Zimmerman of the Foremen penned a song called "Jesse Helms" for the Folk Heroes album.
  • In 1998, Monroe, North Carolina native Tim Kirkman wrote and directed Dear Jesse, a first-person documentary filmed "letter" to the senator from the openly gay filmmaker.
  • Sonic Youth's song "Chapel Hill" includes the lyrics "Jesse H., come into our pit."

The MTV Video Music Awards were established in 1984 by MTV to celebrate the top music videos of the year. ... Dennis Miller (born November 3, 1953) is an American Emmy Award-winning comedian, political commentator, television personality, and talk radio host. ... Babe is an Academy Award-winning 1995 Australian film that tells the story of a pig who wants to be a sheep dog. ... This Section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... Todd Harry Rundgren (born June 22, 1948 in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, USA), is an American musician, singer, songwriter and record producer. ... Loudon Snowden Wainwright III (born September 5, 1946) is an American songwriter, folk singer, humorist, and actor. ... Nerdcore hip hop, or geeksta rap, is a subgenre of hip hop music that is performed by nerds or geeks, and is characterized by themes and subject matter considered to be of general interest to nerds. ... MC Hawking is a fictional nerdcore artist who gained some popularity in the early 2000s, largely due to the availability of his music on the Internet. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... Roy Zimmerman is a Guitarist/songwriter/satirist who founded the Southern California folk quartet The Foremen. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Dear Jesse is a 1998 American documentary film by Tim Kirkman that was released theatrically by Cowboy Pictures in 1998. ... Sonic Youth is a seminal American alternative rock group formed in New York City in 1981. ...

References

  1. ^ World Almanac and Book of Facts 1977
  2. ^ http://openweb.tvnews.vanderbilt.edu/1976-8/1976-08-11-NBC-2.html
  3. ^ http://www.newsobserver.com/114/story/424539.html

External links

Pro-Helms

  • The Jesse Helms Center
  • "Jesse Helms: To mold a nation" — article at the Charlotte News & Observer
  • Liberty University's Helms School of Government

Anti-Helms

Preceded by
B. Everett Jordan
United States Senator (Class 2) from North Carolina
19732003
Served alongside: Sam J. Ervin, Robert Morgan, John P. East, James T. Broyhill, Terry Sanford, Lauch Faircloth, John Edwards
Succeeded by
Elizabeth Dole
Preceded by
Claiborne Pell
Chair of the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
19952001
Succeeded by
Joe Biden
Preceded by
Joe Biden
Chair of the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
2001
Succeeded by
Joe Biden

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Jesse Helms Center (510 words)
The Jesse Helms Center exists to promote the principles of free enterprise, representative democracy, traditional American values, and a strong national defense upon which former U.S. Senator Jesse Helms built his life and career.
The Jesse Helms Center is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit, non-partisan organization supported by tax-deductible donations.
The Helms Center is the North Carolina sponsor for the essay contest.
UNC-TV: Biographical Conversations: Jesse Helms: (1030 words)
Helms, who suffered from an ear infection in his early adulthood, is judged unfit for combat duty.
Helms covers the entire city as a reporter and is credited for being one of the first radio reporters to play clips of audio recorded in the field.
Helms goes to Washington to be the administrative assistant to Senator Willis Smith.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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