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Encyclopedia > Jerry Pournelle
Jerry Pournelle

Jerry Pournelle at the 2006 Stanford Singularity Summit
Pseudonym: "J.E. Pournelle"
"Wade Curtis"
Born: August 7, 1933 (1933-08-07) (age 73)
Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
Occupation: Novelist,
Journalist.
Essayist
Nationality: American
Genres: Science fiction
Website: www.jerrypournelle.com

Jerry Eugene Pournelle, Ph.D., (born August 7, 1933) is an American essayist, journalist and science fiction author who contributed for many years to the computer magazine Byte. He has served as President of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1288x2332, 1600 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jerry Pournelle Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... , : Port City , River City , Rachet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... December 1975 issue of Byte (Vol 1. ... Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA (pronounced // or //), was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight. ...

Contents

Biography

Pournelle was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, and educated in Capleville, Tennessee.[1] He served in the US Army during the Korean War as an artillery officer. After Korea, he obtained advanced degrees in psychology, statistics, engineering, and political science, including two PhDs. He acquired political experience by serving as Executive Assistant to the Mayor and Director of Research for the City of Los Angeles, campaign manager for Congressman Barry Goldwater Jr. (Rep.), and campaign manager for the third (successful) campaign for Mayor Sam Yorty (Dem.). , : Port City , River City , Rachet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... A graph of a normal bell curve showing statistics used in educational assessment and comparing various grading methods. ... Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... d Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Barry Morris Goldwater, Jr. ... Samuel William Yorty (October 1, 1909 – June 5, 1998) was an outspoken politician from Los Angeles, California. ...


Pournelle was an intellectual protege of Russell Kirk (Kenneth C. Cole, Pournelle's mentor at the University of Washington, was co-founder with Kirk of Modern Age) and Stefan T. Possony with whom Pournelle wrote numerous publications including The Strategy of Technology, onetime textbook at the United States Military Academy (West Point) and the United States Air Force Academy (Colorado Springs). His work in the aerospace industry includes editing Project 75, a 1964 study of 1975 defense requirements. He worked in operations research at Boeing, The Aerospace Corporation, and North American Rockwell Space Division, and was founding President of the Pepperdine Research Institute. Russell Kirk Russell Kirk (1918, Plymouth, Michigan – 29 April 1994, Mecosta, Michigan), was an American political theorist, historian, social critic, and man of letters, best known for his influence on 20th century American conservatism. ... Modern Age is an American conservative academic quarterly journal, founded by Russell Kirk in 1957, and published by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute . ... The Strategy of Technology doctrine involves a country using its advantage in technology to create and deploy weapons of sufficient power and numbers so as to overawe or beggar its opponent(s). ... “USMA” redirects here. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661 ) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Boeing. ... The Aerospace Corporation is a nonprofit engineering and science organization headquartered in El Segundo, California. ...


A famous humorist, Dave Barry, gives accolades with regards to Mr. Pournelle's guru column in Byte magazine in Mr. Barry's book, "Dave Barry in Cyberspace". For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ... December 1975 issue of Byte (Vol 1. ...


Writing career

Pournelle began fiction writing non-SF work under a pseudonym in 1965. His early SF was published as "Wade Curtis", in Analog and other magazines. Some SF novels under his own name (sometimes rendered as "J.E. Pournelle") include: Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ...

In the mid-1970s, Pournelle began a fruitful collaboration with Larry Niven: King Davids Spaceship is a novel by science fiction author Jerry Pournelle. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The book cover of Janissaries, a science fiction novel by Jerry Pournelle Janissaries is a novel by science fiction author Jerry Pournelle. ... Roland Green is a mountain bike and road bicycle racer. ... Roland Green is a mountain bike and road bicycle racer. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ...

In 1985, Footfall, in which Robert A. Heinlein was a thinly veiled minor character, reached the number one spot on The New York Times bestseller list. Another bestseller, Lucifer's Hammer (1977), reached number two. Fallen Angels won the Prometheus Award in 1992 for Best Novel and Japan's Seiun Award for Foreign Novel in 1998. Cover of 1991-03-01 paperback edition The Mote in Gods Eye, by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, was called possibly the finest science fiction novel I have ever read by Robert A. Heinlein. ... Inferno is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, published in 1976. ... Lucifers Hammer is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, first published in 1977. ... Oath of Fealty is a 1982 novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Footfall is a 1985 science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... The Legacy of Heorot is a science fiction novel written in 1987 by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. ... Steven Barnes photo by Beth Gwinn Steven Barnes (born March 1, 1952 in Los Angeles, CA) is a self-titled writer, lecturer, creative consultant, and human performance technician. ... The Gripping Hand is a 1993 novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Fallen Angels (1991) (ISBN 0743435826) is a Prometheus Award-winning novel by science fiction authors Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, and Michael Flynn. ... Michael Flynn, (born 1947), sometimes published as Michael F. Flynn, worked full time as a statistician and wrote science fiction as a sideline for several years. ... Beowulfs Children is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. ... The Burning City is a fantasy novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle set in the same prehistoric world as The Magic Goes Away. ... Burning Tower is a fantasy novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ... The Seiun Award is a famous Japanese science fiction award. ...


See [1]


Themes

From the beginning, Pournelle's work has engaged strong military themes. Several books are centered on a fictional mercenary infantry force known as Falkenberg's Legion. There are strong parallels between these stories and the Dorsai mercenary stories by Gordon R. Dickson, as well as Heinlein's Starship Troopers, although Pournelle's work takes far fewer technological leaps than either of these. A mercenary is a person who takes part in an armed conflict who is not a national of a Party to the conflict and is motivated to take part in the hostilities essentially by the desire for private gain and, in fact, is promised, by or on behalf of a... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, bicycles, or other means. ... The Childe Cycle is a series of science fiction novels by Gordon R. Dickson. ... Gordon Dickson lecturing. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Starship Troopers Starship Troopers is a science fiction novel by Robert A. Heinlein, first published (in abridged form) as a serial in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction (October, November 1959, as Starship Soldier) and published hardcover in 1959. ...


Journalism

Since January 1982, Pournelle wrote the "Chaos Manor" column in the print version of Byte. In the column, Pournelle described his experiences with computer hardware and software, some purchased and some sent by vendors for his review. After the print version of Byte ended publication in the United States, Pournelle continued publishing the column for the online version and international print editions of Byte. In July 2006, Pournelle and Byte declined to renew their contract and Pournelle moved the column to his own web site, Chaos Manor Reviews.


Since 1998, Pournelle has maintained a website with a daily online journal, "View from Chaos Manor", in effect a blog dating from before the use of that term. This is a continuation of his 1980's blog-like online journal on GEnie. He says he resists using blog because he considers the word ugly and because he maintains that his "View" is primarily a vehicle for writing rather than a collection of links. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Genie is the English term for the Arabic جني (jinnie). ...


Humor is an important part of his journalistic output. He wrote of an incident when he and his wife drove to Baja California to witness a total eclipse. Driving a rugged trail to a mountain top, the better to see the umbra approaching at hundreds of miles per hour, they found another vehicle there. Parking next to it, Mrs. Roberta Pournelle rolled down a window and asked "Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon?" Baja California (literally lower California in Spanish) is the northernmost state of Mexico. ... “Total eclipse” redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Grey Poupon is a Dijon mustard now made by Kraft Foods. ...


Politics

In a 1997 article Norman Spinrad wrote that Pournelle had written the SDI portion of Ronald Reagan's State of the Union Address, as part of a plan to use SDI to get more money for space exploration, exploiting the larger defence budget. [2] Pournelle wrote in response that while the Citizens' Advisory Council on National Space Policy "wrote parts of Reagan's 1983 SDI speech, and provided much of the background for the policy, we certainly did not write the speech ... We were not trying to boost space, we were trying to win the Cold War". [3] . The Council's first report [1980] became the transition team policy paper on space for the incoming Reagan administration. The third report was certainly quoted in the Reagan "Star Wars" speech. Norman Richard Spinrad (born September 15, 1940) is an American science fiction author. ... The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) was proposed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan on March 23, 1983[1] to use ground-based and space-based systems to protect the United States from attack by strategic nuclear ballistic missiles. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... 2003 State of the Union address given by U.S. President George W. Bush The State of the Union Address is an annual event in which the President of the United States reports on the status of the country, normally to a joint session of the U.S. Congress (the...


Pournelle opposed both Gulf Wars, maintaining that the money would be better spent developing energy technologies for the United States. He is quoted as saying "with what we spent in Iraq we could build nuclear power plants and space solar power satellites and tell the Arabs to drink their oil." His web site is critical of the Iraq War, but demands support of troops committed there. "Once you send the troops in, you have no choice but to give them what they need until you bring them home."


Pournelle is also known for his Pournelle chart, a 2-dimensional coordinate system used to distinguish political ideologies. It is similar to the Nolan chart, except that the X-axis gauges opinion toward state and centralized government (farthest right being state worship, farthest left being the idea of a state as the "ultimate evil"), and the Y-axis measures the belief that all problems in society have rational solutions. (top being complete confidence in planning, bottom being its total lack). The Pournelle chart, developed by Jerry Pournelle (in his 1963 political science Ph. ... The Nolan Chart is a political diagram popularized by the American libertarian David Nolan. ...


Pournelle has popularized a "law", which he calls Pournelle's Iron Law of Bureaucracy. This law "...states that in any bureaucratic organization there will be two kinds of people: those who work to further the actual goals of the organization, and those who work for the organization itself." The Iron Law states that in all cases, the second type of person will always gain control of the organization, and will always write the rules under which the organization functions. His "blog", "The View from Chaos Manor", often references apparent examples of the law.


Contrarian scientific views

Pournelle has expressed support for several viewpoints that differ from the mainstream scientific consensus. These include skepticism on a significant human contribution to global warming and on evolution, and he has advocated research to directly investigate Peter Duesberg's controversial views on the cause of AIDS. However, he also emphasizes that in some cases, particularly when the impacts of wrong decisions could be disastrous, contrarian research by competent researchers is valuable as insurance. Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... This article is about evolution in biology. ... Peter H. Duesberg (born December 2, 1936 in Germany) is an award-winning professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley. ...


Politics in the fiction

In his books Pournelle delights in again and again creating situations and dilemmas from which the only solution (at least, the only one offered to the reader) is taking an action which is decidedly not "politically correct". However these stories are not mere one-sided polemics. The protagonists are at the mercy of forces they may understand but cannot control, forces which are very real and which operate in our world today. If Pournelle has specific targets in mind, they are those who for ideological or personal reasons ignore or bypass these truths. The forces involved are the need for resources, especially energy, the inevitable stratification of societies and the consequences of disturbing the existing order, and the tendency of cultures to drift towards the politics of entitlement, as demonstrated by Welfare States throughout history as well as economic oligarchies. Similar themes occur in the work of H. Beam Piper, who was an influence on Pournelle. There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Oligarchy is a form of government where most political power effectively rests with a small segment of society (typically the most powerful, whether by wealth, military strength, ruthlessness, or political influence). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Pournelle is also a member of noted writer Steve Sailer's "Human Biodiversity Institute."


Recurrent themes

This is a list of some of Pournelle's pet themes that recur in the stories.

  • Welfare States become self sustaining. In fact, eventually the officials of a Welfare State, perceiving that their jobs require a supply of "clients" needing State aid, eventually become adept at making sure that there are always people in need. To do this, they either adopt policies that promote poverty and dependence, or stretch existing classifications to bring more "clients" into the Welfare system.
  • Building a technological society requires a strong defense and the rule of law. Even if large scale war is not a threat, many small scale conflicts can disrupt a society, especially if encouraged and supplied from outside. Even a country such as Sweden, which combines a high level of technological achievement and liberal social policies, maintains a strong military that uses Swedish-manufactured technology.
  • "Those who forget history are condemned to repeat it." Pournelle uses history as a source of warnings about the consequences of certain policies, and of examples of effective military organization and tactics.

Whether any of these are valid in objective reality is, of course, a matter of opinion - often of hotly debated political opinion. But they certainly can be said to be part of the basic underlying structure of the Pournelle Universe, at least as much as the physics which enable Faster-Than-Light travel or the engineering which goes into the weapons used by military protagonists. In the books and stories, protagonists (individuals, groups, whole cultures) who abide by such rules are likely to succeed and those who ignore or flout them are usually doomed to failure, sometimes very messy and painful failure.


Examples in the fiction

  • In The Mercenary, latter integrated into Falkenberg's Legion, the newly-independent planet Hadley is threatened with economic collapse, famine, and resulting mass death. This can only be avoided by having a large part of its city population relocated to the countryside and assigned to work in agriculture. This solution is unpopular, and the leading Freedom Party won't hear of it. The party uses bloody, violent means to force the planet's President to resign and get themselves into power. The story's protagonist, mercenary commander John Christian Falkenberg, finds what he considers a brutal but unavoidable solution: in order to force the city people to move to the countryside, the Freedom Party must be completely crushed, in however bloody a way - as the other alternative is a total economic collapse in which at least a third of the population would perish.
Accordingly, he gets his soldiers into the stadium where the Freedom Party holds its rally, catching its members by complete surprise. His men, firing deadly volleys and advancing with bayonets fixed, break the disorganized resistance and proceed to systematically kill the armed militants and party leaders. Mission completed, with blood literally flowing down the stadium aisles, Falkenberg hands over power to planetary President Hamner, a well-meaning liberal who hitherto could only wring his hands in despair, and departs the planet. He freely offers for Hamner to use himself and his men as scapegoats, since "nobody is going to forget what happened today".
Pournelle clearly set up the situation leading to such a climax to illustrate his opinion that in some situations a brutal solution is unavoidable, and that those willing to implement such a solution unflinchingly should be considered heroes.
Actually, the climax and perhaps some of the politics are borrowed from Fletcher Pratt's The Battles That Changed History, specifically "Fighting in the Streets and the Future of Order." Justinian the Great suppressed a revolt in Constantinople by seeming to capitulate, and then sending in Belisarius with reliable mercenaries to butcher the celebrating faction in the Hippodrome together with their leaders. This incident is formally known as the Nika riots.
For more details on this topic, see The Prince (Pournelle).
  • In Footfall, elephant-like alien invaders land in Kansas, and the only way to dislodge them seems to be large-scale nuclear strikes which would kill a lot of American citizens together with the aliens and render Kansas a radioactive wasteland - which is precisely what the US government proceeds to do.
Later on, when the aliens continue their offensive and seize large parts of Africa, the US President secretly authorizes the construction of a spaceship powered by nuclear blasts - the only way of getting at the orbiting alien mothership and ending the threat. The environmental considerations which led to stopping such a project in the 1960's are brushed aside in the emergency.
An investigative journalist discovers this environmentally-damaging government project and plans to reveal it, in the hope of a Pulitzer - but is murdered by his best friend to whom he had revealed his intention, and who is determined to protect the secret at all costs.
The ship takes off, with radioactive contamination of Earth's atmosphere considered an acceptable price, and successfully engages with the alien ship. But at the critical moment the President grows "soft" and is willing to settle for less than the aliens' unconditional surrender. Whereupon the President's civil and military associates seize power, hold the President incommunicado and hand effective power to the hawkish National Security Adviser - who carries the war to a successful conclusion and secures the aliens' surrender.
  • In Lucifer's Hammer, the world is thrown into total chaos by the disastrous strike of a comet. The one hope of restoring a technological civilization is a nuclear power station which miraculously survived intact - but a coalition of religious fanatics, militant environmental activists and Afro-Americans, who have all taken up cannibalism, are determined to destroy the station, and they possess the guns to do it. The "good guys" seem helpless to stop them, until a scientist comes up with the formula for mustard gas - and they proceed to gas the advancing cannibals, save the power station and get on with the reconstruction of civilization. (The scientist saviour, who had selflessly given the production of mustard gas priority over insulin, dies of diabetes).
  • High Justice is a collection of seven stories, all of which portray as heroes (or at least, as protagonists whose success the author seems to desire) the agents and executives of multinational corporations (upgraded to multi-planetary corporations in the later stories) who work to defend their corporation's business interests in ways both fair or foul in various science-fictional settings.

The Prince is a science fiction compilation by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The Prince is a science fiction compilation by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The Nika riots (Greek: Στάση του Νίκα), or Nika revolt, took place over the course of a week in Constantinople in 532. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... Footfall is a 1985 science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... An artists conception of the NASA reference design for the Project Orion spacecraft powered by nuclear propulsion. ... Pulitzer may refer to: Joseph Pulitzer, a U.S. newspaper publisher and journalist Roxanne Pulitzer, society diva Pulitzer Prize, an annual U.S. journalism award Pulitzer, Inc. ... Lucifers Hammer is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, first published in 1977. ... Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ... A nuclear power station. ... This article is about consuming ones own species. ... The sulfur mustards, of which mustard gas is a member, are a class of related cytotoxic, vesicant chemical warfare agents with the ability to form large blisters on exposed skin. ... Insulin (from Latin insula, island, as it is produced in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas) is a polypeptide hormone that regulates carbohydrate metabolism. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... HIGH, MIDDLE AND LOW JUSTICE are notions dating from Western feudalism to indicate descending degrees of judiciary power to administer justice by the maximal punishment the holders could inflict upon their subjects and other dependents. ... A multinational corporation (MNC) or transnational corporation (TNC) is one that spans multiple nations; these corporations are often very large. ...

Bibliography

  • Important to Pournelle's early career was Jack Woodford and his books on writing and getting published.

(incomplete) Jack Woodford (1894–1971) was a successful pulp novelist and non-fiction author of the 1930s and 1940s. ...


Non-fiction

  • Stability and national security (Air Force Directorate of Doctrines, Concepts and Objectives) (1968)
  • The Strategy of Technology with Stephan T. Possony, Ph.D. and Francis X. Kane, Ph.D. (1970) available at [4]
  • A Step Farther Out (1981)
  • The users guide to small computers (1984)
  • Mutually Assured Survival (1984)
  • Adventures in Microland (1985)
  • Guide to Disc Operating System and Easy Computing (1989)
  • Pournelle's PC Communications Bible: The Ultimate Guide to Productivity With a Modem with Michael Banks (1992)
  • Jerry Pournelle's Guide to DOS and Easy Computing: DOS over Easy (1992)
  • Jerry Pournelle's Windows With an Attitude (1995)
  • PC Hardware: The Definitive Guide (2003) with Bob Thompson
  • 1001 Computer Words You Need to Know (2004)

Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...

Fiction

Birth Of Fire is a 1976 science fiction book written by Author Jerry Pournelle and published by Baen Books. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beowulfs Children is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Steven Barnes photo by Beth Gwinn Steven Barnes (born March 1, 1952 in Los Angeles, CA) is a self-titled writer, lecturer, creative consultant, and human performance technician. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Burning City is a fantasy novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle set in the same prehistoric world as The Magic Goes Away. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Burning Tower is a fantasy novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... The Burning City is a fantasy novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle set in the same prehistoric world as The Magic Goes Away. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Escape from the Planet of the Apes is a 1971 science fiction film that is the second sequel to the Planet of the Apes movie of 1968, the first sequel being Beneath the Planet of the Apes. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Exiles to Glory is a short science fiction novel by Jerry Pournelle, published in 1978. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Footfall is a 1985 science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Go Tell the Spartans is a low-budget and critically acclaimed 1978 American film about U.S. advisors in the early days of the Vietnam War. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... The Gripping Hand is a 1993 novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... HIGH, MIDDLE AND LOW JUSTICE are notions dating from Western feudalism to indicate descending degrees of judiciary power to administer justice by the maximal punishment the holders could inflict upon their subjects and other dependents. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Dean Ing (born 1931) is an American author, who usually writes in the science fiction and techno-thriller genres. ... Inferno is a science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, published in 1976. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... The book cover of Janissaries, a science fiction novel by Jerry Pournelle Janissaries is a novel by science fiction author Jerry Pournelle. ... Roland J. Grenn is a Chicago native and science-fiction and fantasy writer and editor. ... Roland J. Grenn is a Chicago native and science-fiction and fantasy writer and editor. ... The Legacy of Heorot is a science fiction novel written in 1987 by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Steven Barnes photo by Beth Gwinn Steven Barnes (born March 1, 1952 in Los Angeles, CA) is a self-titled writer, lecturer, creative consultant, and human performance technician. ... Lucifers Hammer is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, first published in 1977. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... The Prince is a science fiction compilation by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Cover of 1991-03-01 paperback edition The Mote in Gods Eye, by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, was called possibly the finest science fiction novel I have ever read by Robert A. Heinlein. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Oath of Fealty is a 1982 novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... The Prince is a science fiction compilation by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... The Prince is a science fiction compilation by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... King Davids Spaceship is a novel by science fiction author Jerry Pournelle. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Starswarm is a 1998 science fiction novel by Jerry Pournelle. ... John Francis Carr (born 1944) is a science fiction editor and writer. ... Tran is the name of a computer programmer who was a member of the American demoscene group, Renaissance. ... Roland J. Grenn is a Chicago native and science-fiction and fantasy writer and editor. ... The Prince is a science fiction compilation by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fallen Angels (1991) (ISBN 0743435826) is a Prometheus Award-winning novel by science fiction authors Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle, and Michael Flynn. ... Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938 Los Angeles, California) is a US science fiction author. ... Michael Flynn, (born 1947), sometimes published as Michael F. Flynn, worked full time as a statistician and wrote science fiction as a sideline for several years. ... The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ... The Baen Free Library is a digital library of the science fiction and fantasy publishing house Baen Books where (as of June 2005) 77 full books are available for free download in a number of formats, without copy protection. ...

Series

Heorot is the stronghold of king Hrothgar in the epic poem Beowulf. ... The fictional CoDominium universe is a future history (now alternate history) setting for the books in the CoDominium Series by Jerry Pournelle. ... A series of military and political-based science fiction novels set in an interstellar confederation of races, in which humans are a slave race entrusted with military affairs and law enforcement, originated by Jerry Pournelle. ...

Other Media

  • This Week in Tech - Dr. Pournelle has appeared a number of times as one of the panelists on the podcast This Week in Tech. He appears to be invited principally as a source of "old-timer" knowledge of the early days of computer technology.

. The initial letter is shown capitalized due to technical restrictions. ...

Awards

The John W. Campbell Award for the Best New Writer in Science Fiction is awarded annually by the World Science Fiction Society. ... The Prometheus Award is an award for libertarian science fiction novels given out annually by the Libertarian Futurist Society (which also publishes a quarterly journal, Prometheus). ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Jerry Pournelle

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

References

  1. ^ The View from Chaos Manor, June 20, 2003.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jerry Pournelle (876 words)
Jerry Pournelle will, I am reasonably confident, go on forever, which means more strong sf like the "Janissaries" series, his collaborations with Larry Niven, Steven Barnes, Steve Stirling, Roland J. Green, Dean Ing, and more.
I'm currently reading "The Legacy of Heorot" by Pournelle, Niven and Barnes, which seems to be shaping up nicely, with a beautifully realised first extra-solar colony (sponsored by the National Geographic) doing pretty well, but, as the people came to the new system in cold sleep, completely on their own.
Niven and Pournelle were proposing that he meet with them for a couple of weeks and iron out a story outline.
Jerry Pournelle | Interviews | SCI FI Weekly (3993 words)
Pournelle: You no longer have much in the way of knowing what to do in a big, epic novel about the future, because nobody knows what the hell is going to happen.
Pournelle: The hard part of writing at all is sitting your ass down in a chair and writing it.
Pournelle: Psychic income is the one damn thing they can't take away from you in taxes, and I have deductibly built myself a fairly comfortable place to live.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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