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Encyclopedia > Jerry Lee Lewis
Jerry Lee Lewis

Background information
Birth name Jerry Lee Lewis
Born September 29, 1935 (1935-09-29) (age 72)
Origin Ferriday, Louisiana, U.S.
Genre(s) Rock and Roll
Country
Rockabilly
Occupation(s) Singer, Songwriter, Pianist
Instrument(s) Vocals, Piano
Years active 1954Present
Label(s) Sun Records ,Mercury Records, Warner Bros. Records, MCA Records
Website www.jerryleelewis.com

Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. An early pioneer of rock and roll music, Lewis was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986 and his pioneering contribution to the genre has been recognized by the Rockabilly Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked him #24 on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[1]. In 2003, they listed his box set All Killer, No Filler: The Anthology #242 on their list of "500 greatest albums of all time".[2] Image File history File links Jerry-Lee-LewisAlbumcover. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Ferriday is a town located in Concordia Parish, Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... // Frank Sinatra wins the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in From Here to Eternity, 1953; resuscitating his singing career in the process Bing Crosby received a Best Actor nomination for his work in The Country Girl January 14 - First documented use of the abbreviated term Rock n Roll to... “Present” redirects here. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Mercury Records was a record label founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1945 by Irving Green, Berle Adams and Arthur Talmadge. ... Warner Bros. ... MCA Records was an American-based record company owned by MCA Inc. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ... This article is about the music magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time is the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ...

Contents

Biography

Lewis was born to the poor family of Elmo and Mamie Lewis in Ferriday, Louisiana, and began playing piano in his youth with his two cousins, Mickey Gilley and Jimmy Swaggart. His parents mortgaged their farm to buy him a piano. Influenced by a piano-playing older cousin Carl McVoy, the radio, and the sounds from the black juke joint across the tracks, Haney's Big House, Lewis developed his own style mixing rhythm and blues, boogie woogie, gospel, and country music, as well as ideas from established "country boogie" pianists like recording artists Moon Mullican and Merrill Moore. Soon he was playing professionally. Ferriday is a town located in Concordia Parish, Louisiana. ... Mickey Gilley (b. ... Jimmy Lee Swaggart (born March 15, 1935 in Ferriday, Louisiana) is a Pentecostal preacher and pioneer of televangelism who reached the height of his popularity in the 1980s. ... A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Boogie woogie has two different meanings: a piano based music style, boogie woogie (music) a dance that imitates the rocknroll of the 50s, boogie woogie (dance) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Moon Mullican was an American country and western singer and pianist in the late 1940s and 1950s from Louisiana. ...


His mother enrolled him in Southwestern Assemblies of God University in Waxahachie, Texas, secure in the knowledge that her son would now be exclusively singing his songs to the Lord. But legend has it that Lewis daringly played a boogie woogie rendition of "My God Is Real" at a church assembly that sent him packing the same night. Pearry Green, then president of the student body, related how during a talent show Jerry played some "worldly" music. The next morning, the dean of the school called both Jerry and Pearry into his office to expel them both. Jerry then said that Pearry shouldn't be expelled because "he didn't know what I was going to do." Years later Pearry asked Jerry "Are you still playing the devil's music?" Jerry replied "Yes, I am. But you know it's strange, the same music that they kicked me out of school for is the same kind of music they play in their churches today. The difference is, I know I am playing for the devil and they don't." Southwestern Assemblies of God University (Southwestern or S.A.G.U.) is an undergraduate and graduate institution of higher learning. ... Waxahachie is a city located in Ellis County, Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Pearry Green was born on July 1, 1933 in Louisiana. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ...


Leaving religious music behind so far as performing, he paid dues at clubs in and around Ferriday and Natchez, Mississippi. He became a part of the burgeoning new rock and roll sound, cutting his first demo recording in 1954. He made a trip to Nashville around 1955 where he played clubs and attempted to drum up interest, but was turned down by the Grand Ole Opry as he had been at the Louisiana Hayride country stage and radio show in Shreveport. Recording executives in Nashville suggested he switch to playing a guitar, Lewis, even then confrontational, once recalled suggesting to one Nashville producer, "You can take your guitar and ram it up your ass!" Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... The Louisiana Hayride was a radio broadcast from the Municipal Auditorium in Shreveport, Louisiana, United States that during its heyday from 1948 to 1960 helped launch the careers of the some of the greatest names in American music. ...


Two years later, at Sun Records studio in Memphis, Tennessee, producer and engineer Jack Clement discovered and recorded Lewis for the Sun label while owner Sam Phillips was away on a trip to Florida. He became a session musician playing piano for Sun artists like Billy Lee Riley and Carl Perkins. As his own career came on the upswing, hits such as "Great Balls of Fire" soon followed, and would become his biggest hit. Watching and listening to Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis Presley allegedly said that if he could play the piano like that, he'd quit singing. Lewis' early billing was Jerry Lee Lewis and his Pumping Piano. Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Jack Henderson Clement (born April 5, 1931 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American singer, songwriter, and a record and film producer. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami metropolitan area Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... Billy Lee Riley was born on October 5, 1933 in Pocahontas, Arkansas, USA. He is a legendary Rockabilly-musician, who worked at Sun Records and who was rediscovered by Bob Dylan in 1992. ... Carl Lee Perkins (April 9, 1932 – January 19, 1998) was an American pioneer of rockabilly music, a mix of rhythm and blues and country music that was recorded most notably at Sun Records in Memphis beginning in 1954. ... Great Balls of Fire is a 1957 song by written by Otis Blackwell and sung by Jerry Lee Lewis. ...


On December 4, 1956, Presley dropped in on Phillips to pay a social visit while Perkins was in the studio cutting new tracks with Lewis backing him on piano. The three started an impromptu jam session, and Phillips left the tapes running. He later telephoned Johnny Cash and brought him in to join the others. These recordings, almost half of which were gospel songs, survived, and have been released on CD under the title Million Dollar Quartet. Tracks also include Chuck Berry's "Brown Eyed Handsome Man", Pat Boone's "Don't Forbid Me" and Presley doing an impersonation of Jackie Wilson (who was then with Billy Ward and the Dominoes) singing "Don't Be Cruel. In 1957, his piano and the pure rock and roll sound of "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" (which in 2005 was selected for permanent preservation in the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress) propelled him to international fame. is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A jam session is a musical act where musicians gather and play (or jam) without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Million Dollar Quartet is the name given to recordings made on Tuesday December 4, 1956 in the Sun Record Studios in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Charles Eugene Patrick Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him a popular performer of the 1950s. ... For the British author, see Jacqueline Wilson. ... Compilation album cover Billy Ward and the Dominoes were one of the top American R&B groups of the 1950s, and launched the careers of both Clyde McPhatter and Jackie Wilson. ... Dont be Cruel is a song by Otis Blackwell, which was recorded by Elvis Presley in 1956. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Whole Lotta Shakin Goin On is a song, written in 1957 by Dave Williams & Sunny David. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Recording Registry is a list of sound recordings which are culturally, historically or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States. ...


Lewis, though not the first pianist in that style, was a pioneer of Piano rock, not only through his sound but also through his dynamic performance. He would often kick the piano bench out of the way to play standing, rake his hands up and down the keyboard for dramatic accent, and even sit down on the instrument. His frenetic performance style can be seen in films such as High School Confidential (he sang the title song from the back of a flatbed truck), and Jamboree. He has been called "rock & roll's first great wild man and also rock & roll's first great eclectic."[1] These performance techniques have been adopted by later Piano rock artists, notably admirers Elton John, Billy Joel, and Ben Folds. Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... High School Confidential is a 1958 film, directed by Jack Arnold. ... Jamboree (known as Disc Jockey Jamboree in the United Kingdom) is the name of a black and white 1957 rock n roll motion picture directed by Roy Lockwood that runs for 71 minutes in mono RCA sound. ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... William Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, composer and musician. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina[1]) is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ...


Scandal

He married Jane Mitcham, his second wife, 23 days before his divorce from his first wife was final. Image File history File links JerryLeeLewisBookcover. ... Image File history File links JerryLeeLewisBookcover. ...


Lewis' turbulent personal life was hidden from the public until a 1958 British tour, when reporters learned about the twenty-three year old star's third wife, Myra Gale Brown, who also happened to be his thirteen-year-old second cousin twice removed. The publicity caused an uproar and the tour was canceled after only three concerts. Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Myra Gale Brown (born July 11, 1944) is the former wife and second cousin twice removed of singer Jerry Lee Lewis. ... For other uses, see Cousin (disambiguation). ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Look up publicity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The scandal followed Lewis home to America, and as a result he almost vanished from the music scene. Lewis felt betrayed by numerous people who had been his supporters. Dick Clark dropped him from his shows. Lewis even felt that Sam Phillips had sold him out when the Sun Record patriarch released "The Return of Jerry Lee," which mocked Lewis' marital and music problems. Only Alan Freed stayed true to Jerry Lee Lewis, playing his records until Freed was removed from the air because of supposed payola problems. For other persons named Dick Clark, see Dick Clark (disambiguation). ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Payola, in the American music industry, is the illegal practice of payment or other inducement by record companies for the broadcast of recordings on music radio, in which the song is presented as being part of the normal days broadcast. ...


Even though Jerry Lee Lewis was still under contract with Sun Records, he stopped recording. He had gone from $10,000 a night concerts to $100 a night spots in beer joints and small clubs. He had few friends at the time whom he felt he could trust. It was only through Kay Martin, the president of Lewis' fan club, T. L. Meade, (aka Franz Douskey) a sometime Memphis musician and friend of Sam Phillips, and Gary Sklar, that Lewis went back to record at Sun Records. {{Infobox Writer | name = Franz Douskey | image = Replace this image1. ...


By this time, Phillips had built a new state-of-the-art studio at 639 Madison Avenue in Memphis, thus abandoning the old Union Avenue studio where Phillips had recorded B. B. King, Howlin' Wolf, Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins, Lewis, Johnny Cash, and others. It was at the new Madison Avenue studio that Lewis recorded his only hit during this period, which was a cover of Ray Charles' "What'd I Say" in 1961. Another recording of Lewis playing an instrumental boogie arrangement of the Glenn Miller Orchestra favorite "In the Mood," was issued by Sun under the pseudonym of "The Hawk," but disc jockeys quickly figured out the distinctive piano style, and this gambit failed. Riley B. King (born September 16, 1925 in Itta Bena, Mississippi) better known as B. B. King or The King of Blues, is an American blues guitarist and singer-songwriter, widely considered one of the best and most respected blues musicians of all time. ... Chester Arthur Burnett (June 10, 1910 – January 10, 1976), better known as Howlin Wolf or sometimes, The Howlin Wolf, was an influential blues singer, guitarist and harmonica player. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Carl Lee Perkins (April 9, 1932 – January 19, 1998) was an American pioneer of rockabilly music, a mix of rhythm and blues and country music that was recorded most notably at Sun Records in Memphis beginning in 1954. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... For the composer and conductor of the Ray Charles Singers, see Ray Charles (composer). ... Whatd I Say is a popular two-part recording that was released in 1959 by R&B/soul singer-songwriter Ray Charles. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Lewis's Sun recording contract ended in 1963 and he joined Smash Records, where he made a number of rock recordings that did not further his career.


His popularity recovered somewhat in Europe, especially in the UK and Germany during the mid-1960s. A live album, Live at the Star Club, Hamburg (1964), recorded with the Nashville Teens, is widely considered one of the greatest live rock and roll albums ever.[3][4] [5] [6][7][8] Music critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine writes, "Live at the Star Club is extraordinary, the purest, hardest rock & roll ever committed to record."[7] For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... // Many successful recording artists release at least one live album at some point during their career. ... A new tremendous version of Down the line (originally Go go go by Orbison) had been released in France on Philips/Mercury Records Série PARADE 127. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Nashville Teens are a British pop band formed in Weybridge, Surrey in 1961. ... Stephen Thomas Erlewine is a music journalist and the Senior Editor for All Music Guide. ...


Switch to country

A comeback eluded him in the United States, however, at least within the rock and roll genre, in part because of the changing face of rock music due to the British Invasion and the American folk-rock movement, which gave rock an entire new style, even though most of the musicians in those fields idolized Lewis. Although Lewis was again making steady money touring, he didn't have much success in the charts. Producers coaxed Lewis into trying various ideas, but the one that held the most potential came on an album called "Country Songs for City Folks" which featured Lewis doing country ballads. In the late 1960s, Mercury Records producer Jerry Kennedy convinced Lewis to make a complete switch to country music on record, explaining that he could record country and still play whatever he wanted onstage. Lewis, who had always considered country one of the genres he blended into his trademark sound, had recorded similar ballads at Sun, so it wasn't a stretch. "Another Place, Another Time" shot up the country charts in 1968. More country hits soon followed over the late 1960s and through the 1970s, many of them crossing over into the Hot 100 charts. As his success grew in the country field, he began adding more and more rock to his albums, culminating in a 1972 # 1 single with the Big Bopper hit "Chantilly Lace." Bear Family Records of Germany later licensed and reissued all of Lewis's Sun Recordings on a box set with selected material on various CDs, and did two box sets first on LP, then on CD, compiling Lewis's complete Smash recordings including unreleased material. For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Mercury Records was a record label founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1945 by Irving Green, Berle Adams and Arthur Talmadge. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Jiles Perry Richardson, Jr. ... Bear Family Records is a Germany-based record label that specializes in reissues of archival material ranging from country music to 1950s rock and roll. ...


Drug addiction and personal tragedies

Although he was always a heavy drinker who often combined his sprees with raucous, even violent behavior, he increasingly became plagued by alcohol and drug problems after Myra divorced him in 1970. Tragedy struck when Lewis' 19-year-old son, Jerry Lee Lewis Jr., was killed in a car accident in 1973. During the 1960s, his second son, Steve Allen Lewis, drowned in a swimming pool accident. He also has a daughter, Phoebe Lewis, who is a singer and musician, and for the past few years has been her father's manager. Lewis' own erratic behavior during the 1970s led to his being hospitalized in 1981 after nearly dying from bleeding stomach ulcers. Again addicted to drugs, Lewis checked himself into the Betty Ford Clinic. Year 1970 ([[Rf 1970 == January 1 - The Unix epoch begins at 00:00:00 UTC January 2 - The last studio performance of The Beatles oman numerals|MCMLXX]]) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Peptic ulcer is a non-malignant ulcer of the stomach (called gastric ulcer) or duodenum (called duodenal ulcer). ... The Betty Ford Center was co-founded by former United States First Lady Betty Ford and her friend, Ambassador Leonard Firestone, in 1982. ...


While celebrating his 41st birthday in 1976, Lewis accidentally shot and injured his bass player, Butch Owens. According to Lewis' own account, he had been playing around and didn't realize the gun was loaded. Owens himself stated that Lewis was trying to shoot at an empty cola bottle and he was simply hit by the ricochet. Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the video game. ...


A few weeks later, on November 23, Lewis, still drinking heavily, was involved in another gun-related incident at Elvis Presley's Graceland residence. Lewis had been invited by Presley, but security was unaware of the visit. Lewis, displaying a gun given to him by a local sheriff on the dashboard of his car, was questioned as to his motives for bringing the weapon. He sarcastically replied, "I'm not here to kill Elvis if that's what you're worried about," but the guard remained suspicious. is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Graceland (disambiguation). ... A security officer guards a construction site. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Later career

In 1989, a major motion picture based on his early life in rock & roll, Great Balls of Fire, brought him back into the public eye, especially when he decided to re-record all his songs for the movie soundtrack. The film was based on the book by Lewis' ex-wife, Myra Gale Lewis, and starred Dennis Quaid as Lewis, Winona Ryder as Myra, and Alec Baldwin as Jimmy Swaggart. The movie focuses on Lewis' early career and his relationship with Myra, and ends with the scandal of the late 1950's. Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Great Balls of Fire! is an American 1989 film, directed by Jim McBride and stars Dennis Quaid as Jerry Lee Lewis. ... Dennis William Quaid (born April 9, 1954) is an American actor. ... Winona Ryder (born October 29, 1971) is a two-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress. ... Alexander Rae Alec Baldwin III (born April 3, 1958) is an Emmy- and Academy Award-nominated, and Golden Globe Award-winning, American actor. ...


The very public downfall of his cousin, television evangelist Jimmy Swaggart, resulted in more adverse publicity to an already troubled family. Swaggart is also a piano player, as is another cousin, country music star Mickey Gilley. All three listened to the same music when they were growing up and frequented Haney's Big House, the Ferriday club that featured black blues acts. Lewis and Swaggart have had a complex relationship over the years. Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jimmy Lee Swaggart (born March 15, 1935 in Ferriday, Louisiana) is a Pentecostal preacher and pioneer of televangelism who reached the height of his popularity in the 1980s. ... Mickey Gilley (b. ...


Lewis's sister, Linda Gail Lewis has recorded with Jerry Lee, toured with his stage show for a time and more recently recorded with Van Morrison. In 1990, Lewis made minor news when a new song he co-wrote called "It Was the Whiskey Talking, Not Me" was included in the soundtrack to the hit movie Dick Tracy. The song can even be heard in a scene from the movie in which it is playing on the radio. Linda Gail Lewis is the sister of Jerry Lee Lewis. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a singer-songwriter from Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Dick Tracy is a 1990 film based upon the Dick Tracy comic strip character created by Chester Gould. ...


Despite the personal problems, Lewis' musical talent is widely acknowledged. Nicknamed "The Killer" for his forceful voice and piano production on stage, he was described by fellow artist Roy Orbison as the best raw performer in the history of rock and roll music.[9] In 1986, Lewis was part of the first group inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ...


That same year, he returned to Sun Studio in Memphis to team up with Orbison, Cash, and Perkins along with longtime admirers like John Fogerty and Ricky Nelson to create the album Class of '55, a sort of followup to the "Million Dollar Quartet" session, though in the eyes of many critics and fans, lacking the spirit of the old days at Sun. Class of 55 is a music album by Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison and Carl Perkins released in 1986 through Chips Momans American Sound Studios and Smash Records. ...


Lewis has never stopped touring, and fans who have seen him perform say he can still deliver unique concerts that are unpredictable, exciting, and personal. In February 12, 2005, he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by The Recording Academy (which also grants the Grammy Awards). On September 26, 2006 a new album titled Last Man Standing was released, featuring many of rock and roll's elite as guest stars. Receiving positive reviews, the album charted in four different Billboard charts, including a two week stay at number one on the Indie charts. is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences is known variously as NARAS or The Recording Academy. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Last Man Standing is an album released by rock legend Jerry Lee Lewis in September, 2006. ...


A DVD entitled Last Man Standing Live, featuring concert footage with many guest artists, was released in March 2007, while the CD was well on the way to going gold. 'Last Man Standing' CD is Jerry Lee's biggest selling album of all time. If it goes gold it will be his 10th official gold record, and his first since 1973. ('The Session' album was awarded a Gold Disk for selling over 250,000 copies because it was a double album. Single albums and CDs have to sell over 500,000. 'Last Man Standing' has more tracks than the original 'The Session' release and has already shipped over 400,000 copies worldwide.) Last Man Standing Live (CD + DVD, 2007, Killer Productions) is an album recorded live 2006, by Jerry Lee Lewis in cooperation with other musicians. ...


He now resides on a ranch in Nesbit, Mississippi with his family.


Discography

This is a detailed discography for Jerry Lee Lewis. ...

See also

Million Dollar Quartet is the name given to recordings made on Tuesday December 4, 1956 in the Sun Record Studios in Memphis, Tennessee. ... Piano rock, sometimes referred to as piano pop, is a term for a style of music that is based around the piano, and sometimes around piano-related instruments, such as the Fender Rhodes, the Wurlitzer electric piano, and keyboard-based synthesizers. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... The Rockabilly Hall of Fame was established on March 21, 1997 to present early rock and roll history and information relative to the artists and personalities involved in this pioneering American music genre. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  2. ^ All Killer, No Filler! Rolling Stone Magazine online. (November 1, 2003). Accessed September 30, 2007.
  3. ^ Peter Checksfield, "Jerry Lee Lewis. The Greatest Live Show on Earth", Record Collector, #188 - April 1995, p. 79.
  4. ^ Milo Miles, Album review of Live at the Star Club, Hamburg. Rolling Stone, #899/900 - July 2002, p.112.
  5. ^ Q Magazine, #1, 2002, p.59.
  6. ^ Mojo, 3/01/04, p.52.
  7. ^ a b Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Album Review: "Live at the Star Club, Hamburg" at All Music Guide.
  8. ^ Steven Stoulder, Editorial review of "Live at the Star Club, Hamburg" at Amazon.com.
  9. ^ Rob Patterson, "Jerry Lee Lewis: ‘The Killer’ Keeps Comin’ Back", at BMI / MusicWorld, December 22, 2006.

This article is about the music magazine. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Cover of the Nov 2005 issue Record Collector started in 1979 and is the UK’s longest-running monthly music magazine. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Q is a music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom, with a circulation of 140,282 and a readership of 731,000. ... Mojo is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Amazon. ... Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) is a collecting society that protects composers intellectual property in the communications business, especially radio. ...

References

  • Tosches, Nick (1982). Hellfire. New York: Grove Press. 
  • Gutterman, Jimmy (1991). Rockin' My Life Away: Listening to Jerry Lee Lewis. Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press. 
  • Gutterman, Jimmy (1993). The Jerry Lee Lewis Anthology: All Killer, No Filler. Rhino Records. 
  • Lewis, Myra (1981). Great Balls of Fire: The Uncensored Story of Jerry Lee Lewis. William Morrow/Quill/St. Martin's Press. 
  • Whitburn, Joel (1985). The Billboard Book of Top 40 Hits. 

Nick Tosches (born 1949) is an American writer, music journalist, novelist, biographer and poet. ... Joel Carver Whitburn (born November 29, 1939 in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin) is an American author and music historian. ...

External links and sources

  • The Official Jerry Lee Lewis Website
  • All Music Guide - Jerry Lee Lewis
  • Rockin' My Life Away by Jimmy Guterman, a full biography, online.
  • Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jerry Lee Lewis (732 words)
Jerry Lee began to play piano at age eight on a Stark Upright that his parents, Elmo and Mamie Lewis mortgaged the farm to buy.
Jerry grew up listening to a variety of music; "The Louisiana Hayride" and "Grand Ole' Opry" broadcasts, 78 rpm recordings of country singers and blues men, and the inspired gospel music of the Assembly of God Church.
A creator in a world of imitators, Jerry Lee Lewis, will be remembered with Chuck Berry, Little Richard, and Elvis Presley, as one of the true fathers of Rock and Roll.
Jerry Lee Lewis - MSN Encarta (457 words)
Jerry Lee Lewis, born in 1935, American rock singer and pianist, known for his wild, piano-pounding performances.
Lewis also suffered a series of personal tragedies, starting in 1962 when his second son drowned in a swimming pool.
Lewis was hospitalized in 1981 after hemorrhaging from a perforated stomach ulcer and was reportedly near death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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