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Encyclopedia > Jerry Falwell
Jerry Falwell

Born August 11, 1933(1933-08-11)
Lynchburg, Virginia,
United States
Died May 15, 2007 (aged 73)
Lynchburg, Virginia,
United States
Occupation Protestant Christian Evangelist
Website http://www.falwell.com/

Jerry Lamon Falwell, Sr. (August 11, 1933May 15, 2007)[1] was an American fundamentalist Christian pastor and televangelist. He was the founding pastor of the Thomas Road Baptist Church in Lynchburg, Virginia. He founded Liberty University in 1971 and co-founded the Moral Majority in 1979. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 457 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1969 pixel, file size: 815 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jerry Falwell, Jr, the son of Reverend Jerry Falwell, Sr, is the chancellor of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Fundamentalist Christianity, or Christian fundamentalism, is a movement that arose mainly within British and American Protestantism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by conservative evangelical Christians, who, in a reaction to modernism, actively affirmed a fundamental set of Christian beliefs: the inerrancy of the Bible, Sola Scriptura, the... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Falwell led services at Thomas Road Baptist Church, a megachurch in Lynchburg, Virginia. He changed affiliations from Baptist Bible Fellowship International to the mainly conservative Southern Baptist Convention, and ended his self-identification with fundamentalism in favor of evangelicalism. The interior of Rev. ... The Baptist Bible Fellowship International is a strong separatist fundamentalist organization formed in 1950 by members who separated from the World Baptist Fellowship. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination consisting of numerous agencies and agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Church, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual... Fundamentalist Christianity, or Christian fundamentalism, is a movement that arose mainly within British and American Protestantism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by conservative evangelical Christians, who, in a reaction to modernism, actively affirmed a fundamental set of Christian beliefs: the inerrancy of the Bible, Sola Scriptura, the... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to...

Contents

Personal life

Part of a series on
Southern Baptists

Background

Christianity
Protestantism
Anabaptists
General Baptists & Particular Baptists
Landmarkism
Conservative/Fundamentalist Ascendance
The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination consisting of numerous agencies and agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Church, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Anabaptists (re-baptizers, from Greek ana and baptizo; in German: Wiedertäufer) are Christians of the so-called radical wing of the Protestant Reformation. ... Baptists were first identified by the name General Baptists in 17th century England. ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct denomination but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ... Landmarkism is a ecclesiological viewpoint held by some Baptists concerning the origin and nature of the church. ... Conservative Resurgence/Fundamentalist Takeover are terms used to describe a major controversy within the Southern Baptist Convention—the largest association of Baptists in the US. Conservative Resurgence is the term preferred by supporters and Fundamentalist Takeover is the descriptive used by detractors. ...


Baptist theology

London Confession, 1689
New Hampshire Confession, 1833
Baptist Faith & Message
The 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith was written by Calvinistic Baptists in England to give a formal expression of the Reformed and Protestant Christian faith with an obvious Baptist perspective. ... In 1833, Baptists in the United States agreed upon a confession of faith around which they could organize a missionary society under the Triennial Convention. ... The Baptist Faith and Message (BF&M) is the Southern Baptist Convention confession of faith. ...


Doctrinal distinctives

Biblical inerrancy
Autonomy of the local church
Priesthood of believers
Two ordinances
Individual soul liberty
Separation of church and state
Two offices
Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Biblical inerrancy is the doctrinal position... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... The priesthood of all believers is a Christian doctrine based on several passages of the New Testament. ... Baptist ordinances, the term for the sacraments within Baptist theology, are the Lords Supper and Believers baptism. ... Soul competency is a Christian theological perspective on the accountability of each person before God. ... Separation of church and state is one of the primary theological distinctions of the Baptist tradition. ... Baptists generally recognize two Scriptural offices, those of pastor-teacher and deacon. ...


People
Deceased

John SpilsburyLottie MoonB. H. Carroll
W.A. CriswellAdrian RogersJerry Falwell, Sr.
John Spilsbury was an English Baptist minister who led the Particular Baptists during the Eighteenth Century. ... Charlotte Digges Lottie Moon (December 12, 1840 – December 24, 1912) was a Southern Baptist missionary to China with the Foreign Mission Board who spent nearly forty years (1873-1912) helping the Chinese. ... Benajah Harvey Carroll (1843-1914) was a Baptist pastor, theologian, teacher, and author. ... W.A. Criswell,Ph. ... Adrian Rogers Adrian Rogers,Th. ...

Living

Billy GrahamFranklin Graham • Duke K. McCall
Richard LandPaige PattersonAlbert Mohler
Mark Dever • Jonathan Falwell
The Reverend William Franklin Graham, Jr. ... William Franklin Graham III, known publicly as Franklin Graham (born July 14, 1952), is a controversial American Christian evangelist and missionary. ... Duke K. McCall (b. ... Dr. Richard Land is the president of Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), the public policy entity of the Southern Baptist Convention, a post he has held since 1988. ... Patterson after hunting in Africa. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mark Dever (born approx. ... Jonathan Falwell is the Senior Pastor at the Thomas Road Baptist Church. ...


Related organizations

Cooperative Program
North American Mission Board
International Mission Board
LifeWay Christian Resources
Women's Missionary Union
Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission
Baptist Press
Canadian Convention
Cooperative education is a structured method of combining academic education with practical work experience. ... The North American Mission Board (NAMB) was founded in 1997 out of the roots of the Home Mission Board. ... The International Mission Board (or IMB) is a missionary sending agency affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention which opperates in virtually every nation except the United States and Canada (these nations are serviced by the SBCs North American Mission Board). ... LifeWays headquarters, One LifeWay Plaza, are located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Womens Missionary Union is an auxiliary of the Southern Baptist Convention that was founded in 1888. ... The Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission is the public policy agency of the Southern Baptist Convention. ... Baptist Press (BP) is a religious news service based at the headquarters of the Southern Baptist Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Canadian Convention of Southern Baptists - the Canadian ministries arm of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC). ...


Seminaries

Golden Gate
Midwestern
New Orleans
Southeastern
Southern
Southwestern
Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (MBTS) is one of six official seminaries of the Southern Baptist Convention. ... The New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is a private, non-profit institution of higher learning associated with the Southern Baptist Convention, located in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary (SEBTS) is a seminary of the Southern Baptist Convention. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is a private, non-profit institution of higher education, associated with the Southern Baptist Convention, whose stated mission is to provide theological education for individuals engaging in Christian ministry. ...

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Falwell was born in Lynchburg, Virginia to Helen and Carey Hezekiah Falwell[2]. His father was an entrepreneur and one-time bootlegger who was not very religious.[2] His grandfather was a staunch atheist.[2][3] Falwell was born with a twin brother, Gene. Lynchburg is an independent city located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... The Rum Runner nightclub was opened on Broad Street in the Birmingham city centre in 1979. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... For other uses, see Twin (disambiguation). ...


Falwell married the former Macel Pate on April 12, 1958, and had two sons (one, Jerry Falwell, Jr., is a lawyer and the other, Jonathan, a pastor) and one daughter (Jeannie, who is a surgeon). is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jerry Falwell, Jr, the son of Reverend Jerry Falwell, Sr, is the chancellor of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an... “Surgeon” redirects here. ...


Prior to the founding of his church, Falwell attended Lynchburg College in Lynchburg, Virginia, but left during his sophomore year. He then transferred to and graduated from Baptist Bible College in Springfield, Missouri in 1956.[4][5] Lynchburg College is a private college in Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) with approximately 2,400 undergraduate and graduate students. ... Baptist Bible College is an Independent Baptist school, located in Springfield, Missouri. ... Hammons Tower in downtown Springfield Springfield is the third largest city in Missouri. ...


Although he sometimes used the title "Doctor," Falwell held no earned doctorate. He held three honorary degrees: an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Tennessee Temple Theological Seminary [6], an honorary Doctor of Letters from California Graduate School of Theology, and an honorary Doctor of Laws from Central University in Seoul, South Korea.[4] Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Tennessee Baptist Seminary is the Christian graduate school of theology in Chattanooga, Tennessee of Tennessee Temple University. ... Doctor of Letters (Latin: Litterarum doctor; D.Litt. ... California Graduate School of Theology is an unaccredited Christian institution of higher learning in La Habra, CA. It was founded in 1968 as an interdenominational graduate school and has been attended by over 5,000 students. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... Short name Statistics Location map Map of location of Seoul. ...


Associated organizations

Thomas Road Baptist Church

In 1956, at age 22, Falwell became the founding pastor of the Thomas Road Baptist Church of Lynchburg (TRBC). This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Liberty University

Main article: Liberty University

In 1971, Jerry Falwell founded Liberty University, a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...


Moral Majority

Main article: Moral Majority

In 1979, Falwell founded the Moral Majority, one of the largest political lobby groups for evangelical Christians in the United States. The group is credited with delivering two-thirds of the white, evangelical Christian vote to Ronald Reagan during the 1980 presidential election.[7] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The United States presidential election of 1980 featured a contest between incumbent Democrat Jimmy Carter and his Republican opponent, Ronald Reagan, along with third party candidates, the liberal Republican John B. Anderson and Libertarian Ed Clark. ...


Social and political views

Families

Falwell strongly advocated beliefs and practices he felt were taught by the Bible.[8] He believed in the quintessential patriarchal family in which, ideally, the father is the primary bread-winner and the wife takes care of the home and raises the children until they’re old enough to attend a Christian school. The entire family was expected to play an active role in their local church. Falwell's company "The Moral Majority" was founded on four basic tenets, 1) pro-family, 2) pro-life, 3) pro-defense and 4) pro-Israel.[9]


The church, Falwell asserted, was the cornerstone of a successful family. Not only was it a place for spiritual learning and guidance, but also a gathering place for fellowship and socializing with like-minded individuals. The dialogs started one-on-one after service among parishioners would often build into more focused speeches or organized goals Falwell could then present to a larger audience via his various media outlets.


Civil rights

During the appearance on MSNBC, Falwell said he was not troubled by reports that Supreme Court nominee John Roberts had done volunteer legal work for gay rights activists on the case of Romer v. Evans. Falwell told MSNBC's Tucker Carlson that if he were a lawyer, he too would argue for civil rights for gays. "I may not agree with the lifestyle, but that has nothing to do with the civil rights of that... part of our constituency," Falwell said. When Carlson countered that conservatives "are always arguing against 'special rights' for gays," Falwell said that equal access to housing and employment are basic rights, not special rights. "Civil rights for all Americans, black, white, red, yellow, the rich, poor, young, old, gay, straight, et cetera, is not a liberal or conservative value. It's an American value that I would think that we pretty much all agree on."[10] However, this apparent support for the civil rights of gays and lesbians is in sharp contrast to most of the statements Fallwell made throughout his lifetime that were harshly critical of gays and lesbians. [2] MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... This article is about the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Holding An amendment to the Colorado Constitution that allows discrimination against homosexuals and prevents the state from protecting them violated equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment, because it was not rationally related to a legitimate state interest, but instead was motivated by animus towards homosexuals. ... Tucker Swanson McNear Carlson (born May 16, 1969) is a conservative political news pundit who formerly co-hosted Crossfire and currently hosts >Tucker, a national television news show, which is broadcast weekdays at 6 p. ...


Falwell supported Anita Bryant's 1977 movement to overturn an ordinance in Dade County, Florida that prohibited discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and a similar movement in California.[2] Anita Jane Bryant (born March 25, 1940, in Barnsdall, Oklahoma) is an American singer. ... Miami-Dade County (formerly known as Dade County and many times referred to as simply Miami) is a county located in the southeastern part of the state of Florida. ... This box:      Most broadly, discrimination is the discernment of qualities and rejection of subjects with undesirable qualities. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ...


Falwell grew up in a strongly segregationist setting and supported racial segregation. In 1965, he gave a sermon at his Thomas Road Baptist Church criticizing Martin Luther King and the Civil rights movement, which he sometimes referred to as the "Civil Wrongs Movement". On his Evangelist program The Old-Time Gospel Hour in the mid 1960s, he regularly featured segregationist politicians like Lester Maddox and George Wallace.[11] Falwell's views eventually shifted and he opposed segregation in his later years.[12] The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... Historically, various popular movements struggling for social justice and democratic rights since the Second World War were known as civil rights movement, most famously the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, which struggled for equal rights for African-Americans. ... The Old Time Gospel Hour is a ministry program broadcasted from Thomas Road Baptist Church. ... Segregation means separation. ... Lester Garfield Maddox Lester Garfield Maddox (September 30, 1915 – June 25, 2003) was an American Democratic Party politician who was governor of the U.S. state of Georgia from 1967 to 1971. ... George Corley Wallace, Jr. ...


He said this about Martin Luther King: "I do question the sincerity and non-violent intentions of some civil rights leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Mr. James Farmer, and others, who are known to have left wing associations."[13] Martin Luther King redirects here. ... James L. Farmer, Jr. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word...


Israel

The Anti-Defamation League, and its leader Abraham Foxman, have expressed strong support for Falwell's staunch pro-Israel stand, sometimes referred to as "Christian Zionism," despite repeatedly condemning what they perceive as intolerance towards Muslims in Falwell's public statements.[14] The Anti-Defamation League (or ADL) is an advocacy group founded by Bnai Brith in the United States whose stated aim is to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience and, if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. ... Abraham Henry Foxman (born 1940) is the current National Director and chairman of the Anti-Defamation League of Bnai Brith. ... PRAISE GOD FOR ZIONISM AND THAT HIS WORD WILL BE FULLFILLED, WHETHER MOCKERS LIKE WIKI DENY IT OR NOT!!!! Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley...


Education

Falwell repeatedly denounced certain teachings in public schools and secular education in general, calling them breeding grounds for atheism, secularism, and humanism, which he claimed to be in contradiction with Christian morality. He advocated that the United States change its public education system by implementing a school voucher system which would allow parents to send their children to either public or private schools. Jerry Falwell wrote in America Can Be Saved that "I hope I live to see the day when, as in the early days of our country, we won't have any public schools. The churches will have taken them over again and Christians will be running them."[15] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Secular education is a term that refers to the system of public education in countries with a secular or separation between religion and state. ... “Atheist” redirects here. ... This article is about secularism. ... See also the specific life stance known as Humanism For the Renaissance liberal arts movement, see Renaissance humanism Humanism is a broad category of ethical philosophies that affirm the dignity and worth of all people, based on the ability to determine right and wrong by appeal to universal human qualities... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behaviour) has three principal meanings. ... A school voucher, also called an education voucher, is a certificate by which parents are given the ability to pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school (UK state school) to which they were assigned. ...


Falwell supported President George W. Bush's Faith Based Initiative, but had strong reservations concerning where the funding would go and the restrictions placed on churches. "My problem is where it might go under his successors... I would not want to put any of the Jerry Falwell Ministries in a position where we might be subservient to a future Bill Clinton, God forbid... It also concerns me that once the pork barrel is filled, suddenly the Church of Scientology, the Jehovah Witnesses [sic], the various and many denominations and religious groups — and I don’t say those words in a pejorative way — begin applying for money — and I don’t see how any can be turned down because of their radical and unpopular views. I don’t know where that would take us."[16] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives (OFBCI) is a department under the Office of the President of the United States that was established by President George W. Bush through Executive Order on January 29, 2001, and which represents one of the key domestic policies of Bush... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... A pork barrel, literally, is a barrel in which pork is kept. ... Scientology cross Symbol Doctrine Practices Concepts People Public outreach Organization Controversy The Church of Scientology is the largest religious organization devoted to the practice and the promotion of the Scientology belief system. ...


Apartheid

In the 1980s Jerry Falwell was critical of sanctions against the apartheid regime of South Africa. He stated that while he was opposed to apartheid, he feared that sanctions would result in a worse situation, with either a more oppressive white minority government or a Soviet-backed revolution. He drew the ire of many when he called Nobel Peace Prize winner and Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu a phony "as far as representing the black people of South Africa."[17] He later apologized for that remark and claimed that he had misspoken.[18] He also urged his followers to buy up gold Krugerrands and push U.S. "reinvestment" in South Africa.[19] A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Soviet redirects here. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ...


Controversies

Election fund improprieties

In 1987, the Federal Election Commission fined Falwell US $6,000 for illegally transferring US$6.7 million in funds intended for his religious ministry to his political action committees.[citation needed] The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency created in 1975 by the United States Congress to administer and enforce campaign finance legislation in the United States. ...


The Clinton Chronicles

Main article: Clinton Chronicles

In 1994, Falwell promoted and distributed the straight-to-video documentary The Clinton Chronicles: An Investigation into the Alleged Criminal Activities of Bill Clinton. The video connected Clinton to a theoretical conspiracy involving Vincent Foster, James McDougall, Ron Brown, and an alleged cocaine-smuggling operation. Despite the theory having been discredited by all major investigations, the video's sophisticated production techniques served as effective exposure, and it sold over 150,000 copies.[20] VHS copy of The Clinton Chronicles. ... VHS copy of The Clinton Chronicles. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Vincent Walker Foster, Jr. ... James B. (Jim) McDougal (August 25, 1940 – March 8, 1998), a native of White County, Arkansas, and his wife, Susan McDougal (the former Susan Carol Hendley), were financial partners with Bill Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton in the real estate venture that led to the Whitewater political scandal of the... Ronald Harmon Brown (August 1, 1941 – April 3, 1996), was the United States Secretary of Commerce, serving during the first term of President Bill Clinton. ... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Funding for the film was provided by "Citizens for Honest Government," to which Jerry Falwell paid $200,000 in 1994 and 1995.[20] In 1995 Citizens for Honest Government interviewed two Arkansas state troopers regarding the conspiracy about Vincent Foster. These two troopers Roger Perry and Larry Patterson also gave information regarding the allegations in the Paula Jones (See: Troopergate) claims.[20] In March 2005, trooper Patterson was convicted of lying to the FBI about an unrelated incident.[21] Roger Perry (born May 7, 1933 in Davenport, Iowa) is an American film and television actor whose career began in the late 1950s. ... Larry Patterson is a former Arkansas State Trooper connected to Bill Clinton, who served as the Governor of Arkansas and later, President of the United States. ... Paula Corbin Jones (born Paula Rosalee Corbin on September 17, 1966, in Lonoke, Arkansas) is a former Arkansas state employee who sued President Bill Clinton for sexual harassment and eschewal. ... Troopergate is the popular name of a scandal involving allegations by two Arkansas state troopers that they arranged sexual liaisons for then-governor Bill Clinton. ... This statute generally prohibits lying to or concealing information from a federal official. ...


Falwell's infomercial for the 80-minute tape included footage of Falwell interviewing a silhouetted journalist who claimed to be afraid for his life. The journalist accused Clinton of orchestrating the deaths of several reporters and personal confidants who had gotten too close to his illegalities. It was subsequently revealed, however, that the silhouetted journalist was, in fact, Patrick Matrisciana, the producer of the video and president of Citizens for Honest Government.[20] "Obviously, I'm not an investigative reporter," Matrisciana admitted [to investigative journalist Murray Waas [20] Later, Falwell seemed to back away from personally trusting the video. In an interview for the 2005 documentary The Hunting of the President, Falwell admitted, "to this day I do not know the accuracy of the claims made in The Clinton Chronicles."[22] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Murray S. Waas (born circa 1968) is an American freelance investigative journalist noted most recently for his coverage of the White House planning for the 2003 invasion of Iraq and ensuing controversies such as the CIA leak investigation. ... The movie is about Bill Clinton and the attempt by the Arkansas Project to destroy his presidency. ...


Homosexuality

In 1977 he supported Anita Bryant's "Save Our Children" campaign based on "Christian beliefs regarding the sinfulness of homosexuality and the perceived threat of homosexual recruitment of children and child molestation" in Dade County, Fla., in order to repeal an ordinance that prohibited discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. In urging the repeal of the ordinance, Falwell told one crowd, "Gay folks would just as soon kill you as look at you."[23] Anita Jane Bryant (born March 25, 1940, in Barnsdall, Oklahoma) is an American singer. ... Homosexual recruitment is a term used for the idea that homosexuals (usually gay men) actively target impressionable individuals (usually youth) for homosexual indoctrination to persuade them towards homosexual self-identification, or alternatively, that there is a widespread conspiracy to subvert appropriate values by promoting homosexuality as a valid normal sexual...


Falwell has been called an agent of intolerance[24] and the founder of the anti-gay industry[25] who regularly demonized and dehumanized gays and fought against gay rights. In the early 1980s when the AIDS pandemic was still in its early years and could have been addressed more proactively as a national health crisis he swayed public opinion against people with AIDS (PWAs) saying “AIDS is not just God's punishment for homosexuals, it is God's punishment for the society that tolerates homosexuals.”[26] The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


On Falwell's "Old Time Gospel Hour" broadcast (March 11, 1984), when the mostly gay Metropolitan Community Church was almost accepted into the World Council of Churches, Falwell called them "brute beasts" and stated, "this vile and satanic system will one day be utterly annihilated and there'll be a celebration in heaven."[27] Logo of the Metropolitan Community Churches The Metropolitan Community Church (in full, The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches or UFMCC, or more commonly MCC) is an international fellowship of Christian congregations. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ...


Falwell's ghostwriter, Mel White, said Falwell remarked about gay protesters, "Thank God for these gay demonstrators. If I didn't have them, I'd have to invent them. They give me all the publicity I need."[28] For other uses, see Ghostwriter (disambiguation). ... James Melville White (born 1940) is a gay American clergyman and author. ...


Teletubbies

In February 1999 an unattributed National Liberty Journal article[29] claimed that Tinky Winky, a Teletubby, was intended as a gay role model. (NLJ was not the first source to make this association; a 1998 Salon.com article had previously noted Tinky Winky's status as a gay icon.[30]) The immensely popular UK show was aimed at pre-school children, but the article stated "he is purple - the gay pride color; and his antenna is shaped like a triangle - the gay-pride symbol." Apart from those characteristics Tinky Winky also carries a magic bag which the NLJ article said was a purse. Falwell added "role modelling the gay lifestyle is damaging to the moral lives of children." In response, Steve Rice, spokesperson for Itsy Bitsy Entertainment, which licenses the Teletubbies in the US, said, "I really find it absurd and kind of offensive."[31][32] Teletubbies is a BBC childrens television series, particularly aimed at young children, produced from 1997 to 2001 by Ragdoll Productions. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... Salon. ... This article is about the color. ... Gay pride or LGBT pride refers to a world wide movement and philosophy asserting that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals should be proud of their sexual orientation and gender identity. ... A triangle. ...


September 11th attacks

After the September 11, 2001 attacks, Falwell said on the 700 Club, "I really believe that the pagans, and the abortionists, and the feminists, and the gays and the lesbians who are actively trying to make that an alternative lifestyle, the ACLU, People For the American Way, all of them who have tried to secularize America. I point the finger in their face and say 'you helped this happen.'" Fellow evangelist Pat Robertson concurred with his sentiment. After heavy criticism, Falwell apologized,[33], though he later said that he stood by his statement, stating "If we decide to change all the rules on which this Judeo-Christian nation was built, we cannot expect the Lord to put his shield of protection around us as he has in the past."[34] A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... The 700 Club is the flagship news talk show of the Christian Broadcasting Network, airing on cables ABC Family and in syndication throughout the United States and Canada. ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... An abortion is the removal or expulsion of an embryo or fetus from the uterus, resulting in or caused by its death. ... Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... People For the American Way (PFAW) is a liberal, self described progressive advocacy organization in the United States. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... Jacob wrestling an angel, by Gustave Doré (1832-1883), a shared Judeo-Christian story. ...


Labor unions

Falwell has also said, "Labor unions should study and read the Bible instead of asking for more money. When people get right with God, they are better workers."[35] A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers...


Legal issues

SEC and bonds

In 1972 , the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) launched an investigation of bonds issued by Falwell's organizations. The SEC charged Falwell's church with "fraud and deceit" in the issuance of $6.5 million in unsecured church bonds.[36] The church won a 1973 federal court case prosecuted at the behest of the SEC, in which the Court exonerated the church and ruled that there had been no intentional wrong-doing. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... Look up bond in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the telling of falsehoods. ...


According to Falwell, the survival of the University could be attributed to the work of Daniel Reber and Jimmy Thomas, as leaders of the non-profit Christian Heritage Foundation in Forest, Virginia. Forest is a census-designated place located in Bedford County, Virginia. ...


Falwell versus Penthouse

Falwell filed a $10 million lawsuit against Penthouse Magazine for publishing an article based upon interviews he gave to freelance reporters, after failing to convince a federal court to place an injunction upon the publication of that article. The suit was dismissed in Federal district court on the grounds that the article was not defamatory or an invasion of Falwell's privacy; Falwell ultimately dropped the suit.[37][38][39] Jesse Capelli on Penthouse magazine cover Penthouse is a mens magazine founded by Bob Guccione, combining urban lifestyle articles and soft-core pornographic pictorials, that eventually, in the 1990s evolved into hard-core. ... A freelancer or freelance worker is a person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any one employer. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Privacy has no definite boundaries and it has different meanings for different people. ...

Hustler's parody ad of Falwell
Hustler's parody ad of Falwell

Image File history File links Falwellhustler. ... Image File history File links Falwellhustler. ...

Falwell versus Hustler

In November 1983, Larry Flynt's pornographic magazine Hustler carried a parody advertisement of a Campari ad, featuring a fake interview with Falwell in which he admits that his "first time" was incest with his mother in an outhouse while drunk. Falwell sued for $45 million in compensation alleging invasion of privacy, libel, and intentional infliction of emotional distress.[40] A jury rejected the invasion of privacy and libel claims, holding that the parody could not have reasonably been taken to describe true events, but ruled in favor of Falwell on the emotional distress claim. This was upheld on appeal. Flynt then appealed to the Supreme Court, winning a unanimous decision on February 24, 1988. The ruling held that public figures cannot circumvent First Amendment protections by attempting to recover damages based on emotional distress suffered from parodies. The decision in favor of Flynt strengthened free speech rights in the United States in relation to parodies of public figures. Holding The creators of parodies of public figures are protected against civil liability by the First Amendment, unless the parody includes false statements of fact made in knowing or reckless disregard of the truth. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Porn redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hustler (disambiguation). ... A parody advertisement is a fictional advertisement for a non-existent product, either done within another advertisement for an actual product, or done simply as parody of advertisements -- used either as a way of ridiculing or drawing negative attention towards a real advertisement or such an advertisements subject, or... A bottle of Campari Campari is an alcoholic aperitif obtained from the infusion of bitter herbs, aromatic plants and fruit in alcohol and water. ... Incest is sexual activity between two persons related by close kinship. ... Outhouse near Crabapple Lake, United States, with wafer board walls, and a fiberglass ceiling An outhouse, (also known as a privy, kybo, jakes or earth-closet) usually refers to a type of toilet in a small structure separate from the main building which does not have a flush or sewer... Drunkenness, in its most common usage, is the state of being intoxicated with alcohol (i. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Emotional distress may refer to: Law of torts: Intentional infliction of emotional distress Negligent infliction of emotional distress Medicine: Stress (medicine) see also List of emotions Category: ... For jury meaning makeshift, see jury rig. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Public figure is a legal term applied in the context of defamation actions (libel and slander). ... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ...


After the death of Falwell, Larry Flynt released a comment regarding his friendship over the years with Falwell.

"My mother always told me that no matter how much you dislike a person, when you meet them face to face you will find characteristics about them that you like. Jerry Falwell was a perfect example of that. I hated everything he stood for, but after meeting him in person, years after the trial, Jerry Falwell and I became good friends. He would visit me in California and we would debate together on college campuses. I always appreciated his sincerity even though I knew what he was selling and he knew what I was selling." - Larry Flynt [41]

Sloan versus Falwell and The Old-Time Gospel

In 1984, Falwell was ordered to pay gay activist and former Baptist Bible College classmate Jerry Sloan $5,000 after losing a court battle.


In July, 1984 during a TV debate in Sacramento, California, Falwell denied calling the mostly gay Metropolitan Community Churches "brute beasts" and "a vile and Satanic system" that will "one day be utterly annihilated and there will be a celebration in heaven." When Sloan insisted he had a tape, Falwell promised $5,000 if he could produce it. Sloan did, Falwell refused to pay, and Sloan successfully sued. The money was donated to build Sacramento's first gay community center, the Lambda Community Center, serving "Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex" communities.[42] Sacramento redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Logo of the Metropolitan Community Churches The Metropolitan Community Church (in full, The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches or UFMCC, or more commonly MCC) is an international fellowship of Christian congregations. ... Satanism can refer to a number of belief systems depending on the user and contexts. ... Sacramento is a Spanish- and Portuguese-language word meaning sacrament; it is a common toponym in parts of the world where those tongues were or are spoken. ...


Falwell appealed the decision with his attorney charging that the judge in the case was prejudiced. He lost again and was made to pay an additional $2,875 in sanctions and court fees. In law, an appeal is a process for making a formal challenge to an official decision. ...


Falwell versus Christopher Lamparello

On April 17, 2006, the US Supreme Court refused to grant review of a lower court ruling that Christopher Lamparello's usage of the Internet domain Fallwell.com (note: the extra "L") was legal. The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit had held that Lamparello "clearly created his Web site intending only to provide a forum to criticize ideas, not to steal customers".[43] Lamparello's website describes itself as not being connected to Jerry Falwell and is critical of Falwell's views on homosexuals.[43] Previous to this, "Falwell's attorneys have fought over domain names in the past" with a man turning over jerryfalwell.com and jerryfallwell.com "after Falwell threatened to sue for trademark infringement."[43] Lawyers for Public Citizen Litigation Group's Internet Free Speech project represented the domain name owners in both cases. is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit is a federal court located in Richmond, Virginia with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts: District of Maryland Eastern District of North Carolina Middle District of North Carolina Western District of North Carolina District of South... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Trademark infringement is a violation of the exclusive rights attaching to a registered trademark without the authorisation of the trademark owner or any licensees (provided that such authorization was within the scope of the license). ... Public Citizen Litigation Group is the litigating arm of the non-profit consumer advocacy organization Public Citizen. ...


Apocalyptic beliefs

On July 31, 2006, Cable News Network's (CNN) Paula Zahn Now program featured a segment on "whether the crisis in the Middle East is actually a prelude to the end of the world," "marking the third time in eight days that CNN ha[d] devoted airtime to those claiming that the ongoing Mideast violence signal[ed] the coming of the Apocalypse."[44] Falwell was interviewed claiming, "I believe in the premillennial, pre-tribulational coming of Christ for all of his church, and to summarize that, your first poll, do you believe Jesus coming the second time will be in the future, I would vote yes with the 59 percent and with Billy Graham and most evangelicals." is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... Paula Zahn, during the December 6, 2004 broadcast of Paula Zahn Now. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Look up Apocalypse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Reverend William Franklin Graham, Jr. ...


In 1999, Falwell declared the Antichrist would probably arrive within a decade and "Of course he'll be Jewish."[45] After anti-Semitism charges Falwell apologized and explained that he was simply expressing the theological tenet that the Antichrist and Christ share many attributes.[46][47] For the Friedrich Nietzsche book, see The Antichrist. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


Failing health and death

In early 2005, Falwell was hospitalized for two weeks with a viral infection, discharged, and then rehospitalized on May 30, 2005, in respiratory arrest.[48][49] President George W. Bush contacted Falwell to "wish him well."[49] He was subsequently released from the hospital and returned to his duties. Later in 2005, a stent was implanted to treat a 70% blockage in his coronary arteries.[50] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Infection is also the title of an episode of the television series Babylon 5; see Infection (Babylon 5). ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Respiratory arrest is the cessation of the normal tidal flow of the lungs due to paralysis of the diaphragm, collapse of the lung or any number of respiratory failures. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Endoscopic image of self-expanding metallic stent in esophagus, which was used to palliatively treat esophageal cancer. ... The coronary circulation consists of the blood vessels that supply blood to, and remove blood from, the heart. ...


On May 15, 2007, CNN and USA Today[51] reported Falwell had been found without pulse and unconscious in his office about 10:45 am after missing a morning appointment and was taken to Lynchburg General Hospital. is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


"I had breakfast with him, and he was fine at breakfast… He went to his office, I went to mine and they found him unresponsive." said Godwin, the executive vice president of Falwell's Liberty University.[52]


His condition was initially reported as "gravely serious"; CPR was administered unsuccessfully.[52][53] As of 2:10 pm, during a live press conference, a doctor for the hospital confirmed that Falwell had died[54] of "cardiac arrhythmia, or sudden cardiac death." A statement issued by the hospital reported he was pronounced dead at Lynchburg General Hospital at 12:40 pm, EST.[55] Falwell’s family, including his wife Macel and sons Jerry Falwell, Jr. and Jonathan Falwell, were with him at the hospital.[56] For other meanings of CPR, see CPR (disambiguation). ... Cardiac arrhythmia is any of a group of conditions in which the electrical activity of the heart is irregular or is faster or slower than normal. ... A cardiac arrest is the cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the ventricles of the heart to contract effectively during systole. ... Jerry Falwell, Jr, the son of Reverend Jerry Falwell, Sr, is the chancellor of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. ...


Falwell's funeral took place at 1:00 PM EDT on May 22, 2007 at Thomas Road Baptist Church after lying in repose at both the church and Liberty University.[57] Falwell's burial service was private. It took place at a spot on the Liberty University campus near the Carter Glass Mansion, near his office.[58] Buried nearby is the late B. R. Lakin.[59] is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... Bascom Ray Lakin (January 5, 1901- March 15, 1984) was a Baptist preacher and evangelist. ...


After his death, his two sons succeeded him at his two posts; Jerry Falwell, Jr. took over as Chancellor of Liberty University while Jonathan Falwell became the Senior Pastor of the Thomas Road Baptist Church. Jerry Falwell, Jr, the son of Reverend Jerry Falwell, Sr, is the chancellor of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Jonathan Falwell is the Senior Pastor at the Thomas Road Baptist Church. ...


The last televised interview with Jerry Falwell was conducted by Christiane Amanpour for the CNN original series CNN Presents: God's Warriors.[60]He had been interviewed on May 8th, one week before his death. Christiane Amanpour, CBE (born January 12, 1958) (in Persian: ) is the chief international correspondent for CNN. // Shortly after her birth in London, her British mother Patricia, and her father Mohammed, an Iranian airline executive, moved the family to Tehran. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


Publications

  • Achieving Your Dreams. Thomas Nelson (January 30, 2006) ISBN 0529122464
  • Building Churches of Dynamic Faith: A Five-Session Study Guide. Thomas Nelson (October 17, 2005) ISBN 0529121336
  • Capturing a Town for Christ. Fleming Revell, 1969.
  • Champions for God. Victor Books, 1985.
  • Church Aflame. (co-author Elmer Towns) Impact, 1971.
  • Dynamic Faith Journal. Thomas Nelson (64 pages) (January 30, 2006) ISBN 0529122456
  • Falwell: An Autobiography. Liberty House, 1996. (Ghost written by Mel White [61]) ISBN 1888684046
  • Fasting Can Change Your Life. Regal, 1998.
  • Finding Inner Peace and Strength. Doubleday, 1982.
  • If I Should Die Before I Wake. Thomas Nelson, 1986. (ghost-written by Mel White)
  • Liberty Bible Commentary on the New Testament. Thomas Nelson/Liberty University, 1978.
  • Liberty Bible Commentary. Thomas Nelson, 1982.
  • Listen, America! Bantam Books (July 1981) ISBN 0553149989
  • Stepping Out on Faith. Tyndale House, 1984.
  • Strength for the Journey. Simon & Schuster, 1987. (ghost-written by Mel White)
  • The Fundamentalist Phenomenon. Doubleday, 1981.
  • The Fundamentalist Phenomenon/the Resurgence of Conservative Christianity. Baker Book House, 1986.
  • The New American Family. Word, 1992.
  • When it Hurts Too Much to Cry. Tyndale House, 1984. ISBN 0842379932
  • Wisdom for Living. Victor Books, 1984.

Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... This article is about a ghostwriter, the type of writer. ... James Melville White (born 1940) is a gay American clergyman and author. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... James Melville White (born 1940) is a gay American clergyman and author. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... James Melville White (born 1940) is a gay American clergyman and author. ... Baker Book House is a Christian book publisher based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... A series of scandals resulted in the destruction of the reputations of several famous Christian evangelists. ... VHS copy of The Clinton Chronicles. ... Heritage USA is the now defunct 2,300 acre (9 km²) Christian theme park/water park/residential complex built in Fort Mill, South Carolina, USA, by PTL Club founders televangelist Jim Bakker and Tammy Faye Bakker. ... Jerry Falwell, Jr, the son of Reverend Jerry Falwell, Sr, is the chancellor of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... Jonathan Falwell is the Senior Pastor at the Thomas Road Baptist Church. ... Liberty University is a Christian liberal arts university in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jim Bakker (born January 2, 1939 in Muskegon, Michigan) is an American televangelist, Assemblies of God preacher, and evangelist beset by scandal, and the former host of The PTL Club (PTL being an acronym for Praise the Lord and People That Love) with his then-wife Tammy Faye Bakker. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Jerry Falwell Told Followers He Was at Peace With Death. Associated Press via Fox News (16 May 2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-25.
  2. ^ a b c d Peter Applebome, Jerry Falwell, Leading Religious Conservative, Dies at 73, The New York Times, May 15, 2007.
  3. ^ Televangelist, Christian Leader Falwell Dies, by www.NPR.org, retrieved May 15, 2007
  4. ^ a b Jerry Falwell's Official Biography July 1, 2006; Falwell left Lynchburg College, which was accredited at the time for Baptist Bible College in Springfield, Missouri which was then non-accredited. Baptist Bible College became accredited in 2001.
  5. ^ http://www.ncahlc.org/index.php?option=com_directory&Action=ShowBasic&instid=2797
  6. ^ Meet Jerry Falwell
  7. ^ "When worlds collide: politics, religion, and media at the 1970 East Tennessee Billy Graham Crusade. (appearance by President Richard M. Nixon)", Journal of Church and State, March 22, 1997. Retrieved on 2007-08-18. 
  8. ^ The Fundamentalist Phenomenon et al, Baker Publishing Group, 1986)
  9. ^ Falwell.com
  10. ^ Eartha Jane Melzer, Falwell hints support for some gay rights, The Washington Blade, August 26, 2005.
  11. ^ http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=522
  12. ^ http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2006/01/09/justice_sunday/index_np.html
  13. ^ Washington, James M. (1990). A Testament of Hope: the essential writings of Martin Luther King. San Francisco: Harper Collins. ISBN 0060646918. 
  14. ^ http://www.adl.org/PresRele/DiRaB_41/4168_41.htm
  15. ^ http://atheism.about.com/library/glossary/western/bldef_falwelljerry.htm
  16. ^ http://www.beliefnet.com/story/70/story_7040_1.html
  17. ^ http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,959695,00.html
  18. ^ FALWELL DENOUNCES TUTU AS A 'PHONY'
  19. ^ OSTLING, RICHARD N.. "Jerry Falwell's Crusade", Time Magazine, 1985-9-2. Retrieved on 2007-05-17. 
  20. ^ a b c d e The Falwell connection by Murray Waas Salon.com
  21. ^ Satter, Linda. "Ex-trooper sentenced for lying to FBI agent 3 years’ probation, fine ordered in Quitman case", Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, March 12, 2005. 
  22. ^ The Hunting of the President (DVD) 2005
  23. ^ Johnson, Hans and Eskridge, William. The Legacy of Falwell's Bully Pulpit. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  24. ^ Agent of Intolerance. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  25. ^ Anti-gay evangelist dies at 73. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  26. ^ Press: The Sad Legacy of Jerry Falwell. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  27. ^ Burns, Katy. Jerry Falwell's greatest hates. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  28. ^ Steve Inskeep. Religion, Politics a Potent Mix for Jerry Falwell NPR June 30, 2006
  29. ^ PARENTS ALERT . . . PARENTS ALERT. Retrieved on 2007-05-30.
  30. ^ 'Tubbythumping '. Retrieved on 2007-05-30. | last=Millman | first=Joyce
  31. ^ 'Gay Tinky Winky bad for children'. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  32. ^ Burke, Heather. Jerry Falwell, Evangelist, Political Activist, Dies. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  33. ^ http://archives.cnn.com/2001/US/09/14/Falwell.apology/
  34. ^ http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/index.jsp?stid=1&aid=69715
  35. ^ http://www.wisaflcio.org/political_action/rightwing.htm
  36. ^ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5522064
  37. ^ "Falwell Says He Will Press $10 Million Penthouse Suit." The New York Times, 5 February 1981.
  38. ^ "Penthouse Wins in Court Against Falwell Suit." The New York Times, 7 August 1981.
  39. ^ "Falwell Won't Pursue Suit." The New York Times, 10 September 1981.
  40. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0283658/bio
  41. ^ http://www.accesshollywood.com/news/ah5356.shtml
  42. ^ about Lambda Community Fund. Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  43. ^ a b c Supreme Court declines Falwell Web appeal Associated Press. April 17, 2006
  44. ^ CNN still fixated on Apocalypse predictors. Media matters for America. Aug 1, 2006
  45. ^ Cohen, Debra Nussbaum. Falwell Antichrist remark sparks anti-Semitism charges. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  46. ^ Kampeas, Ron. Falwell Left Jews With Mixed Feelings. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  47. ^ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6160167
  48. ^ http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D8P4UVFO1&show_article=1
  49. ^ a b Falwell is taken off ventilator, upgraded to stable condition USA Today May 30, 2005
  50. ^ Rev. Jerry Falwell Dies - breitbart.com
  51. ^ Evangelist Jerry Falwell dies at 73. USA Today/Associated Press (2007-05-15). Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  52. ^ a b Falwell dies at age 73.
  53. ^ http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070515/ap_on_re_us/jerry_falwell
  54. ^ Rev Jerry Falwell Has Died: Rev Dead After Being Found Unconscious. PostChronicle.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-10.
  55. ^ http://www.centrahealth.com/news/pressrelease78.aspx
  56. ^ http://www.liberty.edu/administration/index.cfm?PID=14092
  57. ^ Falwell funeral arrangements (Liberty University)
  58. ^ Thousands Line Up To Attend Jerry Falwell's Funeral
  59. ^ [1]
  60. ^ [http://www.hvc-inc.com/clients/cnn/warriors/for.html#pr CNN Press Release
  61. ^ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5522064

May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Lynchburg College is a private college in Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) with approximately 2,400 undergraduate and graduate students. ... Accreditation is a type of quality assurance process under which a facilitys or institutions services and operations are examined by a third-party accrediting agency to determine if applicable standards are met. ... Baptist Bible College is an Independent Baptist school, located in Springfield, Missouri. ... Hammons Tower in downtown Springfield Springfield is the third largest city in Missouri. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Murray S. Waas (born circa 1968) is an American freelance investigative journalist noted most recently for his coverage of the White House planning for the 2003 invasion of Iraq and ensuing controversies such as the CIA leak investigation. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The movie is about Bill Clinton and the attempt by the Arkansas Project to destroy his presidency. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenshot from Media Matters for America (Jan 6, 2006) Media Matters for America (or MMfA) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 2004 by journalist and author David Brock. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Persondata
NAME Falwell, Jerry Laymon, Sr.
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Protestant Christian Evangelist
DATE OF BIRTH August 11, 1933
PLACE OF BIRTH Lynchburg, Virginia, United States
DATE OF DEATH May 15, 2007
PLACE OF DEATH Lynchburg, Virginia, United States

  Results from FactBites:
 
NPR : Religion, Politics a Potent Mix for Jerry Falwell (1502 words)
The Rev. Jerry Falwell speaks at a rally in Philadelphia on Jan. 8, 2006, before the start of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito.
Falwell says he purchased this Bible "the day after I became a Christian in 1952" and used it while training to be a pastor at Baptist Bible College in Springfield, Mo.
Falwell was criticized for those remarks, and for calling the United States a Christian nation, and for saying the devil is Jewish.
Falwell’s Folly by Laurence M. Vance (1506 words)
Falwell’s first distortion is the inappropriate use of that portion of Scripture that prefaces his article: "To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: A time to be born.
Falwell’s second distortion is the title of his article itself: "God is pro-war." To say that because God permitted wars to take place, and even commanded the nation of Israel in the Old Testament to conduct them, that he is "pro-war" is ludicrous.
Falwell’s shameless pseudo-patriotism is a violation of the third commandment in the Bible he professes to believe: "Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain" (Exodus 20:7).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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