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Encyclopedia > Jerome Kern

Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885November 11, 1945) was an American composer of popular music. He wrote around 700 songs, including such classics as Ol' Man River, A Fine Romance, Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, and The Way You Look Tonight and more than 100 complete scores for shows and films, including Show Boat, in a career lasting from 1902 until his death. is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Ol Man River (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II) is a song in the 1927 musical Show Boat that tells the story of African American hardship and struggles of the time. ... A Fine Romance was a British sitcom starring husband-and-wife team Judi Dench and Michael Williams. ... Smoke Gets In Your Eyes is a song written by American composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for their 1933 Broadway musical Roberta. ... The Way You Look Tonight is a song featured in the film Swing Time, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ...


Biography

Jerome Kern was born in New York City. His parents, Fanny and Henry Kern, were both German Jews. They named him Jerome because they lived near Jerome Park, a favorite place of theirs. (Jerome Park was named after Leonard Jerome, who was the father of Jennie Jerome, mother of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.) Fanny encouraged her son to take piano lessons. Henry was a merchandiser and sold pianos among other items. Although Henry wanted his son to go into business with him, Jerome insisted on staying with music. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... ... Leonard Walter Jerome, born November 3, 1817 in Pompey, New York, United States – died March 3, 1891 at Brighton, England , was a Brooklyn, New York entrepreneur and grandfather of Sir Winston Churchill. ... Jennie Jerome in 1874 Jeanette (Jennie) Jerome [1] CI DStJ, known also as Lady Randolph Churchill (January 9, 1854 – June 9, 1921) was an American society beauty, best known to history as the mother of British prime minister Winston Churchill. ... Churchill redirects here. ...


Kern grew up on East 56th Street in Midtown Manhattan, where he attended public schools. He studied at the New York College of Music and then briefly in 1904, in Heidelberg, Germany. From 1905, Kern spent a lot of time in London, and he married in Walton-on-Thames in 1910. In New York, he started working as a rehearsal pianist, initially contributing numbers for interpolation into other composers' scores, and by 1915 he was represented in many Broadway shows. On May 1 of that year, he was meant to accompany Charles Frohman to London on board the RMS Lusitania, but overslept after being kept up late playing requests at a party. View of Midtown from Empire State Building. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Heidelberg (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Walton-On-Thames is a town in the Elmbridge borough of Surrey in South East England. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Charles Frohman (1860 - 1915) was a U.S. theatre manager. ... RMS Lusitania was a British luxury ocean liner owned by the Cunard Steamship Line Shipping Company and built by John Brown and Company of Clydebank, Scotland. ...


Kern's biggest hit at that time was the song "They Didn't Believe Me", with lyric by Edward Laska. It was interpolated into the show The Girl from Utah.


In 1920, he wrote the entire score for the musical Sally. Otto Harbach wrote the script and lyrics. From this popular show came the song "Look for the Silver Lining", performed by the rising Broadway star Marilyn Miller. Sally is a theater musical with music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Clifford Grey and book by Guy Bolton with additional lyrics by Buddy DeSylva and P. G. Wodehouse. ... Marilyn Miller Marilyn Miller (born Mary Ellen Reynolds) (September 1, 1898 – April 7, 1936) was one of the most popular Broadway musical stars of the 1920s and early 1930s. ...


1925 was a major turning point in Kern's career when he met Oscar Hammerstein II with whom he would entertain a lifelong friendship and collaboration. Their first show (written together with Harbach) was Sunny, which featured the song "Who (Stole My Heart Away)?". The by-now renowned Marilyn Miller played the title role in Sunny, as she had in Sally. Kern and Hammerstein next wrote the famous Show Boat in 1927, which includes the well-known songs "Ol' Man River" and "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man." Based on the book of the same name by Edna Ferber, "Show Boat" deviated from the usual musical revue of that era and featured an unusually dramatic plot highlighting racism and miscegenation, a taboo subject in musicals then. (A 1946 revival would also try to integrate choreography into the show, in the manner of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, as would the 1993 Harold Prince revival.) Several of the songs from "Show Boat" were arranged by Charles Miller into the orchestral work Scenario for Orchestra: Themes from Show Boat in 1941. This was premiered and first recorded by the Cleveland Orchestra conducted by Artur Rodziński, the first instance that such an honor had been paid to music from a Broadway show. For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Sunny is a 1925 musical play written by Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II, and Otto Harbach. ... Marilyn Miller Marilyn Miller (born Mary Ellen Reynolds) (September 1, 1898 – April 7, 1936) was one of the most popular Broadway musical stars of the 1920s and early 1930s. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ... Ol Man River (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II) is a song in the 1927 musical Show Boat that tells the story of African American hardship and struggles of the time. ... Cant Help Lovin Dat Man, music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, is one of the most famous songs from their classic 1927 musical play Show Boat, adapted from Edna Ferbers novel. ... Edna Ferber (August 15, 1885 - April 16, 1968), was an American novelist, author and playwright. ... Frederick Douglass with his second wife Helen Pitts Douglass (sitting) who was white, a famous 19th century American example of miscegenation. ... This article is about the American composer. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a theatre producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical (and less notably, dramatic) productions of the past half-century. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Artur RodziÅ„ski (January 1, 1892 - November 27, 1958) was a Polish conductor. ...


Show Boat remains Kern's most often revived work. In his album notes for the 3-CD 1988 recording of the show, musical theatre historian Miles Kreuger hailed Show Boat as the greatest single step forward in American musical theatre, enabling composers, lyricists and librettists to introduce more mature subject matter into their shows. The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ...


Music in the Air (1932) was another Kern-Hammerstein collaboration. This musical is remembered for "The Song Is You". Another tune from the show, "In Egern on the Tegern See," is parodied by the song "In Izzenschnooken on the Lovely Essenzook Zee" in Rick Besoyan's satirical 1959 musical Little Mary Sunshine. Little Mary Sunshine is an American musical in emulation of older operetta, with book, music, and lyrics by Rick Besoyan. ...


The musical Roberta (1933) by Kern and Harbach gave us "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" and featured, among others, Bob Hope, Fred MacMurray, George Murphy and Sydney Greenstreet all in the early stages of their careers. Roberta was a 1933 Broadway musical, with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Otto Harbach, which starred Tamara, Bob Hope, George Murphy, Lyda Roberti, Fred MacMurray, Fay Templeton, Raymond E. Middleton, and Sydney Greenstreet. ... Smoke Gets In Your Eyes is a song written by American composer Jerome Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach for their 1933 Broadway musical Roberta. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Fred MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an actor who appeared in over one hundred movies and a highly successful television series during a career that lasted from the 1930s to the 1970s. ... George Lloyd Murphy (July 4, 1902–May 3, 1992) was an American dancer, actor, and politician. ... Sydney Hughes Greenstreet (December 27, 1879 – January 18, 1954) was an English actor. ...


In 1930, Jerome Kern was placed under contract by Warner Bros. to produce a series of musicals. Jerome Kern worked on Men of the Sky which was released in 1931. Unfortunately, in 1931, the public was apathetic towards musicals and the film was virtually ignored. Consequently, the Warner Bros. bought out his contract and he returned to the stage. In 1935, when musical films had become popular once again, Kern moved to Hollywood and started working on music for films but continued working on Broadway productions, too. His last Broadway show was the rather unsuccessful Very Warm for May in 1939; the score included another Kern–Hammerstein classic, "All The Things You Are". In 1985, the centenary of his birth, a rediscovered recording of a radio production featuring the original cast received a Grammy Nomination as Best Cast Show Album. It was Kern's last Broadway show; he suffered a heart attack in 1939 and was told by his doctors to concentrate on film scores - a less stressful task since Hollywood songwriters were not as involved with the production of films as Broadway songwriters were with the production of stage musicals. Men of the Sky (1931) is an All-Talking musical drama film which was produced by Warner Bros. ... ... Very Warm for May opened at the Alvin Theatre on November 17, 1939 and was Jerome Kerns last score for Broadway before relocating to Hollywood and writing music for movies until his death in 1945. ... The Best Of The Columbia Years: 1943-1952 is a 1998 compilation album by the American singer Frank Sinatra. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...


Kern's Hollywood career was successful indeed. For Swing Time (starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire), he wrote "The Way You Look Tonight" (with lyrics by Dorothy Fields), which won the Academy Award in 1936 for the best song. Other songs in the film include "A Fine Romance", "Pick Yourself Up", and "Never Gonna Dance". In 1941, he and Hammerstein wrote "The Last Time I Saw Paris", in homage to the French city just recently occupied by the Germans. The song was used in the film Lady Be Good and won another Oscar for Best Song - the only time a song not written for the film it appears in won the Oscar. In 1944, Kern teamed up with Ira Gershwin to write the songs for one of his best-remembered film musicals, Cover Girl, starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly. It featured the classic song "Long Ago and Far Away". That same year he also wrote the music for songs in Universal Pictures' Deanna Durbin musical comedy, Can't Help Singing. This article is about the film. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... The Way You Look Tonight is a song featured in the film Swing Time, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1936. ... Dorothy Fields was immortalised on a USPS postage stamp. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... A Fine Romance is a popular song composed by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Dorothy Fields. ... Poster for The Last Time I Saw Paris The Last Time I Saw Paris is a 1954 romantic drama made by MGM, loosely based on F. Scott Fitzgerald s short story Babylon Revisited. ... Lady Be Good is the title of an MGM musical film which was released in 1941. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ... Cover Girl is a 1944 musical film starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly. ... Rita Hayworth (October 17, 1918 – May 14, 1987), was an American actress who reached fame during the 1940s as the eras leading sex symbol. ... For the similarly-named American actress, see Jean Kelly. ... Long Ago (and Far Away) is a popular song. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... Deanna Durbin (born Edna Mae Durbin on December 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to English immigrant parents) was a popular young singer and actress in Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Film Data Cant Help Singing is a film musical filmed in Technicolor. ...


Although Kern generally wrote for musical theatre, the harmonic richness of his compositions lend themselves well to the jazz idiom, which typically emphasizes improvisation based on a harmonic structure; many have been adopted by jazz musicians and have become standard tunes. The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Musical composition is a phrase used in a number of contexts, the most commonly used being a piece of music. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... A jazz musician is someone who plays or sings jazz music. ... Jazz standard refers to a tune that is widely known, performed, and recorded among jazz musicians. ...


Jerome Kern died of a stroke in 1945, at the age of 60 in his birthplace New York. He had been overseeing auditions for a new revival of Show Boat, and was due to compose the score for the musical Annie Get Your Gun (which task, following his death, was passed to Irving Berlin). At the time of Kern's death, MGM was filming a fictionalized version of his life, Till the Clouds Roll By, which was released in 1946 starring Robert Walker as Kern. For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Annie Get Your Gun is a musical with lyrics and music written by Irving Berlin and a book by Herbert Fields and his sister Dorothy Fields. ... Irving Berlin (May 11, 1888 – September 22, 1989) was an American composer and lyricist, one of the most prodigious and famous American songwriters in history. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Till The Clouds Roll By is an American musical-biographical film released by MGM in 1946. ... There are several notable Robert Walkers in hsitory Sir Robert Walker is a member of the British Privy Council. ...


Complete Work for Broadway

Note: All shows are musical comedies for which Kern was the sole composer unless otherwise specified. Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...


During his first phase of work for Broadway theater (1904-11), Kern wrote songs that were featured in revues or other collaborative musicals and occasionally co-wrote comic musicals with one or two other composers. In some cases, the show had opened in London, and Kern contributed additional music for songs interpolated into the New York production. During visits to London in 1905-10 he also composed songs that were first performed in London shows. A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ...

  • Mr. Wix of Wickham (1904) - co-composer and co-lyricist
  • The Catch of the Season (1905) - contributing composer
  • The Earl and the Girl (1905) - featured songwriter
  • The Rich Mr. Hoggenheimer (1906) - featured songwriter
  • The Dairymaids (1907) - featured songwriter
  • The Girls of Gottenberg (1908) - featured songwriter for "I Can't Say That You're The Only One"
  • Fluffy Ruffles (1908) - co-composer (for eight out of ten songs, including "Fluffly Ruffles")
  • Kitty Grey (1909) - featured composer for "If The Girl Wants You (Never Mind the Color of Her Eyes)" and "Just Good Friends"
  • King of Cadonia (1910) - co-composer
  • La Belle Paree (1911) - revue - co-composer
  • Ziegfeld Follies of 1911 (1911) - revue - featured composer for "I'm a Crazy Daffy-Dill (Daffydil)"

Beginning in 1912, the more-experienced Kern began to work on dramatically-concerned shows, including music for plays, and for the first time in his young career, he wrote musicals as the sole composer. His regular lyricist collaborators during this period were Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Harry B. Smith, Anne Caldwell, and Howard Dietz. The Catch of the Season is an English musical comedy by Seymour Hicks and Cosmo Hamilton, with music by Herbert Haines and Evelyn Baker and lyrics by Charles H. Taylor, based on the fairy tale Cinderella. ... The Earl and the Girl is a musical comedy in two acts by Seymour Hicks, with lyrics by Percy Greenbank and music by Ivan Caryll. ... The Girls of Gottenberg is a musical play in two acts by George Grossmith and L. E. Berman, with lyrics by Adrian Ross and Basil Hood, and music by Ivan Caryll and Lionel Monckton, which opened at the Gaiety Theatre, London, managed by George Edwardes, on 15 May 1907, and... Cover of the Vocal Score King of Cadonia is an English musical in two acts by Frederick Lonsdale, with lyrics by Adrian Ross and Arthur Wimperis and music by Sidney Jones and Frederick Rosse. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... This article is about the Ziegfeld Follies Broadway shows . ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... Guy Bolton (November 23, 1884 - September 6, 1979) was a writer of Broadway musical comedies who frequently collaborated with P. G. Wodehouse and Jerome Kern among others. ... Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE (15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) (IPA: ) was a comic writer who has enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ... Harry B. Smith (born December 28, 1860 in Buffalo, New York - died January 2, 1936 in Atlantic City) was a reknowned and prolific writer, lyricist, and composer. ... Anne Caldwell (August 30, 1867 - October 22, 1936), also known as Anne Caldwell ODea was a librettist and lyricist. ... Howard Dietz (September 8, 1896 - July 30, 1983) was an American publicist, lyricist, and librettist. ...

  • The Girl from Montmartre (1912) - play - co-incidental music composer
  • The "Mind-the-Paint" Girl (1912) - play - incidental music composer
  • The Red Petticoat (1912)
  • Oh, I Say! (1913)
  • When Claudia Smiles (1914) - featured co-lyricist for "Ssh! You'll Waken Mr. Doyle"
  • The Girl from Utah (1914) - Added five songs to the American production of this Paul Rubens musical, including the classic "They Didn't Believe Me"
  • 90 in the Shade (1915)
  • Nobody Home (1915)
  • Cousin Lucy (1915) - play - incidental music composer
  • Miss Information (1915) - play - incidental music composer
  • Very Good Eddie (1915)
    • Revived in 1975
  • Ziegfeld Follies of 1916 (1916) - revue - featured composer for "When the Lights Are Low", "My Lady of the Nile", and "Ain't It Funny What a Difference Just a Few Drinks Make?"
  • Have a Heart (1917)
  • Love o' Mike (1917)
  • Oh, Boy! (1917)
  • Ziegfeld Follies of 1917 (1917) - featured composer for "Because You Are Just You (Just Because You're You)"
  • Leave It to Jane (1917)
    • revived in 1958
  • Oh, Lady! Lady! (1918)
  • Toot-Toot! (1918)
  • Rock-a-Bye Baby (1918)
  • Head Over Heels (1918)
  • She's a Good Fellow (1919)
  • The Night Boat (1920)
  • Hitchy-Koo of 1920 (1920) - revue
  • Sally (1920)
    • Revived in 1923, 1948
  • Good Morning Dearie (1921)
  • The Bunch and Judy (1922)
  • Stepping Stones (1923)
  • Sitting Pretty (1924)
  • Dear Sir (1924)

During the last phase of his life, Jerome Kern continued to work with his previous collaborators but also met Oscar Hammerstein II and Otto Harbach, with whom Kern wrote his most lasting, memorable, and well-known works. For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Paul Alfred Rubens, (b London, 29 April 1875; d Falmouth, 25 February 1917) was a songwriter and scribe of the musicals and songs for the Victorian and Edwardian musical stage. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Incidental music is music in a play, television program, radio program or some other form not primarily musical. ... Very Good Eddie is a musical with a book by Philip Bartholomae and Guy Bolton, music by Jerome Kern, and lyrics by Schuyler Green, with additional lyrics by Elsie Janis, P. G. Wodehouse, Anne Caldwell, Frank Craven, Harry Graham, Herbert Reynolds, and John E. Hazzard. ... This article is about the Ziegfeld Follies Broadway shows . ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... Oh, Boy! was a 1917s Princess Theatres musical play in two acts, produced by William Elliott and F. Ray Comstock; and conducted by Max Hirschfeld. ... This article is about the Ziegfeld Follies Broadway shows . ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... Sally is a theater musical with music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Clifford Grey and book by Guy Bolton with additional lyrics by Buddy DeSylva and P. G. Wodehouse. ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ...

  • Sunny (1925)
  • The City Chap (1925)
  • Criss Cross (1926)
  • Lucky (1927) - co-composer
  • Show Boat (1927) - (2 out of 19 songs were written by others; the music for the song Bill was by Kern, but the lyric was co-written by P.G. Wodehouse)
    • Revived in 1932, 1946, 1954, 1961, 1966, 1976, 1983, 1994
  • Sweet Adeline (1929)
  • The Cat and the Fiddle (1931) - co-composer, co-lyricist, co-bookwriter, and outliner of orchestrations which were done by Robert Russell Bennett)
  • Music in the Air (1932) - composer and co-director
    • Revived in 1951
  • Roberta (1933)
  • Mamba's Daughters (1939) - play - featured songwriter
    • Revived in 1940
  • Very Warm for May (1939)

In addition to revivals of his most popular shows, the music of Jerome Kern was posthumously featured in a variety of revues, musicals, and concerts on Broadway. Look up sunny in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ... Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... In musical theater, a plays spoken lines are known as its book. ... For the use of the term orchestration in computer science, see orchestration (computers) Orchestration or arrangement is the study and practice of arranging music for an orchestra or musical ensemble. ... For other men named Robert Bennett, see Robert Bennett (disambiguation). ... A theatre director oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a play by unifying various endeavors and aspects of production. ... Roberta was a 1933 Broadway musical, with music by Jerome Kern and lyrics by Otto Harbach, which starred Tamara, Bob Hope, George Murphy, Lyda Roberti, Fred MacMurray, Fay Templeton, Raymond E. Middleton, and Sydney Greenstreet. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ... Very Warm for May opened at the Alvin Theatre on November 17, 1939 and was Jerome Kerns last score for Broadway before relocating to Hollywood and writing music for movies until his death in 1945. ... A revival is a restaging of a former hit play at a later date. ...

  • Jerome Kern Goes to Hollywood (1986) - revue consisting solely of songs composed by Kern and with lyrics by twelve different writers
  • Big Deal (1986) - dance revue - featured composer for "Pick Yourself Up"
  • Something Wonderful (1995) - concert celebrating Oscar Hammerstein II's 100th birthday - featured composer
  • Paul Robeson (1995) - one-man play - featured composer for "Ol' Man River"
  • Dream (1997) - revue - featured composer for "You Were Never Lovelier", "I'm Old Fashioned", and "Dearly Beloved"
  • Swing! (1999) - dance revue - featured songwriter for "I Won't Dance"
  • Elaine Stritch at Liberty (2002) - one-woman show - featured songwriter for "All In Fun"
  • Never Gonna Dance (2003) - musical consisting solely of songs composed by Kern and with lyrics by nine different writers

A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... For work done with Richard Rodgers, see Rodgers and Hammerstein Oscar Hammerstein II (July 12, 1895 – August 23, 1960) was a New-York born writer, producer, and (usually uncredited) director of musicals for almost forty years. ... Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was a multi-lingual American actor, athlete, bass-baritone concert singer, writer, civil rights activist, fellow traveler, Spingarn Medal winner, and Stalin Peace Prize laureate. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... Swing! is a musical conceived by Paul Kelley with music by various artists. ... Elaine Stritch (born on February 2, 1925) is an Irish-American actress and singer. ... Never Gonna Dance is a Broadway musical featuring the music of Jerome Kern. ...

External links

  • Jerome Kern's biography at the "Songwriters Hall of Fame".
  • Jerome Kern at the Internet Broadway Database
  • "Dorothy Fields on Kern" at the Dorothy Fields website; describes circumstances of the composer's sudden demise.
  • Jerome Kern at Find A Grave

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jerome Kern - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1251 words)
Jerome Kern was born in New York City.
Although Kern generally wrote for musical theatre, the harmonic richness of his compositions lend themselves well to the jazz idiom, which typically emphasizes improvisation based on a harmonic structure — many have been adopted by jazz musicians and have become standard tunes.
Jerome Kern died from a heart attack at the age of 60 in New York.
Kern - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (280 words)
A Kern is also a light infantry unit in Medieval Irish armies.
Kern is a word commonly used within the Eastern side of Australian.
The definition of Kern is literally beautiful freak, used to define a person who is either physically attractive but is a "bad" person or someone who is physically unattractive but is a "good" person.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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