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Encyclopedia > Jeopardy!
Jeopardy!

Jeopardy! Season 24 logo
Format Game show
Created by Merv Griffin
Starring Alex Trebek
(1984–present)
Art Fleming
(1964–1975; 1978–1979)
Country of origin Flag of the United States United States
No. of episodes Fleming daytime: 2,753
Fleming syndicated: ~40
Fleming revival: 113
Trebek syndicated: 5,250 (as of October 22, 2007)
Super Jeopardy!: 13
Total: ~8169
Production
Running time 30 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel NBC (1964–1975, 1978–1979)
Syndication (1974–1975, 1984–present)
Picture format NTSC (480i),
720p & 1080i (HDTV)
Original run March 30, 1964 – present
External links
Official website
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Jeopardy! is an international television quiz game show based on trivia in topics such as history, literature, pop culture, and science. The show has a more than 40-year broadcast history in the United States since being created by Merv Griffin in the early 1960s in response to the quiz show scandals of the 1950s. It first ran on NBC from March 30, 1964 until January 3, 1975; in a weekly syndicated version from September 9, 1974 to September 7, 1975; and in a revival from October 2, 1978 to March 2, 1979. Its most successful incarnation is the Alex Trebek-hosted syndicated version, which has aired continuously since September 10, 1984. Jeopardy may mean: Jeopardy!, the game show Jeopardy (horror/suspense series) Jeopardy (legal topic) This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Image File history File links Hdjeopalexbig. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Fleming introduces a 1974 episode of Jeopardy! Art Fleming (born Arthur Fleming Fazzin in New York City May 1, 1924; died April 25, 1995, in Crystal River, Florida) was the original host of the TV game show Jeopardy! // Flemings parents, William and Marie Fazzin, had emigrated to the United... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the television network. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... NTSC is the analog television system in use in Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, the United States, and some other countries, mostly in the Americas (see map). ... 480i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... JOHN HERMAN SUCKS FAT DICK ... 1080i is a shorthand name for a category of video modes. ... High-definition television (HDTV) means broadcast of television signals with a higher resolution than traditional formats (NTSC, SECAM, PAL) allow. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Quiz show redirects here. ... Look up trivia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... The U.S. television game show Jeopardy! has experienced a long life in several incarnations over a period exceeding four decades. ... Mervyn Edward Merv Griffin, Jr. ... The American quiz show scandals of the 1950s were the result of the revelation that contestants of several popular television quiz shows were secretly given assistance by the producers to arrange the outcome of a supposedly fair competition. ... This article is about the television network. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


During the game, three competing contestants select clues from a game board, up to 61 clues per game, each clue in the form of an answer to which they must supply correct responses, each response in the form of a question. The conceit of "questioning answers" is original to Jeopardy! and, along with its theme music, remains a distinctive element of the show. Jeopardy redirects here. ...


Since the 1980s, the Trebek version has consistently placed weekly among the top-rated shows in syndication. In January 2001, TV Guide ranked it #2 among the 50 Greatest Game Shows of All Time. Esquire magazine readers named it their "favorite game show", and in the summer of 2006, it was also ranked #2 by GSN on their list of the 50 Greatest Game Shows of All Time. The show holds the record for number of Emmy Awards in the category of Best Game Show, with 11. TV Guide is the name of two North American weekly magazines about television programming, one in the United States and one in Canada. ... TV Guide cover from January 27, 2001, featuring game show hosts Alex Trebek of Jeopardy! and Regis Philbin of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. ... August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ... “GSN” redirects here. ... The 50 Greatest Game Shows of All-Time was a series on GSN airing from July 18, 2006 through August 31, 2006, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at 10 PM Eastern Time. ... An Emmy Award. ...

Contents

Gameplay

Jeopardy! Round

Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek, circa 1986
Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek, circa 1986

Each day, there are three contestants, one of whom is usually the defending champion (and is always introduced last and is at the podium on the viewer's left), who play a three-round game. The first round is simply called the Jeopardy! Round. Alex Trebek File links The following pages link to this file: Jeopardy! ... Alex Trebek File links The following pages link to this file: Jeopardy! ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Six categories are announced, each with a column of five trivia clues (phrased in answer form), each one valued, in dollars, incrementally more than the previous, ostensibly by difficulty. Each category is a topical category, and the categories change on each show; frequently, they contain puns or other wordplay. The names of the six categories are sometimes related in some way (e.g., titles of Shakespeare plays, although only one may actually concern the famous playwright). For other uses, see Pun (disambiguation). ... Shakespeare redirects here. ...


Jeopardy! Round clue values

1964-1975 1978-1979, 1st Trebek pilot 2nd Trebek pilot 1984-2001 2001-present 1990 Super Jeopardy! tournament
$10 $25 $50 $100 $200 200 points
$20 $50 $100 $200 $400 400 points
$30 $75 $150 $300 $600 600 points
$40 $100 $200 $400 $800 800 points
$50 $125 $250 $500 $1000 1000 points
The answer board (Season 19-22 Jeopardy! set).
The answer board (Season 19-22 Jeopardy! set).

The returning champion or the new challenger in the first position (standing at the leftmost lectern from Trebek's point of view) begins the game by selecting a category and monetary value (e.g. "PRESIDENTS for $200"). The host then reads the clue ("He was the father of our country; he didn't really chop down a cherry tree"), after which any of the three contestants may ring in using a hand-held signaling device. The host recognizes the first contestant to successfully ring in following the host's reading of the clue, and that contestant must then respond generally in the form of a question ("Who was/Who is/Who's George Washington?"). (See Phrasing below). Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Super Jeopardy! logo Super Jeopardy! was a special version of the popular television game show Jeopardy! that aired on ABC in the summer of 1990. ... Image File history File links Question board in final game of Champs round Template:Googlevideo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Question board in final game of Champs round Template:Googlevideo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ...


A correct response earns the dollar value of the clue, and gives the "questioner" the right to select the next clue. If he/she is incorrect or fails to answer in time, that amount is deducted (hence, the dollar amount was always in jeopardy) and his/her opponents may ring in and respond. If none of the contestants gives a correct response, the correct response is read, and the player who originally chose that question maintains control of the board.


The current scores are shown on the front of each player's lectern. In the Art Fleming run, positive scores had plus signs next to them, while negative scores had minus signs next to them; in the Trebek version, no plus sign is used for a positive score, but the minus sign remains. On the current set, scores in the plus column are displayed on a blue background, negative scores on a red one.


Daily Doubles

In each game, three clues are designated "Daily Doubles" (a name taken from horse racing): one in the Jeopardy! Round and two in the Double Jeopardy! Round. Only the contestant who selects a Daily Double may respond to its clue. The player may wager as much as the maximum amount of a clue on the board (currently $1000 in the Jeopardy! Round and $2000 in the Double Jeopardy! Round) or as much as he or she has accumulated, whichever is greater, but must wager at least $5. [1] Players may also indicate that they wish to make it a "True Daily Double", meaning that they are risking all the money that they have accumulated up to that point. Daily Doubles are sometimes designated with special tags, such as "Audio Daily Double" (in which a sound clip is played as part of the clue), "Video Daily Double" (in which a video clip is played as part of the clue), "Celebrity Daily Double" (in which a celebrity delivers the clue), etc. Such a tag is displayed as soon as the Daily Double has been selected, and may serve as a hint to aid the contestant in his or her wagering. A daily double is a type of wager offered by horse and dog racing tracks. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ...


Ringing in

Before the 1985–1986 season, contestants could ring in any time after the clue was revealed. Ever since, in order to give all three contestants a fair shot at the clue, players are required to wait until the host finishes reading the clue and the lights surrounding the board are illuminated before they can ring in. Pressing the signaling button too soon locks the player out for one quarter of a second. For easy clues, ringing in at the right moment is important, as it is presumed that all three contestants will be able to respond correctly. Many Jeopardy! players comment that the use of the signaling device was the most important aspect in the play of the game.


Phrasing

In the Jeopardy! Round, players are not penalized for forgetting to phrase a response in the form of a question; the host will give a reminder to contestants who do not correct themselves before their time runs out. In the Double Jeopardy! Round, adherence to the phrasing rule is followed more strictly, but players are still permitted to correct themselves before their time runs out if they are not immediately ruled against. On occasion, players have couched their phrasing in creative ways or in languages other than standard English without penalty.[2][3]


Double Jeopardy! Round

The second round, Double Jeopardy!, works like the first round, with the following exceptions:

  • Six new categories are used.
  • There are two Daily Doubles in this round.
  • The value of each clue is double what it was in the first round (except in the case of the 1990 Super Jeopardy! tournament):
1964-1975 1978-1979, 1st Trebek pilot 2nd Trebek pilot 1984-2001 2001-present 1990 Super Jeopardy! tournament
$20 $50 $100 $200 $400 500 points
$40 $100 $200 $400 $800 1000 points
$60 $150 $300 $600 $1200 1500 points
$80 $200 $400 $800 $1600 2000 points
$100 $250 $500 $1000 $2000 2500 points
  • The contestant with the lowest amount of money at the end of the Jeopardy! Round makes the first selection in Double Jeopardy! If there is a tie for the trailing position, the player to the host's left selects first.
  • From 1985 to 1997, the set would change from blue to red starting with this round. When the show finished (Season 13), the set would change back to blue.
  • Also, in the 1978–1979 version only, only the two highest-scoring players at the end of Round 1 played Double Jeopardy!; the third-place player was eliminated before the start of the round.
  • The response must be phrased in question form (see Phrasing above).
  • The 2000th NBC episode featured six Daily Doubles, one for each category; this is the only time that there have been more than two Daily Doubles in a round. This episode also only had the Double Jeopardy! and not a regular Jeopardy! round.

Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Alex Trebek, with his once-iconic mustache, hosting a 1986 episode of Jeopardy! George Alexander Trebek (born as Giorgi Suka-Alex Trebek [1] on July 22, 1940) is an Emmy Award-winning Canadian-American television personality and game show host whos best known as the host of the game... Super Jeopardy! logo Super Jeopardy! was a special version of the popular television game show Jeopardy! that aired on ABC in the summer of 1990. ... Jeopardy redirects here. ...

Finishing Double Jeopardy! with $0 or less

Sometimes, contestants will finish Double Jeopardy! with either $0 or a negative score. If that happens, they are automatically eliminated from the game and not allowed to participate in the game's final round, Final Jeopardy! In this case, the contestants still receive consolation prizes, which (beginning with Show #4089, aired May 16, 2002) are $1000 for third place and $2000 for second place. In the original Art Fleming version, no money was awarded if a contestant finished with zero dollars or in the red (with a negative score), but he/she did receive parting gifts. A prize is an award given to a person or a group of people to recognise and reward actions or achievements. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


If a returning champion finished in the red, it did not count against their previously accumulated winnings. In other words, any cash they had previously won was theirs to keep. In Celebrity Jeopardy!, contestants are allowed to participate in Final Jeopardy! under all circumstances, and such contestants are granted nominal scores with which to wager for Final Jeopardy! (as the celebrity contestants are competing on behalf of charitable foundations, rather than for personal gain).On rare occasions, two contestants have been disqualified from playing, leaving the first-place player to play the Final Jeopardy! Round alone.[4] Saturday Night Live parody, see Celebrity Jeopardy! (Saturday Night Live). ...


In the Alex Trebek syndicated version, there has never been an instance of all three contestants finishing Double Jeopardy! with $0 or less, thereby disqualifying everyone from Final Jeopardy! A three-way disqualification from Final Jeopardy! did happen at least once on the Fleming daytime version sometime between 1968 and 1975. During the commercial break between Double Jeopardy! and Final Jeopardy!, a member of the studio audience suggested that they could simply replay the game, as if the embarrassing result had never happened. But such a thing to do was not permitted by NBC's rules. The time normally used to play Final Jeopardy! was filled with chitchat between Art Fleming and the contestants. For the following telecast, three new contestants were featured.


Final Jeopardy! Round

In the Final Jeopardy! Round, the host first announces the category, then the show goes into a commercial break (during which the staff comes on stage and advises the contestants while barriers are placed between the players to discourage cheating). The contestants then risk as little as $0 or as much money as they have accumulated, by writing it on a card (in the 1964-1975 version) or electronic tablet (since 1984). The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


After the final commercial break, the Final Jeopardy! clue is revealed and read by the host, following which contestants have 30 seconds to write a response on a card/electronic drawing board, again phrased in the form of a question. The light pen is automatically cut off at the end of the 30 seconds (this was not the case during the first syndicated season; because a number of contestants went overtime, leading to judgement dilemmas if their response was correct, the second season saw the addition of an electronic switch to Trebek's podium, which allowed him to turn the light pens on and off at the appropriate times). With rare exception, the "Think!" music is played during this 30-second period. A light pen is a computer input device in the form of a light-sensitive wand used in conjunction with the computers CRT monitor. ...


Other Final Jeopardy! response methods are occasionally used:

  • Blind contestants (including 5-time champion Eddie Timanus and 2005 Teen Tournament quarterfinalist Kerri Regan) utilize a keyboard with Braille keys. Entered text will be displayed in a typed font rather than the contestant's handwriting.
  • In the event of a malfunction of the handwriting input, contestants respond using a marker and paper tablet.

As with the rest of the show, Final Jeopardy! responses must be phrased in the form of a question.[5] Eddie Timanus is a Jeopardy! champion and USA Today sportswriter who graduated from Wake Forest University. ... Braille code where the word (, French for first) can be read. ...


Cash prizes

The top money-winner at the end of Final Jeopardy! is the day's champion and returns to the next show. The value of the theoretical maximum one-day winnings is $566,400 ($28,320 from 1964-1975 and $283,200 from 1984-2001), provided:

  • All clues are revealed in both the Jeopardy! Round and the Double Jeopardy! Round
  • One player gives the correct response to every clue
  • All three Daily Doubles are hidden in the boards' top row (lowest dollar amount)
  • The Daily Doubles are the last clues to be uncovered in each round
  • Each time a Daily Double is revealed, the player wagers all of his or her winnings on it
  • The player also wagers all his or her winnings on Final Jeopardy!

During the 1964 and 1978 NBC and 1974 syndicated versions, all three contestants kept whatever cash they won. On the 1974 syndicated version, the winner also received a bonus prize or cash (see entry in "Other versions" for more information).


Starting in 1984, rather than receiving their scores in cash, runners-up were awarded consolation prizes; typically, a vacation package for the second-place player and merchandise for the third-place player. This changed on May 16, 2002; thereafter, the second-place finisher was awarded $2000 and the third place finisher was awarded $1000. Since the show did not provide airfare or lodging for challengers (airfare was provided for returning champions' subsequent flights to L.A.), these cash consolation prizes alleviated the financial burden of appearing on the show. A prize is an award given to a person or a group of people to recognise and reward actions or achievements. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The greatest amount won by an individual in a day was $75,000, by Ken Jennings, on July 23, 2004.[6] For other persons named Ken Jennings, see Ken Jennings (disambiguation). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Special cases

If no contestant finishes Final Jeopardy! with a positive total (i.e., at least $1), then nobody wins and three new contestants appear on the following show; in such cases the three players will participate in a backstage draw to determine player position. The three-way loss has happened three times since 1984, the first occasion being on the second episode; the number of times this occurred during the 1964 NBC version is undetermined.[7] If two or more contestants tie for first place, they each win the money and come back, assuming that they each have at least $1. There have been few players who have held the co-champ title twice.


Ties in non-regular-play games are broken via a special Tiebreaker Round; this has only known to have happened on five occasions, most recently on November 13, 2007 during the second semifinal game of the Tournament of Champions. An additional tiebreaker category with a single clue is given after the Final Jeopardy! Round, and the first player to ring in with the correct response wins.[8] In case of a three-way loss in a tournament, nobody advances, and an additional wild card is added in the tournament. (A wild card is one of the usually four non-winners with the highest scores in the opening round of a tournament to advance. There has been one triple loss in a tournament, and a fifth wild card was added.) Scores coming to Double Jeopardy! break ties for a wildcard position. is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Tiebreaker A question used in the event of a tie at the end of a pub quiz, where the answer is oten a figure not likely to be known, the winner is the closest to the answer, thus it breaks the deadlock. ...


A three-way tie for first place has only occurred once during the Alex Trebek era of Jeopardy!,[9] and only one contestant in the Trebek era has won a game with only $1.[10]


Recurring categories

Some categories have special rules pertaining to them. In each case, contestants and viewers are told the specific format required to get the clue correct.


Recurring categories are:

  • "Quotation mark" categories - In these categories, a letter or group of letters will be placed inside quotation marks in the category name; correct responses will begin with or contain that letter or group of letters. For example, if the category title is THE "EYES" HAVE IT: This popular fight song talks about the 30 million of these in this, the second most populous state. Correct response: What are "The Eyes of Texas"?
  • N-LETTER WORDS - The correct word has to be N letters long, N being at least two. (Clue in the category 16- (YES, 16-) LETTER WORDS: In boxing, do something crazy like, I don't know, biting a guy's ear off & you'll get a DQ, this; Response: What is "disqualification"?)
  • ADD A LETTER - The player must guess which letter has to be added to a certain word to turn it into a new one. (Clue: Add this letter to CRAM and you get a charley horse; Response: What is P? (CRAM + P = CRAMP))
  • BEFORE & AFTER - Inspired by a Wheel of Fortune category, the first and second parts of the question join together via a mutual word (Clue: The time it takes an element to lose 50 percent of its radioactivity in a 1979 Monty Python movie; Response: What is Half Life of Brian? (half-life, Life of Brian).
  • COMMON BONDS - Three items are listed, having something in common. (Clue: Bad habits, footballs, buckets; Response: What are things you kick?)
  • CROSSWORD CLUES - A specialized "quotation mark" category, in which the category title gives the first letter; the question is the completion of a crossword-style clue that gives the number of letters in the correct answer (Clue: Late-night hunger pains (8); Response: What are munchies?, where the category is CROSSWORD CLUES "M"). Previously known as STARTS WITH a given letter of the alphabet, which did not give the expected number of letters.
  • GET YOUR FACTS STRAIGHT - Clues in this category present information about two similar-sounding names; at least one of those names is given, and the contestant must supply the other name, or related information (Clue: A gazelle is a graceful animal; this 1841 ballet has been called "the 'Hamlet' of the dance"; Response: What is Giselle?)
  • NAME'S THE SAME - The two nouns given share either the first or last word (Clue: Close, Frey; Response: Who is Glenn?, where the category is FIRST NAME'S THE SAME).
  • POTENT POTABLES - The ingredients of an alcoholic drink are given, and the player must guess the name of the drink.
  • POTPOURRI (sometimes called HODGEPODGE) - A variety of topics inside one category. This category almost always appears in the sixth (rightmost) column on the board. One variant is LEFTOVERS, which are simply clues that went unpicked in previous shows as time ran out.
  • RHYME TIME - Two consecutive words in the correct response rhyme with each other (Clue: A chilly swimming basin; Response: What is a cool pool?). Popular variants include CELEBRITY RHYME TIME and BEASTLY RHYME TIME.
  • SPELLING (aka THE DREADED SPELLING CATEGORY) - The correct response must be spelled out. Generally, the answer is given, but not shown on the board (Clue: Get hooked on the spelling of... is shown, the word "Phonics" is given; Response: What is P-H-O-N-I-C-S?)
  • STUPID ANSWERS - Contestants can find the correct response within the clue itself. (Clue: Name of the hotel and office complex where the Watergate break-in occurred; Response: What is Watergate?) The correct response may be hidden discreetly to challenge the contestants.

This section contains a list of trivia items. ... Wheel of Fortune may refer to: Wheel of Fortune (US game show), the US nighttime version. ...

Other versions

Host Art Fleming in a 1974 episode of Jeopardy!
Host Art Fleming in a 1974 episode of Jeopardy!

The 1974-75 weekly syndicated version was essentially the same as the NBC version, but with several changes. Host Art Fleming always wore a tuxedo with a check-patterned jacket and a number of flashing light bulbs were added to the set. Most contestants were previous winners from the daytime show. As well, any player who correctly answered all five questions in a category received a bonus prize, originally a Chevrolet Vega, later a trip to London (as opposed to a cash bonus on the daytime edition). Image File history File links 1974Jeopardy!Art1. ... Image File history File links 1974Jeopardy!Art1. ... Fleming introduces a 1974 episode of Jeopardy! Art Fleming (born Arthur Fleming Fazzin in New York City May 1, 1924; died April 25, 1995, in Crystal River, Florida) was the original host of the TV game show Jeopardy! // Flemings parents, William and Marie Fazzin, had emigrated to the United... The then-innovative Chevrolet Vega was a subcompact car sold from 1971 through 1977. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Originally, the winning contestant picked a number from 1-30 off the Jeopardy Jackpot Board; possible prizes included a new car, a luxury vacation, or bonus money, with the grand prize being $25,000 (though the latter took up two spaces, each corresponding one half, and could only be won if the contestant found the second half on an additional pick). Later in the show's one-season run, the Jackpot Board was dropped, and the champion's bonus prize or cash was based on his or her final score.


However, this version failed to catch on in the ratings or garner enough stations, mainly due to a glut of other weekly versions of network daytime games that stations ran in their Prime Time Access early-evening timeslots, such as Price is Right and Let's Make a Deal). The show was cancelled after only one season. During the previous season, packagers of Dating Game and Sale of the Century had tried to keep their shows alive in syndication as well; neither of those games were successful either. The Prime Time Access Rule (PTAR) was instituted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to restrict the amount of network programming that local television stations owned by or affiliated with a network may air during prime time. The first PTAR was issued in 1970 and was implemented at the beginning... The Price is Right is a popular game show based on contestants guessing the retail prices of displayed prizes. ... Lets Make a Deal is a television game show which aired in various encarnations in the United States. ... The Dating Game is an ABC television show that first aired on December 20, 1965 and was created by Chuck Barris. ... Countries which have their own version Sale of the Century is an international television game show format that has screened in several countries in various incarnations since 1969. ...


The All-New Jeopardy! was a short-lived 1978–79 series, the lowest-scoring contestant was eliminated after the Jeopardy! Round; whoever was ahead at the end of the Double Jeopardy! Round became the champion. In the pilot, taped March 6, 1977 for CBS, a sub-round was played before the first round, each player had 30 seconds to answer any question on the board they wanted, no penalty for an incorrect questions. After each player had a turn, they played regular Jeopardy! with the clues left on the board.


Instead of Final Jeopardy!, the winner then got to play a bonus round called Super Jeopardy! (no relation to the special summer 1990 tournament of all-time champions as aired on ABC). This round featured a new board of five categories with five clues in each, numbered 1–5 (and unlike the main game, not necessarily increasing in difficulty down the column). The object was for the contestant to provide any five correct responses in a straight line in a Bingo-like fashion (horizontally, vertically, or diagonally). Jeopardy! is a popular international television game show, originally devised by Merv Griffin, who also devised Wheel of Fortune. ... Super Jeopardy! logo Super Jeopardy! was a special version of the popular television game show Jeopardy! that aired on ABC in the summer of 1990. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Housie. ...


Giving an incorrect response, or a pass, earned the player a "strike," and blocked off that space on the board; three strikes ended the round. Super Jeopardy! was worth $5000 to a first-day champion, with the jackpot increasing by $2500 each day that champion successfully defended his/her title; with the five-day limit in place, that meant a potential total of $50,000 in just Super Jeopardy! earnings ($5000 + $7500 + $10,000 + $12,500 + $15,000). If a player struck out, he/she still received $100 for each correct response given. In the pilot, this was a timed game, the player had :90 to get the five in a row.


This bonus game proved rather unpopular among long-time fans of the show, and some critics allege that its inclusion, and the gameplay's elimination structure, doomed the revival to failure. Two sound effects from this version carried over to Sale of the Century in the 1980s: the correct response bell (a high-pitched ding) and the Daily Double bell, a Family Feud-esque series of dings.


Rock & Roll Jeopardy! was a music-intensive version of Jeopardy! that aired on VH1 from 1998 to 2001. Hosted by Jeff Probst, clues on this version of the show highlighted post-1950s popular music trivia. Though the host was somewhat looser with the "phrase in the form of a question" requirement, the gameplay was basically identical to Jeopardy! The first two seasons used points, with $5000 to the winner; subsequent seasons were played for cash with a $5000 house minimum. Rock & Roll Jeopardy! was a musical version of the classic quiz show Jeopardy! hosted by Access Hollywood reporter and future Survivor host Jeff Probst. ... VH1 (VH-1: Video Hits One until 1994) is an American cable television channel that was created in January 1985 by Warner-Amex Satellite Entertainment, at the time a division of Warner Communications and owners of MTV. VH1 and sister channel MTV are currently part of the MTV Networks division... Jeffrey Lee Probst (born November 4, 1962) is a six-time Emmy-nominated (once awarded) American television personality, acting as a game show host, executive producer and a reporter. ...


Jep! was the children's version of Jeopardy!, hosted by cartoon voice artist Bob Bergen. The show aired in 1998 on Game Show Network (now GSN), and up to late 2004 on Discovery Kids. The show was not well received by fans or critics, and was cancelled after one season. Starting in 1999, just after Jep!'s cancellation, Jeopardy! began a "Back-to-School Week", which has easier clues and more accessible material for the younger contestants, but is otherwise identical to the adult version. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bob Bergen is an American voice actor. ... “GSN” redirects here. ... Discovery Kids Channel is a digital cable television channel, owned by Discovery Communications (see Discovery Channel) with programming for education of children. ...


Returning champions

For the first six seasons, winning contestants kept all winnings, with a cap of $75,000. Anything won above $75,000 went to the champion's favorite charity. The cap was increased to $100,000 starting in Season 7 after Bob Blake ($82,501) and Frank Spangenberg ($102,597) exceeded the $75,000 cap. In Seasons 14-19 the cap was raised to $200,000. The cap was eliminated altogether at the beginning of Season 20. Until Season 20 of the Trebek version of the show, a contestant who won five days in a row would be retired undefeated, with a guaranteed spot in the next Tournament of Champions. Frank Spangenberg (born July 26, 1957) is an American police officer who garnered a modicum of fame in 1990 when he set the five-day record on the game show Jeopardy! Spangenberg, at the time a member of the New York City Transit Police Department (which is now the Transit...


From Season 14 to Season 17, an undefeated champion would also be awarded a choice of Chevrolet cars or trucks (Corvette, Tahoe, or two Camaros). From Season 18 to Season 19, the winner won a Jaguar X-Type. Similarly, as part of the deal with Ford Motor Company for the 2001–02 season, Ford also added a Volvo to the Teen Tournament prize package. Chevrolet (IPA: - French origin) (colloquially Chevy) is a brand of automobile, produced by General Motors (GM). ... The Chevrolet Corvette is a sports car that has been manufactured by Chevrolet since 1953. ... The Chevrolet Tahoe (and similar GMC Yukon) is a full-size SUV from General Motors. ... The Chevrolet Camaro is a pony car made in North America by the Chevrolet Motor Division of General Motors. ... Jaguar Cars Limited is a luxury car manufacturer, originally with headquarters in Browns Lane, Coventry, England but now at Whitley, Coventry. ... “Ford” redirects here. ... Volvo Cars, or Volvo Personvagnar, is a well-known Swedish automobile maker founded in 1927 in the city of Gothenburg in Sweden. ...


To mark the start of the current version's 20th season, in September 2003, the show changed its rules so there is no winnings limit, and champions' reigns became indefinite; a champion keeps coming back as long as (s)he keeps winning (although automobiles were no longer awarded for five wins). This rule change led to the remarkable winning streak of Ken Jennings, who currently holds most of the winning records on the show, including greatest number of appearances and regular season highest total dollar amounts won (excluding tournaments). For other persons named Ken Jennings, see Ken Jennings (disambiguation). ...


Tournaments

Beginning with the 2nd season of the Alex Trebek syndicated version, a Tournament of Champions (ToC) has been held more or less annually, featuring five-time undefeated champions and other biggest winners to have appeared on the show since the last ToC. The ToC format was devised by Alex Trebek, and was as follows: Fifteen players—five-time champions, and, if there are fewer than 15 five-time champions who have not yet played in a ToC, the highest scorers among the other game winners are invited to participate. The Jeopardy! Tournament of Champions is the crowning glory of the biggest winners from the past season or seasons of the TV quiz show Jeopardy! The field includes 15 of the most recent seasons past champions. ...


The ToC lasts two weeks (10 shows), in the following manner.


Shows 1–5: The quarterfinals, with three new contestants participating each day. The five winners advance to the semi-finals. Four "wild card" spots are available to those with the highest score among non-winners; ties broken by the highest score after the Double Jeopardy! Round.


Shows 6–8: The semifinals. At this point, the game becomes a single-elimination affair, with each winner advancing to the finals. If at any point in the quarterfinals or semifinals there is a tie for first place, one or more successive Tiebreaker Rounds are played, with the first player to answer correctly advancing to the next round. (Tiebreaker Rounds have appeared on the show only four times, thrice in tournaments. In the event of more than one Tiebreaker Round being played in a game, only the deciding Tiebreaker Round is aired as part of the show broadcast; the others are edited out.) A single-elimination tournament, also called a knockout or sudden death tournament, is a type of tournament where the loser of each match is immediately eliminated from winning the championship or first prize in the event. ...


Shows 9–10: The two-day finals. Players begin the second final game with their scores reset to $0, and contestants' totals from both days are added together to determine their final scores. The contestant with the highest cumulative score wins the grand prize ($100,000 from 1985-2001; $250,000 since 2002). All other players, including the second- and third-place players in the finals, receive a guaranteed amount based on their finishing positions. In addition, the runners-up in the finals receive additional cash equal to their score if it exceeds the guaranteed amount.


The structure of the annual best-of-the-best tournaments during the Fleming era differed from the Tournament of Champions of today. A one-week tournament was held consisting of nine undefeated champions since the last TOC. The first or elimination round was held over the first three days, with three champions appearing each day. The winners from each day advanced to the final round which was held over the course of two days. In those matches, the winner won $25,000 and a trophy and was crowned "Grand Champion".[citation needed] Eleven Grand Champions were crowned during the 11-year NBC run.[citation needed]


First aired in 1987, the Teen Tournament features high school students, with the winner receiving a cash prize ($75,000 in the most recent years), and, in some years, a new car. Until 2001, the winner was also invited to participate in the Tournament of Champions. One of the most notable Teen Tournament champions was Eric Newhouse, who advanced to the finals of the 1989 Tournament of Champions, was a finalist in the Million Dollar Masters tournament, and participated in the Ultimate Tournament of Champions. The Jeopardy! Teen Tournament is one of the traditional tournaments held each season on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! Contestants in this tournament are primarily high school students, and between the ages of thirteen and seventeen. ...


Beginning in 1989 the College Championship uses college students as contestants. The College Championship pits 15 full-time undergraduate students from colleges and universities in the US against each other in a two-week tournament, identical to the ToC in format. Beginning in 1997, the College Championship has been taped at host college campus using the show's traveling set. The winner earns $100,000, a trophy, and a spot in the next Tournament of Champions. (Tom Cubbage, the very first Jeopardy! college champion, also won his Tournament of Champions the following season.) The Jeopardy! College Championship is one of the traditional tournaments held each season on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! Contestants in this tournament are full-time undergraduate college students with no prior degrees. ...


Between 1987 and 1995, ten Seniors Tournaments were held for contestants over the age of 50. This tournament was discontinued after December 1995, purportedly due to advertisers wanting to pull in younger demographics. The Jeopardy! Seniors Tournament was one of the traditional tournaments held each season on the game show Jeopardy! Eligible contestants consisted of people aged 50 and over. ...


Special non-tournament play

Usually once a year, Celebrity Jeopardy! weeks are held with celebrity contestants. Each celebrity chooses a charity (or two) to sponsor, and that charity is the recipient of the particular celebrity's winnings. Typically, each charity is guaranteed a certain amount (e.g., $20,000), with the winner's charity receiving a larger amount (e.g., $50,000). Contestants ending the Double Jeopardy! Round with a zero or negative score, who in regular play games would be disqualified from playing Final Jeopardy!, are given a nominal score with which to wager (e.g. $100).[11] Saturday Night Live parody, see Celebrity Jeopardy! (Saturday Night Live). ... For other uses, see Celebrity (disambiguation). ... This article is about charitable organizations. ...


Kids Week, Holiday Kids Week, and Back to School Week feature children ages 10 through 12 as contestants. These games are usually recorded at the show's main studio in Culver City.[12] These weeks comprise five independent shows, with three new contestants in each. Unlike the regular Jeopardy! format, the winner of each game does not return to play another game. The third place winner receives $1,000, second place receives $2,000, and first place wins the amount of his or her score, with some minimum guarantee (typically $10,000). Additional prizes for all players, such as computers, gift certificates, and trips to local theme parks have been awarded in the past.


Special tournaments

There have been a number of special tournaments featuring the greatest players during the history of Jeopardy! These are listed below.


Super Jeopardy!

Main article: Super Jeopardy!

The first of these "all-time best" tournaments, Super Jeopardy! aired in Summer 1990 on ABC. It featured top players during the first six years of the 1984 syndicated run, plus a notable champion from the original Fleming era. The tournament was similar to the Million Dollar Masters and Ultimate Tournament of Champions (see below), although it was on a much smaller scale than that tournament. The Super Jeopardy! tournament also featured 4 contestants per game (in the first round of the tournament) as opposed to the standard three, and the games were played for points instead of dollars. Bruce Seymour won the tournament and $250,000. Super Jeopardy! logo Super Jeopardy! was a special version of the popular television game show Jeopardy! that aired on ABC in the summer of 1990. ...


Tenth Anniversary Tournament

The Tenth Anniversary Tournament was a five-day tournament aired in 1993 following the conclusion of the regular Tournament of Champions. The winner of that tournament, Tom Nosek, received a bye into the Tenth Anniversary Tournament; the other eight spots were awarded by lottery from among Tournament of Champions finalists and semifinalists of the previous decade (one chosen from each of the eight years the tournament was played). Frank Spangenberg won the tournament with a two-game score of $16,800 plus a $25,000 bonus for a total of $41,800. The Jeopardy! Tenth Anniversary Tournament was a special one-week tournament held in 1993 in honor of the tenth anniversary of the hit quiz show Jeopardy! where past semifinalists, finalists, and winners of the past Tournament of Champions competitions played against each other. ... A bye is when a player or team is allowed to advance to the next round of a playoff tournament without playing. ... Frank Spangenberg (born July 26, 1957) is an American police officer who garnered a modicum of fame in 1990 when he set the five-day record on the game show Jeopardy! Spangenberg, at the time a member of the New York City Transit Police Department (which is now the Transit...


Teen Reunion Tournament

In November 1998, players from the 1987, 1988, and 1989 Teen Tournaments (including the champions) were invited to Boston to play in a special Teen Reunion Tournament. 1989 Teen Tournament winner Eric Newhouse won the tournament. The Jeopardy! Teen Reunion Tournament was a special one-week tournament held in November 1998 at the Wang Center for the Performing Arts in Boston, Massachusetts that invited back 12 former Teen Tournament contestants from the first three tournaments on the game show Jeopardy! // 12 former Teen Tournament contestants competed...


Million Dollar Masters

In May 2002, to commemorate the Trebek version's 4,000th episode, the show invited fifteen champions to play for a $1 million bonus, under the standard 2-week tournament format. Tapings took place at Radio City Music Hall. The tournament was won by Brad Rutter. The Jeopardy! Million Dollar Masters tournament was a two-week Jeopardy! tournament televised in May 2002. ... Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Brad Rutter is congratulated for his first place finish by Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek, at the Ultimate Tournament of Champions. ...


Ultimate Tournament of Champions

Jeopardy! televised the Ultimate Tournament of Champions in 2005. This tournament, which was the largest (and longest) in Jeopardy!'s history, pitted 144 former Jeopardy! champions against each other, with two winners moving on to face Ken Jennings in a 3-game final. A partially revealed board in the final game, first round. ... A partially revealed board in the final game, first round. ... For other persons named Ken Jennings, see Ken Jennings (disambiguation). ...


The final winner was Brad Rutter ($62,000 for the tournament final), winning $2 million, the second-largest single-game prize in game show history. Jennings placed second (with $34,599) and took home $500,000. Jerome Vered finished third ($20,600), collecting $250,000. As a result, Rutter is the all-time highest winner of any game show with $3,270,102 (plus two Camaros), with Jennings a close second with $3,022,700. Brad Rutter is congratulated for his first place finish by Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek, at the Ultimate Tournament of Champions. ... Jerome Vered in the second game of the fifth round of the Ultimate Tournament of Champions. ...


Audition process

Unlike the audition process for many game shows, the Jeopardy! contestant audition process is in part merit-based, with 50-question contestant tests administered at local audition sites and, as of 2006, over the Internet. The Jeopardy! staff regularly offers auditions for potential contestants. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Theme songs

Art Fleming versions

"Think!" (originally composed as "A Time for Tony" by Jeopardy! creator Merv Griffin as a lullaby for his son[13]) has served as the Final Jeopardy! Round countdown music since the show's inception in 1964,[14] and is also the melody for the current opening theme. In the United States, "Think!" has insinuated itself into everyday communication; the song has been used to score situations in which someone is waiting for another to answer a question or make a decision.[15] Merv Griffin estimated that the Jeopardy! theme song earned him over $70 million in royalties.[16][17] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The main theme song to the original NBC version, "Take 10", is a jazz number composed by Griffin's wife, Julann. On the final episode of the original version, Art Fleming walked off the set at the end of the show to the tune of Charlie Chaplin's "Smile". As the song played, credits rolled over a shot of the darkened set, with no applause. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... For other uses, see Smile (disambiguation)#Songs. ...


The main theme to the 1978–1979 revival was called "Frisco Disco" and was composed by Merv Griffin and arranged by Mort Lindsey (the bandleader on Griffin's syndicated talk show).[18] The opening theme, called "January, February, March", was also composed by Griffin and arranged by Lindsey, and reappeared as the main theme on the first pilot of the Alex Trebek-hosted Jeopardy! in 1983.[19] Mort Lindsey, born 21 March, 1923 in Newark, New Jersey USA is an orchestrator, composer, pianist, conductor and musical director for Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Merv Griffin. ... The Merv Griffin Show was a long-running American television talk show, starring singer Merv Griffin. ...


Alex Trebek version

An electronic version of the "Think!" melody became the main theme with Jeopardy!'s return to the airwaves in 1984, while the original recording of "Think!" was used for the Final Jeopardy! Round. The main theme was remixed in 1991 to include a bongo track. In 1997, both the main theme and the Final Jeopardy! Round "Think!" music were updated, with jazzy orchestral arrangements by Steve Kaplan. The main theme was updated again in 2000 and again in 2001, arrangements similar to the those previous. The theme has gone through some slight re-orchestrations since then. Bongos Bongo drums or bongos are a percussion instrument made up of two small drums attached to each other. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


The electric guitar-based theme from Rock & Roll Jeopardy! has been used on Jeopardy! leading into and out of commercial breaks during College Championships, Teen Tournaments, recent Back to School Week/Kids Week, and November 2006 Celebrity Jeopardy! episodes. (During a few of those tournaments, it was also played during Final Jeopardy!) An electric guitar An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... The Jeopardy! College Championship is one of the traditional tournaments held each season on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! Contestants in this tournament are full-time undergraduate college students with no prior degrees. ... The Jeopardy! Teen Tournament is one of the traditional tournaments held each season on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! Contestants in this tournament are primarily high school students, and between the ages of thirteen and seventeen. ... Saturday Night Live parody, see Celebrity Jeopardy! (Saturday Night Live). ...


Alternate versions of the Final Jeopardy! music have been performed by the UCLA marching band (during the 2001 College Championship), the Yale Whiffenpoofs (during the 2003 College Championship), and organist Trent Johnson during the final Celebrity Jeopardy! show at Radio City Music Hall in 2006. During the show's first trip to New York City, a piano rendition was used. On an episode aired in May 2007, another piano rendition was used, played by a piano player aboard the Orient Express.[20] Established in 1909, the Whiffenpoofs are an all-male vocal ensemble at Yale University, and the oldest collegiate singing group in the nation. ... Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Poster advertising the Orient Express Orient Express is the name of a long-distance passenger train originally operated by the Compagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits. ...


Set

Like the theme music, the Jeopardy! set has also changed over the years. The set currently in use is as of September 11, 2006. For a summary of changes to the set, see Jeopardy! set evolution. The set of the American television game show Jeopardy! has evolved through a number of iterations during its more than 40-year broadcast history. ... The set of the American television game show Jeopardy! has evolved through a number of iterations during its more than 40-year broadcast history. ...


International adaptations

Countries with versions of Jeopardy!
Countries with versions of Jeopardy!
Country Title(s) Network(s) Host(s) Dates aired
United Kingdom Jeopardy! Channel 4 Derek Hobson 1984
ITV1 Chris Donat 1990
ITV1 Steve Jones 1991-1993
Sky One Paul Ross 1995-1996
Australia Jeopardy! Network Ten Tony Barber (former Sale of the Century host) 1993 (canceled after six months)
New Zealand Jeopardy! TVNZ Mark Leishman (his brother Phillip hosted Wheel of Fortune) 1992
Sweden Jeopardy![?] TV4 Magnus Härenstam 1991-2005
Adam Alsing 2006-present
Quebec (French Canada) Jéopardy![?] TVA network Réal Giguère 1991-1993
Germany Riskant! RTL Hans-Jürgen Bäumler 1990-1992
Jeopardy! Frank Elstner 1994-1998
tm3 Gerriet Danz 2000-2001
Russia Svoya Igra NTV Pyotr Kuleshov 1994-present
France Jeopardy! TF1 Philippe Risoli (host of Le Juste Prix, the French version of The Price is Right) Early 1990s
Denmark Jeopardy! TV2 Søren Kaster 1995-2000
Lasse Rimmer 2000-2003
Lars Daneskov 2003-present
Israel Melech Ha'Trivia Israel 10 Ronny Yovel 1997-?
Spain Jeopardy Antena 3 Carlos Sobera 2007
Estonia Kuldvillak TV3 Mart Mardisalu Early 2000s
Poland Va Banque TVP2 Kazimierz Kaczor 1996-2002
Netherlands Waagstuk! SBS6 Albert Verlinde 1995-?
Italy Rischiatutto Rai Due Mike Bongiorno 1970-1974
Mexico Jeopardy! TV Azteca Omar Fierro 1998-?
Argentina Jeopardy![?] Canal 13 Fernando Bravo (host of El Precio Justo, the local version of The Price is Right) 2006-?
Finland Jeopardy Nelonen Ismo Apell January 2007-
Turkey Riziko TRT 1, Kanal D, Kanal 7(Super Jeopardy! version) Serhat Hacıpaşalıoğlu 1994-2001
Hungary Mindent vagy Semmit! RTL Klub István Vágó (later host of Hungary's version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire) 1993-2000
Croatia Izazov HRT 1 Joško Lokas (a Croatian talk show host) At least early 2000s
Belgium Waagstuk! VTM Luc Appermont Mid-1990s
Norway Jeopardy![?] TV 2 Nils Gunnar Lie 1995-? (started around the time Denmark got its version)
Czech Republic Risk
Riskuj!
Nova Pavel Svoboda
Ivan Vyskočil
Jan Krasl
Petr Svoboda
Jan Rosák
1995 – 2006
Romania Risti si castigi! PRO TV Constantin Cotimanis and Cristi Iacob 1996 - 1998
Slovakia Pokušenie Markíza Michal Duriš
Dodo Dúbravský
1996 – 2007
Riskuj! JOJ Štefan Bučko 2002 – present

In addition, the American version of the show is distributed internationally and airs across the world. In most of Canada, it airs on CTV; in British Columbia, Jeopardy! airs on Citytv, and in Newfoundland and Labrador, it airs on NTV. There are no airings on local Quebec stations. In September 2008, Jeopardy! will move nationwide to CBC Television. [21] Canadian residents are eligible to be contestants on the U.S. version. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 46 KB) Summary Versions of Jeopardy, as listed on w:Jeopardy! Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Jeopardy! User:Astrokey44/maps/TV ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1357x628, 46 KB) Summary Versions of Jeopardy, as listed on w:Jeopardy! Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Jeopardy! User:Astrokey44/maps/TV ... This article is about the British television station. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ... Steve Jones (born 16 March 1977) is a Welsh television presenter and model. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Paul John Ross (born John Ross on December 31, 1956 in Leytonstone, London) is an English journalist, television editor, and media personality. ... Network Ten, or Channel Ten, is one of Australias three major commercial television networks. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Countries which have their own version Sale of the Century is an international television game show format that has screened in several countries in various incarnations since 1969. ... Current TVNZ logo Television New Zealand (TVNZ) is the main broadcaster of television in New Zealand, established in 1980 through the merger of Television One and TV2 (formerly South Pacific Television). ... Countries which have their own versions of Wheel of Fortune The Wheel of Fortune has had a number of versions in different countries: // Main article: Wheel of Fortune (US game show) Main article: Wheel of Fortune (UK game show) Main article: Wheel of Fortune (Australian game show) The Wheel Of... TV4 is the largest commercial television channel in Sweden. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... TVA is a private commercial Canadian French-language television network based in Quebec. ... Born 23 May 1933, Réal Giguère began his carreer as a radio announcer from 1956 to 1961. ... RTL (formerly RTL plus) is a German commercial television station distributed via cable and satellite along with DVB-T (Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial, in larger population centers). ... Hans-Jürgen Bäumler (born January 28, 1942 in Dachau, Bavaria, Germany) is a German figure skater, actor, singer und moderator. ... Frank Elstner Frank Elstner, full name Tim Maria Franz Elstner (b. ... NTV, a Russian television channel (HTB in Cyrillic) was a pioneer in the post-Soviet independent television media. ... TF1 is a private French TV channel, controlled by TF1 Group, whose major share-holder is Bouygues. ... The Price Is Rights US 36th season logo. ... TV 2 is a Danish government-owned television station broadcasting from Odense on Funen. ... Lasse Rimmer Nielsen (born March 26, 1972 in Ã…rhus) is a Danish stand-up comedian, tv-, and radio host. ... Antena 3 Televisión is a Spanish television station. ... TV3 is a private television channel in Estonia. ... TVP 2 is a Polish tv channel operated by TVP. Its programing includes Pamorama (a news show), Europa da siÄ™ lubić (a funny show that compares European countries), and a variety of others. ... SBS 6 Current Logo SBS6 is a commercial TV channel in the Netherlands owned by the SBS Broadcasting Group. ... Rai Due is one of the three main television channels broadcast by Italian public television company RAI alongside with Rai Uno and Rai Tre. ... Michael Nicholas Salvatore Bongiorno (known as Mike Bongiorno ) was born in New York City, United States on May 26, 1924). ... TV Azteca is the second largest Mexican television network. ... Omar Fierro (October 10 1962) is a Mexican actor and TV host whos participated in many soap operas in and outside Mexico, movies and TV Shows such as Cada Mañana, A Ganar con Omar and the Mexican version of Jeopardy between others. ... Canal 13 is an Argentine television network. ... Nelonen or (Fyran in Swedish) is a Finnish commercial TV channel. ... TRT 1 is a Turkish television station. ... Kanal D is a nation-wide television channel in Turkey. ... RTL Klub is a television station (M-RTL Zrt. ... István Vágó (born 14 February 1949) is a Hungarian television host for the Budapest-based RTL Klub. ... Logo from the UK version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? is a television game show which offers very large cash prizes for correctly answering successive multiple-choice questions. ... Croatian Radiotelevision or Hrvatska radiotelevizija (HRT) is the Croatian public broadcasting company. ... VTM or Vlaamse Televisie Maatschappij is the main commercial television station in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking north of Belgium. ... The TV 2 logo TV 2 is Norways most viewed commercial television station. ... TV Nova is a Czech TV station, founded by Vladimír Železný. It began broadcasting in 1994 as the first privately held nation-wide Czech TV station. ... Pro TV, reaching around 82% of households, operates under the PRO TV SA license owned by Central European Media Enterprises managed by the controversial businessman Ronald Lauder, which includes Acasa TV (reaching 73,3% of households), Pro TV InternaÅ£ional and Pro Cinema TV channels. ... The current logo of the station. ... JOJ is a television network in Slovakia. ... This article is about the Broadcast Television Network CTV, for the broadcasting television company see CTVglobemedia. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... CKVU (Citytv Vancouver) is a television station based in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... CJON-TV is a Canadian television station broadcasting on channel 6 (cable channel 5) in St. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... CBC Television is a Canadian English language television network. ...


Jeopardy! has occasionally held international tournaments that allow the champions of each country's versions to compete with each other. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Episode status

Fleming era

1964-1975

It is believed that only a small number of the 2,753 episodes from the original NBC Daytime version of Jeopardy! survive, mostly as black-and-white kinescopes of the original color videotapes. In all likelihood, the original tapes were wiped as they were recorded over by NBC with new programming in an era when videotape was an expensive commodity. Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... Kinescope (IPA: ) originally referred to the cathode ray tube used in television monitors. ... Color is an important part of the visual arts. ... Videotape is a means of recording television pictures and accompanying sound onto magnetic tape as opposed to movie film. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...

  • A demonstration episode dated March 5, 1964 survives as a black-and-white kinescope. (The first game for broadcast was taped on March 18, 1964 and was aired March 30, 1964. From the beginning, the show was recorded and broadcast in color.)
  • The Museum of Television & Radio in New York City has the 2,000th episode from 1972, an all-time champions match featuring Mel Brooks in character as the 2000 Year Old Man. GSN has aired this episode in its entirety.
  • A clip from an early 1960s episode aired in 2004 during an ABC News Nightline special on Jeopardy! on the night Ken Jennings lost.
  • Two regular play 1974 episodes and the 1975 finale exist among private collectors.
  • The UCLA Film and Television Archive has 14 episodes from this era in their collection: black and white kinescopes of episodes from May 1, 3 and 4 1967 (from the Jeopardy! National College Scholarship Contest featuring high school seniors), color tapes of episodes from March 8, 16, 24, and April 1 and 9, 1971; March 12, 20, 28, and April 5 and 13, 1973; and April 24, 1974.

Incomplete paper records of the NBC-era games exist on microfilm at the Library of Congress. This article is about the day. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Museum of Television and Radio, New York City The Museum of Television & Radio (MTR) (formerly The Museum of Broadcasting) is a set of archives in the U.S. dedicated to the collection of programs and advertising broadcast via radio and television. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Cover of the 2000 Year Old Man album The 2000 Year Old Man was a persona created by Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner starting around 1961. ... This article is about the American broadcast network. ... Nightline is a late-night hard and soft news program broadcast by ABC in the United States, and has a franchised formula to other networks and stations elsewhere in the world. ... For other persons named Ken Jennings, see Ken Jennings (disambiguation). ... The UCLA Film and Television Archive is an internationally-renowned visual arts organization focused on the preservation, study, and appreciation of film and television, based at the University of California, Los Angeles. ... Microfilm machines may be available at libraries or record archives. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


1978-1979 revival

The status of the 1978 version is unknown. The first and last episodes of this series are known to exist in broadcast quality; GSN holds the broadcast rights to these two episodes (and presumably any in between, although only the two mentioned have been rebroadcast on the channel). The Game Show Network (GSN) is an American cable television and direct broadcast satellite channel dedicated to game shows and interactive television games. ...


Trebek era

Slate from a Season 8 broadcast
Slate from a Season 8 broadcast
Slate from a Season 23 broadcast
Slate from a Season 23 broadcast

The Trebek version is completely intact. GSN—which like Jeopardy! is an affiliate of Sony Pictures Television—has rerun approximately 8 seasons to date, although they continuously aired the 1997–98 season (14th season) from June 2001 until June 13, 2005. Since then, GSN has been rerunning episodes from the 2001–02 season (Season 18), including a series of 2001 episodes that aired only on about 50 syndicated stations due to the September 11, 2001 attacks[citation needed]. Image File history File links 1992-05-19Jeopardy!Season8LeaderCard. ... Image File history File links 1992-05-19Jeopardy!Season8LeaderCard. ... Image File history File links 2007-01-11Season23Slate. ... Image File history File links 2007-01-11Season23Slate. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


There is a 66 game disparity between the show numbers assigned new Jeopardy! episodes and the actual number of Trebek-era games played. To assist subscribing affiliate stations in airing episodes in the correct order, a show number is read by announcer Johnny Gilbert just prior to the taping of each game; this number is audible on the episodes as received by the affiliates, and visible on the slate attached to them, but the slate is trimmed from the show prior to broadcast.


Each new episode receives an integer show number 1 greater than the previous episode. However, all 65 reruns in Season 1 (1984-1985) were given new show numbers despite not being new games, and a retrospective clip show that aired May 15, 2002 was also given a show number (#4088). As such, the game with show number #5000 aired on May 12, 2006,[22] but the 5,000th game hosted by Alex Trebek did not air until September 25, 2006. is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In popular culture

The show has been portrayed or parodied in numerous television shows, films, and works of literature over the years, frequently with one or more characters participating as contestants, or as a television show the character(s) watch and play along with. Three cultural references stand out among the most popular, having been referenced, in turn, in categories, clues, or interview segments on Jeopardy! itself.

What is. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Clifford C. Clavin, Jr. ... John Deszo Ratzenberger (born April 6, 1947) is an American actor. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Will Ferrell (as Alex Trebek) and Darrell Hammond (as Sean Connery). ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... This article is about the musician himself. ... Greg Kihn (born July 10, 1949 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a U.S. pop musician. ... This article describes the British horror/suspense television series. ... I Lost on Jeopardy is a song by Weird Al Yankovic. ... Fleming introduces a 1974 episode of Jeopardy! Art Fleming (born Arthur Fleming Fazzin in New York City May 1, 1924; died April 25, 1995, in Crystal River, Florida) was the original host of the TV game show Jeopardy! // Flemings parents, William and Marie Fazzin, had emigrated to the United...

Merchandising

The Jeopardy! brand has been used on products in several other formats. There have been Jeopardy! video games made on most platforms including Apple II, Commodore 64, DOS, Nintendo Entertainment System, Nintendo Game Boy, Sega Game Gear, Sega Genesis, Super NES, PlayStation, Nintendo 64, game.com, Sega Dreamcast, Apple Macintosh, PlayStation 2, Microsoft Windows, and mobile phones. A free version of the game can be found at Station.com. Tiger Electronics also marketed a hand-held travel version of the game in the late nineties. Jeopardy! gameplay Jeopardy! is a video game published by Gametek in 1988 for the Nintendo Entertainment System and some early PCs. ... The Apple II was one of the most popular personal computers of the 1980s. ... C-64 redirects here. ... This article is about the family of closely related operating systems for the IBM PC compatible platform. ... “NES” redirects here. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... The Mega Drive/Genesis was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega in Japan (1988), Europe (1990) and most of the rest of the world as the Mega Drive. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... The Game. ... The Dreamcast , code-named Dural, Dricas and Katana during development) is Segas fifth and final video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... PS2 redirects here. ... Windows redirects here. ... Tiger Electronics is an American toy manufacturer, best known for their handheld LCD games, the Furby, and Giga Pets. ... The nineties is a decade common to a number of centuries. ...



Several board game versions of the game have been produced over the years by Milton Bradley, Pressman Toys (including a Simpsons version), Tyco Toys and Parker Brothers. For the show's fifteenth season in 1998-1999, a watch was released. The watch plays the famous theme song with the push of a button, and included 25 game cards with the answer-question format. A board game is a game played with counters or pieces that are placed on, removed from, or moved across a board (a premarked surface, usually specific to that game). ... For the Oakland Athletics outfielder, see Milton Bradley (baseball player) The Milton Bradley Company is an American game company established by Milton Bradley in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1860. ... Home Screen Simpsons Jeopardy! began as a board game (published by Pressman®) which took the popular game show Jeopardy! and themed it to the long-running animated series The Simpsons. The game contained a Jeopardy! style plastic board behind which question sheets could be inserted. ... Tyco Toys is a division of the Mattel toy company. ... The Parker Brothers logo. ...


Educational toy company Educational Insights (makers of the Geosafari system) has released a self-contained, programmable Jeopardy! system that can be hooked up to a normal TV set for both home and school use. The school version is marketed as Classroom Jeopardy!, while the home version is called Host Your Own Jeopardy! Except for the names, both systems are identical, using a cartridge-based system for the categories and wireless controls for the players and host. The unit itself acts as the scoreboard.


A DVD titled Jeopardy!: An Inside Look at America's Favorite Quiz Show was released on November 8, 2005, featuring five full episodes of the show—#1 (Trebek premiere), #4657 (Ken Jennings's loss), #4781, #4782, #4783 (the three final matches of the Ultimate Tournament of Champions), the latter of which can be watched through multiple camera angles—and three featurettes—21 Years of Answers & Questions, Jeopardy!: Behind the Answers, and What Does It Take to Get a Clue?[23] DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Annually, Day-to-Day Calendars releases a daily desktop Jeopardy! Calendar, featuring 6 full games-worth of clues presented 1 clue per day (with the correct response on the back of each day's sheet). The brand has been licensed for slot machine games at casinos and online. In 2007, MGA Games released a DVD Game version of "Jeopardy!" which was titled the Jeopardy! DVD Home Game System and included 3 wireless buzzers and plugin unit for your DVD player that kept the score. Alex Trebek appeared in the game and read the questions. MGA Entertainment (Micro Games of America Entertainment) is a private manufacturer of childrens toys and family entertainment products founded in 1997. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Jeopardy! DVD Game (aka Jeopardy! DVD Home Game System) is based on the highly popular television quiz show Jeopardy! and is produced by Sony Consumer Products, Jeopardy Productions and MGA Entertainment. ...


See also

Merv Griffin Entertainment logo, used since 1999 Merv Griffin Productions (later Merv Griffin Enterprises now Merv Griffin Entertainment) is a production outfit owned by television mogul Merv Griffin that was founded in 1964. ... This article is about the current, syndicated nighttime edition of the U.S. game show, which began in 1983. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Definition from the J! Archive
  2. ^ In Show #4604, aired September 16, 2004, Ken Jennings responded to the clue "SPEAKING IN TONGUES $800: A 1996 Oakland School Board decision made many aware of this term for African-American English" with "What be Ebonics?" In Show #4657, aired November 30, 2004, Jennings responded to the clue "A CATEGORY ABOUT NOTHING $400: En español" with "¿Qué es nada?" In Show #4752, aired April 12, 2005, Steve Chernicoff responded to the clue "FROM THE FRENCH $1200 (DD, wager $2000): It's a hint or trace of something (sounds like of Campbell's)" with "Qu'est-ce que c'est qu'un soupçon?" In Show #5087, aired October 24, 2006, John Bowen was ruled correct with a response of "How about architect, now?" for the clue "OCCUPATIONS $800: Trained in engineering, a ship designer is often called a naval one of these" after he used the aforementioned guess incorrectly earlier in the category.
  3. ^ International adaptations of the show may enforce phrasing rules more strictly. In the UK version, host Steve Jones reminds the players that their responses must be grammatically correct.
  4. ^ The last show in which two contestants finished in the red was Show #4718, aired on February 23, 2005 during the Ultimate Tournament of Champions. Only Jeff Richmond advanced to Final Jeopardy!
  5. ^ During the first two seasons of the Alex Trebek version of the show, a few contestants lost their games solely because they had forgotten to phrase their Final Jeopardy! responses in the form of a question. Since the beginning of the 1986–1987 season, contestants have been provided with and instructed to write the appropriate first word of the correct Final Jeopardy! response ("What", "Who", etc.) during the commercial break after the Double Jeopardy! Round. Resultantly, contestants frequently omit the verb from their Final Jeopardy! responses, but without penalty. See, for example, Kerry Breitenbach's Final Jeopardy! response and Alex's associated commentary in the third quarterfinal game of the 2006 Tournament of Champions, show #4998 - Wednesday, May 10, 2006.
  6. ^ Show #4595 from the J! Archive
  7. ^ show #2 from the J! Archive
  8. ^ Multiple tiebreaker clues may be played, but all but the deciding one, for which a contestant provides a correct response, are edited out of the broadcast version of the program.
  9. ^ On show #5190, aired 2007-03-16, the first three-way tie for first place in the history of the show aired, with each of the contestants (Scott Weiss, Jamey Kirby, and Anders Martinson) ending with $16,000 after the Final Jeopardy! clue. The leader going into Final Jeopardy! (computer science professor Weiss) wanted to make history after hearing that a three-way tie had never happened before, and he made the a wager that would match the doubled scores of the other two contestants, who were tied with each other after Double Jeopardy! All three contestants returned on the next episode, with Kirby becoming sole champion, winning an additional $22,677.
  10. ^ On the show aired January 19, 1993, Air Force Lt. Col. Daryl Scott won the game with only $1; he won another $13,401 the next day.
  11. ^ Some celebrities have returned to play Celebrity Jeopardy! on multiple occassions. Regis Philbin and Carol Burnett have made the most appearances on Celebrity Jeopardy!, with three appearances each.
  12. ^ On one occasion, Kids Week was taped in Washington, D.C.'s DAR Constitution Hall.
  13. ^ The original "A Time for Tony", which differs slightly from "Think!", was used as a jewelry prize cue on Wheel of Fortune in the 1980s.
  14. ^ "Think!" was not used in the 1978–1979 version of Jeopardy!, as that version of the show did not have a Final Jeopardy!Round.
  15. ^ "Think!" is often heard at baseball stadiums when the manager goes to the pitcher's mound to discuss a replacement, or at football games during instant replay reviews, or at short-track races when officials are trying to ascertain the cause of a red flag accident. On numerous television shows, including the Jerry Springer show and Boston Legal, the theme or some variation thereof is heard when a choice has to be made or a result is being awaited.
  16. ^ CBS Television Distribution Shows / Jeopardy!. Retrieved on 2007-07-30.
  17. ^ International versions of Jeopardy! use sound-alike music rather than the actual "Think!" theme during the Final Jeopardy! Round, presumably avoiding royalty payments to Griffin.
  18. ^ "Frisco Disco" would resurface in 1983 as a prize cue on Wheel of Fortune, where it was used until 1989.
  19. ^ Both "Frisco Disco" and "January, February, March" were recorded in 1976 and released on Merv Griffin's double album As Time Goes By, two years prior to the revival of Jeopardy! in 1978.
  20. ^ On at least one occasion, the "Think!" theme was not played at all during Final Jeopardy! Before, during, and after Alex Trebek's reading of the Final Jeopardy! clue for show #3985, aired Friday, December 21, 2001, the L.A. Spirit Chorale sang a live, a cappella rendition of "Silent Night", with Clue Crew member Cheryl Farrell performing the solo. This appeared to confuse challenger Carly Minner, who looked up from her podium in surprise when it was announced that time had expired.
  21. ^ Canadian Press: "Hockey soap opera, immigration police drama on CBC's winter schedule". Canadian Press, via jam.canoe.ca. Retrieved on 2007-11-20.
  22. ^ Show #5000 from the J! Archive
  23. ^ Jeopardy!: An Inside Look at America's Favorite Quiz Show promotional web site. Sony Pictures Home Entertainment (2005). Retrieved on 2006-12-10.

is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Ken Jennings, see Ken Jennings (disambiguation). ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are several notable individuals named Steve Jones: Steve Jones (athlete) Steve Jones (biologist) Steve Jones (golfer) Steve Jones (footballer), a Northern Irish footballer Steve Snapper Jones is a former basketball-player and an NBA analyst. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A partially revealed board in the final game, first round. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Regis Francis Xavier Philbin (born August 25, 1931) is an Emmy Award-winning American television personality best known for his roles as a talk show host, game show host, and presenter at various events. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) is a five-time Golden Globe winning American actress and comedienne. ... DAR Constitution Hall DAR Constitution Hall is a concert hall located in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1929 by the Daughters of the American Revolution, which still owns the theater. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about Jerry Springer himself. ... Boston Legal is an American dramedy television series that began airing on ABC on October 3rd, 2004. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... Autograph of the carol by Gruber Silent Night (Stille Nacht) is a traditional and popular Christmas carol. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
The $25,000 Pyramid
Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show
1990 – 1995
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The Price is Right
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The Price is Right
Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show
1998
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Win Ben Stein's Money
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Who Wants to Be a Millionaire (US version)
Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show
2002 – 2003
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The Price is Right
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The Price is Right
Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show
2005 – 2006
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  Results from FactBites:
 
How To Win On Jeopardy (3916 words)
I estimate the typical Jeopardy contestant on the show would average around $24,000 if you adjusted for Daily Doubles and Final Jeopardy and eliminated competition — in other words, if nobody were able to beat him or her to the buzzer.
Jeopardy is not going to ask about Li (unless they go in the direction of giving the name and asking for the empire, in which case it would be easy to guess), but Typhoid Mary — who remains a topic of interest — comes up all the time.
For instance, Jeopardy would never ask for the atomic number of the element fermium, but they would definitely expect you to know who Enrico Fermi is — so you'd be wasting your time and energy by learning all the atomic numbers when you could be learning about prominent physicists.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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