FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jennings Randolph
Jennings Randolph
Jennings Randolph

U.S. Senator, West Virginia
In office
November 1958–January 1985
Preceded by John D. Hoblitzell, Jr.
Succeeded by Jay Rockefeller

Born March 8, 1902
Salem, West Virginia
Died May 8, 1998
St. Louis, Missouri
Political party Democratic
Spouse Mary Katherine Babb

Jennings Randolph (March 8, 1902May 8, 1998) was an American politician from West Virginia. He was a member of the Democratic Party and was the last surviving member of the United States Congress to have served during the first 100 days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration. Image File history File links Jennings_Randolph_headshot. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Dempsey Hoblitzell, Jr. ... John Davison Rockefeller IV (born on June 18, 1937), generally known as Jay Rockefeller, has served as a Democratic U.S. Senator from West Virginia since 1985. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Salem is a city located in Harrison County, West Virginia. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Nickname: Gateway City, Gateway to the West, or Mound City Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: Country United States State Missouri County Independent City Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area    - City 66. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... FDR redirects here. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Randolph was born in Salem, West Virginia and was named after William Jennings Bryan. He was a descendent of colonist William Randolph. Both his grandfather and father had been mayors of Salem. Salem is a city located in Harrison County, West Virginia. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... William Randolph (1650 - April 11, 1711) was a founding father, colonist and land owner who played an important role in Virginian history and politics. ...


He attended the public schools, and graduated from the Salem Academy in 1920 and Salem College in 1924. He engaged in newspaper work in Clarksburg, West Virginia in 1924. He was the associate editor of West Virginia Review at Charleston, West Virginia in 1925; head of the department of public speaking and journalism at Davis and Elkins College at Elkins, West Virginia, 1926-1932; and a trustee of Salem College and Davis and Elkins College. Clarksburg is a city located in Harrison County, West Virginia. ... Official website: www. ... Davis Avenue in downtown Elkins Elkins is a city in Randolph County, West Virginia, United States. ...


He was an unsuccessful candidate for election in 1930 to the Seventy-second Congress, but was elected to the Seventy-third and to the six succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1933-January 3, 1947). While a congressman, he was chairman of the U.S. House Committee on the District of Columbia (Seventy-sixth through Seventy-ninth Congresses) and the U.S. House Committee on Civil Service (Seventy-ninth Congress). The Committee on Government Reform is a House of Representatives committee that has existed in varying forms since 1816. ...

Jennings Randolph and Jimmy Carter in the Oval Office. (National Archives)
Jennings Randolph and Jimmy Carter in the Oval Office. (National Archives)

Randolph was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection during the Republican landslide of 1946. He went on to become a professor of public speaking at Southeastern University in Washington, D.C., 1935-1953, and dean of School of Business Administration from 1952 to 1958; he was assistant to president and director of public relations, Capital Airlines (later purchased by United Airlines), Washington, D.C., February 1947-April 1958. Image File history File links Jennings_Randolph. ... Image File history File links Jennings_Randolph. ... Southeastern University is a private, non-profit undergraduate and graduate institution of higher education. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia. ... Uniteds logo as seen at United hub Denver International Airport. ...


U.S. Senate

He was elected in a special election on November 4, 1958, to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of senator Matthew M. Neely. He was reelected in 1960, 1966, 1972 and 1978 and served from November 5, 1958, to January 3, 1985. He did not seek reelection in 1984. In the Senate, Randolph was chairman of the Committee on Public Works (Eighty-ninth through Ninety-fifth Congresses) and a member of the Committee on Environment and Public Works (Ninety-fifth and Ninety-sixth Congresses). A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Matthew Neely Matthew M. Neely (b. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ...


Legislation

Twenty-Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Randolph was best known for sponsoring eleven times an amendment to the Constitution that would grant citizens aged between 18 and 21 the right to vote. He first introduced the amendment in 1942, arguing that young soldiers fighting in World War II should be able to vote. In 1970 amendments to the Voting Rights Act lowered the voting age to 18 in both local and national elections. After a Supreme Court decision found that Congress only had the power to lower the voting age to 18 for national elections, Randolph was among the Senators who reintroduced the amendment. It was ratified by three-fourths of the states in 1971 as the Twenty-Sixth Amendment less than 100 days after it was approved by Congress. Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... The Voting Rights Act of 1965 (Public Law 89-10) outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters -- instead of state or local voter registration which had often been denied... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged. ... Amendment XXVI (the Twenty-sixth Amendment) of the United States Constitution was adopted in 1971. ...


Randolph-Sheppard Act

While a member of the House of Representatives, Randolph was the main sponsor of the Randolph-Shepard Act, which was passed by Congress in 1936. This act, which is still in force, gives blind people preference in federal contracts for food service stands on federal properties such as military bases, as well as some other jobs. Organizations for blind people such as the National Federation of the Blind cite this act as one of the first and most successful programs to give blind people secure jobs with less supervision and more independence than other previous programs such as sheltered workshops. This act became one of the first instances of affirmative action legislation. Blindness is the condition of lacking visual perception due to physiological or psychological factors. ... The National Federation of the Bblind (NFB) is an organization representing blind people in the United States It is probably the largest organization for blind people in the United States and is notable for its willingness to take controversial positions on many issues. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Aeronautics Legislation

An aviation enthusiast, he often flew more than once a day to visit constituents in the West Virginia and to commute to Washington. He was the founder and first president of the Congressional Flying Club. He was a strong advocate for programs to advance air travel and airport development. In 1938 he sponsored the Civil Aeronautics Act, which transferred the federal civil aviation responsibilities from the Department of Commerce to a new independent agency, the Civil Aeronautics Authority. The legislation gave the CAA the power to regulate airline fares and to determine the routes that air carriers would serve. In subsequent years, Randolph co-authored the Federal Airport Act as well as legislation that created the Civil Air Patrol, the National Air and Space Museum, and National Aviation Day. During his tenure in the Senate, he sponsored the Airport-Airways Development Act that created the Airport Trust Fund. As a co-author of the Appalachian Regional Development Act, he included provisions for the development of rural airports. ... The United States Department of Commerce is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. ... Governments have played an important part in shaping air transportation. ... Civil Air Patrol seal The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is the official civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force (USAF). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


Synthetic Liquid Fuels Act

In 1942 he proposed a Synthetic Liquid Fuels Act, which would fund the transformation of coal and its products into other useful forms of energy. To promote the viability of synthetic fuels, November 1943 Randolph and a professional pilot flew in an aircraft powered by gasoline derived from coal. The small, single-engine airplane flew from Morgantown, West Virginia to National Airport in Washington, DC. Aided by Interior Secretary Harold Ickes and Senator Joseph C. O'Mahoney, the Synthetic Liquid Fuels Act was approved on April 5, 1944. The Act authorized $30 million for the construction and operation of demonstration plants to produce synthetic liquid fuels. The Synthetic Liquid Fuels Program was a program run by the United States Bureau of Mines to create the technology to produce synthetic fuel from coal. ... Synthetic fuel or synfuel is any liquid fuel obtained from coal or from natural gas. ... Morgantown is a city in Monongalia County, West Virginia, on the banks of the Monongahela River and is part of the Pittsburgh DMA. Morgantown is the largest city in North-Central West Virginia and is the principal city of and is included in the Morgantown, West Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Harold LeClair Ickes (March 15, 1874–February 3, 1952) was a U.S. administrator and political figure. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Department of Peace

He introduced legislation to establish a Department of Peace in 1946 with the goal of strengthening America's capacity to resolve and manage international conflicts by both military and nonmilitary means. In the 1970s and 1980s he joined Senators Mark Hatfield and Spark Matsunaga and Congressman Dan Glickman in efforts to create a national institution dedicated to peace. After he had announced his retirement from Congress in 1984, Randolph played a key role in the passage and enactment of the United States Institute of Peace Act. To guarantee its passage and funding, the legislation was attached to the Department of Defense Authorization Act of 1985. Approval of the legislation was in part a tribute to Randolph's long career in public service. The Jennings Randolph Program, which awards fellowships to enable outstanding scholars, policymakers, journalists, and other professionals from around the world to conduct research at the U.S. Institute of Peace, has been named in his honor. The United States Department of Peace is a proposed cabinet-level department of the executive branch of the U.S. government. ... Mark Odom Hatfield (born July 12, 1922) is an American politician from Oregon. ... Spark Matsunaga Spark Masayuki Matsunaga (October 8, 1916 - April 15, 1990) was a United States Senator from Hawaii. ... Dan Glickman Daniel Robert Glickman (born November 24, 1944) is an American politician. ... Proposed new USIP headquarters, construction to begin 2007. ...


Life Outside of Congress

Preceded by:
Frank L. Bowman
U.S. Representative of West Virginia's 2nd Congressional District
1933–1947
Succeeded by:
Melvin C. Snyder
Preceded by:
John D. Hoblitzell, Jr.
Class 2 U.S. Senator from West Virginia
1958–1985
Succeeded by:
Jay Rockefeller

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jennings Randolph Recognition Project (2160 words)
The Jennings Randolph Recognition Project (JRRP) is generating positive benefits for historians and students interested in an intriguing case study of how one senior legislator demonstrated leadership on a world stage with a complex weave of issues providing "a window" on his times.
Jennings Randolph was actively engaged in agricultural/rural development issues across his career beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and the New Deal.
On September 18, 2000 a meeting in Jennings Randolph's home town of Salem, West Virginia, JRRP sparked considerable media interest calling for a "New Populism" dedicated to Randolph's spirit of citizenship activism on behalf of rural America and of the less fortunate (particularly small farmers), decency and humility in American politics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m