FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jeffrey Sachs
Jeffrey Sachs
Jeffrey Sachs

Jeffrey David Sachs (born November 5, 1954, in Detroit, Michigan) is an American economist known for his work as an economic advisor to governments in Latin America, Eastern Europe, the former Yugoslavia, the former Soviet Union, Asia, and Africa. He is currently a professor on the faculty at the School of International and Public Affairs and director of the Earth Institute, both at Columbia University. He is also Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. From 2002 to 2006, he was Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan and Director of the UN Millennium Project. He proposed "shock therapy" (though he himself dislikes the term) as a solution to the economic crises of Bolivia, Poland, and Russia. He is also known for his work with international agencies on problems of poverty reduction, debt cancellation, and disease control — especially HIV/AIDS, for the developing world. He advocated distribution of free insecticide-treated bed nets to combat malaria. He is the only academic to have been repeatedly ranked among the world's most influential people by Time magazine. He was appointed the 2007 lecturer for the BBC Reith Lectures. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Detroit redirects here. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in the Latin alphabet, Југославија in Cyrillic; English: South Slavia, or literary The Land of South Slavs) describes three political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ... The Earth Institute was established at Columbia University in 1995. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Secretary-General of the United Nations is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal organs of the United Nations. ... IPA pronunciation: This is a Korean name; the family name is Ban Ban Ki-moon (born June 13, 1944)[1] is a South Korean diplomat and the current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan GCMG (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to January 1, 2007, serving two five-year terms. ... The Millennium Project is an initiative that focuses on research implementing the organizational means, operational priorities, and financing structures necessary to achieve a certain set of goals. ... In economics, shock therapy refers to the sudden release of price and currency controls, withdrawal of state subsidies, and immediate trade liberalization within a country. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ... Time 100 cover for 2007 The Time 100 is an annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, as assembled by Time. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Reith Lectures are a series of annual radio lectures given by leading figures of the day, and broadcast by the BBC. They were begun in 1948, in honour of the first Director-General of the BBC, John Reith. ...

Contents

Biography

Sachs graduated from Oak Park High School in Oak Park, Michigan in 1972 and received his B.A., summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1976, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard in 1978 and 1980 respectively. He holds honorary degrees from several institutions, including Simon Fraser University and Ohio Wesleyan University. Oak Park is a city in Oakland County of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Simon Fraser University (SFU) is a Canadian university in British Columbia with campuses located on Burnaby Mountain, and in Vancouver and Surrey. ... “OWU” redirects here. ...


Before going to Columbia University in July 2002, Sachs spent over 20 years at Harvard University. Sachs passed the general examinations for his Ph.D. and was invited to join the Harvard Society of Fellows while still a Harvard undergraduate.[1] He joined the Harvard faculty as an Assistant Professor in 1980, and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1982 and Full Professor (with tenure) in 1983, at the age of 29, eventually becoming Galen L. Stone Professor of International Trade. Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ...


Bolivia was the first country in which Jeffrey Sachs began to develop his theories. In 1985 the economic situation in Bolivia was undermined by hyperinflation and the country was unable to pay its debt to the IMF. Jeffrey Sachs, at that time active as economic adviser to the Bolivian government, drew up a plan that was adopted as decree 21060. Whereas inflation had reached 20,000% per year in 1985,[2] when Jeffrey Sachs left the country two years later it had fallen to 11%. But his plan resulted in "collateral damage" of the already meager productive sector. The only sector which thrived was the production of coca. Whereas only 17% of labor market was employed in the coca sector in 1980, that had risen to 37% by 1990.[citation needed] In economics, hyperinflation is inflation that is out of control, a condition in which prices increase rapidly as a currency loses its value. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ...


On January 1, 1990, following the advice of Sachs and ex-International Monetary Fund economist (former Sachs student and future assistant Treasury secretary for international affairs) David Lipton, the Polish government introduced what came to be known as "shock therapy" — the rapid conversion of all property and assets from public to private ownership. After initial shortages and inflation, prices eventually stabilized [3], and Poland was converging towards the EU as regards the income level in 1993-2004.[4] IMF redirects here. ... In economics, shock therapy refers to the sudden release of price and currency controls, withdrawal of state subsidies, and immediate trade liberalization within a country. ...


The Russian government invited Sachs' advice on reproducing the Polish success in late 1991. Sachs introduced fellow Harvard economist Andrei Shleifer around the Russian government and it was decided that Shleifer would advise on privatization while Sachs advised macroeconomic issues.[5] Andrei Shleifer (born February 20, 1961) is a prominent academic economist. ...


In 1995 Sachs replaced Dwight H. Perkins as director of one of several international consulting entities of the John F. Kennedy School of Government, the Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID; established in 1974),[6] resigning in 1999 to head a 1998 spinoff, the Center for International Development (CID). The CID, started with the transfer of roughly half of HIID's endowment, survived the dissolution of HIID in 2000 after two years of financial deficits and filing of an eventually successful lawsuit against Harvard by the U.S. Agency for International Development(USAID) over Andrei Shleifer's 1992–1997 HIID consulting project in Russia.[7][8][9][10] The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (colloquially known as the Kennedy School, Harvard Kennedy School and HKS[1]) is a public policy and public administration school, and one of Harvards graduate and professional schools. ... Andrei Shleifer (born February 20, 1961) is a prominent academic economist. ... The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ...


Outside of Sachs' own projects CID failed to attract sustainable funding or broad scholarly involvement and, in March, 2002 Sachs resigned from Harvard to become director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University, effective July 2002.[11] He has also been a guest lecturer at the London School of Economics several times. Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Earth Institute was established at Columbia University in 1995. ... Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ...


Since that date Sachs has been, in addition to his directorship, a professor in Columbia's Department of Economics, School of International and Public Affairs, and Department of Health Policy and Management; in 2003 he became Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development. He is also Director of the United Nations Millennium Project, President and Co-Founder of Millennium Promise, and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously, Sachs has been an advisor to the IMF, the World Bank, the OECD, the World Health Organization, and the United Nations Development Programme. The School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) of Columbia University is a public policy school and one of the most prestigious schools of international affairs and/or public affairs in the United States, and internationally. ... The title of Quetelet professor is a distinction awarded to professors at Columbia University. ... The Millennium Project is an initiative that focuses on research implementing the organizational means, operational priorities, and financing structures necessary to achieve the Millennium Development Goals or (MDGs). ... Millennium Promise is a non-profit organization dedicated to ending extreme poverty by 2025. ... The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) is a private, nonprofit, nonpartisan research organization dedicated to studying the science and empirics of economics, especially the American economy. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ... WHO redirects here. ... The United Nations Development Programe (UNDP), the United Nations global development network, is the largest multilateral source of development assistance in the world. ...


In his 2005 work, The End of Poverty, Sachs wrote that "Africa's governance is poor because Africa is poor." According to Sachs, with the right policies, mass destitution — like the 1.1 billion extremely poor living on less than $1 a day — can be eliminated within 20 years. China and India serve as examples; China has lifted 300m people out of poverty in the last two decades. For Sachs a key element is raising aid from the $65 billion level of 2002 to $195 billion a year by 2015. Sachs emphasizes the role of geography, with much of Africa suffering from being landlocked and disease-prone, but stresses that these problems once recognized can be overcome: disease (such as malaria) can be controlled, and infrastructure created. Without specifically addressing these issues, political elites will continue to focus on getting resource-based wealth out of the country as fast as possible, and investment and development remain mirages. The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time (ISBN 1-59420-045-9) is a 2005 book by American economist Jeffrey Sachs, with a foreword by U2 frontman and humanitarian Bono. ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ...


In 2007, Sachs was conferred with the Padma Bhushan, India's third highest civilian honor. The Padma Bhushan is an Indian civilian decoration established on January 2, 1954 by the President of India. ...


In early 2007, the Sachs for President Draft Committee, a non-profit organization, formed to draft Jeffrey D. Sachs to run for the presidency of the United States of America in the 2008 election. [12]


Sachs claims he has developed a new branch of economics, called "clinical economics." His research interests include the links of health and development, economic geography, globalization, transitions to market economies, international financial markets, international macroeconomic policy coordination, emerging markets, economic development and growth, global competitiveness, and macroeconomic policies in developing and developed countries. Economic geography is the study of the location, distribution and spatial organisation of economic activities across the Earth. ... Economic globalization has had an impact on the worldwide integration of different cultures. ... A market economy (also called a free market economy or a free enterprise economy) is an economic system in which the production and distribution of goods and services take place through the mechanism of free markets (though completley useless to some dumbasses) guided by a free price system. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Sachs is married to Sonia Ehrlich Sachs, who is a pediatrician. They have three children, Lisa, Adam, and Hannah. Lisa and Adam both followed in their parents footsteps and attended Harvard as well. Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants and children. ...


Criticism

Although Sachs is a hero to many, some economists view his proposals as dangerously naive. One of his strongest critics is New York University (NYU) Professor of Economics William Easterly who reproached The End of Poverty in his review for The Washington Post. Easterly's 2006 book, White Man's Burden, is a more thorough rebuttal of Sachs's argument that poor countries are stuck in a "poverty trap" from which there is no escape, except by massively scaled-up foreign aid. Easterly presents statistical evidence that he says proves that many newly developed countries — indeed, most of them — attained their higher status without large amounts of foreign aid as Sachs proposes. Easterly says "So yes, do read Sachs's eloquent descriptions of poverty and his compelling ethical case for the rich to help the poor. Just say no to the Big Plan." New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... William Easterly is Professor of Economics at New York University, joint with Africa House, and Co-Director of NYU’s Development Research Institute. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


Daniel Ben-Ami, writing on the British Internet magazine Spiked, has criticized Sachs from an opposite perspective to Easterly. Ben-Ami argued in a review of The End of Poverty that Sachs’ views represent an acceptance that underdevelopment is here to stay. He argues that despite Sachs’ "grandiose rhetoric" his goal is the long-term eradication of extreme poverty rather than the economic development and transformation of poorer societies. Ben-Ami also argued that the Sachs 2007 BBC Reith lecture embodied low horizons for the poor. Daniel Ben-Ami is a London-based journalist and author specialising in economics and finance. ... Spiked is a British Internet magazine focusing on politics, culture and society. ... A Reith Lecture is a lecture in a series of annual radio lectures given by leading figures of the day, and broadcast by the BBC. They were begun in 1948, in honour of the first Director-General of the BBC, John Reith. ...


Another person to criticize Sachs is Amir Attaran, who is a scientist and lawyer and currently the Canada Research Chair in Law, Population Health and Global Development at the University of Ottawa. Sachs and Attaran have worked closely as colleagues, including to coauthor a famous study in The Lancet documenting the dearth of foreign aid money to fight HIV/AIDS in the 1990s, which led to the creation of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. However, Sachs and Attaran part company in their opinion of the Millennium Development Goals, and Attaran argues in a paper published in PLoS Medicine and an editorial in the New York Times that the United Nations has misled people by setting specific, but immeasurable, targets for the Millennium Development Goals (for example, to reduce maternal mortality or malaria). Sachs dismisses that view in a reply to PLoS Medicine by saying that only a handful of the Millennium Development Goals are immeasurable, but Attaran also replies citing the United Nations' own data analysis (which the UN subsequently blocked from public access) showing that progress on a very large majority of the Millennium Development Goals is never measured.[13][14] The Lancet is one of the oldest and most respected peer-reviewed medical journals in the world, published weekly by Elsevier, part of Reed Elsevier. ... Tuberculous lungs The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a UN-related organization whose purpose is to finance programs that purport to prevent and treat patients with AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, three major threats to health on a global scale. ... The Millenium Development Goals The Millennium Development Goals are eight goals that 192 United Nations member states have agreed to try to achieve by the year 2015. ... The Public Library of Science (PLoS) is a nonprofit open access scientific publishing project aimed at creating a library of scientific journals and other scientific literature under an open content license. ...


Sachs has been variously criticized for having too neoliberal a perspective on economy. Socialist feminist Nancy Holmstrom pointed out in a 2000 article that, in advising implementation of his shock therapy on the collapsing Soviet Union, Sachs "supposed the transition to capitalism would be a natural, virtually automatic economic process: start by abandoning state planning, free up prices, promote private competition with state-owned industry, and sell off state industry as fast as possible [...]" Holmstrom goes on to cite the drastic decreases in industrial output over the coming years, a nearly halving of the country's GDP and of personal incomes, a doubling of the suicide rate, and a skyrocketing unemployment rate. [1] For the school of international relations, see Neoliberalism in international relations. ... Socialist feminism is a branch of feminism that focuses upon both the public and private spheres of a womans life and argues that liberation can only be achieved by working to end both the economic and cultural sources of womens oppression. ...


What is viewed as one of Sachs' great successes, the reversal of hyperinflation in Bolivia in the late 1980s by using extreme methods of economic shock therapy, is analyzed in depth in chapter 7 of Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine: the Rise of Disaster Capitalism (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2007). Klein argues that the story of Sachs' Bolivian "success" is clearly not true. In Klein's analysis, the radical reforms pushed by Sachs were neither democratically agreed upon nor achieved without violent state repression, and left the majority of Bolivians in far worse circumstances. Naomi Klein (b. ... The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism is a 2007 book by Canadian journalist Naomi Klein. ...


Support of proposed policies

Sachs suggests that with improved GMO seeds, irrigation, and fertilization, the crop yields in Africa (and other places with subsistence farming) can be increased from 1 ton/hectare to 3-5 tons/hectare. Sachs reasons that increased harvests would significantly increase the income of subsistence farmers and thereby reduce poverty. [2] This belief is also expressed in his 2008 book Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet. GMO is an abbreviation with several meanings: Genetically modified organism, an organism the genetic material of which has been altered using recombinant DNA technology Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad (AAR reporting mark GMO), an American railroad carrier This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Like most farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa, this Cameroonian man cultivates at the subsistence level. ...


The suggestion to gift Africa with Malaria bed nets was in response to a failed project which tried to sell the bed nets. Sachs argued that the bed nets weren't doing any good being stored in warehouses, when the bed nets were unaffordable to those in need. Sachs also argues that wealthy nations can afford to be generous, particularly when such programs are stalled by issues of financing. United States foreign aid is approximately 0.25% of the federal budget, while many European countries give a significantly larger percentage. [3] Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ...


Sachs does not believe that increased aid is the only solution. He also supports establishing credit and capitalizing microloan programs, which are often lacking in impoverished areas.[4] // Microcredit is an integral part of the microfinance concept which also includes microenterprise training, microinsurance and other financial innovations aimed at serving the very poor. ...


The economic impact of malaria has been estimated to cost Africa US$12 billion per year.[5] Sachs estimates that malaria can be controlled for US$3 billion per year,[3] thus suggesting that anti-Malaria projects would be an economically justified investment.


Publications

Articles and columns

  • Sustainable Developments — 2006-2007. An ongoing column in the monthly science magazine Scientific American focusing on how the earth and its climate affect world politics. The first column was published in the June 2006 issue.
  • Economics and Justice. A monthly column for Project Syndicate, a non-profit association of newspapers around the world, concerning the social and environmental implications of economic growth around the world.
Sachs at a book signing at the London School of Economics with a masters student.

Scientific American is a popular-science magazine, published (first weekly and later monthly) since August 28, 1845, making it the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. ... Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ...

Monographs (books)

  • Sachs, Jeffrey (2008). Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet Penguin Press HC ISBN 978-1594201271
  • Humphreys, Macartan, Sachs, Jeffrey, and Stiglitz, Joseph (eds.). "Escaping the Resource Curse" Columbia University Press ISBN 978-0-231-14196-3
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (2005). The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time Penguin Press Hc ISBN 1-59420-045-9
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (2003). Macroeconomics in the Global Economy Westview Press ISBN 0-631-22004-6
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (2002). A New Global Effort to Control Malaria (Science), Vol. 298, October 4, 2002
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (2002). Resolving the Debt Crisis of Low-Income Countries (Brookings Papers on Economic Activity), 2002:1
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (2001). The Strategic Significance of Global Inequality (The Washington Quarterly), Vol. 24, No. 3, Summer 2001
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (1997). Development Economics Blackwell Publishers ISBN 0-8133-3314-8
  • Sachs, Jeffrey and Pistor, Katharina. (1997). The Rule of Law and Economic Reform in Russia (John M. Olin Critical Issues Series (Paper)) Westview Press ISBN 0-8133-3314-8
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (1994). Poland's Jump to the Market Economy (Lionel Robbins Lectures) The MIT Press ISBN 0-262-69174-4
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (1993). Macroeconomics in the Global Economy Prentice Hall ISBN 0-13-102252-0
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (ed) (1991). Developing Country Debt and Economic Performance, Volume 1 : The International Financial System (National Bureau of Economic Research Project Report) University of Chicago Press ISBN 0-226-73332-7
  • Sachs, Jeffrey and Warwick McKibbin Global Linkages: Macroeconomic Interdependence and Co-operation in the World Economy, Brookings Institution, June, 277 pages. (ISBN 0-8157-5600-3)
  • Sachs, Jeffrey (ed) (1989). Developing Country Debt and the World Economy (National Bureau of Economic Research Project Report) University of Chicago Press ISBN 0-226-73338-6
  • Bruno, Michael and Sachs, Jeffrey (1984), "Stagflation in the World Economy"

Warwick McKibbin (born 21 April 1957 in Sydney) is an Australian Professor of economics at the Australian National University who works across a wide range of areas in applied policy. ...

References

  1. ^ Holmstrom, Nancy, and Richard Smith. The Necessity of Gangster Capitalism: Primitive Accumulation in Russia and China. The Monthly Review, 2001.<http://www.monthlyreview.org/200holm.htm>
  2. ^ Article, The need for an African green revolution
  3. ^ a b Hull, Kevin. (2006) "Malaria: Fever Wars". PBS Documentary
  4. ^ Article, The need for an African green revolution
  5. ^ Malaria

Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ...

External links

Sustainable development Portal
  • Jeffrey Sach's Reith lectures hosted by the Royal Society in London, during April and May of 2007
  • Prof. Jeffrey D. Sachs Biographical Information
  • The End of Poverty
  • Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet
  • Article on Jeff Sachs in the Yale Economic Review
  • The Earth Institute at Columbia University
  • Jeffrey Sachs' syndicated monthly op/ed columns for Project Syndicate
  • Interview on PBS' Commanding Heights
  • Interview on The Colbert Report, March 2006
  • The UN Millennium Project
  • Millennium Development Goals
  • Millennium Promise
  • Official website of the Sachs for President Draft Committee
  • Economics for a Crowded Planet (video)
  • Jeffrey Sachs Charlie Rose interviews
  • Audio/Video recording of Jeffrey Sachs lecture as part of the University of Chicago World Beyond the Headlines series.
Image File history File links Sustainable_development. ... Charlie Rose is an American television interview show, with Charlie Rose as executive producer, executive editor, and host. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Commanding Heights : Jeffrey Sachs | on PBS (11410 words)
JEFFREY SACHS: We're living in a time of incredible flux on many dimensions -- in the nature of our daily lives and the role of technology, in the rate of economic change, and in the rate of change of the social and political and economic institutions by which our societies are organized.
JEFFREY SACHS: When I got to Bolivia, I was invited by the presumptive president, the man that had won the plurality in the vote, the man [who] is, in the year 2000, president of Bolivia, President Banzer.
JEFFREY SACHS: The idea of the reform in Bolivia was first, to stop the hyperinflation; second, to make the economy open for international trade; and third, to change the role of government so that government would help to regulate and create rules of the game, but not to control, to manage, to micromanage the economy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m