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Encyclopedia > Jeffrey Archer
The Lord Archer of Weston-super-Mare
Jeffrey Archer

Member of Parliament
for Louth (Lincolnshire)
In office
8 December 1969 – 10 October 1974
Preceded by Cyril Osborne
Succeeded by Michael Brotherton

Born 15 April 1940 (1940-04-15) (age 68)
London
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse Mary Archer
Children William and James Archer
Alma mater Brasenose College, Oxford
Occupation Politician, Author
Website Jeffrey Archer
Jeffrey Archer
Born 15 April 1940 (1940-04-15) (age 68)
Occupation novelist, short story writer, playwright
Writing period 1976-present
Genres Thriller, Drama

Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is a British best-selling author and former politician. He was a Member of Parliament and Deputy Chairman of the Conservative Party, and became a life peer in 1992. His political career, having suffered from several earlier controversies, finally ended after a conviction for perjury and his subsequent imprisonment. He is married to Mary Archer, a scientist specialising in solar power. Geoffrey Archer is a fiction writer from London, UK. He specialises in military adventures and spy thrillers. ... Peter Kingsley Archer, Baron Archer of Sandwell, PC (born 20 November 1926), is a Labour Party member of the House of Lords. ... Louth was a parliamentary constituency in Lincolnshire which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until it was abolished for the 1983 general election. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Cyril Osborne (19 June 1898 - 31 August 1969) was a British Conservative politician. ... Michael Lewis Brotherton (born 26 May 1931) is a British Conservative politician. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Mary Doreen Archer, Baroness Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born Mary Doreen Weeden,on 22nd December 1944) is a British scientist specialising in solar power conversion. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... and of the Brasenose College College name The Kings Hall and College of Brasenose Latin name aula regia et collegium aenei nasi Named after Bronze door knocker Established 1509 Sister college Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge Principal Prof. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about work. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... Mary Doreen Archer, Baroness Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born Mary Doreen Weeden,on 22nd December 1944) is a British scientist specialising in solar power conversion. ... Ultraviolet image of the Sun. ...

Contents

Early life

Jeffrey Howard Archer was born in the City of London Maternity Hospital. When he was two weeks old he and his family moved to the seaside town of Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, where he spent most of his young life. In 1951 he won a scholarship to Wellington School, in Somerset. At this time his mother, Lola, contributed a column "Over the teacups" to the local press in Weston-super-Mare and wrote about the adventures of her son 'Tuppence'; this caused Archer to be the victim of bullying while at Wellington School.[1] Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ... For other uses, see Coast (disambiguation). ... Weston-super-Mare is an English seaside resort town in North Somerset, population 65,000 (1991 estimate). ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Wellington School, Somerset, is a co-educational public school catering for both boarders and day pupils. ...


Archer left school after passing three O-levels, in English Literature, Art, and History. He worked in a number of jobs, including training with the army and for the police. He lasted only a few months in either position, but he fared reasonably well as a Physical Education teacher at Dover College. As a teacher he was popular with his pupils and was reported by some to have had good motivational skills. The General Certificate of Education or GCE is an academic qualification, often divided into two levels: Ordinary level (O-level) and Advanced level (A-Level), although other categories exist. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ... // Dover College is a co-educational public school in Dover, Kent, England. ...


Oxford

He gained a place at Brasenose College, Oxford to study for a one-year diploma in education, though he eventually stayed there for three years, gaining an academic qualification in teaching awarded by the University of Oxford. There have been claims that Archer provided false evidence of his academic qualifications, for instance the apparent citing of an American institution which was actually a body building club, in gaining admission to Oxford University.[1][2] and of the Brasenose College College name The Kings Hall and College of Brasenose Latin name aula regia et collegium aenei nasi Named after Bronze door knocker Established 1509 Sister college Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge Principal Prof. ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


While at Oxford he was moderately successful in athletics, competing in sprinting and hurdling. He also made a name for himself in raising money for the then little-known charity Oxfam, famously managing to obtain the support of The Beatles in a charity fundraising drive. The band accepted his invitation to visit the Senior Common Room of Brasenose College, where they were photographed with Archer and dons of the college, although they didn't play there. It was during this period that he met his future wife, Mary. They married in July 1966. This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Sprints are races where the runner tries to go as fast as humanly possible. ... Hurdling In track and field athletics there are sprint hurdle races and long hurdle races. ... Oxfam International logo Oxfam International is a confederation of 13 organizations working with over 3000 partners in more than 100 countries to find lasting solutions to poverty and injustice. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


Early career

After leaving Oxford, he continued as a charity fundraiser, working for the National Birthday Trust, a medical charity. He also began a career in politics, serving as a councillor on the Greater London Council from 1967 onwards. Arms of the Greater London Council The Greater London Council (GLC) was the top-tier local government administrative body for Greater London from 1965 to 1986. ...


One other charity Archer worked for, the United Nations Association, alleged discrepancies in his claims for expenses, but details only appeared in the press in scrambled form. Archer sued Tory MP Humphrey Berkeley, linked to the UNA, as the source of the allegations. This case was eventually settled out of court after three years. Berkeley had also unsuccessfully attempted to persuade Conservative Central Office of Archer's unsuitability for becoming an MP, but the selection meeting at Louth disregarded any doubts.[1] Humphry John Berkeley (February 21, 1926 – November 14, 1994) was a British politician noted for his many changes of parties. ... Conservative Central Office (CCO) is the headquarters of the British Conservative Party, housing its central staff and committee members. ...


Member of Parliament

At the age of 29, he was elected as a Member of Parliament (MP) for the Lincolnshire constituency of Louth, holding the seat for the Conservative Party in a by-election on 4 December 1969. Archer beat Ian Gow to the selection after winning over a substantial proportion of younger members at the selection meeting. Archer's campaign colour was a dayglo orange/pink with a blue arrow; the political parties in Lincolnshire had not abandoned local colours which were different from the party national colours. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... Louth was a parliamentary constituency in Lincolnshire which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until it was abolished for the 1983 general election. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Ian Reginald Edward Gow TD (11 February 1937 – 30 July 1990) was a British Conservative politician and a solicitor. ...


The Louth constituency consisted of three key areas: Louth, Cleethorpes, and Immingham. During his time as a Member of Parliament, Archer was a regular at the Immingham Conservative Club in what was traditionally the most working-class part of the constituency. Membership and activity within the local Conservative Party increased dramatically with Archer as MP, due to his energy and campaigning skills. His flamboyant personality and professionalism (he always drank orange juice) won him many friends in the town and the local party. For other uses, see Cleethorpes (disambiguation). ... Immingham (informally referred to as Ming or Ming Ming) is a town in North East Lincolnshire, located on south bank of the Humber Estuary. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


In Parliament, Archer was on the left of the Conservative Party, rebelling against some of his party's policies. He urged free TV licences for the elderly and was against museum charges. Archer voted against restoring capital punishment, saying it was barbaric and obscene. In 1971 he employed David Mellor, then needing money for his bar finals, to deal with his correspondence. He tipped Mellor to reach the cabinet in the future. In an interview Archer once said that "I hope we don't return to extremes. I'm what you might call centre-right but I've always disliked the right wing as much as I've disliked the left wing."[3] Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ... The Right Honourable David Mellor (born 12 March 1949) is a British Conservative politician and barrister. ...


In 1974, Archer was a casualty of a fraudulent investment scheme involving Aquablast, a Canadian company. The debacle resulted in the loss of Archer's first fortune [1] and faced with likely bankruptcy, he stood down as an MP at the October 1974 general election. The UK general election of October 1974 took place on October 10, 1974. ...


Archer remained as Honorary President of the Immingham Conservative Party until he withdrew from the 2000 election for Mayor of London in 1999. Archer is to this day considered to be a local celebrity by the people of Immingham who were around when he was their Member of Parliament (although Archer has no family or business connections with the area). His increasingly rare visits to northern Lincolnshire continue to attract considerable local public interest. Immingham (informally referred to as Ming or Ming Ming) is a town in North East Lincolnshire, located on south bank of the Humber Estuary. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ...


Politics and writing

His first book, Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less was a success, and he ultimately avoided bankruptcy, never being legally declared bankrupt. While he was a witness in the Aquablast case in Toronto, he was accused of taking three suits from a department store.[1] No charges were brought, but Archer has subsequently admitted the validity of the accusation. Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less was Jeffrey Archers first novel, first published in 1974. ...


Kane and Abel proved to be his best-selling work, reaching number one on the New York Times bestsellers list. It was made into a television mini-series. His wife Mary is often rumoured to have a significant role in the writing of his novels. His books are also rumoured to require extensive editing by others to make them readable.[4][5] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ...


Archer purchased the Old Vicarage, Grantchester, a house associated with the poet Rupert Brooke. He also began to hold shepherd's pie and Krug parties for prominent people at his London apartment, which overlooked the Houses of Parliament.[1] The Old Vicarage in the English town of Grantchester is a house associated with the poet Rupert Brooke, who lived nearby and in 1912 immortalised it in a poem. ... A statue of Rupert Brooke in Rugby Rupert Chawner Brooke (August 3, 1887 – April 23, 1915) was an English poet known for his idealistic War Sonnets written during the First World War (especially The Soldier), as well as for his poetry written outside of war, especially The Old Vicarage, Grantchester... Shepherds Pie with minced (ground) beef. ... Champagne Krug - a negociant-manipulateur with offices in Reims, the main city in Champagne - was one of the famous Champagne houses who formed part of the membership of the Grande Marques. ... This may refer to the: British Houses of Parliament. ...


Archer's political career revived once he became well known for his novels and as a popular speaker among the Conservative grassroots. He was made Deputy Chairman of the Conservative party by Margaret Thatcher in 1985. Norman Tebbit, then party chairman, had misgivings over the wisdom of the appointment. In the summer of 1986 Archer suggested that John Major would be a future Prime Minister.[citation needed] Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... This article is about the year. ... Norman Beresford Tebbit, Baron Tebbit, CH, PC (born 29 March 1931) is a British Conservative politician and former Member of Parliament (MP) for Chingford, who was born in Southgate in Enfield. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


Another scandal arose leading to his resignation in October 1986, when The News of the World led on the story "Tory boss Archer pays vice-girl". The article claimed that Archer had paid Monica Coghlan, a prostitute, £2000 through an intermediary at Victoria Station to go abroad. Unlike the Daily Star, the newspaper did not allege that Archer had actually slept with Coghlan.[1] Archer sued the Daily Star. The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... Monica Coghlan (3 May 1951 – 27 April 2001) was the prostitute at the centre of a scandal that involved English Conservative politician Jeffrey Archer in 1987. ... Victoria station may refer to: London Victoria station Manchester Victoria station Victoria tube station Victoria Station, a restaurant chain which uses real train boxcars as dining rooms. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Peerage

In 1992, after having been previously rejected,[6] Archer was made a life peer as Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare, of Mark in the County of Somerset by the Queen on the advice of the Prime Minister John Major. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... In the United Kingdom, Life Peers are appointed members of the Peerage whose titles may not be inherited (those whose titles are inheritable are known as hereditary peers). ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


In a speech at the 1993 Conservative party conference, Archer urged the then Home Secretary Michael Howard, to "Stand and deliver" saying: "Michael, I am sick and tired of being told by old people that they are frightened to open the door, they're frightened to go out at night, frightened to use the parks and byways where their parents and grandparents walked with freedom ... We say to you: stand and deliver!". Archer is though an opponent of a return to Capital punishment. He then attacked violent films and urged tougher prison conditions to prevent criminals from re-offending. He criticised the role of do-gooders and finished off the speech by denouncing the opposition party's Law and Order policies.[7]. On Question Time in February 1994, Archer stated that the age of 18 should be the new age of consent for homosexuality, as opposed to 21, which it was at the time, or 16, which it was to be made in 1999. The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... The Rt Hon. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ... In politics, law and order refers to a political platform which supports a strict criminal justice system, especially in relation to violent crime and property crimes, through harsher criminal penalties. ... For the British television programme, see Question Time (TV series). ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...


Controversies

Daily Star libel case

In July 1987, the libel case over the allegation that Archer had had sex with Monica Coghlan came to court. The payment to Coghlan was explained as the action of a philanthropist rather than that of a guilty man. He won the case and was awarded £500,000 damages. Archer claimed he would donate the money to charity, although it has not been verified that he did so. This case would be the reason for Archer's final exit from front-line politics some years later. This article is about the year 1987. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ...


There was widespread astonishment at the description the judge (Mr Justice Caulfield) gave of Mrs Archer[8] in his jury instructions: "Remember Mary Archer in the witness-box. Your vision of her probably will never disappear. Has she elegance? Has she fragrance? Would she have, without the strain of this trial, radiance? How would she appeal? Has she had a happy married life? Has she been able to enjoy, rather than endure, her husband Jeffrey?" The judge then went on to say of Jeffrey Archer, "Is he in need of cold, unloving, rubber-insulated sex in a seedy hotel round about quarter to one on a Tuesday morning after an evening at the Caprice?" By this time, according to the journalist Adam Raphael, Jeffrey and Mary Archer were in fact, living largely separate lives.


The editor of the Daily Star, Lloyd Turner, was sacked six weeks after the trial by the paper's owner Lord Stevens of Ludgate.[9] He died of a heart attack in September 1996. Coghlan was hit and killed by a stolen car driven by a drunken drug addict after committing an armed robbery.[10] Heart attack redirects here. ...


Share dealings

In January 1994, Mary Archer, a director of Anglia Television, attended a directors' meeting at which an impending takeover of Anglia Television by MAI, who owned Meridian Broadcasting, was discussed.[11] The following day, Jeffrey Archer bought 50,000 shares in Anglia Television, acting on behalf of a friend, Broosk Saib.[9] Shortly after this, it was announced publicly that Anglia Television would be taken over by MAI. As a result the shares jumped in value, whereupon Archer sold them on behalf of his friend for a profit of £77,219.[11] The arrangements he had made with the stockbrokers, which he had never used before[citation needed], meant that he did not have to pay at the time of buying the shares.[9] Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Mary Doreen Archer, Baroness Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born Mary Doreen Weeden,on 22nd December 1944) is a British scientist specialising in solar power conversion. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ITV Meridian Ltd (formerly and more commonly known as Meridian Broadcasting) is the holder of the ITV franchise for South and South East England[1]. It has been broadcasting since 1 January 1993, when it replaced TVS. The main headquarters were situated at studios in Northam, Southampton (previously used by...


An inquiry was launched by the Stock Exchange into possible insider trading. The Department of Trade and Industry, headed by Michael Heseltine, later announced that Archer would not be prosecuted.[11] A stock exchange, share market or bourse is a corporation or mutual organization which provides facilities for stock brokers and traders, to trade company stocks and other securities. ... Insider trading is the trading of a corporations stock or other securities (e. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ...


Missing Kurdish aid

In July 2001, Scotland Yard began investigating allegations that millions of pounds has disappeared from Simple Truth, a fundraising campaign run by Archer. He set up a charity in conjunction with the Red Cross. He employed two Kurdish aides, Broosk Saib and Nadhim Zahawi, whom he nicknamed "Lemon Kurd and Bean Kurd."[6] New Scotland Yard, London New Scotland Yard, it blowwsssss often referred to simply as Scotland Yard or The Yard, is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for policing Greater London (although not the City of London itself). ...


In May 1991, Archer organised a charity pop concert in aid of the Kurds of Iraq, starring Rod Stewart, Paul Simon, Sting and Gloria Estefan, who all performed for free. On June 19, 1991, Jeffrey Archer held up a cheque for £57,042,000, around £3 million came from the Simple Truth concert and appeal, £10m from the UK government, and the remaining £43 million from overseas governments' aid projects, with significant amounts pledged before the concert. The campaign led John Major to recommend Archer for his peerage.[6] A benefit concert is a concert featuring musicians, comedians, or other performers that is held for a charitable purpose, often directed at a specific and immediate humanitarian crisis. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Rod Stewart CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a singer and songwriter born and raised in London, England, with Scottish parentage. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... This article is about the musician. ... Gloria Estefan (born Gloria María Fajardo on September 22, 1961 in Havana, Cuba) is a five-time Grammy Award-winning Cuban American singer and songwriter. ... For other persons named John Major, see John Major (disambiguation). ...


In 1992 the Kurdish Disaster Fund wrote to Mr Archer, complaining: "You must be concerned that the Kurdish refugees have seen hardly any of the huge sums raised in the west in their name," Kurdish groups claimed little more than £250,000 had been received by groups in Iraq. Former Conservative Party vice chairman Lady Nicholson said "practically nothing" of the £57 million Archer said he collected had reached the Kurdish people.[12] Archer then went to Iraq on a fact-finding mission, where his chant of "Long Live Kurdistan" was unfortunately mis-translated as "Bastard, Devilish Kurdistan."[6] The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


A British Red Cross-commissioned KPMG audit of the cash showed no donations were handled by Archer and any misappropriation was "unlikely". But KPMG said it could find no evidence to support Archer's claims to have raised £31.5 million from overseas governments. The police said they would launch a "preliminary assessment of the facts" from the audit but were not investigating the Simple Truth fund.[13] The British Red Cross Society is a prominent part of the largest impartial humanitarian organisation in the world – the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. ... KPMG is one of the largest professional services firms in the world. ...


Perjury and downfall

Archer had been selected by the Conservative Party as their candidate for the London mayoral election of 2000. He was forced to withdraw from the race when it was revealed that he was facing a charge of perjury. The first election to the office of Mayor of London took place on May 4, 2000. ...


In November 1999 Ted Francis, a friend (who claimed Archer owed him money) and Archer's former personal assistant Angela Peppiatt (whom Archer had been semi-maintaining) claimed that he had fabricated an alibi in the 1987 trial. They were apparently concerned that Archer was standing as Mayor of London and doubted that he was suitable for the post. The personal secretary had apparently kept a secret diary of Archer's movements. This formed the basis of the case against Archer. For alibi used in the sense of a legal defense, see the Wiktionary entry Alibi. ... Ken Livingstone, the current Mayor of London The Mayor of London is an elected politician in London, United Kingdom. ...


The News of the World printed the allegations on 21 November 1999 and Archer withdrew his candidacy the following day. Conservative leader William Hague said "This is the end of Politics for Jeffrey Archer. I will not tolerate such behaviour in my party".[14] On 8 October he had described Archer as a candidate of "Probity and integrity. I'm going to back him all the way" at the Conservative party conference. Hague was never keen on Archer's running for the job[citation needed] but as Archer had won in the ballot of London Conservative members he was forced to back him. is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... William Jefferson Hague (born 26 March 1961) is a British politician, the Member of Parliament for Richmond, North Yorkshire, former leader of the Conservative Party, and current Conservative Shadow Foreign Secretary. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 4 February 2000 Archer was expelled from the Conservative Party for five years. On 26 September 2000 he was charged with perjury and perverting the course of justice during the 1987 libel trial. is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


A few months before the beginning of the perjury trial, Archer began performing in the star role in a courtroom play (which he also wrote) called The Accused. The play was staged at London's Theatre Royal Haymarket and concerns the court trial of an alleged murderer from beginning to end. The play used the technique (first used by Ayn Rand in her play The Night of January 16) of assigning the role of jury in the trial to the audience, with theatre-goers voting on whether Archer's character was innocent or guilty at the end of each night's performance. Archer would attend his real trial during the day and be judged in his fictional trial at the theatre in the evening. The Theatre Royal Haymarket or Haymarket Theatre is a playhouse on the Haymarket in London which dates back to 1720. ... Ayn Rand (IPA: , February 2 [O.S. January 20] 1905 – March 6, 1982), born Alisa Zinovyevna Rosenbaum (Russian: ), was a Russian-born American novelist and philosopher. ...


The real life trial began on 30 May 2001. On 19 July 2001 Archer was found guilty of perjury and perverting the course of justice (meaning he can legally be called a liar, as has been done on the BBC's Have I Got News For You programme several times) at the 1987 trial. He was sentenced to a total of four years' imprisonment by Mr. Justice Potts. The most ironic aspect of his trial was that he had fabricated the alibi for the wrong date. Archer never spoke during the trial. Ted Francis was found not guilty of perverting the course of justice. is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Look up Liar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ...


Archer's mother died on 11 July 2001 aged 87, and he was released for the day on 21 July to attend the funeral. is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Archer originally was sent to Belmarsh Prison, but was moved to the category "C" Wayland Prison in Norfolk on 9 August 2001, and to HMP North Sea Camp, an open prison in October 2001. From there he was let out to work at the Theatre Royal in Lincoln, England, and was allowed occasional home visits. Reports in the media, which showed a continuing interest in him, claimed that he had been abusing this privilege by attending lunches with friends, including former Education Secretary Gillian Shepherrd and in September 2002 he was transferred to Lincoln Prison for a month. HM Prison Belmarsh is a high security prison in London, England. ... Wayland Prison is a prison in the county of Norfolk, England. ... Norfolk (pronounced ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... HMP North Sea Camp HMP North Sea Camp is an open prison on the boundary between the parishes of Freiston and Fishtoft, near Boston, Lincolnshire, England. ... In the United Kingdom, prisons and their inmates are grouped into four categories - A, B, C and D - according to the level of threat posed by the prisoners, the level of supervision they require and their likelihood of attempting escape. ... Lincoln (pronounced Lin-kun) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England, a bridging point over the River Witham that flows to Boston. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Gillian Patricia Shephard, Baroness Shephard of Northwold, PC (born January 22, 1940) is a British Conservative politician; she was the Member of Parliament for South West Norfolk, and a former Secretary of State and is now Parliamentary President of the Conservative Friends of Israel. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


In October 2002 Archer repaid the Daily Star the £500,000 damages he had received in 1987, as well as legal costs of £1 million. That month, he was suspended from Marylebone Cricket Club for seven years for his behaviour. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lords 2005 The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), founded in 1787, is a private members club and was the original governing body of cricket in England and across the world. ...


On 21 July 2003 he was released on licence, after serving half of his sentence, from HMP Hollesley Bay, Suffolk. is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In law, a sentence forms the final act of a judge-ruled process, and also the symbolic principal act connected to his function. ... This page has been deleted, and protected to prevent re-creation. ...


Many of Archer's friends remained loyal to him. He and Lady Archer were invited guests to the Memorial Service for Norris McWhirter at Saint Martin-in-the-Fields on Thursday, 7 October 2004 where they were observed sitting in the same pew as former head of the Conservative Monday Club, Gregory Lauder-Frost, and directly in front of Lady Thatcher, who made a point of embracing Lady Archer. Norris Dewar McWhirter, CBE (August 12, 1925 – April 19, 2004) was a writer, political activist, co-founder of the Freedom Association, and a television presenter. ... St Martin-in-the-Fields, London St. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Conservative Monday Club (widely known as the Monday Club) is a British pressure-group with its origins in the Conservative Party. ... The Conservative Democratic Alliance is a strongly right-wing United Kingdom pressure group which considers the Conservative Party to have swung overtly to the left and to no longer represent Toryism. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ...


On 26 February 2006 on Andrew Marr's Sunday AM programme, Archer said he had no interest in returning to politics: he would pursue his writing career instead.[15] is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Andrew Marr (born 31 July 1959, Glasgow, Scotland) is a Scottish journalist and political commentator. ... Sunday AM is a television programme broadcasting on BBC One on sunday mornings. ...


Equatorial Guinea coup d'état attempt

Further information: 2004 Equatorial Guinea coup d'état attempt

In 2004, The Equatorial Guinea government alleged that Archer was one of the financiers of the failed 2004 coup d'état attempt against them, citing bank details and telephone records as evidence.[16]


Archer in fiction

Jeffrey Archer was satirically portrayed as a much-misunderstood secret agent, saviour of Britain and mankind and "overall thoroughly good chap" by actor Damian Lewis in the BBC drama Jeffrey Archer: The Truth (2002),[17] which received strong reviews. Script writer Guy Jenkin explained that "my Jeffrey Archer is the man who has frequently saved Britain over the last 30 years. He's beloved of all women he comes across, all men, all dogs - he's a superhero". Damian Lewis is an English actor of Welsh descent. ... Guy Jenkin is a comedy writer, most famous for working on sitcoms and comedies such as Drop the Dead Donkey, Jeffery Archer: The Truth and the forthcoming Outnumbered. ...


In There's No Place Like a Home, a comedy play by Paul Elliot, the residents of a retirement home for actors and actresses, trying to prevent its closure, kidnap Jeffrey Archer in an attempt to use the ransom money to keep their home open.


Television Career

Archer was a judge on the ITV1 show Fortune: Million Pound Giveaway. ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ...


Bibliography

Year Title Notes
1976 Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less
1977 Shall We Tell the President?
1979 Kane and Abel
1980 Willy visits the Square World (with illustrations by Derek Matthews) Jeffrey Archer's first Children's book
1980 By Royal Appointment (with illustrations by Peter Longden) Jeffrey Archer's second Children's book
1980 A Quiver Full of Arrows Short story collection
1981 Willy and the Killer Kipper (with illustrations by Derek Matthews) Jeffrey Archer's third Children's book
1982 The Prodigal Daughter
1984 First Among Equals
1986 A Matter of Honour
1987 Beyond Reasonable Doubt Play
1987 Shall We Tell the President? Second version
1989 A Twist in the Tale Short story collection
1989 Exclusive Play
1991 As the Crow Flies
1993 Honour Among Thieves
1994 Twelve Red Herrings Short story collection
1996 The Fourth Estate
1998 The Eleventh Commandment
2000 To Cut a Long Story Short Short story collection
2000 The Accused Courtroom play
2002 Sons of Fortune
2002 A Prison Diary
2003 A Prison Diary Volume 2
2004 A Prison Diary Volume 3
2004 In the Lap of the Gods
2006 False Impression
2006 Cat O'Nine Tales (with illustrations by Ronald Searle) Short story collection
2007 The Gospel According to Judas (with Francis J. Moloney)
2008 A Prisoner of Birth

Not a Penny More, Not a Penny Less was Jeffrey Archers first novel, first published in 1974. ... Shall We Tell The President? is a 1977 book by English author Jeffrey Archer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A Quiver Full of Arrows (ISBN 0340257520) is a 1980 collection of short stories by British writer and politician Jeffrey Archer. ... The Prodigal Daughter Jeffrey Archers The Prodigal Daughter is the story of Florentyna Kane, the daughter of the protagonist of Archers Kane and Abel. ... First among Equals could refer to Primus inter pares, a political concept or First Among Equals, a novel by Jeffrey Archer ... A matter of honour is a chase story. ... Beyond reasonable doubt may refer to: Beyond a Reasonable Doubt, a 1956 Fritz Lang film Beyond Reasonable Doubt (film), a New Zealand docudrama Beyond Reasonable Doubt, the second album by Candiria Beyond Reasonable Doubt (book), a book by Jeffery Archer Burden of proof in common law Burden of proof (logical... Shall We Tell The President? is a 1977 book by English author Jeffrey Archer. ... A Twist in the Tale (ISBN 0-340-40538-4) is a 1988 collection of short stories by British author and politician Jeffrey Archer. ... Look up as the crow flies in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Twelve Red Herrings (ISBN 0708988113) is a 1994 short story collection by British writer and politician Jeffrey Archer. ... The Fourth Estate is a 1996 novel by Jeffrey Archer. ... The Eleventh Commandment is a novel by Jeffrey Archer, first published in 1998. ... Sons of Fortune is a tale of two brothers, Fletcher Davenport and Nat Cartwright, who are separated at birth. ... Jeffery Archers Prison Diary is divided into three parts, each named after the parts of Dantes Divine Comedy - each longer than the last, due his staying being longer and longer at each prison he went to: here is a short summary: Book I - Belmarsh - Hell - This book includes... Jeffery Archers Prison Diary is divided into three parts, each named after the parts of Dantes Divine Comedy - each longer than the last, due his staying being longer and longer at each prison he went to: here is a short summary: Book I - Belmarsh - Hell - This book includes... Jeffery Archers Prison Diary is divided into three parts, each named after the parts of Dantes Divine Comedy - each longer than the last, due his staying being longer and longer at each prison he went to: here is a short summary: Book I - Belmarsh - Hell - This book includes... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Cat ONine Tales (ISBN 0230014933) is British author Jeffrey Archers fifth collection of short stories. ... A 2007 novel by Jeffrey Archer and Frank Moloney which presents the events of the New Testament through the eyes of Judas Iscariot. ...

Further reading

  • Crick, Michael. Jeffrey Archer: Stranger than Fiction. ISBN 0-241-13360-2. 

Michael Crick is a British journalist and author. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Caroline Davies "He lied his way to the top", Daily Telegraph, 20 July 2001 [website p1]. Retrieved on 20 April 2007.
  2. ^ "Author of his own Demise", ninemsn, 22 July, 2001. Retrieved on 20 April 2007.
  3. ^ "Lord Archer answers your questions", BBC News, 1999-02-01. Retrieved on 2007-06-14. 
  4. ^ Paul Kelso "Mendacious, ambitious, generous and naive", The Guardian, 20 July 2001. Retrieved on 9 May 2007.
  5. ^ "The Fall of Jeffrey Archer: The Man and the Myths: His was a life...", The Independent by Chris Blackhurst. 20 July 2007 [page 2. Retrieved on 9 May 2007.
  6. ^ a b c d "Archer fraud allegations: the simple truth", Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-12-18. 
  7. ^ The Times newspaper - Thursday 7th October 1993
  8. ^ "Archer marriage under spotlight", BBC, 2001-06-14. Retrieved on 2007-12-01. 
  9. ^ a b c "Star demands £2.2m from Archer", BBC News, July 19, 2001. 
  10. ^ "Coghlan killer gets life", BBC News, July 6, 2001. 
  11. ^ a b c "Archer's share deal under scrutiny again", The Guardian, October 30, 1999. 
  12. ^ "Archer faces 'missing aid' probe", BBC. Retrieved on 2007-12-18. 
  13. ^ "http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article145624.ece", Independent. Retrieved on 2007-12-18. 
  14. ^ "Disgraced Archer jettisoned by Tories", Guardian Unlimited, Tuesday 23 November 1999. 
  15. ^ "Archer 'may vote in Lords again'", BBC, 26 February 2006. 
  16. ^ "New Archer link to coup plot alleged", Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-08-22. 
  17. ^ Jeffrey Archer: The Truth - BBC Drama. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-12-01.

This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Figure of speech, see Ellipsis (figure of speech). ... Several newspapers go by the name of Guardian: The Guardian, a British newspaper founded in 1821 as the Manchester Guardian, which took its current title in 1959. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir Cyril Osborne
Member of Parliament for Louth
1969–1974
Succeeded by
Michael Brotherton
This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Don Swaim is an American journalist, writer, and broadcaster. ... Wired for Books <http://wiredforbooks. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Sir Cyril Osborne (19 June 1898 - 31 August 1969) was a British Conservative politician. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Louth was a parliamentary constituency in Lincolnshire which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1885 until it was abolished for the 1983 general election. ... The Louth by-election, 1969 was a by-election held on 8 December 1969 for the British House of Commons constituency of Louth in Lincolnshire. ... Harold Wilson Edward Heath The United Kingdom general election of October 1974 took place on 10 October 1974. ... Michael Lewis Brotherton (born 26 May 1931) is a British Conservative politician. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jeffrey Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1380 words)
The Right Honourable Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is the author of a number of books, has raised considerable sums for charities, is a former MP and was Deputy Chairman of the Conservative Party, and was later convicted of perjury.
Archer was put on trial for perjury and perverting the course of justice in December 2000.
Archer very often takes his characters from the upper classes of the UK or New England, discussing mannerisms and sensitivities from that layer of society.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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