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Encyclopedia > Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis
Jefferson Davis

In office
February 18, 1861 – May 5, 1865
Vice President Alexander Stephens
Preceded by Office instituted
Succeeded by Office abolished

In office
March 7, 1853 – March 4, 1857
President Franklin Pierce
Preceded by Charles Magill Conrad
Succeeded by John Buchanan Floyd

Born June 3, 1808(1808-06-03)
Christian County, Kentucky
Died December 6, 1889 (aged 81)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Political party Democratic
Spouse Sarah Knox Taylor
Varina Howell
Profession Soldier, Politician
Religion Episcopal
Signature Jefferson Davis's signature

Jefferson Finis Davis (June 3, 1808December 6, 1889) was an American politician who served as President of the Confederate States of America for its entire history from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. During his presidency, Davis was never able to find a strategy that would defeat the larger, more industrially developed Union. Davis's insistence on independence, even in the face of crushing defeat, prolonged the war, and while not exactly disgraced, he was displaced in Southern affection after the war by the leading general, Robert E. Lee. After Davis was captured in 1865, he was charged with treason (although never convicted) and was stripped of his eligibility to run for public office. This limitation was removed in 1978, 89 years after his death. A West Point graduate, Davis prided himself on the military skills he gained in the Mexican-American War as a colonel of a volunteer regiment, and as U.S. Secretary of War under Franklin Pierce. Jefferson Davis may refer to: Jefferson Davis (1808–1889), president of the Confederate States of America Jefferson Davis (Arkansas governor), Jeff Davis, (1862–1913), Governor of Arkansas and U.S. Senator Jefferson C. Davis, Jefferson Columbus Davis (1828–1879), American Civil War Union general, Military Commander of Alaska Jefferson Davis... Download high resolution version (550x696, 61 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... This is an article about the Confederate Vice President. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Charles Magill Conrad (December 24, 1804–February 11, 1878) was an American political figure. ... John Buchanan Floyd (June 1, 1807 - August 26, 1863), American politician, was born at Blacksburg, Virginia. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Categories: Stub | 1814 births | 1835 deaths | American people ... Varina Howell Davis Varina Howell Davis (May 7, 1826 – October 16, 1905) was an American author best known as the second wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the American Civil War. ... This article is about a military rank. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Historic Southern United States. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ...

Contents

Early life and military career

Davis was the youngest of the ten children of Samuel Emory Davis (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 17564 July 1824) and wife (married 1783) Jane Cook (Christian County, (later Todd County), Kentucky, 17593 October 1845), daughter of William Cook and wife Sarah Simpson, daughter of Samuel Simpson (17061791) and wife Hannah (b. 1710). The younger Davis' grandfather Evan Davis (Cardiff, County Glamorgan, 17291758) emigrated from Wales and had once lived in Virginia and Maryland, marrying Lydia Emory. His father, along with his uncles, had served in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War; he fought with the Georgia cavalry and fought in the Siege of Savannah as an infantry officer. Also, three of his older brothers served during the War of 1812. Two of them served under Andrew Jackson and received commendation for bravery in the Battle of New Orleans. Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Todd County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... Glamorgan or Glamorganshire (Welsh: ) is one of thirteen historic counties and former administrative counties of Wales. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants United States France Kingdom of Great Britain Commanders General Benjamin Lincoln Admiral Comte dEstaing Count Kazimierz Pulaski † General Augustin Prevost Strength 1,550 American troops; 3,500 French troops and sailors 3,200 troops Casualties Total Allied: 800 killed 1200 wounded 40 killed 63 wounded The Siege of... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ...


During Davis' youth, the family moved twice; in 1811 to St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, and in 1812 to Wilkinson County, Mississippi near the town of Woodville. In 1813, Davis began his education together with his sister Mary, attending a log cabin school a mile from their home in the small town of Woodville, known as the Wilkinson Academy. Two years later, Davis entered the Catholic school of Saint Thomas at St. Rose Priory, a school operated by the Dominican Order in Washington County, Kentucky. At the time, he was the only Protestant student. St. ... Wilkinson County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... For other uses, see Log cabin (disambiguation). ... St. ... “Dominicans” redirects here. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


Davis went on to Jefferson College at Washington, Mississippi, in 1818, and to Transylvania University at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1821. In 1824, Davis entered the United States Military Academy (West Point).[1] He completed his four-year term as a West Point cadet, and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in June 1828 following graduation. Jefferson College was a college in Washington, Mississippi. ... Washington, Mississippi, is a small town in Adams County, Mississippi, close to Natchez. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... USMA redirects here. ...


Davis was assigned to the 1st Infantry Regiment and was stationed at Fort Crawford, Wisconsin. His first assignment, in 1829, was to supervise the cutting of timber on the banks of the Red Cedar River for the repair and enlargement of the fort. Later the same year, he was reassigned to Fort Winnebago. While supervising the construction and management of a sawmill in the Yellow River in 1831, he contracted pneumonia, causing him to return to Fort Crawford. 1st Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiments mission is to support the United States Military Academy and to furnish the enlisted garrison for West Point and Stewart Army Subpost. ... Fort Crawford was the name of two fortifications of the United States Army built in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Red Cedar River in northwestern Wisconsin, is a tributary of the Chippewa River, flowing approximately 85 miles from Lake Chetac, a reservoir in southwestern Sawyer County, through a small chain of lakes, including Birch Lake at Birchwood, Balsam Lake in Washburn County and Red Cedar Lake in far northeastern... This article is about the U.S. Army fort. ... The Yellow River is the name of several different rivers: The Huang He in China, called the Yellow River in English. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ...

Second wife, Varina Howell
Second wife, Varina Howell

The year after, Davis was dispatched to Galena, Illinois, at the head of a detachment assigned to remove miners from lands claimed by the Native Americans. Lieutenant Davis was home in Mississippi for the entire Black Hawk War, returning after the Battle of Bad Axe. Following the conflict, he was assigned by his colonel, Zachary Taylor, to escort Black Hawk himself to prison—it is said that the chief liked Davis because of the kind treatment he had shown. Another of Davis' duties during this time was to keep miners from illegally entering what would eventually become the state of Iowa. Image File history File links Sarah_Knox_Taylor. ... Image File history File links Sarah_Knox_Taylor. ... Categories: Stub | 1814 births | 1835 deaths | American people ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Varina Howell Davis Varina Howell Davis (May 7, 1826 – October 16, 1905) was an American author best known as the second wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the American Civil War. ... Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois Counties Jo Daviess Mayor Tom F. Brusch Area    - City 9. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... For other uses of Blackhawk/Black Hawk, see Black Hawk. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Marriage, plantation life, and early political career

Davis fell in love with Colonel Taylor's daughter, Sarah Knox Taylor. Her father did not approve of the match, so Davis resigned his commission and married Miss Taylor on June 17, 1835, at the house of her aunt near Louisville, Kentucky. The marriage, however, proved to be short. While visiting Davis' oldest sister near Saint Francisville, Louisiana, both newlyweds contracted malaria, and Davis' wife died three months after the wedding on September 15, 1835. In 1836, he moved to Brierfield Plantation in Warren County, Mississippi. For the next eight years, Davis was a recluse, studying government and history, and engaging in private political discussions with his brother Joseph.[1] This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... Categories: Stub | 1814 births | 1835 deaths | American people ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Louisville redirects here. ... The town of St. ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Warren County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ...


The year 1844 saw Davis' first political success, as he was elected to the United States House of Representatives, taking office on March 4 of the following year. In 1845, Davis married Varina Howell, the granddaughter of late New Jersey Governor Richard Howell whom he met the year before, at her home in Natchez, Mississippi. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Varina Howell Davis Varina Howell Davis (May 7, 1826 – October 16, 1905) was an American author best known as the second wife of Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the American Civil War. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Richard Howell (Newark, Delaware, in 1753; died in Trenton, New Jersey, 28 April, 1802) was a state Governor of New Jersey from 1794 to 1802. ... Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ...


There is a portrait of Mrs. Jefferson Davis in old age at the Jefferson Davis Shrine in Biloxi, Mississippi, painted by Adolfo Müller-Ury (1862-1947) in 1895 and dubbed 'Widow of the Confederacy'. It was exhibited at the Durand-Ruel Galleries in New York in 1897. The Museum of the Confederacy at Richmond, Virginia, possesses Müller-Ury's 1897-98 profile portrait of their daughter Winnie Davis which the artist presented to the Museum in 1918. Biloxi redirects here. ... Adolfo Müller-Ury (1862-1947) was a Swiss-born American portrait painter. ... White House of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, built in 1818, photo circa 1939. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


Second military career

The year 1846 saw the beginning of the Mexican-American War. He resigned his House seat in June, and raised a volunteer regiment, the Mississippi Rifles, becoming its colonel. On July 21, 1846 they sailed from New Orleans for the Texas coast. Davis armed the regiment with percussion rifles and trained the regiment in their use, making it particularly effective in combat. Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... The Mississippi Rifles was a regiment headed by Jefferson Davis for the Mexican-American War. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... A rifle that used a percussion cap instead of older flintlocks or matchlock variants. ...


In September of the same year, he participated in the successful siege of Monterrey, Mexico. He fought bravely at the Battle of Buena Vista on February 22, 1847, and was shot in the foot, being carried to safety by Robert H. Chilton. In recognition of Davis's bravery and initiative, commanding general Zachary Taylor is reputed to have said, "My daughter, sir, was a better judge of men than I was."[1] A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ... This article is about the Mexican city; for other uses, see Monterrey (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Buena Vista was a land battle of the Mexican-American War fought on 23 February 1847 in Buena Vista, Coahuila, seven miles (12 km) south of Saltillo, in northern Mexico. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Robert Hall Chilton (February 25, 1815 – February 18, 1879) was an officer in the U.S. Army and then a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ...


President James K. Polk offered him a Federal commission as a brigadier general and command of a brigade of militia. He declined the appointment, arguing that the United States Constitution gives the power of appointing militia officers to the states, and not to the Federal government of the United States. This article is about the U.S. President. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... In military science a brigade is a military unit that is part of a division and includes regiments (where that level exists), or (in modern armies) is composed of several battalions (typically two to four) and directly attached supporting units. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ...


Return to politics

Senator

Because of his war service, the Governor of Mississippi appointed Davis to fill out the Senate term of the late Jesse Speight. He took his seat 5 December 1847, and was elected to serve the remainder of his term in January 1848. In addition, the Smithsonian Institution appointed him a regent at the end of December 1847. For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on the National Mall serves as the Institutions headquarters. ... Regent, from the Latin, a person selected to administer a state because the ruler is a minor or is not present or debilitated. ...

Portrait of Jefferson Davis by Daniel Huntington.
Portrait of Jefferson Davis by Daniel Huntington.

The Senate made Davis chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs. When his term expired, he was elected to the same seat (by the Mississippi legislature, as the Constitution mandated at the time). He had not served a year when he resigned (in September 1851) to run for the Governorship of Mississippi on the issue of the Compromise of 1850, which Davis opposed. This election bid was unsuccessful, as he was defeated by fellow senator Henry Stuart Foote by 999 votes. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (835 × 1158 pixel, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 432 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (835 × 1158 pixel, file size: 144 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 - April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York. ... Senate Armed Services Committee convenes to consider to nomination of Robert Gates to become the next Secretary of Defense during the waning days of the 109th United States Congress. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... Henry Stuart Foote (February 28, 1804–May 19, 1880) was a United States Senator from Mississippi from 1847 to 1852 and Governor of Mississippi from 1852 to 1854. ...


Left without political office, Davis continued his political activity. He took part in a convention on states' rights, held at Jackson, Mississippi in January 1852. In the weeks leading up to the presidential election of 1852, he campaigned in numerous Southern states for Democratic candidates Franklin Pierce and William R. King. States rights refers to the idea, in U.S. politics and constitutional law, that U.S. states possess certain rights and political powers in relation to the federal government. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ...


Secretary of War

Pierce won the election and, in 1853, made Davis his Secretary of War.[2] In this capacity, Davis gave to Congress four annual reports (in December of each year), as well as an elaborate one (submitted on February 22, 1855) on various routes for the proposed Transcontinental Railroad. The Pierce Administration ended in 1857. The President lost the Democratic nomination, which went instead to James Buchanan. Davis' term was to end with Pierce's, so he ran successfully for the Senate, and re-entered it on March 4, 1857. The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Pacific Railroad Surveys (1853-1855) explored possible routes for a transcontinental railroad across North America. ... Poster announcing railroads opening The First Transcontinental Railroad was a transcontinental railroad in North America that was finished in 1869. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Return to Senate

His renewed service in the Senate was interrupted by an illness that threatened him with the loss of his left eye. Still nominally serving in the Senate, Davis spent the summer of 1858 in Portland, Maine. On the Fourth of July, he delivered an anti-secessionist speech on board a ship near Boston. He again urged the preservation of the Union on October 11 in Faneuil Hall, Boston, and returned to the Senate soon after. For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... Boston redirects here. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Example. ...


As Davis explained in his memoir, "The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government," he believed that each State was sovereign and had an unquestionable right to secede from the Union. He counseled delay among his fellow Southerners, however, because he did not think that the North would permit the peaceable exercise of the right to secession. Having served as Secretary of War under President Franklin Pierce, he also knew that the South lacked the military and naval resources necessary to defend itself if the North attacked. Following the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860, however, events accelerated. South Carolina adopted an ordinance of secession on December 20, 1860, and Mississippi did so on January 9, 1861. As soon as Davis received official notification of that fact, he delivered a farewell address to the United States Senate, resigned, and returned to Mississippi. Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


President of the Confederate States 1861-1865

Third Confederate National Flag
Third Confederate National Flag

Four days after his resignation, Davis was commissioned a Major General of Mississippi troops.[1] On February 9, 1861, a Constitutional convention at Montgomery, Alabama named him provisional President of the Confederate States of America and he was inaugurated on February 18. In meetings of his own Mississippi legislature, Davis had argued against secession; but when a majority of the delegates opposed him, he gave in. Davis was not opposed to secession in principle; he counseled delay because he did not believe the North would agree to the peaceable exercise of the claimed right, and he knew that the South was not prepared for war. Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Image File history File links Confederate_National_Flag_since_Mar_4_1865. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Jefferson Davis being sworn in as President of the Confederate States of America on February 18, 1861 on the steps of the Alabama State Capitol.
Jefferson Davis being sworn in as President of the Confederate States of America on February 18, 1861 on the steps of the Alabama State Capitol.

In conformity with a resolution of the Confederate Congress, Davis immediately appointed a Peace Commission to resolve the Confederacy's differences with the Union. In March 1861, before the bombardment of Fort Sumter, the Commission was to travel to Washington, D.C., to offer to pay for any Federal property on Southern soil, as well as the Southern portion of the national debt, but it was not authorized to discuss terms for reunion. He appointed General P.G.T. Beauregard to command Confederate troops in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina. He approved the Cabinet decision to bombard Fort Sumter, which started the Civil War. When Virginia switched from neutrality and joined the Confederacy, he moved his government to Richmond, Virginia, in May 1861. Davis and his family took up his residence there at the White House of the Confederacy in late May. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 463 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (970 × 1256 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 463 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (970 × 1256 pixel, file size: 1. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Alabama State Capitol The Alabama State Capitol is located on Goat Hill in Montgomery, Alabama. ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... A group of Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government during the American Civil War. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... White House of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, built in 1818, photo circa 1939. ...

Confederate postage stamp featuring President Jefferson Davis.
Confederate postage stamp featuring President Jefferson Davis.

Davis was elected to a six-year term as President of the Confederacy on November 6, 1861. He had never served a full term in any elective office, and that would turn out to be the case on this occasion as well. He was inaugurated on February 22, 1862. In June, 1862, he assigned General Robert E. Lee to replace the wounded Joseph E. Johnston in command of the Army of Northern Virginia, the main Confederate army in the Eastern Theater. That December, he made a tour of Confederate armies in the west of the country. Davis largely made the main strategic decisions on his own, or approved those suggested by Lee. He had a very small circle of military advisors. Jefferson Davis openly pushed for the acquisition of Cuba upon completion of the Civil War. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 5c Jefferson Davis stamp This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the Confederate States of America. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... Western Theater Overview (1861 – 1865) This article presents an overview of major military and naval operations in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. ...


In August 1863, Davis declined General Lee's offer of resignation after his defeat at the Battle of Gettysburg. As Confederate military fortunes turned for the worse in 1864, he visited Georgia with the intent of raising morale. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


On April 3, 1865, with Union troops under Ulysses S. Grant poised to capture Richmond, Davis escaped for Danville, Virginia, together with the Confederate Cabinet, leaving on the Richmond and Danville Railroad. He issued his last official proclamation as President of the Confederacy, and then went south to Greensboro, North Carolina. Circa April 12, he received Robert E. Lee's letter announcing surrender. is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Nickname: River City, City of Churches Motto: A World Class Organization Country United States State Virginia County Independent City  - Mayor R. Wayne Williams, Jr. ... The Richmond & Danville Railroad was chartered in Virginia in the United States in 1847. ... Greensboro redirects here. ...



President Jefferson Davis met with his Confederate Cabinet for the last time on May 5, 1865 in Washington, Georgia, and the Confederate Government was officially dissolved. The meeting took place at the Heard house, the Georgia Branch Bank Building, with fourteen officials present. On May 10, he was captured at Irwinville in Irwin County, Georgia. After being captured, he was held as a prisoner for two years in Fort Monroe, Virginia. is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Washington is a city located in Wilkes County, Georgia. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Irwin County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ...


Administration and Cabinet

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (910x595, 195 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (910x595, 195 KB) http://hdl. ... Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Stephen Russell Mallory (c. ... Christopher Gustavus Memminger (January 9, 1803–March 7, 1888) was a prominent Confederate political leader. ... This is an article about the Confederate Vice President. ... Image:Walder, Leroy Pope 1. ... John Henninger Reagan (October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905), was a leading 19th century American politician from the U.S. state of Texas. ... Postbellum photograph of Robert A. Toombs. ... The President of the Confederate States was the Head of State of the short-lived republic of the Confederate States of America which seceded from the United States. ... The Vice President of Jefferson Davis was Alexander Stephens. ... This is an article about the Confederate Vice President. ... The Confederate States Secretary of State was the head of the Confederate States State Department from 1861 to 1865 during the American Civil War. ... Postbellum photograph of Robert A. Toombs. ... Robert Mercer Taliaferro Hunter (April 21, 1809 - July 18, 1887), American statesman, was born in Essex County, Virginia. ... Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Six Confederate notes The Confederate States of America dollar was first issued into circulation in April, 1861, when the Confederacy was only two months old, and on the eve of the outbreak of the Civil War. ... Christopher Gustavus Memminger (January 9, 1803–March 7, 1888) was a prominent Confederate political leader. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... John Henninger Reagan (October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905), was a leading 19th century American politician from the U.S. state of Texas. ... The Confederate States Secretary of War was a member of the Confederate States Presidents Cabinetwho was gay during the Civil War. ... Image:Walder, Leroy Pope 1. ... Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. ... George Wythe Randolph (March 10, 1818–April 3, 1867), the Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, was born in Charlottesville, Virginia at Monticello to Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. ... James Seddon James Alexander SeddonBorn 9/1/1988 James seddon is a pupil at sutton high and isnt a very good one. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Navy Department Seal The Confederate States Navy (CSN) was the naval branch of the Confederate States armed forces established by an act of the Confederate Congress on February 21, 1861 responsible for Confederate naval operations during the American Civil War. ... Stephen Russell Mallory (c. ... A Postmaster General is the national politician in charge of the postal system of a country. ... John Henninger Reagan (October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905), was a leading 19th century American politician from the U.S. state of Texas. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Categories: Stub | 1810 births | 1872 deaths | Governors of North Carolina | United States Senators ... Thomas Hill Watts (January 3, 1819–September 16, 1892) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Alabama from 1863 to 1865, during the Civil War. ... George Davis (born March 1, 1820; died February 23, 1896) was a U.S.-Confederate political figure and the last Confederate Attorney General 1864-1865. ...

Imprisonment and retirement

Jefferson Davis at his home c.1885
Jefferson Davis at his home c.1885

On May 19, 1865, Davis was imprisoned in a casemate at Fortress Monroe, on the coast of Virginia. He was placed in irons for three days. Davis was indicted for treason a year later. While in prison, Davis arranged to sell his Mississippi estate to one of his former slaves, Ben Montgomery. Montgomery was a talented business manager, mechanic, and even an inventor who had become wealthy in part from running his own general store. Image File history File links 1885JDavis. ... Image File history File links 1885JDavis. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... A Casemate is a heavy duty structure originally a vaulted chamber in a fortress. ... Satellite Photo of Fort Monroe Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ... This article is about crop plantations. ... Benjamin Montgomery (1819-1877) was an influential American inventor, land owner, visionary, and a former slave. ...


After two years of imprisonment, he was released on bail which was posted by prominent citizens of both northern and southern states, including Horace Greeley, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Gerrit Smith (Smith, as a member of the Secret Six, had earlier supported John Brown). Davis visited Canada, Cuba and Europe. In December 1868, the court rejected a motion to nullify the indictment, but the prosecution dropped the case in February 1869. Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, reformer and politician. ... {{Infobox Person | name = Cornelius Vanderbilt | image = Vanderbilt. ... Gerrit Smith Gerrit Smith (March 6, 1797 – December 28, 1874) was a leading United States social reformer, abolitionist, politician, and philanthropist. ... This article is about the historical Secret Six. ... John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was a white American abolitionist who advocated and practiced armed insurrection as a means to abolish slavery. ...


In 1869 Davis became president of the Carolina Life Insurance Company in Memphis, Tennessee. Upon Robert E. Lee's death in 1870, Davis presided over the memorial meeting in Richmond, Virginia. Elected to the U.S. Senate again, he was refused the office in 1875, having been barred from Federal office by the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. He also turned down the opportunity to become the first president of The Agriculture and Mechanical College of Texas, which is now Texas A&M University. For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Amendment XIV in the National Archives The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (Amendment XIV) is one of the post-Civil War amendments (known as the Reconstruction Amendments), first intended to secure rights for former slaves. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ...


In 1876, he promoted a society for the stimulation of U.S. trade with South America. Davis visited England the next year, returning in 1878 to Beauvoir (Biloxi, Mississippi). Over the next three years there, Davis wrote The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. Having completed that book, he visited Europe again, and traveled to Alabama and Georgia the following year. South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Beauvoir Main Residence (pre-Katrina) Beauvoir is the location of the historic post-war home and Presidential library of Confederate President Jefferson Davis begun in 1848 at Biloxi, Mississippi. ... Bold textthe rise & fall of the confederate goverment was wrote by jeff davis when he was 70 years of age, it was not a big hit then for the south at the time was poor & the north was rich but didnt like the book for he & the south had a... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


He completed A Short History of the Confederate States of America in October 1889. Two months later on December 6, Davis died in New Orleans of unestablished cause at the age of eighty-one. His funeral was one of the largest ever staged in the South, and included a continuous cortège, day and night, from New Orleans to Richmond, Virginia. He is buried at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond. A Short History of the Confederate States of America is a memoir written by Jefferson Davis, completed shortly before his death in 1889. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ...

Jefferson Davis grave at the Hollywood Cemetery
Jefferson Davis grave at the Hollywood Cemetery

A view of Hollywood Cemetery and Presidents Circle Hollywood Cemetery is a large, sprawling cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, characterized by rolling hills and winding paths overlooking the James River. ...

Legacy

  • The Jefferson Davis Presidential Library, on the grounds of Davis's last home, Beauvoir, at Biloxi, Mississippi, was dedicated in 1998 by the state of Mississippi.
  • Jefferson Davis is included on a bas relief sculpture on Stone Mountain, which is just east of Atlanta, Georgia.
  • A monument to Jefferson Davis was unveiled on June 3, 1907, on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia and a life-sized statue marks his grave at Hollywood Cemetery in that city.
  • A statue of Jefferson Davis stands in Confederate Park in Memphis, Tennessee.
  • A statue of Jefferson Davis stands on the South Mall of the University of Texas at Austin.
  • A 351-foot (107 m) tall concrete obelisk at the Jefferson Davis State Historic Site in Fairview, Todd County, Kentucky marks the site of his birth place in what was then Christian County, Kentucky.
  • A bust statue of Jefferson Davis is located in a park on the spot he was captured, near Fitzgerald, Georgia.
  • Another bust of Jefferson Davis is located outside of the Jeff Davis County Court House building in Hazlehurst, Georgia.
  • The state of Alabama celebrates Jefferson Davis's birthday on the first Monday in June. The state of Mississippi observes Davis's birthday in conjunction with the Memorial Day Federal holiday.
  • In the State of Florida, Jefferson Davis's birthday, June 3, is a legal holiday and public holiday. [1]
  • Jefferson Davis was honorarily inducted into the Kappa Sigma Fraternity (University of Arkansas - Xi chapter) following his son's death. He is currently the only honorary member of the fraternity.
  • Jefferson Davis County, Mississippi, Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana, Jeff Davis County, Texas, and Jeff Davis County, Georgia, all created after the civil war, were named after Jefferson Davis.
  • The Jefferson Davis Highway was named in his honor.
  • Section 3 of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution barred from office anyone who had violated their oath to protect the Constitution by serving in the Confederacy. That prohibition included Davis. In 1978, pursuant to authority granted to Congress under the same section of the Amendment, Congress posthumously removed the ban on Davis with a two-thirds vote of each house and President Jimmy Carter signed it. These actions were spearheaded by Congressman Trent Lott of Mississippi. Congress had previously taken similar action on behalf of Robert E. Lee.
  • A statue of Jefferson Davis is depicted in the National Statuary Hall in the U.S. Capitol Building, for the state of Mississippi.
  • There is a carved stone memorial to Jefferson Davis at First and Camp Streets, next to the home where he died, in New Orleans, La, as well as a life-sized statue at the corner of Jefferson Davis Parkway and Canal Street.
  • There are statues of Davis in the Alabama, Virginia and Kentucky State Capitols -- in Montgomery, on the grounds in front of the main entrance where he was sworn in as President of the Confederacy; in Richmond, in the old house of delegates chamber; and inside the rotunda at Frankfort.
Statue of Jefferson Davis
Statue of Jefferson Davis

The Jefferson Davis Presidential Library and museum was constructed in 1996 and dedicated in 1998 by the state of Mississippi for the purposes of housing the papers and artifacts of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. ... Beauvoir Main Residence (pre-Katrina) Beauvoir is the location of the historic post-war home and Presidential library of Confederate President Jefferson Davis begun in 1848 at Biloxi, Mississippi. ... Bas-relief (pronounced bah-relief, French for low relief) is a method of sculpting which entails carving or etching away the surface of a flat piece of stone or metal creating a sculpture portrayed as a picture. ... This article is about Stone Mountain in Georgia, USA. For other uses, see Stone Mountain (disambiguation). ... Atlanta redirects here. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Jefferson Davis monument on Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia Monument Avenue, in Richmond, Virginia, memorializes Virginian native Confederate participants of the Civil War and one 20th century Richmond native. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... University of Texas redirects here. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris Obelisk outside Santa Maria sopra Minerva in Rome. ... The Jefferson Davis State Historic Site is a monument maintained by the Kentucky Department of Parks, in Christian County, Kentucky, east of Hopkinsville, dedicated to the birthplace of the first and only President of the Confederate States of America. ... Fairview is the name of several places: In the U. S.: Fairview, California Fairview, Georgia Fairview, Illinois Fairview, Kansas Fairview, Kentucky Fairview, Michigan Fairview, Missouri Fairview, Montana Fairview, New Jersey Fairview, New York Fairview, North Carolina Fairview, Ohio Fairview, Oklahoma Fairview, Oregon Fairview, Pennsylvania Fairview, South Dakota Fairview, Texas Fairview... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Fitzgerald is a city located in Ben Hill County, Georgia. ... Hazlehurst is a city located in Jeff Davis County, Georgia. ... Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... Jefferson Davis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Jefferson Davis Parish is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... Jeff Davis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... Jeff Davis County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... Jefferson Davis Memorial Highway was named for Jefferson Davis (1808-1889). ... Amendment XIV in the National Archives The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (Amendment XIV) is one of the post-Civil War amendments (known as the Reconstruction Amendments), first intended to secure rights for former slaves. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Chester Trent Lott Sr. ... For other uses, see Robert E. Lee (disambiguation). ... National Statuary Hall The National Statuary Hall is an area in the United States Capitol devoted to statues of people and symbols important in American history. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A photograph of a Jefferson Davis statue, sculpted in bronze by Augustus Lukeman for the state of Mississippi and given to the National Statuary Hall in 1931. ... A photograph of a Jefferson Davis statue, sculpted in bronze by Augustus Lukeman for the state of Mississippi and given to the National Statuary Hall in 1931. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Hamilton, Holman (1978). "Jefferson Davis Before His Presidency", The Three Kentucky Presidents. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0813102464. 
  2. ^ (1992) "Davis, Jefferson", in Kleber, John E.: The Kentucky Encyclopedia, Associate editors: Thomas D. Clark, Lowell H. Harrison, and James C. Klotter, Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0813117720. 

Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 - June 28, 2005) was perhaps Kentuckys most notable historian. ...

References

Primary sources

  • Jefferson Davis, Jefferson Davis: The Essential Writings ed. by William J. Cooper (2003)
  • Dunbar Rowland, ed., Jefferson Davis: Constitutionalist; His Letters, Papers, and Speeches (10 vols., 1923).
  • The Papers of Jefferson Davis (1971- ), edited by Haskell M. Monroe, Jr., James T. McIntosh, and Lynda L. Crist; latest is vol. 11 (2004) to May 1865
  • Jefferson Davis. The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881; numerous reprints)
  • http://www.nndb.com/people/336/000050186/

Secondary sources

  • Allen, Felicity. Jefferson Davis: Unconquerable Heart (1999) online edition
  • Ballard, Michael. Long Shadow: Jefferson Davis and the Final Days of the Confederacy (1986) online edition
  • William J. Cooper. Jefferson Davis, American (2000)
  • William C. Davis, Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour (1991).
  • William E Dodd. Jefferson Davis (1907)
  • Clement Eaton, Jefferson Davis (1977).
  • Paul D. Escott, After Secession: Jefferson Davis and the Failure of Confederate Nationalism (1978).
  • Herman Hattaway and Richard E. Beringer. Jefferson Davis, Confederate President. (2001)
  • Rable; George C. The Confederate Republic: A Revolution against Politics. (1994). online edition
  • Neely Jr.' Mark E. Confederate Bastille: Jefferson Davis and Civil Liberties (1993) online edition
  • Hudson Strode, Jefferson Davis (3 vols., 1955-1964)
  • Emory M. Thomas, The Confederate Nation, 1861-1865 (1979)

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Preceded by
William H. Hammett
Robert W. Roberts
Jacob Thompson
Tilghman M. Tucker
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Mississippi's At-large congressional district

March 4, 1845 – June, 1846
Served alongside: Stephen Adams, Robert W. Roberts and Jacob Thompson
Succeeded by
Henry T. Ellett
Preceded by
Jesse Speight
United States Senator (Class 1) from Mississippi
August 10, 1847September 23, 1851
Served alongside: Henry S. Foote
Succeeded by
John J. McRae
Preceded by
Charles Magill Conrad
United States Secretary of War
March 7, 1853March 4, 1857
Succeeded by
John Buchanan Floyd
Preceded by
Stephen Adams
United States Senator (Class 1) from Mississippi
March 4, 1857January 21, 1861
Served alongside: Albert G. Brown
Succeeded by
Adelbert Ames(1)
Preceded by
Office established
President of the Confederate States of America
February 18, 1861May 5, 1865
Succeeded by
Office abolished
Notes and references
1. Because of Mississippi's secession, the Senate seat was vacant for nine years before Ames succeeded Davis.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jefferson Davis (5266 words)
Davis had advocated the construction of a Pacific railway as military necessity, and a means of preserving the Pacific coast to the Union, and he was now put in charge of the organization and equipment of the surveying parties sent out to examine the various routes proposed.
Davis had issued an address to the people of the south, in which he drew the happiest conclusions as to the success of the Confederacy, from the way in which, in the face of obstacles, it had already organized and disciplined armies.
Davis was specially accepted in a bill to pension veterans of the Mexican war, the adoption of an amendment to that effect being largely the result of a speech by Zachariah Chartdler.
Encyclopedia4U - Jefferson Davis - Encyclopedia Article (1706 words)
Jefferson Davis (June 3, 1808 - December 6, 1889) was an American soldier and politician, most famous for serving as President of the Confederate States of America throughout the American Civil War.
Davis was elected to a six-year term as president of the Confederacy on November 6, 1861.
Jefferson Davis died in New Orleans on December 6, 1889, at the age of 81.
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