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Encyclopedia > Jeff Flake
Jeff Flake
Jeff Flake

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Arizona's 6th district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 2001
Preceded by Matt Salmon
Succeeded by Incumbent

Born December 31, 1962 (1962-12-31) (age 44)
Snowflake, Arizona
Political party Republican
Spouse Cheryl Flake
Religion The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Jeffry "Jeff" Flake (born December 31, 1962), an American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 2001, representing Arizona's 6th congressional district. Official portrait. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Arizonas 6th congressional district encompasses parts of Maricopa and Pinal counties. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Matthew James Salmon (born January 21, 1958) is a former Congressional Representative from Arizona. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Snowflake is a town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Arizonas 6th congressional district encompasses parts of Maricopa and Pinal counties. ...


He was born in Snowflake, Arizona (named in part for his great-great-grandfather, William J. Flake),[1] was educated at Brigham Young University and was a Mormon missionary. He served as Executive Director of the Foundation for Democracy in Namibia and Executive Director of the Goldwater Institute before entering the House. Snowflake is a town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... William Jordan Flake (July 3, 1839 – 1932) was a prominent member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, imprisoned for polygamy. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and is THE university in Utah. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... The Goldwater Institute is a Phoenix, Arizona-based public policy think-tank established in 1988. ...


Flake opposes pork barrel spending and advocates reducing federal spending.[2] Pork barrel (or pork barrel politics) is a derogatory term used to describe United States government spending that is intended to enrich constituents of a politician in return for their political support, either in the form of campaign contributions or votes. ...

Contents

Congressional career

Jeff Flake is known as one of the more libertarian of the Republicans in the House, often among a handful of Republicans joining Ron Paul in casting 'no' votes on bills most of his party supports.[3] See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ...


Some believe Flake harbors further political ambitions, including possible future runs for Governor of Arizona or the United States Senate. The conservative Club for Growth recruited him to run against John McCain (who represented Flake's district from 1983 to 1987) in 2004. However, Flake endorsed Senator McCain for President in 2008. This is a list of Governors of Arizona: See also Governors of Arizona Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Arizona ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Club for Growth is a section 527 political organization and an affiliated political action committee that raises money for candidates who support an anti-tax and limited-government agenda. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He also serves on the Liberty Caucus (sometimes called the Liberty Committee), a group of liberty-minded congressional representatives from both sides of the aisle.[4] Congressman Ron Paul hosts a luncheon for the Liberty Caucus every Thursday. Other members include Jimmy Duncan of Tennessee, Virgil Goode of Virginia, Roscoe Bartlett of Maryland, Scott Garrett of New Jersey, Zach Wamp of Tennessee and Walter B. Jones of North Carolina.[5] Ronald Ernest Paul (born August 20, 1935) is a 10th-term United States congressman from Lake Jackson, Texas, a member of the Republican Party, a pro-life physician, and a candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... John James Duncan, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Virgil Hamlin Goode, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Roscoe Bartlett Dr. Roscoe Gardner Bartlett (born June 3, 1926) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the 6th district (map) of the State of Maryland since 1993. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... E. Scott Garrett (born July 9, 1959 in Englewood, New Jersey) is a member of the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Zachary Paul Zach Wamp (born October 28, 1957) is a conservative Republican politician representing the 3rd Congressional district of Tennessee (map) since 1995. ... Walter Beaman Jones, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Issues and positions

Flake supports creating a temporary worker program for border security, leading some anti-illegal immigration conservative activists to give Flake the Republican In Name Only label.[6] However, others consider him one of the most consistently conservative members of the House and strongly support him. He is one of only eight Congressmen in the entire House to receive a 100% approval rating from the respected American Conservative Union.[6] Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Republican In Name Only, or RINO, is a disparaging term for a member of the Republican Party of the United States whose political views or actions are perceived as not conservative and outside the conservative mainstream. ... The American Conservative Union (ACU) is a large conservative political lobbying group in the United States. ...


Flake voted against No Child Left Behind, Sarbanes-Oxley, Medicare Part D, Homeland Security Act[3], and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. He joined John McCain and Jim Kolbe in sponsoring bills to increase legal immigration and establish a guest worker program. He has expressed interest in abolishing the U.S. Department of Education [citation needed]. Signing ceremony at Hamilton High School in Hamilton, Ohio. ... Before the signing ceremony of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, President George W. Bush meets with Senator Paul Sarbanes, Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao and other dignitaries in the Blue Room at the White House July 30, 2002. ... Medicare Part D is a federal program to subsidize the costs of prescription drugs for Medicare beneficiaries in the United States. ... The Homeland Security Act (HSA) of 2002, Pub. ... The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) is designed to prohibit the improper use of genetic information in health insurance and employment. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... James Thomas Jim Kolbe (born June 28, 1942)) is a former Republican member of the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1985 to 2007. ... A foreign worker (cf expatriate), is a person who works in a country other than the one of which he or she is a citizen. ... The United States Department of Education was created in 1979 (by PL 96-88) as a Cabinet-level department of the United States government, and began operating in 1980. ...


Flake initially supported the Patriot Act and the Iraq War, but more recently has changed his position to one of cautious opposition, including voting against appropriations for both. He also supports ending the Cuba Trade Embargo and has been a proponent of reform in the House, particularly in the wake of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay's ethical and fundraising controversies. He co-authored a letter with now former Congressman Charlie Bass of New Hampshire, which called for DeLay to step down — a possible factor in DeLay's decision not to retake his post once his legal troubles end.[citation needed] This article needs cleanup. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The United States embargo against Cuba (described in Cuba as el bloqueo, Spanish for the blockade) is an economic, commercial, and financial embargo imposed on Cuba on February 7, 1962. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... Thomas Dale DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Sugar Land, Texas. ... Charles Foster Bass (born January 8, 1952) is a member of the United States House of Representatives for the second district of New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ...


"The Flake Hour"

Rep. Flake is opposed to the current and former earmarking processes, frequently challenging earmarks proposed by other members of Congress. Since May 2006, he has become prominent with the "Flake Hour," a tradition at the end of spending bill debates in which he asks earmark sponsors to come to the House floor and justify why "taxpayers should pay for their "pet projects."[7] Flake issues a press release listing an "egregious earmark of the week" every Friday.[2] Earmark is a the term that dates to the 16th century, originally referring to cuts or marks in the ears of cattle and sheep made to show ownership. ... May 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → May 1, 2006 (Monday) Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association outraged Vatican by planning to ordain another bishop, Liu Xinhong in Anhui Province. ... For other uses, see Tradition (disambiguation). ... Debate (North American English) or debating (British English) is a formal method of interactive and position representational argument. ... Earmark is a the term that dates to the 16th century, originally referring to cuts or marks in the ears of cattle and sheep made to show ownership. ... Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. ... A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken to create a product or service[1]. // The word project comes from the Latin word projectum from projicere, to throw something forwards which in turn comes from pro-, which denotes something that precedes the action of the next part of the word in...


His willingness to stand up to appropriators resulted in his removal from the Judiciary Committee in the year 2007, as the Republican appropriators on the Steering Committee sought revenge for his so-called "bad behavior."[8] U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Revenge (disambiguation). ...


Rep. Flake once said of Congressman Jose Serrano's $150,000 earmark to fix plumbing in Italian restaurants, "I would argue this is one cannoli the taxpayer doesn’t want to take a bite of."[1] José Enrique Serrano (born October 24, 1943) is a New York politician. ... $, the dollar sign, is primarily used to represent currencies: Many different dollars Many different pesos Different escudos The Brazilian real The Tongan paanga The Nicaraguan córdoba $ may also be: $ (film), also known as Dollars A sigil (computer programming) Category: ... Cannoli are Italian pastry desserts. ...


In July 2007, Flake was ruled the least profligate spender in Congress by Citizens Against Government Waste and designated a "taxpayer superhero."[2] Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) is a prominent taxpayer watchdog group in the USA. Its stated goal is to eliminate waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement in the federal government. ...


Elections

Rep. Flake was first elected (to what was then the First district) in the year 2000, after the incumbent, Republican Matt Salmon, stepped down in honor of a self-imposed term limit. The district was then renumbered "the 6th" as Arizona gained two Congressional seats due to the results of the 2000 census. This article is about the political process. ... Arizonas 1st Congressional district is the tenth largest congressional district in the nation. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Open seat redirects here. ... Matthew James Salmon (born January 21, 1958) is a former Congressional Representative from Arizona. ... Honor (or honor) comprises the reputation, self-perception or moral identity of an individual or of a group. ... A term limit is a legal restriction that limits the number of terms a person may serve in a particular elected office. ... In 2000, censuses were conducted in United States: The 22nd federal United States 2000 Census Costa Rica: The 9th Costa Rican Census of population. ...


In his campaign of the year 2000, Mr. Flake had pledged to serve no more than three terms in Congress, leaving no later than January of the year 2007, but in early 2005, shortly after being elected for a third time, Rep. Flake announced that he had changed his mind and would in fact run for re-election in the year 2006. "It was a mistake to limit my own terms," Rep. Flake said.[9] For other uses, see January (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rep. Flake's departures from the Republican party-line on certain issues earned him a closely watched primary challenge in the year 2004. He easily defeated the challenger.[10] In that same election, three out of five mayors in his home district opposed his re-election as he did not "bring pork barrel spending" to the mayors' cities.[1] In the year 2006, several Democrats had announced their intention to run for the seat, however, only one met the June filing deadline and that particular filing was rejected due to an insufficient amount of nominating signatures. "I did expect to have a primary opponent. I deserve one," Flake said, referring to the term-limit pledge which he had broken. "By all rights, I ought to have an opponent. I just got lucky, I guess."[11] For other uses, see Primary. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Pork barrel (or pork barrel politics) is a derogatory term used to describe United States government spending that is intended to enrich constituents of a politician in return for their political support, either in the form of campaign contributions or votes. ... For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ... File has several meanings: Computer file File (tool) file (Unix), a program used to determine file types. ...


In the 2006 mid-term elections, Rep. Flake had no Democratic party opponent and easily defeated the Libertarian Party candidate, Jason Blair, with 74% of the vote over Mr. Blair's 26%.[12] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion or a fraction as a whole number. ...


Personal life

Flake is married to Cheryl and they have five children. They are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He spent time in Zimbabwe and South Africa as a Mormon missionary.[1][13] The Flakes have been married for 22 years; Cheryl cuts Flake's hair, and he says that he has only paid for three haircuts his entire life because members of his family have always been willing to cut his hair for free.[2] For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Flake's uncle Jake Flake is an Arizona state senator. When Sen. Jake Flake wanted $3.1 million in federal dollars for a project in his district, he knew not to ask his nephew and instead asked another congressperson.[1] Franklin Lars Jake Flake (born August 1935) is a Senator in the Arizona State Legislature (2004 to present). ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e CBS 60 Minutes, Rep. Flake On Cutting Congressional Pork. Consulted on July 27, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c d It's gotta be the hair. East Valley Tribune (2007-07-12). Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  3. ^ a b Reason Magazine, Who Deserves the Libertarian Vote?. Consulted on July 27, 2007.
  4. ^ The Liberty Committee. Retrieved on 2007-06-24.
  5. ^ Caldwell, Christopher. "The Antiwar, Anti-Abortion, Anti-Drug-Enforcement-Administration, Anti-Medicare Candidacy of Dr. Ron Paul", 'The New York Times Magazine', 2007-07-22. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. 
  6. ^ See "American Patrol" at http://www.americanpatrol.com/_WEB2004/040117.html
  7. ^ Rogers, David. "Tilting at Appropriations". The Wall Street Journal. June 29, 2006. A4. [1]
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ Stone, Andrea. "Term-limit pledges get left behind". USA Today. April 12, 2006. [3]
  10. ^ Arizona Secretary of State website: [4] accessed January 7, 2006
  11. ^ Paul Giblin, "Flake faces solo race after judge removes hopeful", East Valley Tribune, July 12, 2006
  12. ^ CNN [5]
  13. ^ Lynch, Michael W. (February 2001). Reason Magazine, Soundbite: The Missionary's Positions Consulted on July 28, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Matt Salmon
U.S. Representative for Arizona's 1st Congressional District
2001–2003
Succeeded by
Rick Renzi
Preceded by
J.D. Hayworth
U.S. Representative for Arizona's 6th Congressional District
2003–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jeff Flake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (594 words)
He was born in Snowflake, Arizona (named in part for his great-great-grandfather, William J. Flake), was educated at Brigham Young University and was a Mormon missionary.
Jeff Flake is known as one of the more libertarian of the Republicans in the House, often among a small handful of Republicans joining Ron Paul in casting 'no' votes on bills which are supported by most of his party.
Flake is believed to harbor further political ambitions, including possible future runs for Governor of Arizona or the United States Senate.
Jeff Flake - definition of Jeff Flake in Encyclopedia (102 words)
Jeff Flake - definition of Jeff Flake in Encyclopedia
Jeff Flake (born December 31 1962), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 2001, representing the 6th District of Arizona.
He was born in Snowflake, Arizona, was educated at Brigham Young University and was a Mormon missionary, Executive Director of the Foundation for Democracy in Namibia, and Executive Director of the Goldwater Institute before entering the House.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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