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Encyclopedia > Jedburgh
Jedburgh
Gaelic - Deadard
Scots - Jeddart, Jethart,
Coordinates: 55°28′37″N 2°32′46″W / 55.477, -2.546
Population 4,090
OS grid reference NT6520
Council area Scottish Borders
Lieutenancy area Roxburgh, Ettrick and Lauderdale
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town JEDBURGH
Postcode district TD8
Dial code 01835
Vehicle code SK-SO (Edinburgh)
Police Lothian and Borders
Fire Lothian and Borders
Ambulance Scottish
UK Parliament Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk
Scottish Parliament Roxburgh and Berwickshire
European Parliament Scotland
List of places: UKScotland

Jedburgh (Referred to locally Jeddart or Jethart) is a town and former royal burgh in the Scottish Borders. Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 355 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (553 × 933 pixel, file size: 178 KB, MIME type: image/png) Template image for Scottish location maps, high resolution (not for use in infobox). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Roxburgh, Ettrick and Lauderdale (Rosbrog, Eadaraig agus Srath Labhdair in Scottish Gaelic) is a Lieutenancy area of Scotland. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotland() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The TD postcode area, also known as the Galashiels postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Berwick-Upon-Tweed, Cockburnspath, Coldstream, Cornhill-on-Tweed, Duns, Earlston, Eyemouth, Galashiels, Gordon, Hawick, Jedburgh, Kelso, Lauder, Melrose, Mindrum, Newcastleton, Selkirk in Scotland and England. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... In the United Kingdom, all motor-powered road vehicles, including cars (but excepting the official cars of the reigning monarch) have had to carry registration plates (more commonly known as number plates) since 1904. ... The following are the vehicle number plate identifiers used in Great Britain since the 2001 changes to British vehicle number plates. ... Lothian and Borders Police are the police force for the Lothian and Borders regions of Scotland, including Edinburgh, Galashiels and Livingston. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Lothian and Borders Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service covering a total area 2,500 square miles and serving a total population of 890,000. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk was created as a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the general election of 2005. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Roxburgh and Berwickshire is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotland() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ...

Canongate
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Contents

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 776 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 618 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jedburgh town centre July 2006 Taken and donated by John Mullen I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 776 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (800 × 618 pixel, file size: 43 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jedburgh town centre July 2006 Taken and donated by John Mullen I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy...

Location

Jedburgh lies on the Jed Water, a tributary of the River Teviot, it is only ten miles from the border with England, and is dominated by the substantial ruins of Jedburgh Abbey. Other notable buildings in the town include Mary, Queen of Scots' House and Jedburgh Castle Jail, now a museum. The Jed Water is a river that is a tributary of the River Teviot in the Borders region of Scotland. ... A river of the Scottish Borders, the River Teviot rises in the western foothills of Comb Hill on the border of Dumfries and Galloway. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Jedburgh Abbey from the River, 1798-99 by Thomas Girtin Jedburgh Abbey is an extremely old but important abbey in a poor state of repair, situated in Jedburgh, in the Borders of Scotland. ... A large gaol built in the early 19th century on the site of a former castle. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...

Mercat Cross from Castle Hill

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

History

A church had been at Jedburgh since the 9th century, founded by Bishop Ecgred of Lindisfarne, and king David I of Scotland made it a priory between 1118 and 1138, housing Augustinian monks from Beauvais in France. The abbey itself was founded in 1147. Border wars with England in the 16th century left the abbey a magnificent ruin, still worth a visit today. It has been suggested that Ecclesia (Church) be merged into this article or section. ... Ecgred of Lindisfarne (died 845) was Bishop of Lindisfarne from 830 to 845. ... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I the Saint) (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... St. ... Beauvais is a town and commune of northern France, préfecture (capital) of the Oise département. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ...


The deeply religious Scottish king Malcolm IV died at Jedburgh in 1165, aged 24. His death was thought to be brought on by excessive fasting. Malcolm IV (or Máel Coluim mac Eanric) (c. ...


David I had also erected a castle at Jedburgh, and in 1174, it was one of five fortresses ceded to England. It was an occasional royal residence for the Scots but captured by the English so often that it was eventually demolished in 1409, when it was the last English stronghold in Scotland. Jedburgh Castle was a castle at Jedburgh in Scotland. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotland() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen...

Jedburgh Abbey.

In 1258 Jedburgh had also been the focus of royal attention, with negotiations between Scotland's Alexander III and England's Henry III over the heir to the Scottish throne, leaving the Comyn faction dominant. Alexander III was also to marry at the abbey in 1285. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (500 × 625 pixel, file size: 192 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jedburgh Abbey with excavations of the precincts © David Kilpatrick Davidkilpatrick 12:21, 23 February 2007 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (500 × 625 pixel, file size: 192 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jedburgh Abbey with excavations of the precincts © David Kilpatrick Davidkilpatrick 12:21, 23 February 2007 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby... Coronation of King Alexander on Moot Hill, Scone. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa is usually occupied by the Governor General and her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... Clan Cumming, also known as Clan Comyn, is a Scottish clan from the central Highlands that played a major role in the history of 13th century Scotland and in the Wars of Scottish Independence. ...


Its proximity to England made it historically subject to raids and skirmishes by both Scottish and English forces.


Mary, Queen of Scots stayed at a house in the town in 1566 which is now a museum. Mary I (popularly known as Mary, Queen of Scots: French: ); (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587) was Queen of Scots (the monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland) from December 14, 1542, to July 24, 1567. ...


Lord of Jedburgh Forest was a barony that was granted to George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus on the occasion of his marriage to the Princess Mary, daughter of Robert III in 1397. It is subsidiary title of the present Earl of Angus, Angus Douglas-Hamilton, 15th Duke of Hamilton. The Duke of Douglas was raised to the position of Viscount Jedburgh Forest, but he died without heir in 1761. George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus (1380–1403) was born at Tantallon Castle, East Lothian, Scotland. ... Robert III (c. ... The title of Earl of Angus is an ancient one in the Peerage of Scotland, currently held by the Duke of Hamilton. ... Angus Alan Douglas Douglas-Hamilton, 15th Duke of Hamilton and 12th Duke of Brandon (b. ... The title of Earl of Angus is an ancient one in the Peerage of Scotland, currently held by the Duke of Hamilton. ...


In 1745, the Jacobite army led by Prince Charles Edward Stuart passed through the town on its way to England, and the Prince also stayed here. The Castle Prison opened in 1823. Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Silvester Maria Stuart (December 31, 1720 – January 31, 1788), was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ...


The expression "Jeddart justice" or "Jethart Justice", where a man was hanged first, and tried afterward (compare Lynch law), seems to have arisen from one case of summary execution of a gang of villains. Lynch law is an extralegal means of maintaining the established social order. ...


During World War II, men from the American Office of Strategic Services trained around Jedburgh for covert missions in France, these were called Operation Jedburgh after the town. These operations were key in the liberation of Brittany, and thus the port of Brest, from the Nazi control. The importance of Jedburgh is commemorated in the war museum in Jedburgh's twin town Malestroit in southern Brittany. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was a United States intelligence agency formed during World War II. It was the wartime intelligence agency and was a lineage precursor to the Central Intelligence Agency, as well as for the Special Forces and Navy Seals, who have traced their lineage back to... Jedburgh was an operation in World War II in which men from the Office of Strategic Services and the British Special Operations Executive parachuted into Nazi occupied France to conduct sabotage and guerilla warfare, and to lead French Maquis forces against the Germans. ...


Notable people

Several notable people were born in the town, including the actor Peter McCue, in 1921. Tory MP Michael Ancram was born here in 1945, James Thomson (1700–1748) who wrote "Rule Britannia", was born nearby, and educated here. David Brewster, inventor of the kaleidoscope was also born in Jedburgh. For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Michael Andrew Foster Jude Kerr, 13th Marquess of Lothian, PC QC, MP, (born 7 July 1945), known as Michael Ancram, is a United Kingdom Conservative Party politician. ... James Thomson (September 11, 1700 – August 27, 1748) was a Scottish poet. ... “Rule Britannia” is a patriotic British national song, originating from the poem Rule Britannia by James Thomson, and set to music by Thomas Arne in 1740. ... David Brewster Sir David Brewster, (December 11, 1781 – February 10, 1868) was a Scottish scientist. ... A toy kaleidoscope tube Pattern as seen through a kaleidoscope tube Pattern as seen through a kaleidoscope tube Pattern as seen through a kaleidoscope tube The kaleidoscope is a tube of mirrors containing, loose coloured beads or pebbles, or other small coloured objects. ...


The town's most famous rugby sons are the scrum-halves, Roy Laidlaw and Gary Armstrong. A rugby union scrum. ... A rugby union team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15[1]. Depending upon the competition, there may be up to seven replacements. ... Scottish rugby player, scrum half. ... -1...


The town today

The town's population in 2001 was 4,090, down from around 8,000 at the end of the 19th Century.


The ruined abbey was the site of a major archaeological dig in 1986. It is open to the public, as is Jedburgh Castle Jail. Borders traditions like the annual Callants Rideout and bands of pipes and drums add local colour, and delicacies include Jethart Snails and Jethart Pears. Another annual event is the Jethart Hand Ba' game. The Canongate Brig dates from the 16th century, and there are some fine riverside walks. The Capon Oak Tree is reputed to be 2000 years old, and Newgate Prison and the town spire are among the town's older buildings. The town's industries included textiles, tanning and glove-making, grain mills, and electrical engineering. Archaeology, archeology, or archæology (from Greek: αρχαίος, archae, ancient; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains and environmental data, including architecture, artifacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ... Bass drum made from wood, rope, and cowskin A drum is a musical instrument in the percussion group that can be large, technically classified as a membranophone. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Located 2 miles south of Jedburgh west of the A68. ... Old Newgate Prison, which was replaced in the 18th century. ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... Tanned leather in Marrakech This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about cereals in general. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ...


Central to the festival and customs associated with the town of Jedburgh are the Jedforest Instrumental band who support many civic, religious and social events throughout the year, a service provided consistently since 1854. Jedburgh has two primary schools, Howdenburn situated on Howdenburn Drive although it's actual address is Lothian Road, and Parkside on Priors Road. There were two rural schools nearby, Oxnam Primary and Glendouglas Primary but these were shut in 2005 as cost cutting measures were brought in by Scottish Borders Council. Pupils from these schools now attend Howdenburn Primary. Secondary education is served by Jedburgh Grammar School at the bottom of High Street. The pupils come from the two town primaries as well as Ancrum Primary School and Denholm Primary School. The Grammar School has the distinction of being one of only a handful of schools in Britain that has a public road (Pleasance or Anna Road) running through the middle of it. The school has also been under major re-development work starting in 1995 and finishing in 2006. Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Scottish Borders (The Mairches in Scots, Crìochan na h-Alba in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ...

Surrounding area

Other towns of interest include Kelso, Hawick, Galashiels, Selkirk, and Melrose. There are abbeys at Melrose, Kelso and Dryburgh, and Kelso boasts a fine cobbled square. The centre of Kelso with its cobbled square. ... Hawick (IPA []) is a town in the Scottish Borders in the south east of Scotland. ... Bank Street Gardens, Galashiels ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Melrose(Am Maol Ros in Gaelic) is a small, historic town in the Scottish Borders. ... Kelso Abbey Kelso Abbey is a Scottish abbey built in the 12th century by a community of Tironensian monks (originally from Tiron, near Chartres, in France) who had moved from the nearby Selkirk Abbey. ... Dryburgh is a village in the Scottish Borders region of Scotland, famous for Dryburgh Abbey. ...


All the border towns are famous for their rugby, and Galashiels has associations with William Wallace and Robert the Bruce. Selkirk is where William Wallace was declared Guardian of Scotland and has many links to the Earls of Douglas, where some of his descendents live to this day and Melrose was the scene of a battle in 1526 over the stewardship of James V. A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just rugby, may refer to a number of sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England United Kingdom. ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Guardians of Scotland were the de facto heads of state of Scotland during the First Interregnum of 1290-1292, and the Second Interregnum of 1296-1306. ... The title of Earl of Douglas was created in the Peerage of Scotland in 1358 for the senior, or Black line of the great Douglas family. ... James V (April 10, 1512 - December 14, 1542) was king of Scotland (September 9, 1513 - December 14, 1542). ...


Transport

Although Jedburgh has no rail access it is very well located on the road network. The A68 provides direct access to Edinburgh (48 miles) and Newcastle-upon-Tyne (58 miles). Carlisle is 57 miles away and Hawick, Kelso, Selkirk and Galashiels are all within 20 miles. The A68 is a major road in the United Kingdom, running from Darlington in England to Edinburgh in Scotland. ... Edinburgh (() pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second largest city. ... Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... Carlisle is a city in the far north-west of England, and is the largest urban area in Cumbria. ... Hawick (IPA []) is a town in the Scottish Borders in the south east of Scotland. ... // Kelso has several meanings: Kelso, Scotland, a burgh in the Scottish Borders Kelso Abbey Kelso Racecourse Kelso, a small village in Halton Regional Municipality, Ontario, located beside Lake Kelso Kelso, New South Wales, a suburb of Bathurst Kelso, Tasmania a small village in the north of Tasmania Kelso, Queensland a... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bank Street Gardens, Galashiels ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...


Jedburgh is well known to motorists in both Edinburgh and Newcastle-upon-Tyne as Jedburgh is a control town to direct road traffic on the A68. Edinburgh (() pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second largest city. ... Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... This sign in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma lists control cities of Wichita, Kansas and Ft. ...


Sport

The town is home to one of the most famous and oldest Rugby Clubs in Scotland, Jed-Forest. Under-18 "Semi Junior" rugby is played by Jed Thistle at Lothian Park. Also football is represented by Jed Legion FC which currently plays in Division B of the Border Amateur League winning cups most seasons. They play their home matches at Woodend. Ancrum FC play in the village of Ancrum just to the north and include many players from Jedburgh. A Bowling Club play at Allars Mill. Cricket was once also played at Woodend but the club disbanded in the late 80s. Many sports activities are offered in Jedburgh to children including rugby, football, swimming and badminton amongst others. Official website www. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ancrum is a village in the Scottish Borders, 4 miles north of Jedburgh. ...


Jedburgh has the distinction of being the only Border town to have a dry ski slope. Built at Anna Road Sports Complex which also has two tennis courts, a small outdoor football pitch, a 100m sprint track and a sand pit for long jump and triple jump. Canoes are also available for the towns Secondary school pupils at Jedburgh Grammar School which adjoins the complex and a "rock" for climbing and abseiling, although not very high it gives a taster. Dry ski slopes are an attempt to mimic the attributes of snow using materials that are usable at normal summer temperatures. ... A tennis courts dimension A tennis court is where a game of tennis is played. ... Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... The triple jump is an athletics (track and field) event, previously also known as hop, step and jump, whose various names describe the actions a competitor takes. ... Canoe at El Nido, Philippines A canoe is a relatively small human-powered boat. ... Australian rappel demonstrated at a dam in Norway In British English, abseiling (from the German abseilen, to rope down) is the process of descending on a fixed rope. ...


Jethart Snails

A local speciality, a brown mint-flavoured boiled sweet. The recipe is believed to have been brought to the town by French prisoners of the Napoleonic War The Napoleonic Wars lasted from 1804 until 1815. ...


See also

  • Jed-Forest Rugby Football Club

Jed-Forest Rugby Football Club are a rugby union team who are based at Riverside Park in Jedburgh. ...

Sources and External links

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Jedburgh Online Community Website
  • Jed-Forest Rugby Football Club
  • Lyrics and a recording of the Victorian song 'Jedwater' by David Kilpatrick, Traditional Music and Song Association Scottish Borders branch Davidkilpatrick 12:13, 23 February 2007 (UTC)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jedburgh (390 words)
Fordun gives 1147 as the year of foundation, but this seems to have been the date of the erection of the priory into an abbey, when prior Osbert (styled in the Melrose chronicle "primus abbas de Geddeworth") was raised to the abbatial dignity.
Jedburgh soon became one of the greatest Scottish monasteries, deriving importance from its proximity to the castle (now entirely destroyed), which was the favourite residence of many of the Scottish kings.
In 1559 (John Horne being abbot) the abbey was suppressed, and its possessions confiscated by the Crown.
Jedburgh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (682 words)
Jedburgh (Referred to locally Jedart or Jethart) is a royal burgh in the Scottish Borders, lying on the Jed Water, a tributary of the River Teviot.
A church had been at Jedburgh since the 9th century, founded by Bishop Ecgred of Lindisfarne, and David I made it a priory between 1118 and 1138, housing Augustinian monks from Beauvais in France.
In 1258 Jedburgh had also been the focus of royal attention, with negotiations between Scotland's Alexander III and England's Henry III over the heir to the Scottish throne, leaving the Comyn faction dominant.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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