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Encyclopedia > Jean Chrétien

The Right Honourable Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, PC (born January 11, 1934) was the twentieth Prime Minister of Canada, serving from November 4, 1993, to December 12, 2003. The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt Hon. ... The Queens Privy Council for Canada is the ceremonial council of advisors to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by her Governor General in Canada for life on the advice of the Prime Minister. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Rt Hon. Jean Chrétien
Image:jchretien.jpg
Rank: 20th
Term of Office: November 3, 1993 -
December 12, 2003
Predecessor: Kim Campbell
Successor: Paul Martin
Date of Birth: January 11, 1934
Place of Birth: Shawinigan, Quebec
Spouse: Aline Chainé
Profession: lawyer, politician
Political Party: Liberal
Contents

Jean Chretien of Canada The copyright status of this work is difficult or impossible to determine. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Avril Phaedra Douglas Kim Campbell, PC (born March 10, 1947, Port Alberni, British Columbia) was the nineteenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 25 to November 4, 1993. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Shawinigan is a city in the Province of Quebec, Canada on the Saint-Maurice River. ... This article describes the Canadian province. ... Aline Chrétien (born May 14, 1936 in Saint-Boniface-de-Shawinigan, Quebec) is the wife of Canadas twentieth Prime Minister, Jean Chrétien. ... A profession is a specialized work function within society, generally performed by a professional. ... For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... A political party is a political organization subscribing to a certain ideology or formed around very special issues. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ...

Early life

Born in Shawinigan, Quebec as the 18th of 19 children, Chrétien studied law at Laval University. Chretien would later make light of his humble origins, calling himself the little guy from Shawinigan. In his youth, he suffered an attack of Bell's palsy, leaving the left side of his face permanently paralyzed. Political opponents, like former Prime Minister Kim Campbell, used this affliction as a basis for political attacks, accusing Chrétien of both figuratively and literally "talking out of the side of his mouth." This tactic was liable to backfire when made insensitively, as it did for the Campbell-led Conservatives in a 1993 attack ad. Shawinigan is a city in the Province of Quebec, Canada on the Saint-Maurice River. ... Laval University (Université Laval) is one of Canadas leading universities. ... Bells palsy (facial palsy) is characterised by facial drooping due to malfunction of the facial nerve (VII cranial nerve), which controls the muscles of the face. ... The Right Honourable Avril Phaedra Douglas Kim Campbell, PC (born March 10, 1947, Port Alberni, British Columbia) was the nineteenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 25 to November 4, 1993. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The 1993 Chrétien ad was an attack ad made during the 1993 Canadian election by the Progressive Conservative Party against Liberal leader Jean Chrétien that many felt focused on Chrétien’s facial deformity. ...


On September 10, 1957, he married Aline Chainé. They have two sons and one daughter: France, Hubert, and Michel. He was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons in 1963 and, after re-election in 1965, served as parliamentary secretary - first to Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson (1965) and then to Minister of Finance Mitchell Sharp (1966). Pearson later appointed him junior finance minister. He was appointed Minister of National Revenue in 1968 and after the election in June of that year was sworn in as Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. In 1974, he was appointed President of the Treasury Board; beginning in 1976, he served as Minister of Industry, Trade and Commerce. In 1977, he was named Minister of Finance; in 1980, he was appointed Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and also served as Minister of State for Social Development and Minister Responsible for constitutional negotiations, playing a significant role in the patriation of the Constitution of Canada. In 1982, Chrétien was appointed Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources. September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Aline Chrétien (born May 14, 1936 in Saint-Boniface-de-Shawinigan, Quebec) is the wife of Canadas twentieth Prime Minister, Jean Chrétien. ... France Chrétien Desmarais is a Canadian businesswoman. ... The interior of the House of Commons chamber, also called the Green Chamber The House of Commons (in French, la Chambre des communes) is the directly elected lower house of the Parliament of Canada which sits in the nations capital of Ottawa, Ontario. ... Events January-February January 11 - The Whisky A Go-Go night club in Los Angeles, the first disco in the USA, is opened. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson (April 23, 1897 - December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ... The Minister of Finance is one of the most important positions in the Cabinet of Canada. ... Mitchell William Sharp (May 11, 1911–March 19, 2004), a Canadian politician and a Companion of the Order of Canada, was most noted for his service as a Liberal Cabinet minister. ... -1... In the Cabinet of Canada, The Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development really heads two different departments. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ...


After Pierre Trudeau announced his retirement in early 1984, Chrétien sought the leadership of the Liberal Party of Canada, losing on the second ballot to John Turner at the Liberal leadership convention that June. Turner appointed him Deputy Prime Minister and Secretary of State for External Affairs. Relations between the two were strained, and in 1986 Chrétien resigned his seat and left public life for a time. Now working in the private sector again, Chrétien sat on the boards of several corporations. These corporations included the Power Corporation of Canada subsiduary Consolidated Bathurst, the Toronto Dominion Bank, and the Brick Warehouse Corporation, among others. Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... John Napier Turner (born June 7, 1929) was the seventeenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 30, 1984 to September 17, 1984. ... The first three leaders of the Liberal Party of Canada were not chosen at a convention. ... The Deputy Prime Minister of Canada is a position in the Canadian government. ... Canadas Secretary of State for External Affairs was, from 1909 to 1993, the member of the Cabinet of Canada responsible for overseeing the federal governments international relations and the former Department of External Affairs. ... Power Corporation is a major Canadian company with interests in a number of industries, such as media, pulp and paper, and finance. ... The Toronto-Dominion Bank (or TD Bank) offers a range of financial products and services. ... The Brick Warehouse LP operates The Brick, a Canadian owned retailer selling home furniture and consumer Canada with 80 stores (5 warehouses and 6 clearance centres) and served by 5,000 employees. ...


After Turner's resignation as leader in 1989, Chrétien returned: he was elected Liberal Party leader at the June 1990 Liberal leadership convention in Calgary, Alberta, defeating Paul Martin on the first ballot. A by-election in the New Brunswick constituency of Beauséjour in December 1990 returned him to the House of Commons. The first three leaders of the Liberal Party of Canada were not chosen at a convention. ... Motto: Heart of the new west Area: 712. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... This article is about the Canadian province; for the city in New Jersey, see New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Beauséjour is the name of a federal electoral district in eastern New Brunswick, Canada. ... The interior of the House of Commons chamber, also called the Green Chamber The House of Commons (in French, la Chambre des communes) is the directly elected lower house of the Parliament of Canada which sits in the nations capital of Ottawa, Ontario. ...


Prime minister

In the October 1993 election, Jean Chrétien became Prime Minister of Canada by leading his party to a majority victory, ousting Prime Minister Kim Campbell and the Progressive Conservative Party. He was re-elected in 1997 and 2000. During Chrétien's term as Prime Minister, no party emerged as a viable challenger to the supremacy of his Liberal party, in part due to vote-splitting between the Conservatives and Reform/Alliance parties. The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... (Redirected from 1997 Canadian election) 36th Parliament In the 1997 Canadian election held on June 2, 1997, Jean Chrétiens Liberal Party of Canada won a second majority government. ... (Redirected from 2000 Canadian election) The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... For the Reform Party that existed prior to Canadian Confederation see Reform Party (pre-Confederation) The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party in the 1980s and 1990s. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right_of_centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ...


While Brian Mulroney, Joe Clark, and Pierre Trudeau had all been relative political outsiders prior to assuming office, Chrétien had over 30 years of experience within the government. This experience gave him a very masterful knowledge of the Canadian Parliamentary system, and allowed Chrétien to establish a very centralized government that although highly efficient, was also lambasted by critics as being a "friendly dictatorship" and intolerant of internal dissent. The Right Honourable Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993. ... Joseph S. Clark The Right Honourable Charles Joseph Clark, PC (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 2, 1980, and a prominent Canadian politician until his retirement in 2004. ...


One of Chrétien's main focuses in office was preventing the separation of the province of Quebec, which was ruled by the separatist Parti Quebecois for nearly the Prime Minister's entire term. After the 1995 referendum showed a very narrow decision against Quebec sovereignty, Chrétien's government passed what became known as the Clarity Act, which said that no Canadian government would acknowledge an independent Quebec nation unless a "clear majority" supported sovereignty in a referendum based on a clear question. The size of a "clear majority" was left unspecified, but Chrétien made it clear that such a majority would not be "50% plus one vote." This article describes the Canadian province. ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a left wing political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada. ... The 1995 Quebec referendum was the second referendum in Quebec (see 1980 Quebec referendum) that put to public vote the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward independent statehood (sovereignty). The referendum was the culmination of years of rising support for autonomy (see Quiet... Canadian politics is federal legislation that established the conditions under which Ottawa would recognize a vote for secession by one of the provinces. ...


Chrétien's government also introduced a new and far-reaching Youth Criminal Justice Act, which replaced the old Young Offenders Act and changed the way youths were prosecuted for crimes in Canada. The Youth Criminal Justice Act is a piece of Canadian legislation passed in 2002 that determines the way in which youths are prosecuted under Canadas criminal justice system. ... The Young Offenders Act was a 1984 act of the Parliament of Canada, now obsolete, that regulated the criminal prosecution of Canadian youths. ...

Comedian Rick Mercer and then-Prime Minister of Canada Jean Chretien at a Harvey's fast food restaurant
Comedian Rick Mercer and then-Prime Minister of Canada Jean Chretien at a Harvey's fast food restaurant

In 1997, Chrétien (left) was a guest star on This Hour Has 22 Minutes as former member Rick Mercer (right) took him to lunch at a Harvey's fast food restaurant. Low-res Screenshot Rick Mercer and then-Prime Minister Jean Chretien at a Harveys Restaurant, deemed fair use . ... This Hour Has 22 Minutes This Hour Has 22 Minutes is a Canadian television comedy. ... Rick Mercer Rick Mercer (born October 17, 1969 in St. ... Harveys Restaurant in Ottawa Harveys is a fast food restaurant chain that operates in nine Canadian provinces. ...


Following the September 11 terrorist attacks upon the United States, the U.S. shut down North American airspace, and many Canadians opened up their homes to stranded travellers. (See Operation Yellow Ribbon.) In response to those attacks, Canadian forces joined with multinational forces that invaded Afghanistan to pursue al-Qaeda forces there. The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Operation Yellow Ribbon is the operation Transport Canada, the Canadian transportation agency, launched due to the September 11 attacks. ... Afghanistan (Pashtu/Dari-Persian: Afğānistān افغانستان) is a country in Central Asia. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...


Under Chrétien, Canada did not support the US-led 2003 invasion of Iraq but eventually provided significant financial aid to the post-war reconstruction effort, relative to Canada's size. Chrétien's reasoning was that the war lacked UN sanction, but it was noted while in opposition he had also opposed the first US-led Gulf War. Although criticism from right-wing opposition was vocal, the move proved popular with the Canadian public in general. However, in December of 2003 it was revealed that Chrétien had in fact been planning to send as many as 800 Canadian troops to Iraq as late as one month before the war was launched. A UN request for an increased deployment of Canadian peacekeepers to Afghanistan prompted Chretien to scrap his plans for Iraq. This revelation led some of Chretien's anti-war critics on the left to accuse the Prime Minister of never really being fully opposed to the war. Canada is a sovereign state in northern North America, the northern-most country in the world, and the second largest in total area. ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ...


In October 2003, Chrétien, a strong supporter of the decriminalization of marijuana in Canada, raised eyebrows with comments concerning his plans to smoke marijuana after his retirement. "I don't know what is marijuana," he said. "Perhaps I will try it when it will no longer be criminal. I will have my money for my fine and a joint in the other hand." Although this quote was bandied around many a smoke filled room, it was ultimately shown to have been nothing more than a friendly joke between Chretien and a Winnipeg Free Press reporter. Cannabis is a plant which is consumed by humans as a psychoactive drug. ...


Chrétien also benefitted significantly from a divided and ineffective opposition during his term as Prime Minister, facing eight different leaders of the opposition, and was sometimes viewed by Canadians as remaining in power solely because of a lack of alternatives. However, he also had an undeniably strong gut instinct for reading the mood of the Canadian electorate, and he successfully used this skill to defuse most of the controversies his government faced. The Leader of the Opposition in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ...


Chretien's government was re-elected twice, in the 1997 and 2000 federal elections. This has made him one of the few Canadian Prime Ministers to serve three back-to-back terms. 36th Parliament In the 1997 Canadian election held on June 2, 1997, Jean Chrétiens Liberal Party of Canada won a second majority government. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000. ...


Retirement

In August 2002, on the verge of being ousted as party leader by the supporters of ex-Finance Minister Paul Martin, Chrétien announced that he would not run for an additional term and would resign in February 2004. The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ...


Chrétien's final sitting in the House of Commons took place November 6, 2003, with many tributes, standing ovations, and even some hearty laughs at humourous stories told by the Prime Minister. He made an emotional farewell to the party on November 13 at the Liberal Convention. The following day his rival Martin was elected his successor. The two men lavished praise on one another, and Chrétien joined Martin onstage to congratulate him after his acceptance speech. November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ...


On December 12, 2003, Jean Chrétien officially resigned, formally handing power over to Paul Martin. December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Almost a month after retiring, Mr. Chrétien joined the law firm of Heenan Blaikie on January 5, 2004, as counsel. The firm announced he would work out of their Ottawa, Ontario offices four days per week and make a weekly visit to the Montreal office. January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Legacy

In general, Chrétien supported Pierre Elliott Trudeau's ideals of official bilingualism and multiculturalism however his government saw the erosion of the welfare state established and built under William Lyon Mackenzie King, Louis St. Laurent, Lester Pearson and Pierre Trudeau. His government advocated neo-liberal (or right of centre) polices on a number of economic fronts, cutting transfer payments to the provinces and social programs, supporting globalization and free trade and implementing large personal and corporate tax cuts. In the late 90s he and then-Finance Minister Paul Martin balanced the Canadian budget for the first time in decades. Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... Bilingualism in Canada refers to laws and policies of the federal government — and some other levels of government — mandating that certain services and communications be available to the public in both English and French. ... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... William Lyon Mackenzie King ( December 17, 1874– July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921, to June 28, 1926; September 25, 1926, to August 7, 1930; and October 23, 1935, to November 15, 1948. ... Louis Stephen St. ... The Right Honourable Lester Bowles Mike Pearson (April 23, 1897 - December 27, 1972) was the fourteenth Prime Minister of Canada from April 22, 1963, to April 20, 1968, and also a 1957 Nobel Laureate. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... The term neoliberalism is used to describe a political-economic philosophy that had major implications for government policies beginning in the 1970s – and increasingly prominent since 1980 – that de-emphasizes or rejects positive government intervention in the economy, focusing instead on achieving progress and even social justice by encouraging free... Globalization (or globalisation) is a term used to describe the changes in societies and the world economy that are the result of dramatically increased trade and cultural exchange. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a government. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ...


Chrétien was repeatedly attacked by both his opponents and supporters for failing to live up to certain election promises, such as eliminating the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and renegotiating the NAFTA agreement. He also came under fire for delaying a military helicopter purchase. Some point to the "No" result of the 1995 Quebec referendum on separation as a political victory for Chrétien, while others interpret the extremely slim margin as a near-disaster for which Chrétien, as de facto leader of the "No" campaign, was responsible. In 2002, Chrétien promoted a plan to help Africa financially. It is not completely clear for what he will be most remembered. The Canadian Goods and Services Tax or GST (Taxe sur les produits et services, TPS) is a multi-level sales tax introduced in Canada in 1991 to great controversy. ... The North American Free Trade Agreement, known usually as NAFTA, is a comprehensive trade agreement linking Canada, the United States, and Mexico in a free trade sphere. ... A military or miltary force (n. ... A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more large horizontal rotors (propellers). ... The 1995 Quebec referendum was the second referendum in Quebec (see 1980 Quebec referendum) that put to public vote the role of Quebec within Canada and whether Quebec should pursue a path toward independent statehood (sovereignty). The referendum was the culmination of years of rising support for autonomy (see Quiet...


One of the most pressing issues in Chrétien's final year in office was Canada's relationship with the United States. Chrétien had a close relationship with President Bill Clinton, after attacking Brian Mulroney for being too friendly with two of Clinton's predecessors, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, but the fact that many of his cabinet ministers and aides had little respect for George W. Bush was highlighted in a few embarrassing off-the-cuff remarks that found their way into the media. Chrétien's lack of support for the Iraq war was likewise criticized as a damaging move for the historic Canadian-US military alliance, however Canada's response to the September 11, 2001 attacks with Operation Yellow Ribbon, and its participation in the Afghanistan invasion did draw the two countries closer together. The Right Honourable Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq without the explicit backing of the United... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Operation Yellow Ribbon is the operation Transport Canada, the Canadian transportation agency, launched due to the September 11 attacks. ... The United States, with support from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and the Northern Alliance, invaded Afghanistan in October 2001 as part of its War on Terrorism campaign. ...


Though Chrétien failed to make significant moves on such matters while in office, decisions on health care, same-sex marriage, municipal issues, and drug laws will also be very important to his successor. Same-sex marriage is widely anticipated to be legalized across Canada by Bill C-38, introduced by Paul Martins Liberal government in the federal Parliament on February 1, 2005. ...


Very soon after his retirement, Chrétien's legacy was marred by the sponsorship scandal. Although implicated, no direct evidence has yet been found directly linking him to it, however many of his closest and longtime political allies were fired from government jobs by his successor Paul Martin. The scandal also put a question mark over Chretien's preferred style of governance, which had been in question long before his retirement due to various scandals, particularly involving cabinet minister Alfonso Gagliano. Martin has moved to sharply distance himself from the Chrétien legacy, although this is also due to the at times bitter political rivalry between the two men. Many of Chrétien's most loyal ministers were not included in Paul Martin's cabinet and one, Sheila Copps, later lost the Liberal nomination in her ridings. Despite this, Chrétien remains a popular figure to many Canadians. The sponsorship scandal is an ongoing scandal that has affected the government of Canada, and particularly the ruling Liberal Party of Canada for a number of years, but rose to especially great prominence in 2004. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... Sheila Maureen Copps (born November 27, 1952, in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian journalist and politician. ...

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Preceded by:
Kim Campbell
Prime Minister of Canada
1993–2003
Succeeded by:
Paul Martin
Preceded by:
Allan MacEachen
Deputy Prime Minister of Canada
1984
Succeeded by:
Erik Nielsen
Preceded by:
Herb Gray
Liberal Leaders
1990–2003
Succeeded by:
Paul Martin
Preceded by:
Arthur Laing
Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
1968–1974
Succeeded by:
J. Judd Buchanan
Preceded by:
Herb Gray
Leader of the Opposition
1990–1993
Succeeded by:
Lucien Bouchard
Preceded by:
Denis Pronovost, PC
Member of Parliament for Saint-Maurice
1993-2004
Succeeded by:
federal riding abolished in 2003
Preceded by:
Fernand Robichaud, Liberal
Member of Parliament for Beauséjour
1990-1993
Succeeded by:
Fernand Robichaud, Liberal
Preceded by:
federal riding created in 1966
Member of Parliament for Saint-Maurice
1968-1986
Succeeded by:
Gilles Grondin, Liberal
Preceded by:
Gérard Lamy, Social Credit
Member of Parliament for Saint-Maurice—Laflèche
1963-1968
Succeeded by:
federal riding abolished in 1966


The Right Honourable Avril Phaedra Douglas Kim Campbell, PC (born March 10, 1947, Port Alberni, British Columbia) was the nineteenth Prime Minister of Canada from June 25 to November 4, 1993. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... Allan Joseph MacEachen (born July 6, Canadas elder statesmen and was the first Deputy Prime Minister of Canada. ... The Deputy Prime Ministers of Canada See other lists of incumbents Categories: Canadian Deputy Prime Ministers | Lists of Canadian ministers ... Erik Hersholt Nielsen (born February 24, 1924) is a former Canadian politician and longtime Progressive Conservative Member of Parliament for Yukon. ... Herbert Eser (Herb) Gray (born May 25, 1931, Windsor, Ontario) was a Canadian politician. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... Arthur Laing was a Canadian politican. ... The Honourable J. Judd Buchanan is a former Canadian politician and businessman. ... Herbert Eser (Herb) Gray (born May 25, 1931, Windsor, Ontario) was a Canadian politician. ... The Leader of the Opposition in Canada is the Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons who leads Her Majestys Loyal Opposition (the body in Parliament recognized as the Official Opposition). ... Lucien Bouchard official Quebec government picture. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... Fernand Robichaud (born December 2, 1939) is a Canadian politician. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas largest political party. ... Fernand Robichaud (born December 2, 1939) is a Canadian politician. ... The Social Credit Party of Canada was a conservative - populist political party in Canada that promoted social credit theories of monetary reform. ...




 
 

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