FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jean Charest
The Honourable
Jean Charest
Jean Charest

Incumbent
Assumed office 
June 6, 2003
Preceded by Bernard Landry

Born June 24, 1958 (1958-06-24) (age 49)
Sherbrooke, Quebec
Political party Quebec Liberal Party
Spouse Michèle Dionne
Religion Roman Catholic

John James Charest, PC, LL.B., MNA, known as Jean Charest IPA: [ʒɑ̃ ʃɑʀe] (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec. He is a former leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party (1993 - 1998), the current leader of the Parti libéral du Québec and, the 29th Premier of Quebec. The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Premier of Quebec (in French Premier ministre du Québec, sometimes literally translated to Prime Minister of Quebec) is the first minister for the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Bernard Landry, born March 9, 1937 in Saint-Jacques, Quebec, (near Joliette), is a Quebec lawyer, teacher, politician, past Premier of Quebec, Canada, (2001–2003), former leader of the Opposition (2003–2005) and former leader of the Parti Québécois (2001–2005). ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Ne quid nimis Coordinates: Country Canada Province Quebec Settled 1793 Government  - Mayor Jean Perrault  - Governing body Sherbrooke City Council  - MPs Serge Cardin  - MNAs Jean Charest Area  - City 353. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec, although it refers to itself in English as the Québec Liberal Party), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Queens Privy Council for Canada is the ceremonial council of advisors to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by her Governor General in Canada for life on the advice of the Prime Minister. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in the majority of common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... The National Assembly is the name of either a legislature, or the lower house of a bicameral legislature in some countries. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A lawyer, according to Blacks Law Dictionary, is a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      Canada is a federation which consists of ten provinces that, with three territories, make up the worlds second largest country in total area. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec, although it refers to itself in English as the Québec Liberal Party), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Premier of Quebec (in French Premier ministre du Québec, sometimes literally translated to Prime Minister of Quebec) is the first minister for the Canadian province of Quebec. ...

Contents

Profile

Born in the Eastern Townships central city of Sherbrooke, Quebec to Claude 'Red' Charest and Rita Leonard (an Irish Quebecer), Charest has English as a mother tongue[1]. He obtained a law degree from the Université de Sherbrooke and was admitted to the Barreau du Quebec in 1981. He is married to Michèle Dionne and is the father of three children. The Eastern Townships (in French les Cantons de lest) is a region in south central Quebec, lying between the Saint Lawrence River and the US border. ... Motto: Ne quid nimis Coordinates: Country Canada Province Quebec Settled 1793 Government  - Mayor Jean Perrault  - Governing body Sherbrooke City Council  - MPs Serge Cardin  - MNAs Jean Charest Area  - City 353. ... In modern Quebec many Quebecers are partly of Irish descent, making them Irish Quebecers. ... First language (native language, mother tongue, or vernacular) is the language a person learns first. ... The Université de Sherbrooke is a large university with three distinct campuses, two of which are located in Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, and another, which is located in Longueuil, approximately 170 km west of Sherbrooke. ... The Barreau du Québec is the bar association for lawyers in Quebec. ...


Conservative Party Minister

He worked as a lawyer until he was elected Progressive Conservative member of the Canadian Parliament for the riding (electoral district) of Sherbrooke in the 1984 election. From 1984 to 1986, Charest served as Assistant Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons. In 1986, at age 28, he was appointed to the Cabinet of then Prime Minister Brian Mulroney as Minister of State for Youth. He was thus the "youngest cabinet minister in Canadian history."[1] He was appointed Minister of State for Fitness and Amateur Sport in 1988, but had to resign from cabinet in 1990 after improperly speaking to a judge about a case regarding the Canadian Track and Field Association.[2] He returned to cabinet as Minister of the Environment in 1991. A lawyer, according to Blacks Law Dictionary, is a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law. ... The Parliament of Canada (in French: le Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county, in Australia analogous. ... The Canadian federal election of 1984 was called on July 4, 1984, and held on September 4 of that year. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... The Cabinet of Canada plays an important role in the Canadian government in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... In the Canadian Cabinet a minister of state is a junior cabinet minister, usually given specific responsibilities to assist a senior cabinet minister in a specific area. ...


PC Leader

After Mulroney's retirement as PC leader and prime minister, Charest was a candidate for the leadership of the party at the 1993 Progressive Conservative leadership convention. He impressed many observers and party members, and placed a strong second to Defence Minister Kim Campbell, who had held a large lead going into the convention. Charest served as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Industry, Science and Technology in Campbell's short-lived cabinet. The first Progressive Conservative Party of Canada leadership convention was held in 1927, when the party was called the Conservative Party. ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... The Deputy Prime Minister of Canada is a position in the Canadian government. ...


In the 1993 election, the PCs were swept from power. Only two of the party's 295 candidates were elected— Charest and Elsie Wayne. As the only surviving member of what would turn out to be the last PC Cabinet, Charest was appointed interim party leader and confirmed in the post in April 1995. Charest therefore became the first (and last) leader of francophone descent of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada.[3] Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... Elsie Eleanore Wayne (born Fairweather) (born April 20, 1932 in Shediac, New Brunswick) is a Canadian politician. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the 1997 election, the Tories received 19% of the vote, winning 20 seats out of 301, mostly in Atlantic Canada. The party was back from the brink, but Charest considered the result a disappointment. 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. ... The four Canadian Atlantic provinces. ...


Quebec Liberal Party Leader

In April 1998, Charest gave in to considerable public and political pressure,[4] especially among business circles, to leave federal politics and become leader of the Quebec Liberal Party. Charest was considered by many to be the best hope for the federalist QLP to defeat the sovereignist Parti Québécois government. (The QLP has not been officially affiliated with the federal Liberals since 1955.) Quebec federalism, in regards to the future of the Quebec people, defends the concept of Quebec remaining within Canada as opposed to Quebec sovereigntism, proponent of Quebec independence (most often, but not for all followers, along with an economic union with Canada similar to the European Union). ... Quebec The Quebec sovereignty movement is a movement calling for the attainment of sovereignty for Quebec, a province of the country of Canada. ... The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...


In the 1998 election, the Quebec Liberals received more votes than the PQ, but because the Liberal vote was concentrated in fewer ridings, the PQ won enough seats to form another majority government. The two parties won almost the same number of seats in the National Assembly of Quebec as they had won in the previous election in 1994, in which the Liberals had been led by Daniel Johnson, Jr. Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Quebec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the name for the legislative body of the province of Quebec, Canada which was defined in the Canadian constitution as the Legislative Assembly of Quebec (lassemblée législative de... Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... Daniel Johnson, Jr. ...


In the April 2003 election, Charest led the Quebec Liberals to a majority, ending nine years of PQ rule. He declared he had a mandate to reform health care, cut taxes, reduce spending and reduce the size of government.[5] Map of Quebecs ridings and how they voted by percentage. ...


In the March 2007 election, his government won re-election but was reduced to a minority government, the first minority government in Quebec in 129 years. It also gained the lowest percentage of the popular vote in 26 years. The new composition of the legislature Map of Quebecs ridings coloured in to indicate ridings won by each party and their popular vote. ...


Quebec Premier

Charest's first two years as premier were marked by stiff and vocal opposition to his policies by Quebec labour unions. His government failed to cut taxes, as had been promised in the 2003 election campaign, claiming that a hidden deficit left by the former Parti Québecois administration would have made it impossible to do so while maintaining a balanced budget.[citation needed] Indeed the Charest government has consistently sought new sources of revenue, increasing Hydro Rates, raising auto insurance premiums, increasing fees for various government services, and imposing a carbon tax on businesses. They did, however, refrain from raising the Provincial Sales Tax to make up for the loss of revenue caused by the decision of the Federal Government to reduce the Goods and Services Tax to 6%. They also continued the Parti Québecois drive to provide subsidies and tax breaks for families with children. A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... Hydro-Québec is a crown corporation that provides hydroelectric power for Quebec, Canada and the north-eastern parts of the United States. ... In Canada there are three types of sales taxes: provincial sales taxes, the federal GST and the HST in Atlantic Canada. ... The Goods and Services Tax is a Value-added tax that exists in a number of countries. ... The Parti Québécois or PQ is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for Quebec from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement though unlike other social democratic parties it has no formal ties with labour. ...


Much of the fiscal policy of the Charest government has been based upon the expectation that new revenues could be obtained from a resolution of the fiscal imbalance believed to exist between the federal and provincial governments. The Harper government is widely expected to address this issue through increased equalization payments, while falling short of Quebec's overall demands. Fiscal policy is the economic term that defines the set of principles and decisions of a government in setting the level of public expenditure and how that expenditure is funded. ... Equalization payments are cash transfer payments by the federal government of Canada to less wealthy Canadian provinces to equalize the provinces fiscal capacity — their ability to deliver government services. ...


Charest also attempted to distinguish himself on the issue of the environment, with mixed success. His vocal opposition to the federal decision to opt out of the Kyoto protocol and his insistence that Quebec would seek to meet its own Kyoto targets has earned him considerable support. But the decision of his government to allow private condominium development on the slopes of Mount Orford (a National park) became a flashpoint for environmental groups, and was widely criticized by the media and by his own former environment minister, Thomas Mulcair. Earth as seen by Apollo 17 The Kyoto Protocol is an amendment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), an international treaty on global warming. ... The Gondola Mount Orford (French: Mont Orford) is a ski resort in the Eastern Townships region of the Canadian province of Quebec. ...


In the 2003 election, Charest had promised to allow the cities that had been forcibly merged by the Parti Quebecois government to hold referendums which would allow to demerge and return to their previous situation. This promise was seen as key to his victory in many ridings, such as those in the Suburbs around Longueuil and Quebec City and the continued support of the Anglophone community in the West Island of Montreal. In office however, Charest retreated from his promise. Municipalitites were allowed to hold demerger referendums, if at least 10% of the electorate signed a petition calling for them, and only if more than 35% participated in the voting process.[2] In some former municipalities, such as Saint Laurent on the Island of Montreal, the turnout of the vote was of 75.2% in favor of a demerger, but it was invalidated because the total number of voters fell below 35%, it was of 28.6%.[3] The Charest demerger process also resulted in the restructuring of the existing megacities, with both these and the demerged cities handing over massive powers over taxation and local services to the new "agglomeration councils". The makeup of these councils was based on the population of the municipalities involved, with the mayors having the right to unilaterally appoint all of the individuals who would represent their cities on the council. The resulting structure was seen by many to be less democratic than the one which had preceded it, as demerged municipalities were denied an effective voice, and the city councils of the major cities were substantially weakened by the power of the mayors to go over the heads of opposition councillors and exercise power through their appointees to the Agglomeration body. Demerger is the converse of a merger or acquisition. ... Longueuil is a city in extreme southwestern Quebec, Canada, on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River across from Montreal, of which it is a suburb. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (I shall put Gods gift to good use; the Don de Dieu was Champlains ship) Coordinates: , Country  Canada Province  Quebec Agglomeration Quebec City Statute of the city Capitale-Nationale Administrative Region Capitale-Nationale Founded 1608 by Samuel de Champlain Constitution date 1833... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Quebec Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Saint-Laurent is one of the largest boroughs of the city of Montreal. ... A megacity is usually defined as a recognized metropolitan area with a total population in excess of 10 million people. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... In the study of human settlements, an agglomeration is an extended city or town area comprising the built-up area of a central place (usually a municipality) and any suburbs or adjacent satellite towns. ...


The Charest government has been deeply unpopular during its first years in office, enjoying a public approval rating of below 50% in most opinion polls and falling to the low twenties in voter support. In the first few weeks after Andre Boisclair was elected leader of the PQ, polls showed that Charest and the Liberals would be roundly defeated in the next election. Boisclair has not performed well as Leader of the Opposition, and Charest's numbers have recovered somewhat. A recent poll conducted by Leger Marketing for Le Devoir placed the Liberals at 34% against 32% for the PQ and 24% for the ADQ with Charest obtaining a higher personal approval rating than the PQ Leader. Liberal support, however remains heavily concentrated in Anglophone and Allophone ridings in the West of Montreal, meaning that this increase in support may not necessarily translate into seats.[citation needed] Official leadership campaign picture of André Boisclair. ... Léger Marketing claims to be the largest independent research firm in Canada and is a member of Gallup International Association. ... Le Devoir on the 2003 Quebec election. ... The Action d mocratique du Qu bec (ADQ) is a right-wing political party (by Canadian standards) in Quebec, Canada. ... Look up Anglophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In phonetics, an allophone is one of several similar phones that belong to the same phoneme. ... In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county, in Australia analogous. ...


Despite his unpopularity, Charest has faced no real challenges to his leadership. There has, however, been significant tension between himself and members of the party[citation needed], most notably the former Bourassa Cabinet Minister Pierre Paradis (who Charest excluded from his cabinet) and the resignations of several important members of his cabinet, notably Finance Minister Yves Seguin, Justice Minister Marc Bellemare, and Environment Minister Thomas Mulcair. A portrait of Robert Bourassa, taken during his second term as premier of Quebec (1985–1994). ... The finance minister is a cabinet position in a government. ... Yves Séguin (born March 30, 1951 in Val-dOr, Quebec) is a former Canadian politician in Quebec. ... A justice minister is a ministerial position in the governments of some countries, with general responsibility for policing and the maintenance of public order. ... Marc Bellemare is a Canadian politician. ... Thomas J. Mulcair (born on October 24, 1954 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Quebec politician, lawyer and the current MNA for the riding of Chomedey in Laval. ...


2007 Quebec election

On February 21, 2007, he asked the Lieutenant-Governor to dissolve the National Assembly and call an election on March 26, 2007. Charest conducted an extraordinary session the day before with Finance Minister Michel Audet delivering the 2007 budget. is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The Quebec Parliament Building at night The National Assembly of Quebec (French: Assemblée nationale du Québec) is the name for the legislative body of the province of Quebec, Canada which was defined in the Canadian constitution as the Legislative Assembly of Quebec (lassemblée législative de... The new composition of the legislature Map of Quebecs ridings coloured in to indicate ridings won by each party and their popular vote. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Michel Audet (born November 12, 1940 in Jonquière, Quebec) is an economist and a politician in Quebec, Canada. ...


Prior to his call for an election, Charest revealed his platform which included income tax cuts of about $250 million dollars. In the last week of the campaign Charest, promised an additional $700 million in tax cuts - some of it coming for the additional equalization money from the 2007 federal budget - [4], reduction of hospital wait times, improve and increase French courses at school, an increase of the number of daycare spaces and an increase of tuition fees for university students ($50 per semester until 2012).[5] The last measure was met with criticism from students' associations and a more-radical student association, the Association pour une solidarite syndicale etudiante (formerly known as the CASSEE) had also considered a strike. [6].


Charogne won a minority government in the election, and held onto his own seat. On election night early numbers had showed Charest losing his seat of Sherbrooke to his PQ opponent; however, this situation was reversed once it became apparent that the advanced poll ballot boxes which heavily favoured Charest had not been counted.[6] The incoming minority government will be the first since 1878 when Charles Boucher de Boucherville was Premier. This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sherbrooke is an electoral riding in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Charles-Eugène-Napoléon Boucher de Boucherville (May 4, 1822 – September 10, 1915) was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ...


Status of Quebec

Charest was involved in the Constitutional debate of late 1980s and early 1990s regarding Quebec because the province had previously refused to sign the Canadian Constitution of 1982. He was a special committee member charged with examining the Meech Lake Accord in 1990, which would have given the province of Quebec the status of a "distinct society". The Accord ultimately failed. In the 1997 election, Charest campaigned in favour of Quebec being a distinct society. During his mandate as premier, he made efforts to expand the place of Quebec in the international community. The province was granted a spot at the UNESCO, the culture branch of the United Nations. Charest also voiced some support for the Calgary Declaration (1997), which recognized Qubec as "unique."[7] The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... Distinct society (in French la société distincte) was a political neologism used during a constitutional debate in Canada, in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... The Calgary Declaration was an agreement made between most premiers of the provinces and territories of Canada regarding how to approach future amendments to the Constitution. ...


During the debate in the Canadian Parliament over recognizing Quebec as a nation within Canada, Charest stated that Quebec was a nation no matter what other parts of Canada said, that it was not up to anyone else to define. Presumably he meant nation in the ethnological and not political sense, as in a nation-state. A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. ...


First name

Some have claimed that Charest downplays his legal first name John by presenting himself in French as Jean so as to appeal more to francophone Quebecers. For example, in the 1997 federal election, Bloc Québécois MP Suzanne Tremblay attacked Charest by saying, "First, let's recall who Jean Charest really is... his real name is John, that's what's on his birth certificate, not Jean."[8] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... (Redirected from 1997 Canadian federal election) 36th Parliament In the 1997 Canadian election held on June 2, 1997, Jean Chrétiens Liberal Party of Canada won a second majority government. ... The Bloc Québécois is a centre-left federal political party in Canada that is devoted to the promotion of sovereignty for Quebec. ... Suzanne Tremblay (born January 24, 1937) is a politician from Quebec, Canada, and a member of the Bloc Québécois, a federal political party that promotes the independence of Quebec from Canada. ...


Elections as party leader

In the 1997 Canadian federal election, the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada won 20 seats under Charest's leadership, an improvement on its previous 2. 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In the 1998 Quebec election, the Quebec Liberal Party won 48 seats in the National Assembly, forming the official opposition to the Parti Québécois government. Categories: Stub | Quebec general elections ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Parti Québécois (PQ) is a political party that advocates national sovereignty for the Canadian province of Quebec and secession from Canada, as well as social democratic policies and has traditionally had support from the labour movement. ...


In the 2003 election, Charest's Liberals won 76 seats, forming the government. Map of Quebecs ridings and how they voted by percentage. ...


In the 2007 election, the Liberals won 48 seats, forming a minority government in a near three-way-split of votes and seats. (PLQ: 48 seat, ADQ: 41 seats, PQ: 36 seats) Mr. Charest won his own riding of Sherbrooke with a majority of 1332 votes. In 2003 he obtained a majority of 2597 votes while in 1998, he received a majority of 907 votes. The new composition of the legislature Map of Quebecs ridings coloured in to indicate ridings won by each party and their popular vote. ...


See also

Bill on the referendum and eventual declaration of independence. ... The Executive Council of Quebec (informally and more commonly, the Cabinet of Quebec and in French Le Conseil des ministres) is the cabinet of the Canadian province. ... In Quebec, federalists, in regards to the future of the Quebec people, defend the concept of Quebec remaining within Canada, as opposed to Quebec sovereigntists, proponents of Quebec independence (most often, but not for all followers, along with an economic union with Canada similar to the European Union). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of Quebec general elections since Canadian confederation in 1867, when Quebec was created as one of the Canadas provinces. ... This article presents a detailed timeline of Quebec history both as part of the British Empire and the Dominion of Canada. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... Canadian federal election results (1867-1879) Canadian federal election results (1880-1899) Canadian federal election results (1900-1919) Canadian federal election results (1920-1939) Canadian federal election results (1940-1959) Canadian federal election results (1960-1979) Canadian federal election results (1980-1999) Canadian federal election results (2000-) See also: Lists... A peculiar custom of Quebecers is to give nicknames to their politicians (and some personalities), quite especially their Premiers. ... This is a list of people in the Canadian province of Quebec of Irish ancestry. ...

References

  1. ^ Graeme Hamilton, "Charest's bumpy ride to the top," Times-Colonist, Victoria, B.C.: April 20, 2003, pg. D.1.Fro.
  2. ^ "Political scandal: a chronology," The Vancouver Sun, September 24, 1993, pg. A.6.
  3. ^ Terrance Wills, "Farewell to the Commons: MPs bid Charest adieu," The Montreal Gazette, April 3, 1998, pg. A.1.FRO.
  4. ^ The Canadian Press, "Charest takes Liberal reins: New leader heaps scorn on Quebec separatists," Calgary Herald May 1, 1998, pg. A.4.
  5. ^ Kevin Dougherty, "Thousands of Quebecers protest Charest labour plans," Calgary Herald, November 30, 2003, pg. A.8.
  6. ^ CBC News, "Liberal Premier Charest holds on to Sherbrooke seat," March 27, 2007, URL accessed 27 March 2007.
  7. ^ CBC.ca, "Quebecers should have a choice, Chevrette says," URL accessed December 17, 2006.
  8. ^ "Name-calling reaches a new low," Financial Post, May 28, 1997, pg. 14.

The Vancouver Sun is a daily newspaper first published in the Canadian province of British Columbia on February 12, 1912. ... The Gazette, often called The Montreal Gazette to avoid ambiguity, is a major English-language daily newspaper published in Montreal, Quebec. ... The Canadian Press (CP) is a Canadian news agency established in 1917 as a vehicle to permit Canadian newspapers of the day to exchange their news and information. ... The Calgary Herald is a daily Calgary, Alberta newspaper. ... The Calgary Herald is a daily Calgary, Alberta newspaper. ... The National Post is a large Canadian English language national newspaper based in Toronto. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Preceded by
Irénée Pelletier
Member of Parliament for Sherbrooke
1984-1998
Succeeded by
Serge Cardin
Preceded by
Kim Campbell
Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada
1993-1998
Succeeded by
Elsie Wayne
Preceded by
Daniel Johnson, Jr.
Leader of the Quebec Liberal Party
1998 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Monique Gagnon-Tremblay
Leader of the Opposition (Quebec)
1998-2003
Succeeded by
Bernard Landry
Preceded by
Bernard Landry
Premier of Quebec
2003 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Marie Malavoy
MNA for Sherbrooke
1998–present
Succeeded by
incumbent
25th Ministry - Government of Kim Campbell
Cabinet Posts (3)
Predecessor Office Successor
Don Mazankowski Deputy Prime Minister of Canada
(25 June-3 November 1993)
Sheila Copps
Michael Wilson Minister of Industry, Science and Technology
(25 June-3 November 1993)
styled as Minister of Industry
John Manley
Pierre H. Vincent Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs
(25 June-3 November 1993)
styled as Minister of Industry
John Manley
Special Cabinet Responsibilities
Predecessor Title Successor
position created Minister responsible for the Federal Office
of Regional Development - Quebec
(1993)
Paul Martin
24th Ministry - Government of Brian Mulroney
Cabinet Posts (3)
Predecessor Office Successor
Robert de Cotret Minister of the Environment
(1991-1993)
Pierre H. Vincent
Minister of State (Fitness and Amateur Sport)
(1988-1990)
Minister of State (Youth)
(1986-1988)


Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Irénée Pelletier BA, PhD (17 March 1939-11 February 1994) was a Liberal party member of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Sherbrooke is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Quebec. ... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Serge Cardin (born July 2, 1950 in Sherbrooke, Quebec) is a Canadian Member of Parliament for the Bloc Quebecois. ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Elsie Eleanore Wayne (born Fairweather) (born April 20, 1932 in Shediac, New Brunswick) is a Canadian politician. ... Daniel Johnson, Jr. ... The Parti libéral du Québec (Liberal Party of Quebec), or PLQ, is a liberal political party in the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Monique Gagnon-Tremblay served as Liberal leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly of Quebec from May 1998 to December 1998. ... This is a list of the leaders of the Opposition of Quebec, Canada since Confederation (1867). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Bernard Landry, born March 9, 1937 in Saint-Jacques, Quebec, (near Joliette), is a Quebec lawyer, teacher, politician, past Premier of Quebec, Canada, (2001–2003), former leader of the Opposition (2003–2005) and former leader of the Parti Québécois (2001–2005). ... Jean-Bernard Landry, born March 9, 1937 in Saint-Jacques, Quebec, (near Joliette), is a Quebec lawyer, teacher, politician, past Premier of Quebec, Canada, (2001–2003), former leader of the Opposition (2003–2005) and former leader of the Parti Québécois (2001–2005). ... The Premier of Quebec (in French Premier ministre du Québec, sometimes literally translated to Prime Minister of Quebec) is the first minister for the Canadian province of Quebec. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marie Malavoy (born March 23, 1948 in Berlin, Germany) is a Quebec politician and teacher. ... Sherbrooke is an electoral riding in the province of Quebec, Canada. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... Don Mazankowski The Right Honourable Donald Frank Mazankowski, PC , OC , AOE , LL.D (born July 27, 1935, in Viking, Alberta) was a Canadian politician who served as a cabinet minister under Prime Ministers Joe Clark and Brian Mulroney. ... The Deputy Prime Minister of Canada (French: Vice-premier ministre du Canada) is an honorary position in the Canadian government, conferred at the discretion of the Prime Minister on a member of the cabinet. ... Sheila Maureen Copps, PC, HBA, LL.D (hc), (born November 27, 1952, in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian journalist and former politician. ... Hon. ... Former Canadian MP John Manley John Paul Manley, PC, BA, LL.B is a Canadian lawyer, businessperson and politician, was born on January 5, 1950 in Ottawa. ... The Honourable Pierre H. Vincent (born April 2, 1955) is a tax lawyer and former Canadian politician. ... The Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs was a Canadian cabinet position held between 1967 to 1995. ... Former Canadian MP John Manley John Paul Manley, PC, BA, LL.B is a Canadian lawyer, businessperson and politician, was born on January 5, 1950 in Ottawa. ... The title Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec was accorded to full members of the Cabinet of Canada from the Campbell Ministry through the first months of Paul Martin government. ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB, LLD (h. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... The Honourable Robert René de Cotret (February 20, 1944 - July 9, 1999) was a Canadian politician. ... In the Cabinet of Canada, The Minister of the Environment (French: Ministre de lEnvironnement) is responsible for overseeing the federal governments environment department, Environment Canada. ... The Honourable Pierre H. Vincent (born April 2, 1955) is a tax lawyer and former Canadian politician. ...

Deputy Prime Ministers of Canada Flag of Canada
MacEachen | Chrétien | Nielsen | Mazankowski | Charest | Copps | Gray | Manley | McLellan
Conservative Maple Leaf Logo

Leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada and its antecedents The Deputy Prime Minister of Canada (French: Vice-premier ministre du Canada) is an honorary position in the Canadian government, conferred at the discretion of the Prime Minister on a member of the cabinet. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Allan MacEachen Allan Joseph MacEachen, PC (born July 6, 1921) is one of Canadas elder statesmen and was the first Deputy Prime Minister of Canada. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... Erik Hersholt Nielsen, P.C., D.F.C., Q.C., LL.B., (born February 24, 1924) is a former Canadian politician and longtime Progressive Conservative Member of Parliament for Yukon. ... Don Mazankowski The Right Honourable Donald Frank Mazankowski, PC , OC , AOE , LL.D (born July 27, 1935, in Viking, Alberta) was a Canadian politician who served as a cabinet minister under Prime Ministers Joe Clark and Brian Mulroney. ... Sheila Maureen Copps, PC, HBA, LL.D (hc), (born November 27, 1952, in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian journalist and former politician. ... The Right Honourable Herbert Eser (Herb) Gray PC, CC, QC, B.Comm , LL.D (born May 25, 1931, Windsor, Ontario) was a Canadian politician. ... John Manley can refer to several different people: John Manley, British archaeologist John Manley, Canadian politician John Manley, American nuclear physicist This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A. Anne McLellan, P.C. , M.P. , LL.M. , LL.B. , B.A. (born August 31, 1950, in Hants County, Nova Scotia) was the Deputy Prime Minister of Canada under Paul Martin. ... Image File history File links Conservative_maple_leaf,_blue. ... This a list of leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada (historical) (1867-1942), Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-2003), and Conservative Party of Canada (2003-) (the Tory parties), and of Prime Ministers of Canada after Confederation who were members of those parties. ...

Liberal-Conservative/Conservative/Unionist/N.L.C./National Government/Progressive Conservative (1867-2003): Macdonald | Abbott | Thompson | Bowell | Tupper | Borden | Meighen | Bennett | Manion | Meighen | Bracken | Drew | Diefenbaker | Stanfield | Clark | Mulroney | Campbell | Charest | Clark | MacKay

Reform (1987-2000)/Canadian Alliance (2000-2003): Manning | Day | Harper
The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... The National Liberal and Conservative Party was the name adopted by the Canadian Conservatives in 1920 after the end of the Unionist government of Robert Borden. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, GCB, KCMG, PC, QC, DCL, LL.D was born on January 11, 1815 in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The Hon. ... Sir John Sparrow David Thompson, KCMG, PC, QC, (November 10, 1845 – December 12, 1894) was a Canadian lawyer and judge who served as the fourth Prime Minister of Canada from December 5, 1892 to December 12, 1894 as well as Premier of Nova Scotia in 1882. ... Sir Mackenzie Bowell, PC , KCMG (December 27, 1823 – December 10, 1917) was the fifth Prime Minister of Canada from December 21, 1894 to April 27, 1896. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC, DCL, LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... the best school name in the world Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... Richard Bedford Bennett, 1st Viscount Bennett, PC, KC (July 3, 1870 – June 26, 1947) was the eleventh Prime Minister of Canada from August 7, 1930 to October 23, 1935. ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... the best school name in the world Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC , QC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... Robert Lorne Stanfield, PC, QC (April 11, 1914–December 16, 2003) was Premier of Nova Scotia and leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Martin Brian Mulroney, PC, CC, GOQ, LLD (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Avril Phaedra Douglas Campbell, PC, QC, LL.B, LL.D (h. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Peter Gordon MacKay, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canadas Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party that existed from 1987 to 2000. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... Stockwell Burt Day Jr. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Conservative (new) (2003-present): Harper The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jean Charest - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (889 words)
John James Charest (sha-ræ), PC, LL.B, MNA known as Jean Charest (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec.
Born in the Eastern Townships central city of Sherbrooke, Quebec to Claude Red Charest and Rita Leonard (an Irish Quebecer), he obtained a law degree from the University of Sherbrooke and was admitted to the Barreau du Quebec in 1981.
From 1984 to 1986, Charest served as Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons.
Charest, Jean J. (556 words)
Charest remained a Mulroney favourite and in 1990 the PM appointed him chair of a special committee to study a companion resolution to the MEECH LAKE ACCORD.
The Charest report, with its proposed modifications to the Meech Lake deal, was the pretext for the departure of Lucien BOUCHARD from the Mulroney Cabinet.
Charest ran for the leadership of the federal CONSERVATIVES in 1993, and finished a strong second to Kim CAMPBELL at the June convention in Ottawa.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m