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Encyclopedia > Jealousy
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AffinityAttachmentBondingCasualCohabitationCompersion ConcubinageCourtshipDivorceDower, dowry and bride priceFriendshipFamilyHusbandInfatuationIntimacyJealousyLimerenceLoveMarriageMonogamyNonmonogamyOffice romance PassionPartnerPederastyPolygamyPlatonic lovePsychology of monogamyRelationship abuseRomanceSexualitySeparationWeddingWidowhoodWife Look up jealousy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links KarenWhimseyValentineMain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Attachment in adults deals with the theory of attachment in adult romantic relationships. ... The term human bond -- or, more generally, human bonding -- refers to the process or formation of a close personal relationship, as between a parent and child, especially through frequent or constant association. ... A casual relationship is a term used to describe the physical and emotional relationship between two people who may have a sexual relationship or a near-sexual relationship without necessarily demanding or expecting a more formal relationship as a goal. ... This article is about a living arrangement. ... Compersion is a term used by practitioners of polyamory to describe the experience of taking pleasure when ones partner is with another person. ... Concubinage refers to the state of a woman or youth in an ongoing, quasi-matrimonial relationship with a man of higher social status. ... Suitor redirects here. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... Dower (Lat. ... A dowry (also known as trousseau) is a gift of money or valuables given by the family of the bride to the family of the groom at the time of their marriage. ... Bride price also known as bride wealth or a dower is an amount of money or property paid to the parents of a woman for the right to marry their daughter. ... For other uses, see Friendship (disambiguation). ... a family of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso in 1997 Family is a Western term used to denote a domestic group of people, or a number of domestic groups linked through descent (demonstrated or stipulated) from a common ancestor, marriage or adoption. ... For other uses, see Husband (disambiguation). ... Infatuation is the state of being completely carried away by unreasoning passion or love; addictive love. ... Definition Intimacy is complex in that its meaning varies from relationship to relationship, and within a given relationship over time. ... Look up Limerence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ... Nonmonogamy is a blanket term covering several different types of interpersonal relationship in which some or all participants have multiple marital, sexual, and/or romantic partners. ... An office romance, work romance, or corporate affair is a romance that occurs between two people who work together in the same office, work location, or business. ... In psychology and common terminology, emotion is the language of a persons internal state of being, normally based in or tied to their internal (physical) and external (social) sensory feeling. ... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... In the past century, the term pederasty has seen a number of different uses. ... Polygamy has been a feature of human culture since earliest history. ... Platonic love in its modern popular sense is an affectionate relationship into which the sexual element does not enter, especially in cases where one might easily assume otherwise. ... The psychology of monogamy deals with the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that commonly occur in monogamous relationships. ... Abuser redirects here. ... Romance is a general term that refers to an intimate and often sexual relationship between two people. ... This article is about sexual practices (i. ... Legal separation is a possible step towards divorce under United States law. ... Nuptial is the adjective of wedding. It is used for example in zoology to denote plumage, coloration, behavior, etc related to or occurring in the mating season. ... A widow is a woman whose spouse has died. ... For other uses, see Wife (disambiguation). ...

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Emotions

Acceptance
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Ambivalence
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Compassion
Confusion
Contempt
Depression
Disgust
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Ecstasy
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Envy
Embarrassment
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Gay/Happy
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Shame
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Sympathy
Look up Emotion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Acceptance (disambiguation). ... For the change in vowel and consonant quality in Celtic languages, see Affection (linguistics). ... In psychology and other social and behavioral sciences, aggression refers to behavior that is intended to cause harm or pain. ... Look up ambivalence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the emotion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anxiety is a physiological state characterized by cognitive, somatic, emotional, and behavioral components (Seligman, Walker & Rosenhan, 2001). ... Compassion is best described as an understanding of the emotional state of another; not to be confused with empathy. ... Look up Confusion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Confusion can have the following meanings: Unclarity or puzzlement, e. ... For other uses, see Contempt (disambiguation). ... In everyday language depression refers to any downturn in mood, which may be relatively transitory and perhaps due to something trivial. ... A woman showing disgust. ... This article is about the mental state. ... Ecstasy is a category of altered states of consciousness or trancelike states in which an individual transcends ordinary consciousness and as a result has a heightened capacity for exceptional thought, intense concentration on a specific task, extraordinary physical abilities or intense emotional experience. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ... Embarrassment is an unpleasant emotional state experienced upon having a socially or professionally unacceptable act or condition witnessed by or revealed to others. ... Euphoria (Greek ) is a medically recognized emotional state related to happiness. ... For other uses, see Fear (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Forgiveness (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... For other uses, see Happiness (disambiguation). ... “Guilty” redirects here. ... “Thanks” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Anticipatory Grief be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Happiness (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hate (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hope (disambiguation). ... Horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually occurs after something frightening is seen, heard, or otherwise experienced. ... Anger is a term for the emotional aspect of aggression, as a basic aspect of the stress response in animals whereby a perceived aggravating stimulus provokes a counterresponse which is likewise aggravating and threatening of violence. ... Homesickness is generally described as a feeling of longing for ones familiar surroundings. ... Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. ... Loneliness is an emotional state in which a person experiences a powerful feeling of emptiness and isolation. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Empathy, Sympathy, or Compassion. ... Look up Pleasure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pride is the name of an emotion which refers to a strong sense of self-respect, a refusal to be humiliated as well as joy in the accomplishments of oneself or a person, group, nation or object that one identifies with. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Regret is an intelligent (and/or emotional) dislike for personal past acts and behaviors. ... People feel remorse when reflecting on their actions that they believe are wrong. ... In everyday language depression refers to any downturn in mood, which may be relatively transitory and perhaps due to something trivial. ... For other uses, see Shame (disambiguation). ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... Wide eyes are a common human physiological expression of emotional surprise. ... ...

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Jealousy typically refers to the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that occur when a person believes a valued relationship is being threatened by a rival. This rival may or may not know that he or she is perceived as a threat.


The word stems from the French jalousie, formed from jaloux (jealous), and further from Low Latin zelosus (full of zeal), and from the Greek word for "ardour, zeal" (ζήλος) (with a root connoting "to boil, ferment"; or "yeast"). Jealousy is a familiar experience in human relationships. It has been reported in every culture and in many forms where researchers have looked. [1] [2] [3] It has been observed in infants as young as 5-6 months old and in adults over 65 years old. [4] [5] [6] [7] The root is the primary lexical unit of a word, which carries the most significant aspects of semantic content and cannot be reduced into smaller constituents. ... Boil or furuncle is a skin disease caused by the inflammation of hair follicles, thus resulting in the localized accumulation of pus and dead tissues. ... For other uses, see Fermentation. ...


It has been an enduring topic of interest for scientists, artists, and theologians. Psychologists have proposed several models of the processes underlying jealousy and have identified individual differences that influence the expression of jealousy. Sociologists have demonstrated that cultural beliefs and values play an important role in determining what triggers jealousy and what constitutes socially acceptable expressions of jealousy. Biologists have identified factors that may unconsciously influence the expression of jealousy. Artists have explored the theme of jealousy in photographs, paintings, movies, songs, plays, poems, and books. Theologians have offered religious views of jealousy based on the scriptures of their respective faiths. Despite its familiarity, however, people define jealousy in different ways.


The word "jealousy" is frequently used to describe what is more properly envy, fixation on what someone else has. For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Basics of Jealousy

Definitions of jealousy

Main article: Jealousy definitions

The complexity of jealousy allows people to define it in different ways. Dictionary definitions describe popular meanings of jealousy. Scientific definitions emphasize aspects of jealousy that have received attention in theory and research. Despite differences in wording and emphasis, definitions of jealousy usually share basic themes. These shared themes indicate jealousy is a meaningful concept. Jealousy can also be distinguished from concepts such as envy. In simple terms, jealousy is a feeling of protective resentment towards one who threatens a relationship or value. A definition of jealousy is an attempt to identify the essential qualities of jealousy and distinguish it from other concepts. ...

Jealousy and Flirtation, by Haynes King (1831-1904)
Jealousy and Flirtation, by Haynes King (1831-1904)

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 773 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 698 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Painting , author:Haynes King (1831-1904), public domain, source http://ivizlab. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 773 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 698 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Painting , author:Haynes King (1831-1904), public domain, source http://ivizlab. ...

Coping with jealousy

People who experience pathological jealousy, and people for whom jealousy triggers violence, may benefit from professional counseling. People who experience normal jealousy have at least nine strategies for coping with jealousy. The problem-solving strategies include: improving the primary relationship, interfering with the rival relationship, demanding commitment, and self-assessment. The emotion-focused strategies include: derogation of partner or rival, developing alternatives, denial/avoidance, support/catharsis, and appraisal challenge. These strategies are related to emotion regulation, conflict management, cognitive change, and ground rules for managing jealous competition. The most important thing to do about any feelings of jealousy is to first admit them, and then attempt to overcome them. Polyamory groups encourage the replacement of jealousy with compersion, or empathizing with a lover's joy with another lover. Polyamory (from Greek (, literally “multiple”) and Latin (literally “love”)) is the desire, practice, or acceptance of having more than one loving, intimate relationship at a time with the full knowledge and consent of everyone involved. ... Compersion is a term used by practitioners of polyamory to describe the experience of taking pleasure when ones partner is with another person. ... Not to be confused with Pity, Sympathy, or Compassion. ...


Jealousy in the sciences

Psychology of jealousy

While mainstream psychology considers sexual arousal through jealousy a paraphilia (categorized as zelophilia), some authors on sexuality (Serge Kreutz, Instrumental Jealousy) have argued that jealousy in manageable dimensions can have a definite positive effect on sexual function and sexual satisfaction. Studies have also shown that jealousy sometimes heightens passion towards partners and increases the intensity of passionate sex. [8] [9] Look up paraphilia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Sociology of jealousy

Main article: Jealousy sociology

Anthropologists have claimed that jealousy varies across cultures. Cultural learning can influence the situations that trigger jealousy and the manner in which jealousy is expressed. Attitudes toward jealousy can also change within a culture over time. For example, attitudes toward jealousy changed substantially during the 1960s and 1970s in the United States. People in the United States adopted much more negative views about jealousy. The sociology of jealousy deals with cultural and social factors that influence what causes jealousy, how jealousy is expressed, and how attitudes toward jealousy change over time. ...


Jealousy in art

A love letter from a rival; a youth catches his boyfriend with a love letter from another. Panel from a series of ten homoerotic scenes on a shunga-style painted hand scroll (kakemono-e); sumi, color and gofun on silk. Miyagawa Isshô, ca. 1750.
Main article: Jealousy in art

Jealousy is the powerful complex of emotions experienced at the loss, real or imagined, of something or someone you believe is yours, whereas envy concerns what you don’t have and would like to possess. Othello is filled with jealousy at the thought of losing Desdemona: Iago is consumed with envy of Othello’s prestige. Because jealous lovers tell multiple stories about those who arouse their jealousy, and because the emotion is so corrosive, jealousy is a common theme in literature, art, theatre, and film. This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or more. ... This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or more. ... A boyfriend is a male partner in a non-marital romantic relationship, or a male friend. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Shunga ) is a Japanese term for erotic pictures. ... Miyagawa Isshō was a Japanese painter of kakemono-e (picture scrolls) in the ukiyo-e style of popular, colourful art based on everyday life. ... Jealousy in art deals with the way writers and graphic artists have approached the topic of jealousy in their works. ... For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ...


Jealousy in religion

Main article: Jealousy in religion

Jealousy in religion examines how the scriptures and teachings of various religions deal with the topic of jealousy. Religions may be compared and contrasted on how they deal with two issues: concepts of divine jealousy, and rules about the provocation and expression of human jealousy. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


References

  1. ^ Buss, D.M. (2000). The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy is as Necessary as Love and Sex. New York: Free Press.
  2. ^ Buss, D.M. (2001). Human nature and culture: An evolutionary psychological perspective. Journal of Personality, 69, 955-978.
  3. ^ White, G.L., & Mullen, P.E. (1989). Jealousy: Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
  4. ^ Draghi-Lorenz, R. (2000). Five-month-old infants can be jealous: Against cognitivist solipsism. Paper presented in a symposium convened for the XIIth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies (ICIS), 16-19 July, Brighton, UK.
  5. ^ Hart, S. (2002). Jealousy in 6-month-old infants. Infancy, 3, 395-402.
  6. ^ Hart, S. (2004). When infants lose exclusive maternal attention: Is it jealousy? Infancy, 6, 57-78.
  7. ^ Shackelford, T.K., Voracek, M., Schmitt, D.P., Buss, D.M., Weekes-Shackelford, V.A., & Michalski, R.L. (2004). Romantic jealousy in early adulthood and in later life. Human Nature, 15, 283-300.
  8. ^ DeLameter, J. (1991). Emotions and sexuality. In K. McKinney and S. Sprecher (Eds.), Sexuality, in close relationships (pp. 49-70). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  9. ^ Pines, A. (1992). Romantic jealousy: Understanding and conquering the shadow of love. New York: St. Martin's Press.

See also

For other uses, see Envy (disambiguation). ... A definition of jealousy is an attempt to identify the essential qualities of jealousy and distinguish it from other concepts. ... Delusional jealousy or Othello syndrome is a psychiatric disorder in which a person holds a delusional belief that their spouse or sexual partner is being unfaithful. ... The sociology of jealousy deals with cultural and social factors that influence what causes jealousy, how jealousy is expressed, and how attitudes toward jealousy change over time. ... Jealousy in art deals with the way writers and graphic artists have approached the topic of jealousy in their works. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Rival may mean: Rivalry between competing factions, as in sports teams. ... Attachment in adults deals with the theory of attachment in adult romantic relationships. ... Compersion is a term used by practitioners of polyamory to describe the experience of taking pleasure when ones partner is with another person. ... Look up Emotion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Faithfulness redirects here. ... Open marriage typically refers to a marriage in which the partners agree that each may engage in extramarital sexual relationships, without this being regarded as infidelity. ... For the Crass album, see Penis Envy (album). ... Polyamory (from Greek (, literally “multiple”) and Latin (literally “love”)) is the desire, practice, or acceptance of having more than one loving, intimate relationship at a time with the full knowledge and consent of everyone involved. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Polyamory and Jealousy (1886 words)
Jealousy actually has three components to it, that all interact together to make up the experience that we refer to as jealousy.
However, if you only seek to find what triggers your jealousy and then stop at setting limits on the triggers for it, you're missing a huge opportunity to overcome jealousy itself, and even greater blessing to work through some of your insecurities that may be holding you back in other areas of your life.
Jealousy is something you can work on and don't have to accept as being a part of your experience, or something that controls you or your partners.
Anxiety Zone - Jealousy (818 words)
Jealousy is an emotion experienced by one who perceives that another person is giving something that s/he wants (typically attention, love, or affection) to a third party.
While the child's jealousy might be assuaged if she also received candy from the parent, such is typically not the case for a jealous lover, who wants the beloved to give some kinds of attention exclusively to him.
In mainstream society, although jealousy still carries connotations of insecurity, there is a greater tendency to accept it as a normal and expected reaction to a relationship threat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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