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Encyclopedia > Jazz blues

Jazz blues or in it's second name Jlues is a musical style that combines jazz and blues. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ...


The term also refers to any tune that follows the standard 12-bar blues chord progression, whilst being played in the jazz style, rather than the traditional blues style. Blues music was a major influence in the development of jazz, and such tunes -- "jazz blueses" (Jlueses) -- are extremely common in the jazz repertiore. (In addition to the chord progression, jazz players borrowed many other stylistic devices from the blues, such as blue notes, blues-like phrasing of melodies, and blues riffs.) A jazz blues will usually feature a more sophisticated -- or at any rate a different -- treatment of the harmony than a traditional, "blues" blues would, but the underlying features of the standard 12-bar progression remain discernable. One of the main ways the jazz musician accomplishes this is through the use of chord substitutions: a chord in the original progression is replaced by one or more chords which have the same general "sense", or function, but which add a different color, or add some secondary, shorter-term, harmonic movement within the span of the existing overall harmonic movement. An important example of this occurs in the 9th and 10th bars, where the usual blues progression, V  -->  IV,  is almost always replaced by the typical jazz cycle-of-fifths progression&nbsp. 1 well-known artist that sang this form of jazz is Billie Holiday. Jazz blues music is also usually a more difficult piece to write if you try to write it in music form. ; ii minor  -->  V.   The 12-bar blues form, in Bb, often becomes For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... In jazz and blues notes added to the major scale for expressive quality, loosely defined by musicians to be an alteration to a scale or chord that makes it sound like the blues. ... ... Riff is also an alternate spelling of Rif, a region of Morocco. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... A chord substitution is the use of one chord in the place of another in a chord progression. ...

 Bb7 / Eb7 / Bb7 / Bb7 Eb7 / Edim7 / Bb7 / Dm7-G7 Cm7 / F7 / Dm7-G7 / Cm7-F7 

Where each slash represents a new measure, in the jazz blues. The significant changes include the Edim7, which creates movement, and the iii-VI-ii-V turnaround, a jazz staple. The Schoolhouse Rock! song Where the Money Goes is a good example of this genre. Schoolhouse Rock! is a series of fifty-two educational short films featuring songs about schoolhouse topics, including grammar, science, economics, history, mathematics, and politics. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jazz blues - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (253 words)
Jazz blues is a musical style that combines jazz and blues.
The term also refers to any tune that follows the standard 12-bar blues chord progression, whilst being played in the jazz style, rather than the traditional blues style.
Blues music was a major influence in the development of jazz, and such tunes -- "jazz blueses" -- are extremely common in the jazz repertiore.
Jazz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5784 words)
Jazz has roots in the combination of Western and African music traditions, including spirituals, blues and ragtime, stemming ultimately from West Africa, western Sahel, and New England's religious hymns and hillbilly music, as well as in European military band music.
At the root of jazz is the blues, the folk music of former enslaved Africans in the U.S. South and their descendants, heavily influenced by West African cultural and musical traditions, that evolved as fl musicians migrated to the cities.
In addition, it could be argued that jazz would not exist without both instruments invented or developed by Europeans (the trumpet, saxophone, trombone, double bass, etc.) and the previous work of Europeans in music theory, which was explored in different ways by jazz musicians, such as increased use of the seventh chord and extended chords.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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