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Encyclopedia > Jaws (film)
Jaws

Film poster
Directed by Steven Spielberg
Produced by David Brown
Richard D. Zanuck
Written by Novel:
Peter Benchley
Screenplay:
Peter Benchley
Carl Gottlieb
Uncredited:
Howard Sackler
Starring Roy Scheider
Robert Shaw
Richard Dreyfuss
Lorraine Gary
Music by John Williams
Cinematography Bill Butler
Editing by Verna Fields
Distributed by Universal Studios
Release date(s) June 20, 1975
Running time 124 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $7,000,000[1]
Followed by Jaws 2
Official website
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Jaws is a 1975 thriller/horror film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchley's best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. The police chief of Amity Island, a fictional summer resort town, tries to protect beachgoers from a great white shark by closing the beach, only to be overruled by the town council, which wants the beach to remain open to draw a profit from tourists. After several attacks, the police chief enlists the help of a marine biologist and a professional shark hunter. Roy Scheider stars as police chief Martin Brody, Richard Dreyfuss as marine biologist Matt Hooper, Robert Shaw as shark hunter Quint, Lorraine Gary as Brody's wife Ellen and Murray Hamilton as Mayor Vaughn. Image File history File links Jaws_A.jpg‎ [edit] Summary Theatrical poster for the film Jaws (1975). ... German Three sheet Movie poster for Metropolis. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... This is the movie producer David Brown David Browns, see David Brown. ... Richard Darryl Zanuck (born December 13, 1934) is an American movie producer. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Carl Gottlieb (born 18 March 1938 in New York City) is an American screenwriter, actor, comedian and executive. ... Howard Sackler (1929 to 1982), an American screenwriter and playwright, is best known for writing The Great White Hope (play: 1967; film: 1970). ... Roy Richard Scheider (born November 10, 1932 in Orange, New Jersey) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Robert Shaw (August 9, 1927 – August 28, 1978) was an English stage and film actor and writer. ... Richard Stephen Dreyfuss (born October 29, 1947) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Lorraine Gary (born August 16, 1937 in New York City) is an actress best known for her role as Ellen Brody in Jaws, Jaws 2, and Jaws: The Revenge. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Bill Butler (born April 7, 1931) is an American cinematographer, part of the New Hollywood generation. ... Verna Fields (21 March 1918 - 30 November 1982) was an American film editor and executive. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Jaws 2 is a 1978 horror–thriller film directed by Jeannot Szwarc. ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... DVD cover showing horror characters as depicted by Universal Studios. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the capture of a man-eating shark off the Jersey Shore after the attacks. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range (in blue) For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... Roy Richard Scheider (born November 10, 1932 in Orange, New Jersey) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Richard Stephen Dreyfuss (born October 29, 1947) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Robert Shaw (August 9, 1927 – August 28, 1978) was an English stage and film actor and writer. ... Robert Shaw as Captain Quint Quint is a fictional character appearing in the 1974 novel Jaws by Peter Benchley, and in the 1975 film Jaws, which was directed by Steven Spielberg. ... Lorraine Gary (born August 16, 1937 in New York City) is an actress best known for her role as Ellen Brody in Jaws, Jaws 2, and Jaws: The Revenge. ... Murray Hamilton (March 24, 1923 – September 1, 1986) was an American stage, screen, and television character actor. ...


Jaws is regarded as a watershed film in motion picture history, the father of the summer blockbuster movie and one of the first "high concept" films.[2][3] Due to the film's success in advance screenings, studio executives decided to distribute it in a much wider release than ever before. The Omen followed suit in the summer of 1976, and then Star Wars one year later in 1977, cementing the notion for movie studios to distribute their big-release action and adventure pictures (commonly referred to as tentpole pictures) during the summer. The film was followed by three sequels, none with the participation of Spielberg or Benchley, nor were they were as successful or well-received: Jaws 2 (1978), Jaws 3-D (1983) and Jaws: The Revenge (1987). Blockbuster, as applied to film, is a very popular and monetarily-successful movie release. ... High concept, in film, is a term typically used to refer to the style and mode of production developed by Hollywood studios in the late 1970s. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... A movie studio is a location, room, building, or group of buildings and/or sound stages, offices and storage facilities, which may include a backlot, where movies are made. ... Jaws 2 is a 1978 horror–thriller film directed by Jeannot Szwarc. ... Jaws 3-D (a. ... Jaws The Revenge is a 1987s horror film. ...

Contents

Plot

The film begins at a late night beach party on Amity Island. A young woman named Chrissie Watkins leaves to go for a swim. While in the water, she is suddenly jerked around by an unseen force and then pulled under. The next morning, police chief Martin Brody (Roy Scheider) is notified that Chrissie is missing. Brody and his deputy, Hendricks, find her mangled remains washed up on the shore. The medical examiner informs Brody that the victim's death was caused by a shark attack, prompting him to close the beaches. Before he can do so, he is intercepted and overruled by town Mayor Vaughn (Murray Hamilton). Vaughn is concerned that reports of a shark attack will ruin the summer tourist season, especially the upcoming Fourth of July celebration, as it is the town's major source of income. Vaughn instead proposes a theory that the victim was hit by a boat propeller. After the town medical examiner backs up the mayor's story, Brody reluctantly goes along with it. Fourth of July redirects here. ...

Panic on the beach

A few days later, a young boy named Alex Kintner is attacked and eaten by a shark while swimming off a crowded beach. His mother places a $3,000 bounty on the animal, sparking an amateur shark hunting frenzy and attracting the attention of the professional shark hunter Quint (Robert Shaw). Quint interrupts a town meeting to offer his services; his demand for $10,000 is taken "under advisement". Brought in by Brody, marine biologist Matt Hooper (Richard Dreyfuss) conducts an autopsy of the first victim and concludes she was killed by a shark. A large tiger shark is caught by a group of novice fishermen, leading the town to believe the problem is solved, but an unconvinced Hooper asks to examine the contents of the shark's stomach. Vaughn refuses to make a public spectacle of the "operation," so Brody and Hooper return after dark and learn that the captured shark does not have human remains inside. Using Hooper's state-of-the-art boat they come across the half-sunken wreckage of a local fishing vessel. Hooper dons scuba and discovers another victim, the boat's owner Ben Gardener. He also discovers a great white shark tooth in the hull, but drops it after he sees the head of Gardener in the hull, therefore leaving no proof of the shark. Vaughn still refuses to close the beach and on the Fourth of July the beaches are mobbed. While a prank triggers a false alarm and draws the authorities' attention, the real shark enters an estuary, kills another man and nearly snatches one of Brody's sons. Brody forces the stunned mayor to hire Quint. Brody and Hooper join the hunter on his boat, the Orca, and the trio set out to track down the man-eater. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (973x418, 53 KB)screenshot from Jaws source: www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (973x418, 53 KB)screenshot from Jaws source: www. ... A bounty is often offered by a group as an incentive for the accomplishment of a task by someone usually not associated with the group. ... For other uses, see Shark (disambiguation). ... Robert Shaw as Captain Quint Quint is a fictional character appearing in the 1974 novel Jaws by Peter Benchley, and in the 1975 film Jaws, which was directed by Steven Spielberg. ... For other uses, see Tiger shark (disambiguation). ... A scuba diver in usual sport diving gear SCUBA is an acronym for Self-Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Range (in blue) For other uses, see Great White (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Orca sharkfishing boat Orca was a fishing boat described in novelized form by Peter Benchley in the book Jaws, and later in the like titled 1975 motion picture Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg. ...


At sea, Brody is given the task of laying a chum line, while Quint uses a large fishing pole to try to snag the shark; the first results are inconclusive. As Brody continues to chum, the enormous shark suddenly looms up behind the boat. After a horrified Brody announces its presence ("You're gonna need a bigger boat!") Quint and Hooper watch the great white circle the Orca, and estimate the new arrival weighs 3 tons (2.7 metric tonnes) and is 25 feet (8 m) long. Quint harpoons the shark with a line attached to a flotation barrel, designed to weigh the fish down and track it on the surface, but the shark pulls the barrel under and disappears. Night falls without another sighting and the men retire to the boat's cabin, where they compare scars and Quint tells of his experience with sharks as a survivor of the World War II sinking of the USS Indianapolis. The shark reappears, damages the boat's hull, and slips away before the men can harm it. In the morning, while the men make repairs to the engine, the barrel suddenly reappears at the stern. Quint destroys the radio to keep Brody from calling the Coast Guard for help. The shark attacks again, and after a long chase, Quint harpoons it to another barrel. The men tie the barrels to the stern, but the shark drags the ship backwards, forcing water onto the deck and into the engine, flooding it. Quint harpoons it again, attaching three barrels in all to the shark, while the animal continues to tow them. Quint is about to cut the ropes with his machete when the cleats are pulled off the stern. Quint powers his boat towards shore with the shark in pursuit, hoping to beach it. In his obsession with outracing the fish, Quint over-revs his damaged engine, causing it to explode. Look up chum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a Portland-class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... modern factory-made Machete For other uses, see Machete (disambiguation). ...

Quint (Robert Shaw)'s fishing vessel, the Orca

With the Orca immobilized, the trio try a desperate approach; Hooper dons his scuba gear and enters the ocean inside a shark proof cage: he intends to stab the shark in the mouth with a hypodermic spear filled with strychnine nitrate. The shark instead destroys the cage, causing Hooper to lose the spear and flee to the seabed. As Quint and Brody raise the remnants of the cage, the shark throws itself onto the boat, crushing the transom, causing the boat to begin sinking. Quint slides into the shark's mouth, slashing at it in vain with his machete, before being pulled under and devoured. Brody retreats to the boat's cabin, now partly submerged, and throws a pressurized air tank into the shark's mouth as it rams its way inside. Brody takes Quint's M1 Garand rifle and climbs the mast of the rapidly-listing boat, where he temporarily fends off the attacker with a harpoon. The shark circles around and charges one last time at Brody, who starts firing the rifle at the tank still jammed in the shark's mouth. Snarling "Smile, you son-of-a-bitch!" he scores a hit, exploding the tank, which blows the shark's head to pieces and sends the rest of its body to the bottom of the ocean in a cloud of blood. Hooper surfaces and reunites with Brody, and the two survivors use the leftover barrels to construct a makeshift raft and paddle back to Amity Island. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (839x362, 33 KB)Screenshot from DVD for the Universal Studios film Jaws, taken by Dark Kubrick. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (839x362, 33 KB)Screenshot from DVD for the Universal Studios film Jaws, taken by Dark Kubrick. ... Robert Shaw as Captain Quint Quint is a fictional character appearing in the 1974 novel Jaws by Peter Benchley, and in the 1975 film Jaws, which was directed by Steven Spielberg. ... Robert Shaw (August 9, 1927 – August 28, 1978) was an English stage and film actor and writer. ... A shark proof cage is a cage which is lowered into the ocean, and in which a SCUBA diver enters, to examine sharks better and more safely. ... Strychnine (pronounced (British, U.S.), or (U.S.)) is a very toxic (LD50 = 10 mg approx. ... Trinitrate redirects here. ... 12 litre and 3 litre steel diving cylinders A diving cylinder, scuba tank or diving tank is used to store and transport high pressure breathing gas as a component of an Aqua-Lung. ... The M1 Garand (more formally the United States Rifle, Caliber . ... For other uses, see Harpoon (disambiguation) Harpoon gun redirects here. ...


Production

The film was produced by Richard Zanuck and David Brown, who purchased the film rights to Benchley's novel in 1973 for approximately $250,000.[4] His novel was loosely based on a real-life event in the summer of 1916 when a series of shark attacks killed four people along the New Jersey coast and triggered a media frenzy. Though he was not their first choice as a director, the producers signed Spielberg to direct before the release of his first theatrical film, The Sugarland Express (also a Zanuck/Brown production). Richard Darryl Zanuck (born December 13, 1934) is an American movie producer. ... This is the movie producer David Brown David Browns, see David Brown. ... The Philadelphia Inquirer reported the capture of a man-eating shark off the Jersey Shore after the attacks. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Sugarland Express is a 1974 feature film starring Goldie Hawn and William Atherton. ...


When they purchased the rights to his novel, the producers guaranteed that the author would write the first draft of the screenplay. Overall, Benchley wrote three drafts before deciding to bow out of the project (although he appeared in the final film, a cameo appearance as a news reporter).[5] Tony and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Howard Sackler happened to be in Los Angeles when the filmmakers began looking for another writer and offered to do an uncredited rewrite, and since the producers and Spielberg were unhappy with Benchley's drafts, they quickly accepted his offer.[6] Spielberg sent the script to Carl Gottlieb (who appears in a supporting acting role in the film as Meadows, the politically connected reporter), asking for advice.[6] Gottlieb rewrote most scenes during principal photography, and John Milius contributed dialogue polishes. Spielberg has claimed that he prepared his own draft, although it is unclear if the other screenwriters drew on his material. The authorship of Quint's monologue about the fate of the cruiser USS Indianapolis has caused substantial controversy as to who deserves the most credit for the speech. Spielberg tactfully describes it as a collaboration among John Milius, Howard Sackler and actor Robert Shaw. Gottlieb gives primary credit to Shaw, downplaying Milius' contribution.[7] Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Howard Sackler (1929 to 1982), an American screenwriter and playwright, is best known for writing The Great White Hope (play: 1967; film: 1970). ... Carl Gottlieb (born 18 March 1938 in New York City) is an American screenwriter, actor, comedian and executive. ... A supporting actor performs roles in a play or movie other than that of protagonist. ... John Milius (born April 11, 1944 in St. ... A monologue, pronounced monolog, is a speech made by one person speaking his or her thoughts aloud or directly addressing a reader, audience, or character. ... USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a Portland-class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. ...

The full model mechanical shark, attached to special rigging
The full model mechanical shark, attached to special rigging

Three mechanical sharks were made for the production: a full model for underwater shots, one that turned from left to right, with the left side completely exposed to the internal machinery, and a similar right to left model, with the right side exposed.[5] Their construction was supervised by production designer Joe Alves and special effects artist Bob Mattey. After the sharks were completed, they were shipped to the shooting location, but unfortunately had not been tested in water and when placed in the ocean the full model sank to the ocean floor.[6] A team of divers retrieved it. Image File history File links Mechashark. ... Image File history File links Mechashark. ... Film production on location in Newark, New Jersey. ... Joe Alves (born 21 May 1936, San Leandro, California) is an American film production designer, perhaps best known for his work on the Jaws films. ...


Location shooting occurred on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, chosen because the ocean had a sandy bottom while 12 miles (19 km) out at sea.[6] This helped the mechanical sharks to operate smoothly and still provide a realistic location. Still, the film had a famously troubled shoot and went considerably over budget. Shooting at sea led to many delays: unwanted sailboats drifted into frame, cameras were soaked, and even the Orca began to sink with the actors onboard. The mechanical shark frequently malfunctioned, due to the hydraulic innards being corroded by salt water.[6] The three mechanical sharks were collectively nicknamed "Bruce" by the production team after Spielberg's lawyer, and Spielberg called one of the sharks "the Great White turd".[6] Disgruntled crew members gave the film the nickname "Flaws".[8] Map of Marthas Vineyard. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Hydraulics is a branch of science and engineering concerned with the use of liquids to perform mechanical tasks. ... Sea water is water from a sea or ocean. ...


To some degree, the delays in the production proved serendipitous. The script was refined during production, and the unreliable mechanical sharks forced Spielberg to shoot most of the scenes with the shark only hinted at. For example, for much of the shark hunt its location is represented by the floating yellow barrels. This forced restraint is widely thought to have increased the suspense of these scenes, giving it a Hitchcockian tone.[9] Look up Serendipity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ...


The scene where Hooper discovers a body in the hull of the wrecked boat was added after an initial screening of the film. After reactions to that screening, Spielberg said he was greedy for "one more scream" and, with $3,000 of his own money, financed the scene after he was denied funding from Universal Studios.[6] The studios thought was that there was nothing wrong with the film. The added scene is sometimes considered a continuity error: when Brody tries to convince the mayor to close the beaches, he fails to mention the death to bolster his argument. It should be noted that Hooper does make note of the shark tooth found upon discovering this corpse. He tells the mayor that he pulled a large tooth out of Ben Gardner's boat, however when asked to present the tooth as proof he regretfully informs the mayor that he was startled and dropped the evidence. A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ... Screening, in general, is the investigation of a great number of something (for instance, people) looking for those with a particular problem or feature. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ...


Footage of real sharks was shot by Ron and Valerie Taylor in the waters off Australia, with a dwarf actor in a miniature shark cage to create the illusion that the shark was enormous.[6] Originally, the script had the shark killing Hooper in the shark cage, but while filming, one of the sharks became trapped in the girdle of the cage, and proceeded to tear the cage apart.[6] Luckily, the cage was empty at the time, so the script was changed to allow Matt Hooper to live and the cage to be empty.[6] Despite the rare footage of a great white shark exhibiting violent behavior, only a handful of these shots were used in the finished film. In film and video, footage is the raw, unedited material as it has been recorded by the camera, which usually must be edited to create a motion picture, video clip, television show or similar completed work. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article is about the medical condition. ... For other uses, see illusion (disambiguation). ...


The role of Quint was originally offered to actors Lee Marvin and Sterling Hayden, both of whom passed.[6] Producers Zanuck and Brown had just finished working with Robert Shaw on The Sting, and suggested him to Spielberg as a possible Quint. Roy Scheider became interested in the project after overhearing a screenwriter and Spielberg at a party talking about having the shark jump up onto a boat.[6] Richard Dreyfuss initially passed on the role of Matt Hooper, but after seeing a screening of a film he had just done called The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz, he thought his performance in that film was awful.[6] He immediately called Spielberg back and accepted the Matt Hooper role (fearing that no one would want to hire him once Kravitz was released.) The first person actually cast for the film was Lorraine Gary, the wife of then-studio chief Sid Sheinberg.[6] Lee Marvin (February 19, 1924, New York City – August 29, 1987, Tucson, Arizona) was an American film actor. ... Sterling Hayden (March 26, 1916 - May 23, 1986) was an American actor. ... This article is about the 1973 film involving con artists. ... The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz is a 1974 Canadian comedy-drama film based on the 1959 novel of the same name by Mordecai Richler. ...


Reaction

Box office performance

Jaws was the first film to apply the concept of "wide release" in its distribution pattern. As such, it is an important film in the history of film distribution and marketing.


Up until Jaws was released, films had opened slowly, usually in a few theaters in major cities, then "building" across the country—distributors sending more prints to more cities, as the film was perceived to be a success. However, Jaws was the first film to use Sid Scheinberg's scheme of "wide release"—the until then unheard-of practice of opening the same picture nationwide, in hundreds of screens simultaneously, coupled with a nation-wide marketing campaign. Scheinberg's rationale was that nationwide marketing costs would be amortized at a more favorable rate per print than if a slow, scaled release were carried out. Scheinberg's gamble paid off, Jaws becoming the first film in motion picture history to cross the $100 million mark. The success of Jaws created the new paradigm of distributing and marketing major motion pictures simultaneously, a business practice which has continued until today. In computational complexity theory, amortized analysis is the time per operation averaged over a worst_case sequence of operations. ...


When Jaws was released on June 20, 1975, it opened at 409 theaters. The release was subsequently expanded on July 25 to a total of 675 theaters—until then the largest simultaneous distribution of the same film in motion picture distribution history. On its first weekend, Jaws grossed more than $7 million, and was the top grosser for the following five weeks.[1] During its run in theaters, the film beat the $89 million domestic rentals of the reigning box-office champion, The Exorcist, becoming the first film to reach more than $100 million in theatrical rentals,[10] the money paid to the studio distributors out of the total box office gross. Eventually, Jaws grossed more than $470 million worldwide (around $1.85 billion in 2006 dollars[11]) and was the highest grossing box-office hit until Star Wars debuted two years later.[1] is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Exorcist is a horror novel written by William Peter Blatty first published in 1971. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological...


Jaws and Star Wars are considered in retrospect to have marked the beginning of the new business paradigm in American filmmaking, and the beginning of the end of the New Hollywood period. This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... New Hollywood or post-classical Hollywood refers to the brief time between roughly 1967 (Bonnie and Clyde, The Graduate) and 1982 (One from the Heart) when a new generation of young filmmakers came to prominence in America, drastically changing not only the way Hollywood films were produced and marketed, but...


Awards and critical reception

Jaws won Academy Awards for Film Editing, Music (Original Score) and Sound. It was also nominated for Best Picture, although Spielberg was not nominated for Best Director. Jaws was #48 on American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Movies, a list of the greatest American films of all time, and #2 on a similar list for thrillers, 100 Years... 100 Thrills. It was #1 in the Bravo network's five-hour miniseries The 100 Scariest Movie Moments (2004)[12] and #1 on the Wayne State University film students' list of the Top 20 Films of the 20th Century (2007).[13]. The shark was anointed #18 on AFI's 100 Years... 100 Heroes and Villains. In 2001 the United States Library of Congress deemed the film "culturally significant" and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry. In 2005, the American Film Institute voted Roy Scheider's line "You're gonna need a bigger boat" as number 35 on its list of the top 100 movie quotes. John Williams's score was ranked at #6 on AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Film Editing was first given for films issued in 1934. ... The Academy Award for Original Music Score is presented to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. ... The Academy Award for Sound Mixing is an Academy Award that recognizes the finest or most aesthetic sound mixing or recording, and is generally awarded to the production sound mixers and re-recording mixers of the winning film. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first of the AFI 100 Years. ... The 100 most heart-pounding American films as described by the AFI on the evening of June 12, 2001. ... For College in Nebraska, see Wayne State College. ... // AFIs 100 Years. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ...


The film received mostly positive reviews. In his original review, Roger Ebert called it "a sensationally effective action picture, a scary thriller that works all the better because it's populated with characters that have been developed into human beings".[14] Variety's A.D. Murphy praised Spielberg's directorial skills, and called Robert Shaw's performance "absolutely magnificent".[15] Pauline Kael called it "the most cheerfully perverse scare movie ever made... [with] more zest than an early Woody Allen picture, a lot more electricity, [and] it's funny in a Woody Allen sort of way".[16] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Pauline Kael (June 19, 1919 – September 3, 2001) was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine from 1968 to 1991. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Königsberg on December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian, and playwright. ...


The film was not without its detractors. Vincent Canby, of The New York Times, said "It's a measure of how the film operates that not once do we feel particular sympathy for any of the shark's victims...In the best films, characters are revealed in terms of the action. In movies like Jaws, characters are simply functions of the action. They're at its service. Characters are like stage hands who move props around and deliver information when it's necessary," but also noted that "It's the sort of nonsense that can be a good deal of fun".[17] Los Angeles Times critic Charles Champlin disagreed with the film's PG rating, saying that "Jaws is too gruesome for children, and likely to turn the stomach of the impressionable at any age." He goes on to say: "It is a coarse-grained and exploitive work which depends on excess for its impact. Ashore it is a bore, awkwardly staged and lumpily written".[18] The most widespread criticism of the film is the artificiality of the mechanical shark,[19] although it is only seen in the final moments of the film, and is often brushed over by reviewers. Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Charles Champlin (born 1926 in Hammondsport, New York) is an American film critic and writer. ...


Inspirations and influences

Jaws shark at Universal Studios Florida
Jaws shark at Universal Studios Florida

Jaws bears similarities to several literary and artistic works, most notably Moby-Dick by Herman Melville. The character of Quint strongly resembles Captain Ahab, the obsessed captain of the Pequod who devotes his life to hunting a sperm whale. Quint's monologue reveals his similar vendetta against sharks, and even his boat, the Orca, is named after the only natural enemy of sharks. In the novel and original screenplay, Quint dies after being dragged under the ocean by a harpoon tied to his leg, similar to Ahab's death in Melville's novel.[20] A direct reference to these similarities may be found in the original screenplay, which introduced Quint by showing him watching the film version of Moby-Dick.[21] His laughter throughout makes people get up and leave the theater (Wesley Strick's screenplay for Cape Fear features a similar scene). However, the scene from Moby-Dick could not be licensed from Gregory Peck, the owner of the rights.[22] Some have also noticed the influences of two 1950s horror films, The Creature from the Black Lagoon and The Monster That Challenged the World.[23][8] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 288 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): JAWS (ride) User... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 288 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): JAWS (ride) User... Moby-Dick book cover Moby-Dick - the official title of the first edition - is a novel by Herman Melville. ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ... Moby-Dick book cover Moby-Dick - the official title of the first edition - is a novel by Herman Melville. ... The Pequod is the fictional 19th century Nantucket whaling ship that appears in the 1851 novel Moby-Dick by American author Herman Melville. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Sperm whale range (in blue) The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) is the largest of all toothed whales and is the largest toothed animal alive, with adult males measuring up to 20. ... Binomial name Orcinus orca Linnaeus, 1758 Orca range (in blue) The orca (Orcinus orca), commonly known as the killer whale, and sometimes called the grampus, is the largest member of the oceanic dolphin family. ... For other uses, see Harpoon (disambiguation) Harpoon gun redirects here. ... Cape Fear is a 1991 film, directed by Martin Scorsese. ... Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Film poster for Creature from the Black Lagoon Creature from the Black Lagoon is a genre-making 1954 horror film. ...


Jaws was a key film in establishing the benefits of a wide national release backed by heavy media advertising, rather than a progressive release that let a film slowly enter new markets and build support over a period of time.[24] Rather than let the film gain notice by word-of-mouth, Hollywood launched a successful television marketing campaign for the film, which added another $700,000 to the cost.[8] The wide national release pattern would become standard practice for high-profile movies in the late 1970s and afterward.


The film conjured up so many scares that beach attendance was down in the summer of 1975 due to its profound impact.[19] Though a horror classic (its opening sequence was voted the scariest scene ever by a Bravo Halloween TV special),[25] the film is widely recognized as being responsible for fearsome and inaccurate stereotypes about sharks and their behavior. Benchley has said that he would never have written the original novel had he known what sharks are really like in the wild.[26] He later wrote Shark Trouble, a non-fiction book about shark behavior and Shark Life, another non-fiction book describing his dives with sharks. Conservation groups have bemoaned the fact that the film has made it considerably harder to convince the public that sharks should be protected.[27][28] Jaws set the template for many future horror films, so much so that the script for Ridley Scott's 1979 science fiction film Alien was pitched to studio executives with one tag line: "Jaws in space."[29]. A line from Jaws also inspired the name of Bryan Singer's production company Bad Hat Harry productions, as it is his favorite film.[30] The film has been adapted into two video games, a theme park ride at Universal Studios Florida, and two musicals: "JAWS The Musical!", which premiered in the summer of 2004 at the Minnesota Fringe Festival; and "Giant Killer Shark: The Musical," which premiered in the summer of 2006 at the Toronto Fringe Festival. This article is about the U.S. cable network. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... Bryan Singer (born September 17, 1965) is an American film director. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... Jaws is a slow-moving boat ride at Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida based upon the film Jaws. ... Universal Studios Florida is a theme park in Orlando, Florida, part of the Universal Orlando Resort. ... The Toronto Fringe Festival is an annual theatre festival, featuring uncensored plays by unknown or well-known artists, taking place in the theatres of Toronto. ...


A subway poster to the film Jaws was found by Thundarr the Barbarian in the pilot episode of his series when he visited Manhattan. [31] Thundarr the Barbarian was a Saturday morning animated cartoon show, produced by Ruby-Spears Productions. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


Music

John Williams contributed the Academy-Award winning film score, which was ranked #6 on AFI's 100 Years of Film Scores. The main "shark" theme, a simple alternating pattern of two notes, E and F,[32] became a classic piece of suspense music, synonymous with approaching danger. The soundtrack piece was performed by tuba player Tommy Johnson. When asked by Johnson why the melody was written in such a high register and not played by the more appropriate French horn, Williams responded that he wanted it to sound "a little more threatening".[33] When the piece was first played for Spielberg, he was said to have laughed at John Williams, thinking that it was a joke. Spielberg later said that without Williams' score the film would have been only half as successful, and Williams acknowledges that the score jumpstarted his career.[6] He had previously scored Spielberg's feature film debut The Sugarland Express, and went on to collaborate with him on almost all of his films. For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ... This article is about music. ... For other uses, see Tuba (disambiguation). ... Tommy Johnson was a session musician best known for his work on the Jaws theme. ... The horn is a brass instrument consisting of tubing wrapped into a coiled form. ... The Sugarland Express is a 1974 feature film starring Goldie Hawn and William Atherton. ...


The score contains echoes of Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, particularly the opening of "The Adoration of the Earth".[34] Another influence may have been Ed Plumb's score for Walt Disney's Bambi, which uses a low, repeating musical motif to suggest imminent danger from the off-screen threat of Man. The music has drawn comparisons to Bernard Herrman's score for Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, in which the music enhances the presence of an unseen terror, in this case the shark.[35] Igor Stravinsky. ... Bambi is a 1942 animated feature produced by Walt Disney and originally released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. ... Bernard Herrmann (June 29, 1911–December 24, 1975) was a composer, best known for his film scores, particularly for Alfred Hitchcock-directed films. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ...


There are various interpretations on the meaning and effectiveness of the theme. Some have thought the two-note expression is intended to mimic the shark's heartbeat, beginning slow and controlled as the killer hunts, and rising to a frenzied, shrieking climax as it approaches its prey.[36] One critic believes the true strength of the score is its ability to create a "harsh silence," abruptly cutting away from the music right before it climaxes.[35] Furthermore, the audience is conditioned to associate the shark with its theme, since the score is never used as a red herring. It only plays when the real shark appears. This is later exploited when the shark suddenly appears with no musical introduction. Regardless of the meaning behind it, the theme is widely acknowledged as one of the most recognized scores of all time.[19] Look up red herring in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Soundtrack

Main article: Jaws (soundtrack)

The original soundtrack for Jaws was released by MCA in 1975, and as a CD in 1992, including roughly a half hour of music that John Williams redid for the album. In 2000, the score underwent two rushed soundtrack releases: one in a re-recording of the entire Jaws score performed by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and conducted by Joel McNeely; and another to coincide with the release of the 25th anniversary DVD by Decca/Universal, featuring the entire 51 min. of the original score. Fans prefer the Decca release over the Varèse Sarabande re-recording.[37] The latter version has been criticized for changing the original tempo and instrumentation, although it is complimented for its improved sound quality.[38] The original soundtrack for Jaws was released by MCA in 1975, and as a CD in 1992, including roughly a half hour of music that John Williams redid for the album. ... The Royal Scottish National Orchestra is Scotlands national symphony orchestra. ... Joel McNeely (b. ...


Differences from the novel

The most significant change from the novel is the removal of an affair between Ellen and Matt Hooper. In the novel, Brody is a native of Amity; his wife, Ellen, was previously a member of the wealthy New York summer holiday set before she married him. Ellen's despair with her life in Amity leads to a short sexual encounter between her and Hooper. In the film, Brody moved to Amity Island from New York with his family to take up the position of the chief of police, and the relationship between Ellen and Hooper is removed.


There are several other differences:

  • Brody and his wife have three sons: Billy, Martin Jr. and Sean. In the movie, there are only two Brody children, Mike and Sean.
  • Hooper tries to kill the shark with a bangstick, but during the dive he is eaten. He survives in the film.[39] In the original script Hooper would have also died in the film, but this was changed during production.[6]
  • The mayor keeps the beaches open partly because of his Mafia ties.[40]
  • The shark devours a boy and a senior citizen in one afternoon, but in the movie only the boy, Alex Kintner, is the victim.
  • All events in the final reel of the film aboard the boat occur in one unbroken trip at sea, while in the novel the men safely return to Amity's harbor several times.
  • Quint's monologue about the USS Indianapolis is absent from the novel and the original screenplay.
  • The shark dies from being stabbed with a harpoon by Quint, and the novel ends with the shark approaching Brody as the boat sinks, but Brody has no weapon and the shark dies from the stab wounds.[41] For the film, something with more visual impact was deemed necessary. Benchley disliked the change and claimed that the airtank explosion was unbelievable.[6] In the MythBusters JAWS Special, which aired during Discovery Channel's Shark Week, the Mythbusters confirmed Benchley's theory as the scene was deemed "busted," as the airtank would fly around like a rocket after being punctured.[42]
  • Quint's foot becomes tangled in the barrel ropes and he is pulled underwater by the shark, drowning. In the film, he is eaten by the shark.

The terms powerhead, bang stick, and shark stick refer to specialized firearms intended to be used underwater and fire in direct contact with the target. ... USS Indianapolis (CA-35) was a Portland-class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. ... MythBusters is an American popular science television program on the Discovery Channel starring special effects experts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who use basic elements of the scientific method to test the validity of various rumors and urban legends in popular culture. ... Discovery Channel is a cable and satellite TV channel founded by John Hendricks which is distributed by Discovery Communications. ... The Discovery Channels Shark Week, which first aired in 1987, is a week-long series of feature television programs dedicated to facts on sharks. ...

Releases and sequels

The first laserdisc title marketed in North America was the MCA DiscoVision release of Jaws in 1978. Jaws was first released on DVD as an anniversary collector's edition in 2000 for the film's 25th anniversary. It featured a 50-minute documentary on the making of the film, with interviews from Steven Spielberg, Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss, Peter Benchley and other cast and crew members. Other extras included deleted scenes, outtakes, production photos, and storyboards. In June 2005, on the 30th anniversary of the film's release, a festival named JawsFest was held in Martha's Vineyard.[43] Jaws was then re-released on DVD, this time including the full two-hour documentary produced by Laurent Bouzereau for the LaserDisc. As well as containing the same bonus features the previous DVD contained, it included a previously unavailable interview with Spielberg conducted on the set of Jaws in 1975. Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... Map of Marthas Vineyard. ...


In the 2000s, an independent group of fans produced a feature length documentary. The Shark is Still Working features interviews with a range of cast and crew from the film, and some from the sequels. It is narrated by Roy Scheider and dedicated to Peter Benchley.[44][45] The Shark is Still Working (TSISW) is a three-hour long retrospective on the impact and legacy of the 1975 Steven Spielberg blockbuster Jaws. ...


Jaws spawned three sequels, which failed to match the success of the original. Spielberg declined the offer to do a sequel, and went on to make Close Encounters of the Third Kind with Richard Dreyfuss. Jaws 2 was directed by Jeannot Szwarc; Roy Scheider, Lorraine Gary and Murray Hamilton reprised their roles from the original film. The next film, Jaws 3-D, directed by Joe Alves, was released in the 3-D format, although the effect did not transfer to television or home video, where it was renamed Jaws 3. Dennis Quaid as Michael Brody and Louis Gossett Jr starred in the movie. Jaws: The Revenge, directed by Joseph Sargent, featured the return of Lorraine Gary, and is considered one of the worst movies ever made. While all three sequels made a profit at the box office (Jaws 2 and Jaws 3-D are among the top 20 highest-grossing films of their respective years), critics and audiences were generally dissatisfied with the films. This article is about the film; for the definition of the UFO related phenomenon, see Close encounter. ... Jaws 2 is a 1978 horror–thriller film directed by Jeannot Szwarc. ... Jeannot Szwarc (born 21 November 1939) is a French film director. ... Jaws 3-D (a. ... In film, the term 3-D (or 3D) is used to describe any visual presentation system that attempts to maintain or recreate moving images of the third dimension, the illusion of depth as seen by the viewer. ... Dennis William Quaid (born April 9, 1954) is an American actor. ... Louis Gossett Jr. ... Jaws The Revenge is a 1987s horror film. ... Plan 9 from Outer Space, infamously considered so bad its good, is a contender for Worst Movie Ever Made. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c Jaws (1975). boxofficemojo.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  2. ^ Rise of the blockbuster. BBC News Online. Retrieved on 2006-08-20.
  3. ^ Wyatt, Justin. (1994) High Concept: Movies and Marketing in Hollywood. Austin: University of Texas Press. ISBN 0-292-79091-0
  4. ^ Jaws (1975). boxoffice.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-07.
  5. ^ a b Brode, Douglas (1995). The Films of Steven Spielberg. Carol Publishing, 50. ISBN 0-8065-1951-7. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Spotlight on Location: The Making of Jaws, Jaws 30th Anniversary DVD documentary, [2005]
  7. ^ Gottlieb, Carl. (2001) The Jaws Log. ISBN 0-571-20949-1
  8. ^ a b c Dirks, Tim. "Jaws (1975)", filmsite.org. Retrieved on 2006-08-07. 
  9. ^ Stephenson, John-Paul. "Essay on Jaws", jawsmovie.com, 1998-05-23. Retrieved on 2006-08-10. Archived from the original on 2008-02-26. 
  10. ^ Top 5 Box Office Hits, 1939 to 1988. idsfilm.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-30.
  11. ^ Numbers may be entered in the form found on http://www.westegg.com/inflation/, a site which claims to be based on data found in the Consumer Price Index statistics from the Historical Statistics of the United States and the Statistical Abstracts of the United States.
  12. ^ The 100 Scariest Movie Moments. bravotv.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-06.
  13. ^ P. Bublitz, "WSU students rank the top 20 films of the century." The South End (Detroit) June 28, 2007, p. 1. "Just when it was safe to stop looking over movie lists, a new one was recently created by Wayne State students. ... Topping off the list was the 1975 Steven Spielberg blockbuster "Jaws." ... It was a result that thrilled Nicholas Schlegel, the professor who taught the class."
  14. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Jaws", rogerebert.suntimes.com, 1975-01-01. Retrieved on 2006-08-03. 
  15. ^ Murphy, A.D.. "Jaws", variety.com, 1975-06-18. Retrieved on 2006-08-03. 
  16. ^ Kael, Pauline. "Jaws", The New Yorker, 1976-11-08.  Reprinted in Kael, Pauline (1980). "Notes on Evolving Heroes, Morals, Audiences", When the Lights Go Down. Wadsworth, 195-6. ISBN 0-03-056842-0. 
  17. ^ Canby, Vincent. "Entrapped by 'Jaws' of Fear", nytimes.com, 1975-06-21. Retrieved on 2006-08-03. 
  18. ^ Champlin, Charles. "Don't Go Near the Water", latimes.com, 1975-06-20. Retrieved on 2006-08-31. 
  19. ^ a b c Berardinelli, James. "Jaws", reelviews.net. Retrieved on 2006-08-06. 
  20. ^ Ellis, Richard. "Book and Movie Review: Beast", tonmo.com. Retrieved on 2006-11-22. 
  21. ^ Benchley, Peter. "Jaws Final Draft Screenplay", jawsmovie.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-29. 
  22. ^ Woelfel, Jay. ""Tribute to Gregory Peck"", ez-entertainment.net. Retrieved on 2006-08-11. 
  23. ^ Carpenter, Gerry. "Creature from the Black Lagoon", scifilm.org. Retrieved on 2006-08-28. 
  24. ^ Jaws - The monster that ate Hollywood. pbs.org. Retrieved on 2006-08-06.
  25. ^ Trivia for "The 100 Scariest Movie Moments". imdb.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-03.
  26. ^ Metcalf, Geoff. "Great white shark, the fragile giant", geoffmetcalf.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-04. 
  27. ^ Why Sharks?. iemanya.org. Retrieved on 2006-08-08.
  28. ^ Chapple, Mike. "Great white hope, page 3", icliverpool.icnetwork.co.uk, 2005-09-01. Retrieved on 2006-08-09. 
  29. ^ Hays, Matthew. A Space Odyssey. montrealmirror.com. Retrieved on 2007-07-31.
  30. ^ X2 commentary. 20th Century Fox.
  31. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kIIc4tvtF0
  32. ^ Matessino, Michael. "Letter in response to "A Study of Jaws' Incisive Overture To Close Off the Century"", filmscoremonthly.com, 1999-09-24. Retrieved on 2006-12-17. 
  33. ^ Chaundy, Bob. "Spies, sports, and sharks", news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2006-11-06. 
  34. ^ Scheurer, Timothy E.. "John Williams and film music since 1971", findarticles.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-09. 
  35. ^ a b Tylski, Alexandre. "A Study of Jaws' Incisive Overture To Close Off the Century", filmscoremonthly.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  36. ^ Jaws. filmtracks.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-25.
  37. ^ Dursin, Andy. "Thoughts on the Anniversary Video & CD Releases of JAWS", filmscoremonthly.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-25. 
  38. ^ Donga, Roy. "Jaws", musicfromthemovies.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-25. 
  39. ^ Benchley, Peter (1974). Jaws. Ballantine, 258. ISBN 0-449-21963-1. 
  40. ^ Benchley, Peter. (1974). 163–6.
  41. ^ Benchley, Peter. (1974). 277–8
  42. ^ "JAWS Special", MythBusters, 2005-07-17
  43. ^ JawsFest. mvy.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-29.
  44. ^ First look: 'The Shark is Still Working'. spielbergfilms.com (March 15, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-03.
  45. ^ The Shark is Still Working. Retrieved on 2007-04-03.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... X2 is a 2003 superhero film based on the fictional characters the X-Men. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: MythBusters The cast of the television series MythBusters performs experiments to verify or debunk urban legends, old wives tales, and the like. ... MythBusters is an American popular science television program on the Discovery Channel starring special effects experts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who use basic elements of the scientific method to test the validity of various rumors and urban legends in popular culture. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Jaws 2 is a 1978 horror–thriller film directed by Jeannot Szwarc. ... Jaws 3-D (a. ... Jaws The Revenge is a 1987s horror film. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... The decade of the 1970s in film involved many significant films. ... The Sugarland Express is a 1974 feature film starring Goldie Hawn and William Atherton. ... This article is about the film; for the definition of the UFO related phenomenon, see Close encounter. ... 1941 is Steven Spielbergs fourth theatrical film, written by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale. ... The decade of the 1980s in film involved many significant films. ... This article is about the film. ... For the Atari 2600 video game based on the movie, see E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (Atari 2600). ... Twilight Zone: The Movie was a 1983 movie produced by Steven Spielberg as a theatrical version of The Twilight Zone, a long-running early TV series. ... Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is an 1984 adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg. ... The Color Purple is the ninth film directed by Steven Spielberg, and was released 1985. ... Empire of the Sun is a 1987 film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Christian Bale, John Malkovich, and Miranda Richardson. ... Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is a 1989 adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Harrison Ford, Sean Connery, Denholm Elliott, Julian Glover, Alison Doody, River Phoenix, and John Rhys-Davies. ... Always is a 1989 romantic comedy-drama directed by Steven Spielberg, and starring Richard Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter, and John Goodman. ... Films made in the 1990s included: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Above the Rim (1994) Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls (1995) Ace Ventura: Pet... Hook is a 1991 family action/adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg, starring Robin Williams, Dustin Hoffman, Julia Roberts, Bob Hoskins and Maggie Smith. ... Jurassic Park is a 1993 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on the novel of the same name by Michael Crichton. ... This article is about the movie. ... The Lost World: Jurassic Park is a 1997 movie which is a sequel to the blockbuster Jurassic Park. ... This article is about the film dramatization. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 Academy-Award-winning film set in World War II, directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... The first decade of the 2000s in film involved many significant films. ... Minority Report is a 2002 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, loosely based on the Philip K. Dick 1956 short story The Minority Report. It is set in the year 1895, when criminals are interviewed based on foreknowledge. ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... This section contains a list of trivia items. ... War of the Worlds is a 2005 science fiction disaster film based on H. G. Wells original novel starring Tom Cruise. ... Munich is a 2005 drama film starring Eric Bana. ... Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull is a 2008 adventure film. ... The Untitled Tintin Project is an announced film project of three back-to-back features that are going to be based on The Adventures of Tintin, a series of comic books created by Belgian artist Georges Remi, better known by his pen name, Hergé. Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson have... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Untitled Abraham Lincoln biopic is a future biographical film about United States President Abraham Lincoln. ... Interstellar is a new film by Steven Spielberg which explores the academic study of wormholes. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... This article is under construction. ... . ... . ... . ...

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JAWSmovie.com Boards :: Steven Spielberg's JAWS - the shark movie from 1975. (5985 words)
That movie of course was Jaws 2 but although I wouldn't realise what a lackluster sequel it truly was until years later it would introduce me to the notion that things were not always "safe" beneath the surface of the water.
The Film is a masterpiece as far as I am concerned and I hope to visit it's location some day and see all the landmarks from the film.
Jaws is possibly my No. 1 favourite film out there, however this film has opened the dorrway, for my to many other creature/horror flicks.
Jaws (1975) (3586 words)
The tagline for the tensely-paced film, "Don't go in the water," kept a lot of shark-hysterical ocean-swimmers and 1975 summer beachgoers wary (similar to the effect that Hitchcock's Psycho (1960) had on shower-taking).
With a modest film budget of about $12 million, Jaws was the highest grossing film up to that time (unbroken until the release of George Lucas' Star Wars (1977)), and earned its 27 year-old director a place in Hollywood.
It is the most remembered, gripping scene in the film, and prominently displayed on the film's poster in distinctly Freudian terms (showing the ventral view of the shark's gigantic, pointed head, positioned vertically in a phallic position, with a dark mouth filled with voracious, jagged teeth).
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