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Jason (Greek: Ιάσων, Etruscan: Easun, Laz: Yason) was a late Greek mythological figure. His father was Aeson, the rightful king of Iolcus, and his mother was Amphinome. For other uses, see Jason (disambiguation). ... Jason may refer to: Jason, a common given name. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... The Twelve Olympians by Monsiau, circa late 18th century. ... Pan (Greek , genitive ) is the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, of mountain wilds, hunting and rustic music: paein means to pasture. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient deity. ... The ancient Greeks had a very small number of see gods. ... For other uses, see Chthon (disambiguation). ... Alcides redirects here. ... Hercules and the Hydra by Antonio Pollaiuolo The Twelve Labours (Greek: dodekathlos) of Heracles (Latin: Hercules) are a series of archaic episodes connected by a later continuous narrative, concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, was the first of the mythic heroes of Greek mythology whose exploits in defeating various archaic monsters provided the founding myths... For other uses, see Medusa (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... For other uses, see Oedipus (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Επτά επί Θήβας The Seven Against Thebes is a mythic narrative that finds its classic statement in the play by Aeschylus (467 BCE) concerning the battle between the Seven led by Polynices and the army of Thebes headed by Eteocles and his supporters, traditional Theban... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night (By some accounts, this was presented as a rape). ... This article is about the mythological monster. ... Triptolemus (threefold warrior; also Buzyges), in Greek mythology always connected with Demeter of the Eleusinian Mysteries, might be accounted the son of King Celeus of Eleusis in Attica, or, according to Apollodorus (Library I.v. ... The Eleusinian Mysteries (Greek: Ἐλευσίνια Μυστήρια) were initiation ceremonies held every year for the cult of Demeter and Persephone based at Eleusis in ancient Greece. ... A mystery religion is any religion with an arcanum, or body of secret wisdom. ... A bald, bearded, horse-tailed satyr balances a winecup on his erect penis, a trick worthy of note, on an Attic red-figured psykter, ca. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... Dragons play a role in Greek mythology. ... Greek religion encompasses the collection of beliefs and rituals practiced in Ancient Greece in form of cult practices, there for the practical counterpart of Greek mythology. ... Languages in Iron Age Italy, 6th century BC Etruscan was a language spoken and written in the ancient region of Etruria (current Tuscany plus western Umbria and northern Latium) and in parts of what are now Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia-Romagna (where the Etruscans were displaced by Gauls), in Italy. ... The Laz language (lazuri, ლაზური or lazuri nena, ლაზური ნენა in Laz; ლაზური, lazuri, or ჭანური, chanuri, in Georgian) is spoken by the Laz people on the Southeast shore of the Black Sea. ... In Greek mythology, Aeson (or Aison) was the son of Tyro and Cretheus, father of Jason and Promachus. ... Iolcos (also known as Iolkos or Iolcus, Greek: Ιώλκος) was an ancient city in Thessaly, central-eastern Greece (near the modern city of Volos). ... Amphinome is the name of three characters in Greek mythology 1. ...

Contents

The early years

Pelias (Aeson's half-brother) was power-hungry, and he wished to gain dominion over all of Thessaly. Pelias was the product of a union between their shared mother, Tyro ("high born Tyro") the daughter of Salmoneus, and the sea god Poseidon. In a bitter feud, he overthrew Aeson (the rightful king), killing all the descendants of Aeson that he could. He spared his half-brother for unknown reasons. Alcimede I (wife of Aeson) already had an infant son named Jason whom she saved from being killed by Pelias, by having women cluster around the newborn and cry as if he were still-born. Alcimede sent her son to the centaur Chiron for education, for fear that Pelias would kill him - she claimed that she had been having an affair with him all along. Pelias, still fearful that he would one day be overthrown, consulted an oracle which warned him to beware of a man with one sandal. King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... In Greek mythology, Tyro was the daughter of Salmoneus and mother of Pelias and Neleus. ... In Greek mythology, Salmoneus was the son of Aeolus and Enarete, the brother of Athamas and the father of Tyro. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In Greek mythology, Alcimede (mighty cunning) was one of the matrilineal Minyan daughters, the daughter of Clymene, Minyas daughter. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... Chiron and Achilles In Greek mythology, Chiron (hand) — sometimes transliterated Cheiron or rarely Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur among his brethren. ... This article is about prophetic oracles in various cultures. ...


Many years later, Pelias was holding games in honour of the sea god and his alleged father, Poseidon, when Jason arrived in Iolcus and lost one of his sandals in the river Anauros ("wintry Anauros"), while helping an old woman (the Goddess Hera in disguise), to cross. She blessed him for she knew, as goddesses do, what Pelias had up his sleeve. When Jason entered Iolcus (modern-day city of Volos), he was announced as a man wearing one sandal. Jason, knowing that he was the rightful king, told Pelias that and Pelias said, "To take my throne, which you shall, you must go on a quest to find the Golden Fleece." Jason happily accepted the quest. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The River Anavros (or Anauros or Anaurus) is a small stream near the ancient city of Iolkos (modern-day Volos), flowing from Mount Pelion into the Pagasetic Gulf. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... This article is about Volos, Greece. ...


The quest for the Golden Fleece

Jason bringing Pelias the Golden Fleece, Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. 340 BC–330 BC, Louvre
Jason bringing Pelias the Golden Fleece, Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. 340 BC–330 BC, Louvre

Jason assembled a great group of heroes, known as the Argonauts after their ship, the Argo. The group of heroes included the Boreads (sons of Boreas, the North Wind) who could fly, Heracles, Philoctetes, Peleus, Telamon, Orpheus, Castor and Pollux, Atalanta, and Euphemus. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1915x2650, 4032 KB) Description Description: Jason bringing Pelias the Golden Fleece. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1915x2650, 4032 KB) Description Description: Jason bringing Pelias the Golden Fleece. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... Krater discovered at the acropolis of Mycenae, depicting fully armed warriors. ... This article is about the museum. ... The Argo, by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argonauts (Ancient Greek: ) were a band of heroes who, in the years before the Trojan War, accompanied Jason to Colchis in his quest for the Golden Fleece. ... The Argo, painting by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcus to retrieve the Golden Fleece. ... The Boreads, in Greek mythology, were Calais and Zetes. ... There was one person and one god known as Boreas in Greek mythology. ... Alcides redirects here. ... In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ... Architectural telamon on the Wayne County, Ohio courthouse. ... For other uses, see Orpheus (disambiguation). ... Kastor redirects here. ... For other meanings, see Atalanta (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Euphemus was the son of Europa and Poseidon. ...


The Isle of Lemnos

The isle of Lemnos is situated off the Western coast of Asia Minor (modern day Turkey). The island was inhabited by a race of women who had killed their husbands. The women had neglected their worship of Aphrodite, and as a punishment the goddess made the women so foul in stench that their husbands couldn't bear to be near them. The men then took concubines from the Thracian mainland opposite, and the spurned women, angry at Aphrodite, killed every male inhabitant while they slept. The king, Thoas, was saved by Hypsipyle, his daughter, who put him out to sea sealed in a chest from which he was later rescued. The women of Lemnos lived for a while without men, with Hypsipyle as their queen. Lemnos (mod. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... A swampy marsh area ... The Thracians were an Indo-European people, inhabitants of Thrace and adjacent lands (present-day Bulgaria, Romania, northeastern Greece, European Turkey and northwestern asiatic Turkey, eastern Serbia and parts of Republic of Macedonia). ... Thoas, son of Andraimon, was one of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Hypsipyle was the Queen of Lemnos. ... In Greek mythology, Hypsipyle was the Queen of Lemnos. ...


The Argonauts stopped off on the isle, and the women mingled with the men creating a new "race" called Minyae. Jason fathered twins with the queen. Heracles pressured them to leave as he was disgusted by the antics of the Argonauts. He hadn't taken part, which is truly unusual considering the numerous affairs he had with other women. [Note: In "Hercules, My Shipmate" Robert Graves claims that Heracles fathered more children than anyone else of the crew.] See Minyan (disambiguation) for other meanings of the term. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ...


Kyzicos

After Lemnos the Argonauts landed among the Doliones, whose king Kyzicos treated them graciously. The Argonauts departed, losing their bearings and landing again at the same spot that night. In the darkness, the Doliones took them for enemies and they started fighting each other. The Argonauts killed many of the Doliones, among them the king Kyzicos. Kyzicos' wife killed herself. The Argonauts realized their horrible mistake when dawn came.


Mysia

When the Argonauts reached Mysia, they sent some men to find food and water. Among these men was Heracles' servant, Hylas. The nymphs of the stream where Hylas was collecting were attracted to his good looks, and pulled him into the stream. Heracles returned to his Labors, but Hylas was lost forever. Others say that Heracles went to Colchis with the Argonauts and he got the Golden Girdle of the Amazons and slew the Stymphalian Birds at that time.[citation needed] Mysia. ... Two Argonauts before a hunt. ... For other uses of nymph see Nymph (disambiguation). ... Alcides redirects here. ... In ancient geography, Colchis or Kolchis (Georgian/Laz: კოლხეთი, kolkheti; Greek: , Kolchís) was an ancient Georgian [1][2][3], state[4] [5]kingdom and region[6] in the Western Georgia (Caucasus region), which played an important role in the ethnic and cultural formation of the Georgian nation and its subgroups. ... In Greek mythology, the Stymphalian Birds were birds with claws of brass and sharp metallic feathers they could launch at their victims, and also they were Ares pets. ...


Phineus and the Harpies

Soon Jason reached the court of Phineus of Salmydessus in Thrace. Phineus had been given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but was later given the choice of being blind and having a normal life, or having sight and having a short life, for revealing to humans the deliberations of the gods. He chose to be blind. Helios the sun god sent the Harpies, creatures with the body of a bird and the head of a woman, to prevent Phineus from eating any more than what was necessary to live, because he was enraged that Phineus had chosen to live in a continual state of darkness than live in the sun he provided. Jason took pity on the emaciated king and killed the Harpies when they returned (In other versions Calais and Zetes chase the Harpies away). In return for this favor, Phineus revealed to Jason the location of Colchis and how to cross the Symplegades, or The Clashing Rocks, and then they parted. The Boast of Cassiopeia is a story from Greek mythology, associated with Perseus. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Helios (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Harpies (robbers) were first beautiful winged women: Hesiod (Theogony) calls them as two lovely-haired creatures. ... The Boreads, in Greek mythology, were Calais and Zetes. ... In Greek mythology, the Symplegades were a pair of rocks at the Hellespont that clashed together randomly. ...


The Symplegades

The only way to reach Colchis was to sail through the Symplegades (Clashing Rocks), huge rock cliffs that came together and crushed anything that traveled between them. Phineus told Jason to release a dove when they approached these islands, and if the dove made it through, to row with all their might. If the dove was crushed, he was doomed to fail. Jason released the dove as advised, which made it through, losing only a few tail feathers. Seeing this, they rowed strongly and made it through with minor damage at the extreme stern of the ship. In Greek mythology, the Symplegades were a pair of rocks at the Hellespont that clashed together randomly. ...


The Arrival in Colchis

Jason, a highly personal, dreamlike reinterpretation by the Symbolist Gustave Moreau, 1865
Jason, a highly personal, dreamlike reinterpretation by the Symbolist Gustave Moreau, 1865

Jason arrived in Colchis (modern Black Sea coast of Georgia) to claim the fleece as his own. King Aeetes of Colchis promised to give it to him only if he could perform three certain tasks. Presented with the tasks, Jason became discouraged and fell into depression. However, Hera had persuaded Aphrodite to convince her son Eros to make Aeetes's daughter, Medea, fall in love with Jason. As a result, Medea aided Jason in his tasks. First, Jason had to plow a field with fire-breathing oxen, the Khalkotauroi, that he had to yoke himself. Medea provided an ointment that protected him from the oxen's flames. Then, Jason sowed the teeth of a dragon into a field. The teeth sprouted into an army of warriors. Medea had previously warned Jason of this and told him how to defeat this foe. Before they attacked him, he threw a rock into the crowd. Unable to discover where the rock had come from, the soldiers attacked and defeated one another. His last task was to overcome the Sleepless Dragon which guarded the Golden Fleece. Jason sprayed the dragon with a potion, given by Medea, diluted from herbs. The dragon fell asleep, and Jason was able to seize the Golden Fleece. He then sailed away with Medea. Medea had to distract her father, who chased them, as they fled by killing her brother Apsyrtus and throwing pieces of his body into the sea, which Aeetes had to stop for and gather. Jason and Medea escaped. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (426x766, 78 KB) Description Jason et Médée, par Gustave Moreau (1865) Huile sur toile 204 x 121. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (426x766, 78 KB) Description Jason et Médée, par Gustave Moreau (1865) Huile sur toile 204 x 121. ... La mort du fossoyeur (The death of the gravedigger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs. ... Self portrait of Gustav Moreau, 1850 Gustave Moreau (April 6, 1826 – April 18, 1898) was a French Symbolist painter. ... In ancient geography, Colchis or Kolchis (Georgian/Laz: კოლხეთი, kolkheti; Greek: , Kolchís) was an ancient Georgian [1][2][3], state[4] [5]kingdom and region[6] in the Western Georgia (Caucasus region), which played an important role in the ethnic and cultural formation of the Georgian nation and its subgroups. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Aeetes (in Greek Αἰήτης) - King of Colchis (territory of modern West Georgia) in Greek mythology, Aeetes figured prominently in the story of Jason and the Argonauts. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek god Eros. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... The Khalkotauroi are legendary creatures that appear in the Greek myth of Jason and the Golden Fleece. ... In Greek myth, dragons teeth feature prominently in the legends of the Phoenician prince Cadmus and Jasons quest for the Golden Fleece. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... Absyrtus (also Apsyrtus) was the son of Aeëtes and a brother of Medea. ...


The return journey

On the way back to Iolcus, Medea prophesised to Euphemus, the Argo's helmsman, that one day he would rule Libya. This came true through Battus, a descendant of Euphemus. Zeus, as punishment for the slaughter of Medea's own brother, sent a series of storms at the Argo and blew it off course. The Argo then spoke and said that they should seek purification with Circe, a nymph living on the island called Aeaea. After being cleansed, they continued their journey home. In Greek mythology, Euphemus was the son of Europa and Poseidon. ... Battus can refer to: In Greek mythology, Battus is the name of two different people: Son of Polymnestus, founded Cyrene, thus fulfilling a prophecy given to his ancestor, Euphemus. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Circe, a painting by John William Waterhouse. ... In Greek mythology, a nymph is any member of a large class of female nature entities, either bound to a particular location or landform or joining the retinue of a god or goddess. ...


Sirens

Chiron had told Jason that without the aid of Orpheus, the Argonauts would never be able to pass the Sirens — the same Sirens encountered by Odysseus in Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. The Sirens lived on three small, rocky islands called Sirenum scopuli and sang beautiful songs that enticed sailors to come to them, which resulted in the crashing of their ship into the islands. When Orpheus heard their voices, he drew his lyre and played music that was more beautiful and louder, drowning out the Sirens' bewitching songs. For other uses, see Orpheus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the bird-women of Greek myth. ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ... This article is about Homers epic poem. ... In Greek mythology, the Sirenum scopuli were three small rocky islands where the Sirens lived and lured sailors to their deaths. ... “Lyres” redirects here. ...


Talos

The Argo then came to the island of Crete, guarded by the bronze man, Talos. As the ship approached, Talos hurled huge stones at the ship, keeping it at bay. Talos had one blood vessel which went from his neck to his ankle, bound shut by only one bronze nail (as in metal casting by the lost wax method). Medea cast a spell on Talos to calm him; she removed the bronze nail and Talos bled to death. The Argo was then able to sail on. For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Winged Talos armed with a stone. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ...


Jason returns

Medea, using her sorcery, claimed to Pelias' daughters that she could make their father younger by chopping him up into pieces and boiling the pieces in a cauldron of water and magical herbs. She demonstrated this remarkable feat with a sheep, which leapt out of the cauldron as a lamb. The girls, rather naively, sliced and diced their father and put him in the cauldron. Medea did not add the magical herbs, and Pelias was dead.


[It should be noted that Thomas Bulfinch has an antecedent to the interaction of Medea and the daughters of Pelias. Jason, celebrating his return with the Golden Fleece, noted that his father was too aged and infirm to participate in the celebrations. He had seen and been served by Medea's magical powers. He asked Medea to take some years from his life and add them to the life of his father. She did so, but at no such cost to Jason's life. {See Thomas Bulfinch, page 134; compare to Shakespeare's witches in Macbeth.} Pelias' daughters saw this and wanted the same service for their father.] Thomas Bulfinch (July 15, 1796 - May 27, 1867) was an American writer, born in Newton, Massachusetts to a highly-educated but not rich Bostonian merchant family. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ...


Pelias' son, Acastus, drove Jason and Medea into exile for the murder, and the couple settled in Corinth. There Jason married Creusa (sometimes referred to as Glauce), a daughter of the King of Corinth, to strengthen his political ties. Medea, angry at Jason for breaking his vow that he would be hers forever, got her revenge by presenting Creusa a cursed dress, as a wedding gift, that stuck to her body and burned her to death as soon as she put it on. Creusa's father, Creon, burnt to death with his daughter as he tried to save her. Medea killed the children that she bore to Jason, fearing that they would be murdered, or enslaved as a result of their mother's actions, and fled to Athens. In Greek Mythology, Acastus was one of the men who sailed with Jason and the Argonauts. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... In Greek mythology, Glauce refers to two different people: Daughter of Creon, Glauce married Jason. ... There are two kings in Greek mythology named Creon, or Kreeon (ruler), and one historical person. ...


Later Jason and Peleus, father of the hero Achilles, would attack and defeat Acastus, reclaiming the throne of Iolcus for himself once more. Jason's son, Thessalus, then became king. Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Thessalus was the son of Jason and Medea and the twin of Alcimenes. ...


Because he broke his vow to love Medea forever, Jason lost his favor with Hera and died lonely and unhappy. He was asleep under the stern of the rotting Argo when it fell on him, killing him instantly. The manner of his death was due to the deities cursing him for breaking his promise to Medea. For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... The Argo, painting by Lorenzo Costa In Greek mythology, the Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcus to retrieve the Golden Fleece. ...


Treachery of Jason

However good a hero Jason seemed to be, it could not be hidden that all his heroic deeds were brought about only by the love of Medea toward him. In the end Jason showed his true self when they reached Corinth (after Pelias's death) and he engaged himself to marry the daughter of the king. When Medea confronted Jason about the engagement and cited all the help she had given him, he stated that it was not she that he should thank, but Aphrodite who made Medea fall in love with him. This proved too much for Medea and she immediately sought revenge by killing the soon-to-be bride of Jason together with the two sons she bore from him (because she feared that there would be no future for them). When Jason came to know of this, Medea was already gone; carried by a chariot drawn by dragons and he cursed her, never himself, for what came to be. Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ...


Argonauts in Classical Literature

Though some of the episodes of Jason's story draw on ancient material, the definitive telling, on which this account relies, is that of Apollonius of Rhodes in his epic poem Argonautica, written in Alexandria in the late 3rd century BC. Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ... For other meanings of epic, see Epic. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... The 3rd century BC started the first day of 300 BC and ended the last day of 201 BC. It is considered part of the Classical era, epoch, or historical period. ...


Another Argonautica was written by Gaius Valerius Flaccus in late 1st century AD, eight books in length. The poem ends abruptly with the request of Medea to accompany Jason on his homeward voyage. It is unclear if part of the epic poem has been lost, or if it had ever been finished. Gaius Valerius Flaccus (late 1st century AD) was a Roman poet, who flourished under the emperors Vespasian and Titus. ... The 1st century was that century that lasted from 1 to 100 according the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ...


The story of Medea's revenge on Jason is told with devastating effect by Euripides in his tragedy Medea. This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... A statue of Euripides. ... Medea is a tragedy written by Euripides, based on the myth of Jason and Medea and first produced in 431 BC. Along with the plays Philoctetes, Dictys and Theristai, which were all entered as a group, it won the third prize (out of three) at the Dionysia festival. ...


The mythical geography of the voyage of the Argonauts has been speculatively explicated by the historian of science and the cartography of Antiquity, Livio Catullo Stecchini, in a suggestive essay, The Voyage of the Argo, that draws upon fragments of the mythic sources Apollonius employed in constructing his poem. Livio Catullo Stecchini was a historian of science, a teaching professor (Harvard PhD), a scholar of ancient weights and measures, (the science of metrology) and of the history of cartography in antiquity. ...


In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Jason in the eighth circle of Hell among the seducers. For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino...


As city founder

According to legend and certain historical sources (e.g. Herodotus), Jason is the legendary founder of the city of Aemona, today Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. The dragon in the city's coat of arms allegedly derives from the same legend. Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: HÄ“ródotos Halikarnāsseús) was a Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (c. ... For the village of the same name in Bulgaria, see Emona (Burgas). ... Location in Slovenia Coordinates: , Country Founded AD 15 (as Colonia Iulia Aemona) Government  - Mayor and governor Zoran Janković (Lista Zorana Jankovića) Area  - Total 275. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


Jason on film

Jason and the Argonauts (1963) is a fictional fantasy adventure movie based upon the characters Jason and the Argonauts of Greek mythology, regarded by many critics as one of the best fantasy films ever made. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Jason and the Argonauts is a series of TV movies, made by Hallmark Entertainment, based on the Greek myth of Jason and the Argonauts. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... For other uses, see Hercules (disambiguation). ... Stephen L. Reeves (January 21, 1926 – May 5, 2000), was a bodybuilder, actor, and author. ... Not to be confused with MGMs 1981 film, Clash of the Titans. ... Jeffrey Thomas is the author of the best of collections AAAIIIEEE!!! (Writers Club Press) and Punktown (Ministry of Whimsey Press), from which a story was reprinted in St. ... Chris Conrad is an American actor. ... Hercules: The Legendary Journeys was a television series produced from 1995 to 1999, very loosely based on the tales of the classical culture hero Hercules. ... Lars von Trier (born Lars Trier, April 30, 1956) is a Danish film director. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Udo Kier (born October 14, 1944) is a German actor. ...

Jason in video games

This article is about the mythical three-headed dog. ... PS2 redirects here. ... God of War 2: Divine Retribution is a upcoming video game for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console, and is the sequel to the original God of War. ... Age of Mythology (commonly abbreviated as AoM), is a popular mythology-based, real-time strategy computer game developed by Ensemble Studios and published by Microsoft Game Studios. ... Rise of the Argonauts is a role-playing game developed by Liquid Entertainment and published by Codemasters. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Jason returns with the golden Fleece on an Apulian red-figure calyx krater, ca. ... Hercs Adventure is the title of a video game released for the Sony PlayStation and the Sega Saturn by Lucas Arts Entertainment in 1997 the overhead, action adventure format was similar to Zombies Ate My Neighbors. ...

Jason on stage

  • Mary Zimmerman wrote and directed Argonautika, which premiered in 2006 with the Chicago Lookingglass Theatre Company. It tells the story of Jason and the Argonauts from Pelias' initial charge through Jason's betrayal of Medea.
  • Euripides wrote the play Medea, which is focused around the period which leads to Medea killing Jason's bride and their two children. This play has nine characters as well as a chorus role.

Mary Zimmerman is a member of the Lookingglass Theatre Company and is an Artistic Associate of the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Illinois. ... A statue of Euripides. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ...

See also

Cape Yasun, Ordu. ...

External links

  • Museum of Argonautic Expedition, Volos, Greece
  • Timeless Myths - Argonauts, a summary of Jason and his Quest for the Golden Fleece
  • "The Jason Voyage," From the Cradle of Wine
  • Argonuttica is a stage comedy version of Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece written in 2006 by Scott Lynch-Giddings. Site includes photos from the premiere production.
  • Argonautica, available at Project Gutenberg.
  • The Medea of the modern times

Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

References

  • Publius Ovidius Naso. Metamorphoses.
  • Powell, B. The Voyage of the Argo. In Classical Myth. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Prentice Hall. 2001. pp. 477-489.
  • Alain Moreau, Le Mythe de Jason et Médée. Le Va-nu-pied et la Sorcière. Paris : Les Belles Lettres, collection « Vérité des mythes », 2006 (ISBN 10 2-251-32440-2).
  • Bulfinch's Mythology, Medea and Aeson.

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This month the Jason mission satellite completes its primary three-year mission to measure the surface height of the worlds' oceans.
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Jason's father Aeson was himself the son of Cretheus 1, the founder of Iolcus, a city in Thessaly on the coast of the Gulf of Pagasae.
This is how Jason's claims upon the throne of Iolcus were postponed, and instead he started sending messengers to every corner of Hellas in order to gather the men that were to take part in the expedition, and that later were called ARGONAUTS after the name of their ship.
This is why Jason, eager to build up a brilliant future for himself and his children, forgot all his promises and decided to get rid of her lawful wife and benefactress, by marrying the younger princess Glauce 4, daughter of King Creon 3 of Corinth.
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