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Encyclopedia > Jascha Heifetz
Jascha Heifetz

Background information
Born February 2, 1901(1901-02-02)
Flag of Lithuania Vilna, Lithuania, Russian Empire
Died December 10, 1987 (aged 86)
Los Angeles, California, USA
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Pedagogue, violinist
Instrument(s) Violin
Years active fl. ca. 1910-1987
Website www.JaschaHeifetz.com
Notable instrument(s)
Violin
Dolphin 1714 Stradivarius
Heifetz-Piel 1731 Stradivarius
Antonio Stradivari 1734
Carlo Tononi 1736
ex-David 1742 Guarneri

Jascha Heifetz (IPA: [ˈhaɪfɪts]) was a Jewish Lithuanian-born American violin virtuoso (February 4 [O.S. January 20] 1901December 10, 1987). This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Lithuania. ... Vilnius Old Town Vilnius (sometimes Vilna; Polish Wilno, Belarusian Вільня, Russian Вильнюс, see also Cities alternative names) is the capital city of Lithuania. ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... Floruit (often abbreviated fl. ... The ‘Dolphin’ Strad, or Stradivarius, of 1714 is a famous violin made by Italian luthier Antonio Stradivari of Cremona. ... Antonio Stradivari, by Edgar Bundy, 1893: a romanticized image of a craftsman-hero One of the violins in the Stradivarius collection of the Palacio Real, Madrid, Spain A Stradivarius is a stringed instrument built by members of the Stradivari family, especially by Antonio Stradivari. ... Antonio Stradivari examining an instrument, in a Romantic 19th-century print. ... Carlo Annibale Tononi (1675-1730) was a luthier working in Bologna Italy until his father, Johannes Tononi, died in 1713. ... Guarneri is the family name of a group of highly acclaimed violin makers (luthiers) from Cremona in Italy in the 17th and 18th centuries, whose standing is considered comparable to those of the Amati and Stradivari families. ... Lithuanian Jews (known in Yiddish and Haredi English as Litvish (adjective) or Litvaks (noun)) are Ashkenazi Jews with roots in Lita, a region including not only present-day Lithuania but also Latvia, much of Belarus and the northeastern SuwaÅ‚ki region of Poland. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... For other uses, see Virtuoso (disambiguation). ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ...

Contents

Early life

Heifetz was born in Vilnius, Lithuania, then part of the Russian Empire. There is controversy over his birth year, which is sometimes placed a year or two earlier to 1899 or 1900. It is possible that his mother made him two years younger to make him seem like more of a prodigy. His father, Ruvin Heifetz, was a local violin teacher and served as the concertmaster of the Vilna Theatre Orchestra for one season before the theatre closed down. Jascha took up the violin when he was three years old and his father was his first teacher. At five he started lessons with Ilya D. Malkin, a former pupil of Leopold Auer. He was a child prodigy, making his public debut at seven, in Kovno (now Kaunas, Lithuania) playing the Violin Concerto in E minor by Felix Mendelssohn. In 1910 he entered the St Petersburg conservatory to study under Leopold Auer. Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... Leopold Auer. ... Location Ethnographic region AukÅ¡taitija County Kaunas County Municipality Geographic coordinate system Number of elderates 11 General Information Capital of Kaunas County Kaunas city municipality Kaunas district municipality Population 361,274 in 2005 (2nd) First mentioned 1361 Granted city rights 1408 Kaunas ( (help· info), approximate English transcription [ˈkəʊ.nÉ™s... Felix Mendelssohns Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. ... Portrait of Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe (1778-1862), 1839 Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and generally known as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) is a German composer, pianist and conductor of the early Romantic period. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Leopold Auer. ...


He played in Germany and Scandinavia, and met Fritz Kreisler for the first time in a Berlin private house together with other noted violinists in attendance. Kreisler, after accompanying the 12-year-old Heifetz at the piano in a performance of the Mendelssohn Concerto, said to all present, "We may as well break our fiddles across our knees." Heifetz visited much of Europe while still in his teens. In April 1911, Heifetz performed in an outdoor concert in St Petersburg before 25,000 spectators; there was such a sensational reaction that police officers needed to protect the young violinist after the concert. In 1914, Heifetz performed with the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Arthur Nikisch. The conductor was very impressed, saying he had never heard such an excellent violinist.[1] For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Fritz Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austria-born American violinist and composer; one of the most famous violinists of his day. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... The Berliner Philharmoniker (Berlin Philharmonic), is one of the worlds leading orchestras. ... Arthur Nikisch (or Nikitsch) (October 12, 1855 – January 23, 1922) was a Hungarian conductor who performed mainly in Germany. ...


Career

On October 27, 1917, Heifetz played for the first time in the United States at Carnegie Hall and became an immediate sensation. Fellow violinist Mischa Elman in the audience asked "Do you think it's hot in here?", whereupon Leopold Godowsky, in the next seat, imperturbably replied, "Not for pianists."[2] is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Mischa Elman Mischa Elman (January 20, 1891 – April 5, 1967) was a Ukrainian-born violinist, famed for his passionate style and the beauty of his tone. ... Leopold Godowsky (Leopold Godowski) (February 13, 1870–November 21, 1938) was a famed pianist, composer, and teacher. ...


Heifetz was elected as an honorary member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, the national fraternity for men in music, by the fraternity's Alpha chapter at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. As he was age 16 at the time, he was perhaps the youngest person ever elected to membership in the organization. Heifetz remained in the country and became an American citizen in 1925. When he told admirer Groucho Marx he had been earning his living as a musician since the age of seven, Groucho answered, "And I suppose before that you were just a bum." Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Groucho redirects here. ...


Technique and timbre

Considered one of the greatest instrumentalists of all time on any instrument. Heifetz had an immaculate technique and a tonal beauty that many violinists and other musicians still regard as unequalled. Some say that he used Gut strings to quell the brilliance of his technique. Yet, from time to time his near-perfect technique and conservative stage demeanor caused some to accuse him of being overly mechanical, even cold. Virgil Thomson called Heifetz' style of playing "silk underwear music," a term he did not intend as a compliment. Even so, most critics agree he infused his playing with feeling and reverence for the composers' intentions. His style of playing was highly influential in defining the way modern violinists approach the instrument. His use of rapid vibrato, emotionally charged portamento, fast tempos, and superb bow control coalesced to create a highly distinctive sound that make Heifetz's playing instantly recognizable to aficionados. The violinist Itzhak Perlman, who himself is noted for his rich warm tone and expressive use of portamento, describes Heifetz's tone as like "molten lava" because of its emotional intensity. In creating his sound, Heifetz was very particular about his choice of strings. Through much of his career he used a silver wound gut g-string, plain gut d- and a-strings, and a Goldbrokat steel e-string. Heifetz believed that playing on gut strings was important in rendering an individual sound. Virgil Thomson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Virgil Thomson (November 25, 1896 - September 30, 1989) was an American composer from Missouri, whose rural background gave a sense of place in his compositions. ... Vibrato is a musical effect where the pitch or frequency of a note or sound is quickly and repeatedly raised and lowered over a small distance for the duration of that note or sound. ... Portamento is a musical term currently used to mean pitch bending or sliding, and in 16th century polyphonic writing refers to a type of musical ornamentation. ... Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945) is an Israeli-American violinist, conductor, and pedagogue. ...


Early recordings

Jascha Heifetz around 1920
Jascha Heifetz around 1920

Heifetz made his first recordings in Russia during 1910-11, while still a student of Auer. The existence of these recordings was not widely known until after Heifetz's death, when several sides (most notably Schubert's L'Abeille) were reissued on an LP included as a supplement to The Strad magazine. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2442 × 4070 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jascha Heifetz. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 360 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2442 × 4070 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Jascha Heifetz. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... An LP Long playing (LP), either 10 or 12-inch diameter, 33 rpm (actually 33. ... The Strad is a monthly classical music magazine about string instruments, including cellists, violinists, and violists. ...


Shortly after his Carnegie Hall debut on November 7, 1917, Heifetz made his first recordings for the Victor Talking Machine Company; he would remain with Victor and its successor, RCA Victor, for most of his career. For several years, in the 1930s, Heifetz recorded primarily for HMV in the UK because RCA cut back on classical recordings during the Great Depression; these discs were issued in the US by Victor. Heifetz often enjoyed playing chamber music. Various critics have blamed his limited success in chamber ensembles to the fact that his artistic personality tended to overwhelm his colleagues. Some notable collaborations include his 1940 recordings of piano trios by Beethoven, Franz Schubert, and Brahms with cellist Emanuel Feuermann and pianist Arthur Rubinstein as well as a later collaboration with Rubinstein and cellist Gregor Piatigorsky, with whom he recorded trios by Maurice Ravel, Tchaikovsky, and Felix Mendelssohn. Both formations were sometimes referred to as the Million Dollar Trio. is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... This article is about the trademark. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Chamber music is a form of classical music, written for a small group of instruments which traditionally could be accommodated in a palace chamber. ... A piano trio is a group of piano and two other instruments, almost always a violin and a cello, or a piece of music written for such a group. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Schubert redirects here. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... Emanuel Feuermann (November 22, 1902, Kolomea, Austria Galicia - May 25, 1942, New York City) was a celebrated Polish-Austrian-Jewish cellist. ... For the 19th century Russian pianist and composer, see Anton Rubinstein Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Arthur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 – December 20, 1982) was a Polish pianist who is widely considered as one of the greatest piano virtuosos of the 20th Century. ... Piatigorsky in 1945 Gregor Piatigorsky (April 17, 1903 – August 6, 1976) was a Ukrainian cellist well known in his time. ... Maurice Ravel. ... “Tchaikovsky” redirects here. ... Portrait of Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe (1778-1862), 1839 Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, born and generally known as Felix Mendelssohn (February 3, 1809 – November 4, 1847) is a German composer, pianist and conductor of the early Romantic period. ...


He recorded the Beethoven Violin Concerto in 1940 with the NBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Arturo Toscanini, and again in stereo in 1955 with the Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Charles Münch. A live performance of Heifetz playing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, again with Toscanini and the NBC Symphony, has also been released. Ludwig van Beethovens Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major was written in 1806. ... Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony Orchestra in Carnegie Hall]] The NBC Symphony Orchestra was an orchestra established by David Sarnoff of the National Broadcasting Company as a vehicle for conductor Arturo Toscanini. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds premiere orchestras. ... Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... Felix Mendelssohns Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. ...


He performed and recorded Erich Wolfgang Korngold's violin concerto, at a time when many classical musicians avoided Korngold's music because they did not consider him a "serious" composer after he wrote many film scores for Warner Brothers. Korngold conducting the Warner Brothers studio orchestra (Rhino Records) Erich Wolfgang Korngold (May 29, 1897 – November 29, 1957) was a 20th century romantic composer. ... Warner Bros. ...


Wartime

Heifetz commissioned a number of pieces, perhaps most notably the Violin Concerto by Sir William Walton. He also arranged a number of pieces, such as Hora Staccato by Grigoraş Dinicu, a Romanian gypsy whom Heifetz is rumoured to have called the greatest violinist he had ever heard. Heifetz also played and composed for the piano; he performed mess hall jazz for soldiers at Allied camps across Europe during the Second World War, and under the alias Jim Hoyle he wrote a hit piano song, "When you make love to me, don't make believe". The Violin Concerto of William Walton was written in 1938–39 and reorchestrated in 1943. ... Sir William Turner Walton, OM (March 29, 1902–March 8, 1983) was a British composer whose style was influenced by the works of Stravinsky, Sibelius and jazz. ... Hora staccato (Hasapiko staccato) (1906) is a virtuoso violin showpiece by GrigoraÅŸ Dinicu. ... GrigoraÅŸ Dinicu (April 3, 1889 – March 28, 1949) was a Romanian composer and violinist of Roma (gypsy) ethnicity. ...


Decca recordings

From 1944 to 1946, largely a result of the American Federation of Musicians recording ban (which actually began in 1942), Heifetz went to American Decca Records to make recordings because Decca settled with the union in 1943, well before RCA Victor resolved their dispute with the musicians. He recorded primarily short pieces, including his own arrangements of music by George Gershwin and Stephen Foster; these were pieces he often played as encores in his recitals. He was accompanied on the piano by Emanuel Bay or Milton Kaye. Among the more uncommon discs featured one of Decca's most popular artists, Bing Crosby, in the "Lullaby" from Benjamin Godard's opera Jocelyn and Where My Caravan Has Rested (arranged by Heifetz and Crosby) by Hermann Lohr (1872-1943); Decca's studio orchestra was conducted by Victor Young in the July 27, 1946, session. Recorded mostly in small studios, the digitally remastered performances have remarkably clear, high fidelity sound. However, Heifetz soon returned to RCA Victor, where he continued to make recordings until the early 1970s.[3] The American Federation of Musicians (AFM) is a labor union of professional musicians in the United States and Canada. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... For other persons named Stephen Foster, see Stephen Foster (disambiguation). ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Benjamin Godard (Paris August 18, 1849 – January 10, 1895 at Cannes) was a French composer probably best known as a writer of salon music. ... Victor Young (August 8, 1900 - November 10, 1956) was an Jewish-American composer, violinist and conducter. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ...


Later recordings

Returning to RCA in 1946, Heifetz continued to make a number of 78-rpm discs for the company, including solo, chamber, and orchestral recordings.


RCA began releasing long-playing recordings in 1950, including concertos taken from 78-rpm masters. The company began to make new high fidelity recordings with Heifetz, primarily with the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Charles Munch and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under Fritz Reiner. Beginning in early 1954, most classical sessions were also taped on triple track stereophonic tape recorders. The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds premiere orchestras. ... Charles Münch (September 26, 1891 – November 6, 1968) was a French conductor and violinist. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...


A 2000 two-CD RCA compilation titled Jascha Heifetz - The Supreme gives a sampling of Heifetz's major recordings, including the 1955 recording of Johannes Brahms' violin concerto with Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra; the 1957 recording of Peter Tchaikovsky's violin concerto (with the same forces); the 1959 recording of Jean Sibelius' violin concerto with Walter Hendl and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra; the 1961 recording of Max Bruch's Scottish Fantasy with Sir Malcolm Sargent and the New Symphony Orchestra of London; the 1963 recording of Alexander Glazunov's A minor concerto with Walter Hendl and the RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra (drawn from New York musicians); the 1965 recording of George Gershwin's Three Preludes (transcribed by Heifetz) with pianist Brooks Smith; and the 1970 recording of Johann Sebastian Bach's unaccompanied Chaconne from the second Partita in D minor. Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of the Romantic period. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... Johan Julius Christian Jean / Janne Sibelius ( ; December 8, 1865 – September 20, 1957) was a Finnish composer of classical music and one of the most notable composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... Walter Hendl (born 12 January 1917) is an American conductor. ... Max Christian Friedrich Bruch (Cologne, January 6, 1838 – Friedenau, October 20, 1920) was a German Romantic composer and conductor who wrote over 200 works, including a violin concerto which is a staple of the violin repertoire. ... The Scottish Fantasy in E-flat major, op. ... Sir (Harold) Malcolm (Watts) Sargent (April 29, 1895 – October 3, 1967) was a British conductor, organist and composer. ... The New Symphony Orchestra is one of the best known orchestra in Bulgaria. ... Portrait by Ilya Repin, 1887. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... “Bach” redirects here. ...


Musical reformation

After moving to the United States, Heifetz's style saw drastic reformation[citation needed]. Whereas the recordings of 1930-1945 depicted a typical neo-Romantic violinist of the Russian school[citation needed], post-war recordings were more tempered, objective and aristocratic[citation needed]. He reduced the use of his portamento, and his vibrato was rationed into a searing tool which lent dramatic effect to his fiery sound[citation needed].


Third Israel tour

On his third tour to Israel in 1953, Heifetz included in his recitals the Violin Sonata by Richard Strauss. At the time, Strauss was considered by many to be a Nazi composer, and his works were unofficially banned in Israel along with those of Richard Wagner. Despite the fact that the Holocaust had occurred less than ten years earlier and a last-minute plea from the Israeli Minister of Education, the defiant Heifetz argued, "The music is above these factors....I will not change my program. I have the right to decide on my repertoire." Throughout his tour the performance of the Strauss Sonata was followed by dead silence. This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as they were later called). ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...


Heifetz was attacked after his recital in Jerusalem outside his hotel by a man who struck blows to his right arm with an iron bar. As the attacker started to flee, Heifetz alerted his companions, who were armed, "Shoot that man, he tried to kill me." The assailant escaped and was never found. The incident made headlines in the press and Heifetz defiantly announced that he would not stop playing the Strauss. Threats continued to come, however, and he omitted the Strauss from his next recital without explanation. His last concert was cancelled after his right arm began to hurt. He left Israel and did not return until 1970. For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


Russian defector

The consensus within the Russian musical caste was that Heifetz and his teacher Leopold Auer were traitors to their home country[citation needed]. This was primarily due to the fact that they had emigrated from Russia to the US, Heifetz at a very young age. The Russians were inclined to brand any American collaboration as infidelity due to the political circumstances following World War II and the ensuing Cold War[citation needed]. Thus David Oistrakh was seen as a compatriot, whereas Heifetz was considered a traitor[citation needed]. Heifetz also greatly criticized the Russian regime[citation needed]; he condemned the Tchaikovsky Competition for being biased against Western competitors[citation needed]. During the Carl Flesch Competition in London, Oistrakh tried to persuade Erick Friedman, Heifetz's star student, to enter the Tchaikovsky Competition, of which he was the principal juror[citation needed]. This was simply a friendly gesture on Oistrakh's part, so typical of a renowned artist admiring young talent[citation needed]. However, this gesture was misconstrued by both Heifetz and Friedman as Oistrakh having been officially 'instructed' to persuade Friedman[citation needed]. Hearing of this, Heifetz strongly advised against it, warning Friedman, "You will see what will happen there."[citation needed] Although Oistrakh had never promised Friedman the gold medal, both Heifetz and Friedman for some reason assumed the latter was entitled to nothing less[citation needed]. Consequently, they were outraged by the results, as Friedman placed sixth[citation needed]. Joseph Szigeti later informed Heifetz himself that he had given his student top scores, probably in an attempt to bolster a fellow American's standing[citation needed] (as the level of the contestants turned out to be much higher than Friedman had anticipated, this most likely played an important role in his getting into the finals)[citation needed]. Leopold Auer. ... David Fyodorovich Oistrakh (Russian: , David Fiodorovič Ojstrah; September 30 [O.S. September 17] 1908 – October 24, 1974) was a Russian violinist who made many recordings and was the dedicatee of numerous violin works. ... The International Tchaikovsky Competition is one of the most prestigious classical music competitions in the world. ... Joseph Szigeti (September 5, 1892 – February 19, 1973) was a Hungarian violinist. ...


Later life

After an only partially successful operation on his right shoulder in 1972 Heifetz ceased giving concerts and making records. Although his prowess as a performer remained intact and he continued to play privately until the end, his bow arm was affected and he could never again hold the bow as high as before.

Rudolf Koelman (left) with Jascha Heifetz
Rudolf Koelman (left) with Jascha Heifetz

Heifetz taught the violin extensively, first at UCLA, then at the University of Southern California, with his friend Gregor Piatigorsky. For a few years in the eighties he also held classes in his private studio at home in Beverly Hills. His teaching studio can be seen today in the main building of the Colburn school, where it is now used for masterclasses and serves as an inspiration to the students there. During his teaching career Heifetz taught, among others, Erick Friedman, Carol Sindell, Adam Han-Gorsky, Robert Witte, Yuval Yaron, Elizabeth Matesky, Claire Hodgkins, Yukiko Kamei, Rudolf Koelman, Varujan Kojan, Sherry Kloss, Eugene Fodor, and Ayke Agus. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Rudolf Koelman and Jascha Heifetz (Los Angeles 1979) Rudolf Koelman Dutch violinist born in Amsterdam 1959, Professor at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater in Zürich. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Piatigorsky in 1945 Gregor Piatigorsky (April 17, 1903 – August 6, 1976) was a Ukrainian cellist well known in his time. ... The R.D. Colburn School of Performing Arts and Conservatory of Music is a music, dance, and drama school located in downtown Los Angeles adjacent to the Museum of Contemporary Art and across the street from the Walt Disney Concert Hall. ... Rudolf Koelman and Jascha Heifetz (Los Angeles 1979) Rudolf Koelman Dutch violinist born in Amsterdam 1959, Professor at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater in Zürich. ...


Heifetz died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a hospital located in Los Angeles, California. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Heifetz owned the 1714 Dolphin Stradivarius, the 1736 Carlo Tononi, and the 1742 ex David Guarneri, del Gesù, the latter of which he preferred and kept until his death. The Dolphin Strad is currently owned by the Nippon Music Foundation. The Heifetz Tononi violin used at his 1917 Carnegie Hall debut was left in his will to Sherry Kloss, Master-Teaching Assistant to Heifetz, with "one of my four good bows" (Violinist/Author Kloss wrote "Jascha Heifetz Through My Eyes, and is Co-Founder of the Jascha Heifetz Society). The famed Guarneri is now in the San Francisco Legion of Honor Museum, as instructed by Heifetz in his will, and may only be taken out and played "on special occasions" by deserving players. The instrument has recently been on loan to San Francisco Symphony concertmaster Alexander Barantschik.[4] The ‘Dolphin’ Strad, or Stradivarius, of 1714 is a famous violin made by Italian luthier Antonio Stradivari of Cremona. ... Antonio Stradivari, by Edgar Bundy, 1893: a romanticized image of a craftsman-hero One of the violins in the Stradivarius collection of the Palacio Real, Madrid, Spain A Stradivarius is a stringed instrument built by members of the Stradivari family, especially by Antonio Stradivari. ... Guarneri is the family name of a group of highly acclaimed violin makers (luthiers) from Cremona in Italy in the 17th and 18th centuries, whose standing is considered comparable to those of the Amati and Stradivari families. ... The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) is a leading orchestra based in San Francisco, California. ... Concert-master. ... Alexander Barantschik, a Russian violinist, born in 1953, is currently concertmaster of the San Francisco Symphony, as well as a frequent soloist and chamber musician. ...


In 1989, Heifetz received a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and...


Family life

Heifetz was married in 1928 to the silent motion picture actress Florence Vidor, ex-wife of King Vidor, whose seven year old daughter, Suzanne, Heifetz adopted. The couple had two more children, Josefa (born 1930) and Robert (1932-2001) before divorcing in 1945. In 1947, Heifetz took a sabbatical during which he married Frances Spiegelberg, with whom he had another son, Joseph. The second marriage ended in divorce in 1962. Florence Vidor in 1933 Florence Arto (best known as Florence Vidor) (Texas, 23 July 1895 - California 3 November 1977) was an American actress. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ...


Heifetz's son Jay is a professional photographer. He was formerly head of marketing for the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Hollywood Bowl, and the Chief Financial Officer of Paramount Pictures' Worldwide Video Division. He lives and works in Fremantle, Western Australia. Heifetz's daughter, Josefa Heifetz Byrne, is a lexicographer, author of Dictionary of Unusual, Obscure and Preposterous Words.[5] The Los Angeles Philharmonic (LAP) is an American orchestra based in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Hollywood Bowl in 2005. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Fremantle is a city located within the Perth metropolitan area on Australias western coast, at the mouth of the Swan River, 19 kilometres south from Perths Central Business District. ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person...


Heifetz's grandson Danny Heifetz is an accomplished drummer/percussionist and has played with Mr. Bungle, Dieselhed, Secret Chiefs 3 and Link Wray. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mr. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Secret Chiefs 3, also known as SC3, is a group of musicians led by composer and producer Trey Spruance, former guitarist of Mr. ... Link Wray and His Ray Mens The Swan Singles Collection 1963-1967 Fred Lincoln Link Wray Jr (May 2, 1929 – November 5, 2005) was an American rock and roll guitar player most noted for pioneering a new sound for electric guitars in his hit 1958 instrumental Rumble, by Link...


Filmography

Heifetz played a very touching starring role in the movie They Shall Have Music (1939) directed by Archie Mayo and written by John Howard Lawson and Irmgard von Cube. He played himself, stepping in to save a music school for poor children from foreclosure. He later appeared in the 1947 film, Carnegie Hall, performing an abridged version of the first movement of Tchaikovsky's violin concerto, with the orchestra led by Fritz Reiner, and consoling the star of the picture, who had watched his performance. Heifetz later recorded the complete Tchaikovsky concerto with Reiner and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra as one of RCA Victor's "Living Stereo" discs.[6] In 1951, he appeared in the film Of Men and Music. In 1962 he appeared in a televised series of his master classes, and in 1971 Heifetz on Television aired, an hour-long special that featured the violinist performing a series of short works, the "Scottish Fantasy" by Max Bruch, and the Chaconne from the Partita No. 2 by Bach. Archie Mayo (b. ... Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Russian Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский, sometimes transliterated as Piotr, Anglicised as Peter Ilich), (May 7, 1840 – November 6, 1893 (N.S.); April 25, 1840 – October 25, 1893 (O.S.)) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. ... This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, based in Chicago, Illinois, is one of the leading orchestras in the world. ... Max Christian Friedrich Bruch (Cologne, January 6, 1838 – Friedenau, October 20, 1920) was a German Romantic composer and conductor who wrote over 200 works, including a violin concerto which is a staple of the violin repertoire. ... In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ...


Bibliography

  • Alberto Cantù, Jascha Heifetz / L'imperatore solo, Zecchini Editore, Varese, 2007, ISBN 88-87203-61-X

Varese is a city in north-western Lombardy, northern Italy, 55 km north of Milan. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

In popular culture

Heifetz is first referenced in The Muppet Show where Rowlf the Dog opposite George Burns mentions "Oh listen, I can play any key. I'm another Jascha Heifetz", to which George replies, "Jascha Heifetz played the violin." Rowlf then replies, "Nobody will know the difference, George". Heifetz is later mentioned in The Muppet Movie when Rowlf the Dog, after being praised by Kermit the Frog for playing an impressive piece of music on the piano, shrugged modestly and replied, "I'm no Heifetz, but I get by." He was also mentioned by Data on the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Ensigns of Command" as one of the violinists he studied prior to his concert in Ten-Forward aboard the USS Enterprise. From Woody Allen's Hollywood Ending: "If there's a brownout, Heifetz will still be on key, but your guitarist won't be." Finally, Heifetz is mentioned by Woody Allen in "Broadway Danny Rose". As one of Danny Rose's clients plays a glass harmonica Danny remarks "She's the Jascha Heifetz of her instrument!" The Muppet Show was a television program featuring a cast of Muppets (diverse hand-operated puppets, typically with oversized eyes and large moving mouths) produced by Jim Henson and his team from 1976 to 1981. ... Rowlf the Dog Rowlf the Dog is a Muppet character, a scruffy brown dog of indeterminate breed with a rounded black nose and long floppy ears. ... George Burns[1], born Nathan Birnbaum (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), was an American comedian and actor. ... The Muppet Movie is the first of a series of live-action musical feature films starring Jim Hensons Muppets. ... Rowlf the Dog Rowlf the Dog is a Muppet character, a scruffy brown dog of indeterminate breed with a rounded black nose and long floppy ears. ... Kermit the Frog is a Muppet, one of puppeteer Jim Hensons most famous and beloved creations, first introduced in 1955. ... Data[1] is a character, portrayed by Brent Spiner, in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The Ensigns of Command is a third season Star Trek: The Next Generation episode. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, Ten-Forward is a recreation area in the starship Enterprise-D. It is located on level 10, front rim of the starship saucer section. ... The USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D) (or Enterprise-D, to distinguish it from prior starships with the same name) is a 24th century starship in the Star Trek fictional universe and the principal setting of the Star Trek: The Next Generation television series. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Hollywood Ending is a film written and directed by Woody Allen. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... An Armonica. ...


See also

Lithuanian Jews (known in Yiddish and Haredi English as Litvish (adjective) or Litvaks (noun)) are Ashkenazi Jews with roots in Lita, a region including not only present-day Lithuania but also Latvia, much of Belarus and the northeastern Suwałki region of Poland. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ...

References

  1. ^ Nikolaus de Palezieux, Jascha Heifetz - The Supreme (2000 RCA Victor compilation)
  2. ^ MCA Classics liner notes, 1988
  3. ^ Jascha Heifetz: The Decca Masters digitally remastered by MCA Classics in 1988, RCA Victor liner notes
  4. ^ The San Francisco Academy Orchestra (23 Oct 2006). "SF Symphony Concertmaster Alexander Barantschik to lead the Academy Orchestra". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  5. ^ Heifetz, Josefa (1974). Mrs. Byrne's dictionary of unusual, obscure, and preposterous words. Secaucus, NJ: University Books. ISBN 0821602039. 
  6. ^ RCA Victor liner notes

For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  • Jascha Heifetz plays Paganini Caprice No. 24 - Classical Video B&W
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Jascha Heifetz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1307 words)
Jascha Heifetz (February 2, 1901 – December 10, 1987) was a violinist.
Heifetz was born into a Jewish family in Vilna in Lithuania, then a part of the Russian Empire.
Heifetz was married twice, in 1928 to the silent motion picture actress Florence Vidor (ex-wife of King Vidor) whose seven year old daughter, Suzanne, Heifetz adopted.
Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin by Jascha Heifetz at jsbach.org (827 words)
This Heifetz' performance can hardly be surpassed by any other violinist (as brilliant as he/she might be) because he was a perfectionist and possessed an outstanding command of the instrument what enabled him to play these pieces not only faithfully to the metronome but also displaying a show of interpretation and passion.
The Heifetz recordings of J. Bach's Sonatas and Partitas appear to have been some of the early attempts of the "Direct to Disk" technology where the live recording signal was transferred directly to the record cutter, (probably an Ortofon) which became the record mold.
Heifetz is fallaciously known for his superb technique, more correctly his pretension is to race through many of his performances at a blistering pace.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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