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Encyclopedia > Japanese calendar
Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Children's Day
Koinobori, flags decorated like koi, are popular decorations around Children's Day
This mural on the wall of a Tokyo subway station celebrates Hazuki, the eighth month.

Since January 1, 1873, Japan has used the Gregorian Calendar, with local names for the months and mostly fixed holidays. Before 1873 a lunisolar calendar was in use, which was adapted from the Chinese calendar. Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 277 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x1536, 277 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Binomial name Cyprinus carpio (Linnaeus, 1758) Koi (鯉, Rōmaji: koi, pronounced ) are ornamental domesticated varieties of the common carp Cyprinus carpio, originated from China and widely spread in Japan. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (708x1250, 518 KB) Summary Mural Hachigatsu Hazuki Tokyo Metro Shin-Ochanomizu Station Tokyo Japan I contribute my rights in this photo to the public domain. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (708x1250, 518 KB) Summary Mural Hachigatsu Hazuki Tokyo Metro Shin-Ochanomizu Station Tokyo Japan I contribute my rights in this photo to the public domain. ... Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the capital and one of the forty-seven prefectures of Japan. ... Click on map to enlarge The Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line (東京地下鉄千代田線) is a metro line in Tokyo, Japan, administered by the Tokyo Metro. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Gregorian calendar is the calendar that is used nearly everywhere in the world. ... A lunisolar calendar is a calendar whose date indicates both the moon phase and the time of the solar year. ... The Chinese calendar (Traditional Chinese: 農曆; Simplified Chinese: 农历; pinyin: nónglì) is a lunisolar calendar incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ...

Contents


Years

Since the adoption of the Gregorian calendar, three different systems for counting years have or had been used in Japan:

Of these three, the first two are still in current use; the imperial calendar was used until the end of World War II. The Common Era (CE or C.E.), sometimes known as the Current Era or Christian Era, is the period of measured time beginning with the year 1 (the traditional birthdate of Jesus) to the present. ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Japanese era name. ... Meiji era print of Emperor Jimmu Emperor Jimmu (神武天皇 Jinmu Tennō; also known as: Kamuyamato Iwarebiko; given name: Wakamikenu no Mikoto or Sano no Mikoto, born according to legend on January 1, 711 BC, and died, again according to legend, on March 11, 585 BC,[citation needed] was the mythical founder...


Months

The modern Japanese names for the months literally translate to "first month", "second month", and so on. The corresponding number is combined with the suffix -gatsu (month):

  • January - 一月 (ichigatsu)
  • February - 二月 (nigatsu)
  • March - 三月 (sangatsu)
  • April - 四月 (shigatsu)
  • May - 五月 (gogatsu)
  • June - 六月 (rokugatsu)
  • July - 七月 (shichigatsu)
  • August - 八月 (hachigatsu)
  • September - 九月 (kugatsu)
  • October - 十月 (jūgatsu)
  • November - 十一月 (jūichigatsu)
  • December - 十二月 (jūnigatsu)

In addition, every month has a traditional name, still used by some in fields such as poetry; of the twelve, shiwasu is still widely used today. The opening paragraph of a letter or the greeting in a speech might borrow one of these names to convey a sense of the season. Some, such as yayoi and satsuki, do double duty as given names (for women). These month names also appear from time to time on jidaigeki, contemporary television shows and movies set in the Edo period or earlier. The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... A given name is a word which specifies and differentiates between members of a group of individuals, especially a family, all of whose members usually share the same family name. ... Jidaigeki (時代劇) is a genre of film and television in Japan. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... The Edo period (Japanese: 江戸時代, Edo-jidai), also called Tokugawa period, is a division of Japanese history running from 1603 to 1867. ...


The name of month: (pronunciation, literal meaning)

  • January - 睦月 (mutsuki, affection month)
  • February - 如月 or 衣更着 (kisaragi or kinusaragi, changing clothes)
  • March - 弥生 (yayoi, new life; the beginning of spring)
  • April - 卯月 (uzuki, hare month)
  • May - 皐月 or 早月 or 五月(satsuki, fast month)
  • June - 水無月 (minatsuki or minazuki, water month -- the 無 character is ateji)
  • July - 文月 (fumizuki, book month)
  • August - 葉月 (hazuki, leaf month)
  • September - 長月 (nagatsuki, long month)
  • October - 神無月 (kan'nazuki or kaminazuki, no god month), 神有月 or 神在月; (kamiarizuki, god month – only in Izumo province, where all the gods are believed to gather in October for an annual meeting at the Izumo Shrine); as with June, and in keeping with the previous, the 無 character is ateji, so kan'nazuki also means "god's month."
  • November - 霜月 (shimotsuki, frost month)
  • December - 師走 (shiwasu, priests run; it is named so because priests are busy making end of the year prayers and blessings.)

Kisaragi (如月 or 衣更着) is a traditional name for February in Japanese. ... Kisaragi (如月 or 衣更着) is a traditional name for February in Japanese. ... Ateji (当て字 ) guessed characters are Kanji selected to write a borrowed non-Chinese or native Japanese word with the intent of implying an etymology, which is fanciful or false. ... Izumo (Japanese: 出雲国; Izumo no kuni) was an old province of Japan which today consists of the eastern part of Shimane prefecture in the Chugoku region. ... Ateji (当て字 ) guessed characters are Kanji selected to write a borrowed non-Chinese or native Japanese word with the intent of implying an etymology, which is fanciful or false. ...

Days of the month

Each day of the month has a semi-systematic but irregularly formed name:

1 一日 tsuitachi (sometimes ichijitsu) 17 十七日 jūshichinichi
2 二日 futsuka 18 十八日 jūhachinichi
3 三日 mikka 19 十九日 jūkunichi
4 四日 yokka 20 二十日 hatsuka (sometimes nijūnichi)
5 五日 itsuka 21 二十一日 nijūichinichi
6 六日 muika 22 二十二日 nijūninichi
7 七日 nanoka, nanuka 23 二十三日 nijūsannichi
8 八日 yōka 24 二十四日 nijūyokka
9 九日 kokonoka, kokonuka 25 二十五日 nijūgonichi
10 十日 tōka 26 二十六日 nijūrokunichi
11 十一日 jūichinichi 27 二十七日 nijūshichinichi
12 十二日 jūninichi 28 二十八日 nijūhachinichi
13 十三日 jūsannichi 29 二十九日 nijūkunichi
14 十四日 jūyokka 30 三十日 sanjūnichi
15 十五日 jūgonichi 31 三十一日 sanjūichinichi
16 十六日 jūrokunichi  

In the traditional calendar, the thirtieth was the last day of the month, and its traditional name, 晦日 misoka, survives (although sanjunichi is far more common, and is the usual term). The last day of the year is 大晦日 ōmisoka (the big thirtieth day), and that term is still in use. Ōmisoka (Japanese: 大晦日), New Years Eve, is an important day in Japanese tradition, occurring on December 31, the last day of the year. ...


Days of the week

The seven day week, with names for the days corresponding directly to those used in Europe, was brought to Japan around 800 AD. The system was used for astrological purposes and little else until 1876, shortly after Japan officially adopted the Western calendar. Fukuzawa Yukichi was a key figure in the decision to adopt this system as the source for official names for the days of the week. The names come from the five visible planets, which in turn are named after the five Chinese elements (wood, fire, earth, metal, water), and from the moon and sun (yin and yang). Fukuzawa Yukichi, c. ... In English the days of the week are: Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Saturday and Sunday are commonly called the weekend and are days of rest and recreation in most western cultures. ... Chinese Wood (木) | Fire (火) | Earth (土) | Metal (金) | Water (水) Hinduism The Panchamahabhuta (five great elements) Prithvi/Bhumi (Earth) Ap/Jala (Water) Agni/Tejas (Fire) Vayu/Pavan (Air/Wind) Akasha (Aether) In traditional Chinese philosophy, natural phenomena can be classified into the Five Elements (Chinese: 五行; Pinyin: wǔxíng): wood, fire, earth, metal, and... Taijitu, the traditional symbol representing the forces of Yin and Yang The concepts of yin and yang originate in ancient Chinese philosophy and metaphysics, which describes two primal opposing but complementary forces found in all things in the universe. ...

月曜日 getsuyōbi Moon Monday
火曜日 kayōbi Fire Tuesday
水曜日 suiyōbi Water Wednesday
木曜日 mokuyōbi Wood Thursday
金曜日 kin'yōbi Metal/Gold Friday
土曜日 doyōbi Earth Saturday
日曜日 nichiyōbi Sun Sunday

National holidays

Notes: Single days between two national holidays are taken as a bank holiday. This applies to May 4, which is a holiday each year. When a national holiday falls on a Sunday the next day that is not a holiday (usually a Monday) is taken as a holiday.

Date English name Local name Romanization
January 1 New Year's Day 元日 Ganjitsu
2nd Monday of January Coming-of-age Day 成人の日 Seijin no hi
February 11 National Foundation Day 建国記念の日 Kenkoku kinen no hi
March 20 or March 21 Vernal Equinox Day 春分の日 Shunbun no hi
April 29 Greenery Day * みどりの日 Midori no hi
May 3 Constitution Memorial Day * 憲法記念日 Kenpō kinenbi
May 4 National holiday * 国民の休日 kokumin no kyūjitsu
May 5 Children's Day * 子供の日 Kodomo no hi
3rd Monday of July Marine Day 海の日 Umi no hi
3rd Monday of September Respect for the Aged Day 敬老の日 Keirō no hi
September 23 or September 24 Autumnal Equinox Day 秋分の日 Shūbun no hi
2nd Monday of October Health-Sports Day 体育の日 Taiiku no hi
November 3 Culture Day 文化の日 Bunka no hi
November 23 Labour Thanksgiving Day 勤労感謝の日 Kinrō kansha no hi
December 23 The Emperor's Birthday 天皇誕生日 Tennō tanjōbi

† Traditional date of the founding of Japan by Emperor Jimmu, in 660 BC. Veracity of this claim is often questioned. In linguistics, romanization (or Latinization, also spelled romanisation or Latinisation) is the representation of a word or language with the Roman (Latin) alphabet, or a system for doing so, where the original word or language uses a different writing system. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... In ancient times, the Japanese New Year (正月 shōgatsu) followed the same lunisolar calendar as the Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese New Year (at the beginning of spring). ... In Christianity, a moveable feast or movable feast is a holy day -- a feast or a fast -- whose date is not fixed to a particular day of the calendar year but moves in response to the date of Easter, which date varies according to a complex formula. ... Seijin shiki (成人式) is the Japanese coming-of-age ceremony. ... February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... National Foundation Day (建国記念日, kenkoku kinen-bi; also 建国記念の日, kenkoku kinen-no-hi) is a national holiday in Japan celebrated annually on February 11. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... In astronomy, the vernal equinox (spring equinox, March equinox, or northward equinox) is the equinox at the beginning of spring in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading northward. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... Greenery Day (Japanese: みどりの日 Midori no hi) is one of the holidays for Japanese Citizen. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... Constitution Memorial Day (Japanese: 憲法記念日, Kenpō Kinen-bi) is a national holiday in Japan. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... Czechoslovak poster celebrating the International Childrens Day Childrens Day is a holiday in many countries around the world, mainly the holidays purpose is to simply honor children. ... Koinobori (The top, large carp is considered as a father, the second, red carp as a mother, and the third, little carp as a child. ... The third Monday of July is Marine Day (Japanese: 海の日 Umi no hi), the 14th national holiday of Japan. ... Respect for the Aged Day is a Japanese holiday celebrated annually on September 15 which honors elderly citizens. ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years). ... In astronomy, the autumnal equinox signals the beginning of autumn in the northern hemisphere: the moment when the sun appears to cross the celestial equator, heading southward; the equinox occurs around September 22–September 24, varying slightly each year according to the 400-year cycle of leap years in... Health and Sports Day (体育の日, taiiku-no-hi, also trans: Health-Sports Day, Sports Day) is a national holiday in Japan held annually on the second Monday in October. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... Culture Day (文化の日, Bunka-no-hi) is a national holiday held annually in Japan on November 3 for the purpose of promoting culture, the arts, and academics. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... Labour Thanksgiving Day (勤労感謝の日) is a national holiday in Japan. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Emperor Akihito prepares to greet the flag-waving crowd at the Imperial Palace on his birthday. ... Meiji era print of Emperor Jimmu Emperor Jimmu (神武天皇 Jinmu Tennō; also known as: Kamuyamato Iwarebiko; given name: Wakamikenu no Mikoto or Sano no Mikoto, born according to legend on January 1, 711 BC, and died, again according to legend, on March 11, 585 BC,[citation needed] was the mythical founder... Centuries: 8th century BC - 7th century BC - 6th century BC Decades: 710s BC 700s BC 690s BC 680s BC 670s BC - 660s BC - 650s BC 640s BC 630s BC 620s BC 610s BC Events and Trends 668 BC - Egypt revolts against Assyria 668 BC - Assurbanipal succeeds Esarhaddon as king of...


* Part of Golden Week Golden Week (Japanese: ゴールデンウィーク or 黄金週間, abbreviation: GW) is a Japanese term applied to the period containing the following public holidays: April 29, Greenery Day (みどりの日) May 3, Constitution Memorial Day (憲法記&#24565...


Timeline of changes to the national holidays

  • 1948 - The following national holidays were introduced: New Year's Day, Coming-of-Age Day, Constitution Memorial Day, Children's Day, Autumnal Equinox Day, Culture Day, Labour Thanksgiving Day.
  • 1966 - Health and Sports Day was introduced in memory of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. Vernal Equinox Day was also introduced.
  • 1985 - Reform to the national holiday law made May 4, sandwiched between two other national holidays also a holiday.
  • 1989 - After Emperor Showa died on January 7, the Emperor's Birthday became December 23 and Greenery Day took place of the former Emperor's birthday.
  • 2000, 2003 - Happy Monday System (ハッピーマンデー制度 Happī Mandē Seido) moved several holidays to Monday. Starting with 2000: Coming-of-Age Day (formerly January 15), and Health and Sports Day (formerly October 10). Starting with 2003: Marine Day (formerly July 20), and Respect for the Aged Day (formerly September 15).
  • 2005, 2007 - According to a May 2005 decision, starting with 2007 Greenery Day will be moved from April 29 to May 4, while April 29 will be known as Showa Day.
  • 2009 - September 22 may become sandwiched between two holidays, which would make this day a national holiday.

1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Games of the XVIII Olympiad were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hirohito (裕仁), the Shōwa Emperor (昭和天皇), (April 29, 1901 - January 7, 1989) reigned over Japan from 1926 to 1989. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Showa Day (Japanese: 昭和の日 Shōwa no hi) is a Japanese holiday in honor of Emperor Hirohito who was the Emperor during and after World War II. The holiday is planned to be officially starting in the year 2007. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ...

Seasonal days

Some days have special names to mark the change in seasons. The 24 Sekki (二十四節気 Nijūshi sekki) are days that divide a year in the Lunisolar calendar into twenty four equal sections. Zassetsu (雑節) is a collective term for the seasonal days other than the 24 Sekki. 72 Kō (七十二候 Shichijūni kō) days are made from dividing the 24 Sekki of a year further by three. Some of these names are still used quite frequently in everyday life in Japan. A Jiéqì is one of 24 points spaced 15° apart along the ecliptic used by all traditional East Asian lunisolar calendars to stay synchronized with the seasons. ... A lunisolar calendar is a calendar whose date indicates both the moon phase and the time of the solar year. ...


24 Sekki

Days can vary by ±1 day. See also: Jieqi. January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 4 is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (66th in Leap years). ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The vernal equinox (or spring equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical spring. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (111th in leap years). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (142nd in leap years). ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... Illumination of Earth by the sun on the northern hemisphere summer solstice The summer solstice is an astronomical term regarding the position of the sun in relation to the celestial equator. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... August 23 is the 235th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (236th in leap years), with 130 days remaining. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... Illumination of Earth by Sun on the day of equinox The autumnal equinox (or fall equinox) marks the beginning of astronomical autumn. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 69 days remaining. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The December solstice occurs on December 21 or December 22 of most years, and is known by different names in different hemispheres of Earth: Winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere; the shortest day of the year. ... A Jiéqì is one of 24 points spaced 15° apart along the ecliptic used by all traditional East Asian lunisolar calendars to stay synchronized with the seasons. ...


Zassetsu

Day Kanji Romaji Comment
January 17 冬の土用 Fuyu no doyō  
February 3 節分 Setsubun The eve of Risshun by one definition.
March 21 春社日 Haru shanichi Also known as 春社 (Harusha, Shunsha).
March 18 - March 24 春彼岸 Haru higan The seven days surrounding Shunbun.
April 17 春の土用 Haru no doyō  
May 2 八十八夜 Hachijū hachiya Literally meaning 88 nights (since Risshun).
June 11 入梅 Nyūbai Literally meaning entering tsuyu.
July 2 半夏生 Hangeshō One of the 72 Kō. Farmers take five days off in some regions.
July 15 中元 Chūgen Sometimes considered a Zassetsu.
July 20 夏の土用 Natsu no doyō  
September 1 二百十日 Nihyaku tōka Literally meaning 210 days (since Risshun).
September 11 二百二十日 Nihyaku hatsuka Literally meaning 220 days.
September 20 - September 26 秋彼岸 Aki higan  
September 22 秋社日 Aki shanichi Also known as 秋社 (Akisha, Shūsha).
October 20 秋の土用 Aki no doyō  

Shanichi days can vary as much as ±5 days. Chūgen has a fixed day. All other days can vary by ±1 day. January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Setsubun, Tokuan shrine In Japan, Setsubun (節分) is the day before the beginning of each season. ... March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (81st in leap years). ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... March 24 is the 83rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (84th in leap years). ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... Tsuyu is the Japanese name for the rainy season that lasts in Japan from the middle of June to near the end of July. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... Chugen is a holiday in Japan on July 15th for which one gives gifts to those to whom one has become indebted. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 96 days remaining. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ...


Many zassetsu days occur on multiple seasons:

  • Setsubun (節分) refers to the day before each season, or the eves of Risshun, Rikka, Rishū, and Rittō; especially the eve of Risshun.
  • Doyō (土用) refers to the 18 days before each season, especially the one before fall which is known as the hottest period of a year.
  • Higan (彼岸) is the seven middle days of spring and autumn, with Shunbun at the middle of the seven days for spring, Shūbun for fall.
  • Shanichi (社日) is the Tsuchinoe (戊) day closest to Shunbun (middle of spring) or Shūbun (middle of fall), which can be as much as -5 to +4 days away from Shunbun/Shūbun.

Seasonal festivals

The following are known as the five seasonal festivals (節句 sekku, also 五節句 go sekku). The Sekku were made official holidays during Edo era. History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Edo period (江戸時代) is a...

  1. January 7 (1/7) - 人日 (Jinjitsu), 七草の節句 (Nanakusa no sekku)
  2. March 3 (3/3) - 上巳 (Jōshi, Jōmi), 桃の節句 (Momo no sekku)
    雛祭り (Hina matsuri), Girls' Day.
  3. May 5 (5/5) - 端午 (Tango), 端午の節句 (Tango no sekku), 菖蒲の節句 (Ayame no sekku)
    Boys' Day. Overlaps with the national holiday Children's Day.
  4. July 7 (7/7) - 七夕 (Shichiseki, Tanabata), 星祭り (Hoshi matsuri )
  5. September 9 (9/9) - 重陽 (Chōyō), 菊の節句 (Kiku no sekku)

Not Sekku: January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Festival of Seven Herbs ) is the long-standing Japanese custom of eating seven-herb kayu ) on Jinjitsu (January 7). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... Seven-tiered Hina doll set The Japanese Doll Festival ), or Girls Day, is held March 3. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... Tango No Sekku (May 5) May 5th is the Tango no Sekku (端午の節句), Boys Festival in Japan. ... Czechoslovak poster celebrating the International Childrens Day Childrens Day is a holiday in many countries around the world, mainly the holidays purpose is to simply honor children. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... People dressed in yukata at Tanabata Tanabata (七夕, meaning Seven Evenings) is a Japanese star festival, derived from Obon traditions and the Chinese star festival, Qi Xi. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ...

January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... In ancient times, the Japanese New Year (正月 shōgatsu) followed the same lunisolar calendar as the Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese New Year (at the beginning of spring). ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... YOSAKOI1(2004 August at Enomoto Primary School Osaka) Yosakoi2(2004 August at Enomoto Primary School Osaka) O-bon is a Japanese Buddhist holiday to honor the departed spirits of ones ancestors. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Ōmisoka (Japanese: 大晦日), New Years Eve, is an important day in Japanese tradition, occurring on December 31, the last day of the year. ...

Rokuyō

The rokuyō (六曜) are a series of six days that predict whether there will be good or bad fortune during that day. The rokuyō are still commonly found on Japanese calendars and are often used to plan weddings and funerals. The rokuyō are also known as the rokki (六輝). In order, they are:

  • 先勝 (senshō) - Good luck before noon, bad luck after noon. Good day for beginnings (in the morning).
  • 友引 (tomobiki) - Bad things will happen to your friends. Funerals avoided on this day (tomo = friend, biki = pull, thus a funeral might pull friends toward the deceased).
  • 先負 (senbu) - Bad luck before noon, good luck after noon.
  • 仏滅 (butsumetsu) - The day Buddha died. Most unlucky day. Weddings best avoided.
  • 大安 (taian) - Most lucky day. Good day for weddings.
  • 赤口 (shakkō) - The hour of the horse (11 am - 1 pm) is lucky. The rest is bad luck.

The rokuyō days are easily calculated from the Japanese Lunar calendar. Lunar January 1st is always senshō, with the days following in the order given above until the end of the month. Thus, January 2nd is tomobiki, January 3rd is senbu, and so on. Lunar February 1st restarts the sequence at tomobiki. Lunar March 1st restarts at senbu, and so on for each month. The last six months repeat the patterns of the first six, so July 1st = senshō and December 1st is shakkō. A stone image of the Buddha. ...


April 1

The first day of April has broad significance in Japan. It marks the beginning of the government's fiscal year. Many corporations follow suit. In addition, corporations often form or merge on that date. In recent years, municipalities have preferred it for mergers. On this date, many new employees begin their jobs, and it is the start of many real-estate leases. The school year begins on April 1. (For more see also academic term) April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...


See also

// Public Holiday law The Public Holiday Law (国民の祝日に関する法律 Kokumin no Shukujitsu ni Kansuru Hōritsu) of 1948 (as amended) establishes the occasions on which Japan has a legal holiday. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... Japanese era name (年号, nengō, lit. ... Jikkan Jūnishi (十干十二支), also called eto (干支), is the sexagenary cycle of the Japanese calendar, which is calculated by combining jikkan (the ten stems) and jūnishi (the twelve branches). ... The Chinese calendar (Traditional Chinese: 農曆; Simplified Chinese: 农历; pinyin: nónglì) is a lunisolar calendar incorporating elements of a lunar calendar with those of a solar calendar. ...

External links

  • Japanese calendar history by the National Diet Library
  • The Lunar Calendar in Japan
  • Koyomi no page in Japanese
  • Koyomi no hanashi in Japanese
  • Rokuyō calculator in Japanese
  • NengoCalc (Tool for converting Japanese dates into Western equivalents)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Lunar Calendar in Japan (0 words)
Ancient calendar scholars in a number of cultures found that after three solar years, the lunar calendar would be behind the sun's actual progress by about 33 days.
While both calendar and navigational needs were important in the advancement of astronomy in Europe, it was improvements in lunar calendar reckoning that drove most of Chinese and later Japanese advances in astronomy.
Seeing the current calendar to be in error by up to two days, they had an uphill struggle against a general obsession with astrology, mystic assumptions of the emperor, disinterest by the Shogunate, and their own lack of information from the "outside" world.
Japanese calendar information - Search.com (1438 words)
Before 1873 a lunisolar calendar was in use, which was adapted from the Chinese calendar.
In the traditional calendar, the thirtieth was the last day of the month, and its traditional name, 晦日 misoka, survives (although sanjunichi is far more common, and is the usual term).
The rokuyō are still commonly found on Japanese calendars and are often used to plan weddings and funerals.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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