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Encyclopedia > Japanese Buddhism
Japanese Buddhist priest c.1897

The history of Buddhism in Japan can be roughly divided into three periods, namely the Nara period (up to 784), the Heian period (794-1185) and the post-Kamakura period (1185 onwards). Each period saw the introduction of new doctrines and upheavals in existing schools. Download high resolution version (528x726, 99 KB)Japanese Buddhist priest c. ... Download high resolution version (528x726, 99 KB)Japanese Buddhist priest c. ... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Nara Period (奈良時代) of the History of Japan... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei Overview The Heian period (平安時代) is the last division... History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Kamakura period 1185 to 1333 is a period...


Buddhism
Culture
History
List of topics
People
By region and country
Schools and sects
Temples
Terms and concepts
Texts
Timeline
Contents

1.1 Ritsu
1.2 Jojitsu
1.3 Kusha
1.4 Sanron
1.5 Hosso
1.6 Kegon
Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... The cultural elements of Buddhism vary by region and include: Buddhist cuisine Buddhist art Buddharupa Art and architecture of Japan Greco-Buddhism Tibetan Buddhist sacred art Buddhist music Buddhist chant Shomyo Categories: Buddhism-related stubs ... The history of Buddhism spans from the 6th century BCE to the present, starting with the birth of the Buddha Siddharta Gautama. ... Contents: Top - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z The following is a List of Buddhist topics: A Abhidharma Ahimsa Ajahn Ajahn Chah Ajanta Aksobhya Alexandra David-Néel Amara Sinha B... Buddhist beliefs and practices vary according to region. ... The percentage of Buddhist population of each country was taken from the US State Departments International Religious Freedom Report 2004 [1]. Other sources used were CIA Factbook [2] and adherents. ... An image of Gautama Buddha with a swastika, traditionally a Buddhist symbol of good luck, on his chest. ... The Buddhist temple Wat Chiang Man, in Chiang Mai, Thailand, which dates from the late 13th century Buddhist temples and monasteries, sorted by location. ... Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Several Buddhist terms and concepts lack direct translations into English that cover the breadth of the original term. ... There is great variety in Buddhist texts. ... Before Common Era Trad. ...

Nara Period

Buddhism was first introduced to Japan via the Korean peninsula in 552, when Baekje monks came to Nara to introduce the eight doctrinal schools. Initial uptake of the new faith was slow, and Buddhism only started to spread some years later when Empress Suiko openly encouraged the acceptance of Buddhism among all Japanese people. In 607, in order to obtain copies of Sutras, an imperial envoy was dispatched to Sui dynasty China. As time progressed and the number of Buddhist clergy increased, the offices of Sojo (archbishop) and Sozu (bishop) were created. By 627 there were 46 Buddhist temples, 816 Buddhist priests, and 569 Buddhist nuns in Japan. Statues of Buddha such as this, the Tian Tan Buddha statue in Hong Kong, remind followers to practice right living. ... The Korean Peninsula is a peninsula in East Asia. ... Baekje was a kingdom in southwestern Korea. ... Nara (奈良市; -shi) is the capital city of Nara Prefecture in the Kansai region of Japan, near Kyoto. ... Empress Suiko (推古天皇) (554-628) was the 33rd imperial ruler of Japan and the first woman to hold this position. ... Events February 19 - Boniface III becomes pope, but dies the same year. ... The Sui Dynasty (隋朝 Hanyu Pinyin: Suí, 581-618) followed the Southern and Northern Dynasties and preceded the Tang Dynasty in China. ... Events April 11 - Paulinus, a Roman missionary, baptizes King Edwin of Deira December 12 - Battle of Nineveh: Byzantine Emperor Heraclius defeats the Persians Births Deaths November 10 - Justus, Archbishop of Canterbury Categories: 627 ...


There were traditionally six schools of Buddhism in Nara Japan Ritsu (Vinaya), Jojitsu (Satyasiddhi), Kusha (Abhidharma) Sanron (Madhyamika, Hosso (Yogacara), and Kegon (Hua-yen). However they were not exclusive schools, and temples were apt to have scholars versed in several of the schools. It has been suggested that they can best be thought of as 'study groups'. Pali or Sanskrit word meaning discipline. The Vinaya is the textual framework for the Buddhist monastic community, or sangha. ... The abhidhamma is the name of one of the three pitakas, or baskets of tradition, into which the Tipitaka (Pali; Sanskrit: Tripitaka), the canon of early Buddhism, is divided. ... Sanlun or literally Three Treatise School was a Chinese school of Buddhism based upon the Indian Madhyamaka tradition, founded by Nagarjuna. ... Madhyamaka is a Buddhist philosophical tradition that asserts that all phenomena are empty of self-nature or essence (Sanskrit: Svabhāva), that they have no intrinsic, independent reality apart from the causes and conditions from which they arise. ... Dharma-character school (Chinese: 法相宗 pinyin fa xiang zong) is the pejorative name for a stream of thought that represented the Indian Yogācāra system of thought in East Asia. ... Yogācāra (Sanskrit: yoga practice), also spelled yogāchāra, is an influential school of philosophy and psychology that developed in Indian Mahayana Buddhism starting sometime in the fourth to fifth centuries C.E., also commonly known as Consciousness-only (Sanskrit: Chittamatra). ... Kegon is the name of the Japanese transmission of the Huayan school of Chinese Buddhism, via the Korean Hwaeom tradition. ... Huayan (華嚴, Pinyin: huáyán, Sanskrit: Avatamsaka) or Flower Garland is a tradition of Mahayana Buddhist philosophy that flourished in China during the Tang period. ...


Ritsu

Founded by Daoxuan (道宣, Jp. Dosen), China, c. 650 AD
First Introduction to Japan: Ganjin (鑑真), 753 AD. The Ritsu school specialized in the Vinaya (the monastic rules in the Tripitaka). They used the Dharmagupta version of the vinaya which is known in Japanese as Shibunritsu 四分律) Dry-lacquer statue of Jianzhen made shortly after his death. ... Pali or Sanskrit word meaning discipline. The Vinaya is the textual framework for the Buddhist monastic community, or sangha. ... The Tripitaka (Sanskrit, lit. ...


Jojitsu

The Satyasiddhi school is considered to be an offshoot of the Sautrantika school, one of the Nikaya schools of Indian Buddhism (see early Buddhist schools). They were distinguished by a rejection of the Abhidharma as not being the 'word of the Buddha'. The name means literally, Ends with the Sutras" which refers to the traditional order of texts in the Tripitaka - vinaya, sutra, abhidharma. Nikaya Buddhism is a general term for those schools of Buddhism that accept only the class of sutras collected in the Pāli Canon as authentic. ... Contents // Categories: Buddhism-related stubs | Buddhism by country ... Divisions among the early Buddhist schools came about due to doctrinal or practical differences in the views of the Buddhist Sangha following the death of the Buddha. ... The Tripitaka (Sanskrit, lit. ...


Kusha

Introduced into Japan from China during the Nara period (710–784). The school takes its name from its authoritative text, the Abidatsuma-kusha-ron(Sanskrit:Abhidharma-kosa), by the 4th- or 5th-century Indian philosopher Vasubandhu. The Kusha school is considered to be an offshoot of the Indian Sarvastivada school. Vasubandhu (Sanskrit. ... The Sarvastivada (roughly, Proclaiming that all exist) --a reference to one of the distinguishing doctrines of the school, the existence of dharmas in all of the three times (past, present, and future). ...


Sanron

Literally: Three-Discourse School; a Madhyamika school which developed in China based on two discourses by Nagarjuna and one by Aryadeva; this school was transmitted to Japan in the 7th century. (Madhyamika is one of the two most important Mahayana philosophies, and reemphasizes the original Buddhist teachings that phenomena are neither truly existent or absolutely non-existent, but are characterized by impermanence and insubstantially. Madhyamaka is a Buddhist philosophical tradition that asserts that all phenomena are empty of self-nature or essence (Sanskrit: Svabhāva), that they have no intrinsic, independent reality apart from the causes and conditions from which they arise. ... A statue depicting Nagarjuna Nāgārjuna (c. ... Madhyamaka is a Buddhist philosophical tradition that asserts that all phenomena are empty of self-nature or essence (Sanskrit: Svabhāva), that they have no intrinsic, independent reality apart from the causes and conditions from which they arise. ... Relief image of the bodhisattva Guan Yin from Mt. ...


Hosso

The Yogacara (瑜伽行派 Yugagyouha) schools are based on early Indian Buddhist thought by masters such as Vasubandhu, and are also known as "consciousness only" since they teach a form of idealism which posits that all phenomena are phenomena of the mind. The Hosso school was founded by Xuanzang (玄奘, Jp. Genjo), China, c. 630 AD, and introduced to Japan in 654 AD. The Discourse on the Theory of Consciousness-Only (Jo yuishikiron 成唯識論) is an important text for the Hosso school. Yogācāra (Sanskrit: yoga practice), also spelled yogāchāra, is an influential school of philosophy and psychology that developed in Indian Mahayana Buddhism starting sometime in the fourth to fifth centuries C.E., also commonly known as Consciousness-only (Sanskrit: Chittamatra). ... Vasubandhu (Sanskrit. ... Xuanzang, Dunhuang cave, 9th century. ...


Kegon

Also known by its Chinese name Huayen (華厳), the Kegon school was founded by Dushun (杜順, Jp. Dojun), China, c. 600 AD, and introduced to Japan by Bodhisena in 736 AD. The Avatamsaka Sutra (Kegonkyo 華厳経) is the central text for the Kegon school. Huayan (華嚴, Pinyin: huáyán, Sanskrit: Avatamsaka) or Flower Garland is a tradition of Mahayana Buddhist philosophy that flourished in China during the Tang period. ... For other uses, see number 600. ... Bodhisena (Sanskrit. ... Events The Kegon school of Buddhism arrives in Japan via Korea, when Rōben invites the Korean monk Simsang to lecture, and formally founds Japans Kegon tradition in the Tōdaiji temple. ... The Avataṃsaka Sūtra (Chinese 華嚴經; pinyin hua yan jing) is one of the most influential scriptures in East Asian Buddhism. ...


Heian Period

The Late Nara period saw the introduction of Esoteric Buddhism (密教, Jp. mikkyo) to Japan from China, by Kukai and Saicho, who founded the Shingon and Tendai schools. The later Heian period saw the formation of the first truly Japanese school of Buddhism, that of Nichiren. Kūkai (空海) or Kōbō-Daishi (弘法大師) , 774—835 CE: Japanese monk, scholar, and artist, founder of the Shingon or “True Word” school of Buddhism. ... Saichō (最澄, 767-822) is a Japanese Buddhist monk credited with founding the Tendai school in Japan, based around the Chinese Tiantai tradition he was exposed to during his trip to China beginning in 804. ... Shingon (真言宗) is a major school of Japanese Buddhism, and the most important school of Vajrayana Buddhism outside of the Himalayan region. ... Tendai (天台) is a Japanese school of Buddhism, a descendant of the Chinese Tiantai or Lotus Sutra school. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 - October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro, later Zesho-bo Rencho and sometimes called Nichiren Shonin or Nichiren Daishonin, was a Buddhist monk in 13th century Japan, and founder of Nichiren Buddhism, a Buddhist movement which continues today. ...


Tendai

Known as Tiantai (天台) in China, the Tendai school was founded by Zhiyi (智顗, Jp Chigi) in China, c. 550 AD. In 804 Saicho (最澄) traveled to China to study at the Tiantai teachings, at Mount Tiantai. However before his return he also studied, and was initiated into the practice of the Vajrayana - with emphasis on the Mahavairocana Sutra. The primary text of Tiantai is Lotus Sutra (Hokkekyo 法華経), but when Saicho established his school in Japan he incorporated the study and practice of Vajrayana as well. Tendai (天台) is a Japanese school of Buddhism, a descendant of the Chinese Tiantai or Lotus Sutra school. ... Tiantai (天台宗, Wade-Giles: Tien Tai) is one of the thirteen schools of Buddhism in China and Japan, also called the Lotus Sutra School. ... Zhiyi (智顗 Wade-Giles: Chih-i) (538 - 597) is traditionally listed as the fourth patriarch, but actually is the founder of the Tiantai sect of Buddhism in China. ... Saichō (最澄, 767-822) is a Japanese Buddhist monk credited with founding the Tendai school in Japan, based around the Chinese Tiantai tradition he was exposed to during his trip to China beginning in 804. ... The Lotus Sutra or Sutra on the White Lotus of the Sublime Dharma (Sanskrit: Saddharmapundarīka-sūtra; Chinese: 妙法蓮華經 or Miàofǎ Liánhuā Jīng; Japanese Myōhō Renge Kyō) is one of the most popular and influential Mahāyāna sutras in East Asia and the basis on which the Tiantai and Nichiren sects of...


Shingon

Kukai traveled to China in 804 as part of the same expedition as Saicho. In the T'ang capital he studied esoteric Buddhism, Sanskrit and received initiation from Huikuo. On returning to Japan Kukai eventually manged to establish Shingon (真言) as a school in its own right. Kukai received two lineages of teaching - one based on the Mahavairochana Sutra (Dainichikyo 大日経), and the other based on the Vajrashekhara. Shingon (真言宗) is a major school of Japanese Buddhism, and the most important school of Vajrayana Buddhism outside of the Himalayan region. ... Kūkai (空海) or Kōbō-Daishi (弘法大師) , 774—835 CE: Japanese monk, scholar, and artist, founder of the Shingon or “True Word” school of Buddhism. ... Tang has several possible meanings: Tang, a brand name of instant orange flavored drink, 1950s - present a projecting element connecting a knife or sword blade to the handle Tang Dynasty of China Tang, a ruler of Chinas Shang dynasty transliteration of Chinese family names 唐,湯,鄧,邓,滕... The Sanskrit language ( संस्कृता वाक्) is one of the earliest attested members of the Indo-European language family and is not only a classical language, but also an official language of India. ...

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Kinkakuji, the Temple of the Golden Pavilion, located in Kyoto.

The Kinkaku-ji Temple (aka the Golden Temple) reflecting on the water. ... The Kinkaku-ji Temple (aka the Golden Temple) reflecting on the water. ... Kinkaku-ji, the Gold Pavilion Kinkaku-ji from across the water Kinkakuji (Jp. ... Location of Kyoto, on the main island of Japan Kyoto (Japanese: 京都市; Kyōto-shi) is a city in Japan that has a population of 1. ...

Kamakura to Modern Period

The Kamakura period saw the introduction of the two schools that had perhaps the greatest impact on the country: the Amidist Pure Land schools, promulgated by evagelists such as Genshin and articulated by monks such as Hōnen, which emphasized salvation through faith in Amitabha and remain the largest Buddhist sect in Japan (and throughout Asia) to this day; and the more philosophical Zen schools, which were equally rapidly adopted by the upper classes and had a profound impact on Japanese culture. History of Japan Paleolithic Jomon Yayoi Yamato period ---Kofun period ---Asuka period Nara period Heian period Kamakura period Muromachi period Azuchi-Momoyama period ---Nanban period Edo period Meiji period Taisho period Showa period ---Japanese expansionism ---Occupied Japan ---Post-Occupation Japan Heisei The Kamakura period 1185 to 1333 is a period... The Buddha Amitabha, 13th century, Kamakura, Japan. ... Genshin (942-1017) was the most influential of a number evangelists active during the eleventh and twelfth centuries in Japan. ... Hōnen Shonin (法然; 1133-1212) is credited with the establishment of Jōdo (Pure Land) Buddhism as an independent sect in Japan. ... The Big Buddha in Kamakura, an image of Amitabha Amitābha (阿彌陀佛 Ch. ... Bodhidharma, woodblock print by Yoshitoshi, 1887. ... Japanese culture and language Japans isolation until the arrival of the Black Ships and the Meiji era produced a culture distinctively different from any other, and echoes of this uniqueness persist today. ...


Amidist Schools

Jodo

Founder: Huiyuan (慧遠, Jp. Eon), China, c. 400 AD
Chinese name: Jingtu (浄土) "Pure Land"
First Introduction to Japan: Honen (法然), 1175 AD
Doctrine: nembutsu (念仏, "prayer to Buddha")
Primary Text: Infinite Life Sutra (Muryojukyo 無量壽経) Jodo can mean: A Japanese martial art that uses the jo, a four-foot long wooden staff, see Jojutsu. ... The Buddha Amitabha, 13th century, Kamakura, Japan. ... Honen Shonin (法然; 1133-1212) is credited with the establishment of Pure Land Buddhism as an independent sect in Japan. ... The Infinite Life Sutra, or Longer Pure Land Sutra, is a Mahayana Buddhist text associated with Pure Land Buddhism. ...


Jodo Shin

Founder: Shinran (親鸞), 1224 AD
Japanese name: 浄土真, "True Pure Land"
Major Influences: Jodo
Doctrine: shintai zokutai (真諦俗諦, "Real Truth, Common Truth")
Primary Text: Infinite Life Sutra (Muryojukyo 無量壽経) Jōdo Shinshū (淨土眞宗 True Pure Land School), also known as Shin Buddhism, is a branch of Pure Land Buddhism which was founded in Japan by the monk Shinran. ... Shinran Shonin (親鸞聖人)(1173-1262) was pupil of Honen and founder of the Jodo Shinshu (or True Pure Land) Buddhism in Japan. ... Jodo can mean: A Japanese martial art that uses the jo, a four-foot long wooden staff, see Jojutsu. ... The Infinite Life Sutra, or Longer Pure Land Sutra, is a Mahayana Buddhist text associated with Pure Land Buddhism. ...


Zen Schools

Several variants of Zen (禅宗) were separately brought to Japan. Note that Zen influences are identifiable earlier in Japanese Buddhism, esp. cross-fertilization with Hosso and Kegon, but the independent schools were formed quite late. Bodhidharma, woodblock print by Yoshitoshi, 1887. ...


Soto

Founders: Caoshan (曹山, Jp. Sosan) and Dongshan (洞山, Jp. Tosan), China, c. 850
Chinese name: Caodong (曹洞), named after its founders
First Introduction to Japan: Dogen (道玄), 1227 AD
Major Influences: Hosso, Kegon
Doctrine: zazen (座禅, "sitting meditation"), especially shikantaza
Primary Texts: Transcendental Wisdom Sutras aka Prajnaparamita Sutras (般若波羅蜜経), incl. Heart Sutra Soto (曹洞宗; Japanese: sōtō-shū; Chinese Caodong Zong) is one of the two major Japanese Zen sects. ... Dongshan may refer to either of: Dongshan rural township in Yilan County, Taiwan, Republic of China Dongshan district in Guangzhou, Guangdong, Peoples Republic of China This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Caodong (Chinese 曹洞宗) is a Chinese Zen Buddhist sect founded by Dongshan Liangjie and his Dharma_heirs in the 9th century. ... Dōgen Zenji (道元禅師; January 19, 1200 - September 22, 1253) was a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher and founder of the Soto school of Zen in Japan. ... Dharma-character school (Chinese: 法相宗 pinyin fa xiang zong) is the pejorative name for a stream of thought that represented the Indian Yogācāra system of thought in East Asia. ... Kegon is the name of the Japanese transmission of the Huayan school of Chinese Buddhism, via the Korean Hwaeom tradition. ... Kodo Sawaki practicing zazen In Zen Buddhism, sitting meditation or zazen (Japanese: 座禅; literally seated concentration) is a meditative discipline practitioners perform to calm the body and the mind and experience insight into the nature of existence. ... Shikantaza 只管打座 is literally translated as only focused on doing sitting. More often it is called: just sitting or silent illumination. It is the main meditation technique of the Soto school of Zen Buddhism. ... Perfection of Wisdom is a translation of the Sanskrit term prajñā pāramitā (Hanzi. ... The Heart of Perfect Wisdom Sutra or Heart Sutra (Sanskrit: Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra) is a well known Mahāyāna Buddhist scripture. ...


Rinzai

Founder: Linji (臨済), China, c. 850
Chinese name: Linji (臨済), named after founder
First Introduction to Japan: Eisai (栄西), 1191 AD
Major Influences: Hosso, Kegon
Doctrine: zazen (座禅, "sitting meditation"), especially koan (公案, "public matter") practice
Primary Texts: Transcendental Wisdom Sutras aka Prajnaparamita Sutras (般若波羅蜜経), incl. Heart Sutra There is a disputed proposal that this article should be merged with Rinzai and Linji. ... Japanese painting of Linji Yixuan (Jap. ... Japanese painting of Linji Yixuan (Jap. ... Myōan Eisai, founder of the Rinzai School of Zen, 12th century. ... Dharma-character school (Chinese: 法相宗 pinyin fa xiang zong) is the pejorative name for a stream of thought that represented the Indian Yogācāra system of thought in East Asia. ... Kegon is the name of the Japanese transmission of the Huayan school of Chinese Buddhism, via the Korean Hwaeom tradition. ... Kodo Sawaki practicing zazen In Zen Buddhism, sitting meditation or zazen (Japanese: 座禅; literally seated concentration) is a meditative discipline practitioners perform to calm the body and the mind and experience insight into the nature of existence. ... A koan is a story, dialog, question, or statement in the history and lore of Chan (Zen) Buddhism, generally containing aspects that are inaccessible to rational understanding, yet that may be accessible to intuition. ... Perfection of Wisdom is a translation of the Sanskrit term prajñā pāramitā (Hanzi. ... The Heart of Perfect Wisdom Sutra or Heart Sutra (Sanskrit: Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra) is a well known Mahāyāna Buddhist scripture. ...


Obaku

Founder: Ingen (隠元), Japan, 1654 AD
Japanese name: 黄檗, named the mountain where the founder had lived in China
Major Influences: Rinzai
Doctrine: kyozen itchi (経禅一致, "Unity of Sutras and Zen")
Primary Texts: Transcendental Wisdom Sutras aka Prajnaparamita Sutras (般若波羅蜜経), incl. Heart Sutra Ōbaku (Japanese. ... Yinyuan Longqi (Chinese 隱元隆琦; pinyin yin yuan long qi; Japanese Ingen Ryuki) (Fuqing, Fujian, 1592 - Uji, 1673) was a Chinese Linji Chan Buddhist monk, poet, and calligrapher. ... There is a disputed proposal that this article should be merged with Rinzai and Linji. ... Perfection of Wisdom is a translation of the Sanskrit term prajñā pāramitā (Hanzi. ... The Heart of Perfect Wisdom Sutra or Heart Sutra (Sanskrit: Prajñā Pāramitā Hridaya Sūtra) is a well known Mahāyāna Buddhist scripture. ...


Fuke

Founder: Puhua Chanshi (普化禅師)
First introduction to Japan: Shinchin Kakushin (心地覚心), 1254 AD
Major Influences: Rinzai
Abolished: 1871 Fuke Zen (Japanese: 普化禅) was a branch of Zen Buddhism which existed in Japan from the 13th century until the late 19th century. ... There is a disputed proposal that this article should be merged with Rinzai and Linji. ...


Nichiren

Nichiren (日蓮), "Japanese Lotus". Founded by Nichiren in 1253 AD. Doctrinally the school was focused on the Lotus Sutra (Hokkekyo 法華経), but practice is based around the mantra Namu Myoho Renge Kyo (南無妙法蓮華経). The school split into Nichiren Shu and Nichiren Shoshu after the death of Nichiren Nichiren Buddhism is a branch of Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Buddhist monk named Nichiren. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 - October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro, later Zesho-bo Rencho and sometimes called Nichiren Shonin or Nichiren Daishonin, was a Buddhist monk in 13th century Japan, and founder of Nichiren Buddhism, a Buddhist movement which continues today. ... For broader historical context, see 13th century. ... The Lotus Sutra or Sutra on the White Lotus of the Sublime Dharma (Sanskrit: Saddharmapundarīka-sūtra; Chinese: 妙法蓮華經 or Miàofǎ Liánhuā Jīng; Japanese Myōhō Renge Kyō) is one of the most popular and influential Mahāyāna sutras in East Asia and the basis on which the Tiantai and Nichiren sects of... Nam Myōhō Renge Kyō (南無妙法蓮華経, also transliterated Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō) is a mantra, which is recited as part of the practice of Nichiren Buddhism. ... Nichiren Shu (日蓮宗, lit. ... Nichiren Shōshū Buddhism (日蓮正宗) , with a growing number of believers worldwide, is a branch of Nichiren Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese Buddhist monk named Nichiren (1222-1282). ...


Timeline

Dharma-character school (Chinese: 法相宗 pinyin fa xiang zong) is the pejorative name for a stream of thought that represented the Indian Yogācāra system of thought in East Asia. ... Dharma-character school (Chinese: 法相宗 pinyin fa xiang zong) is the pejorative name for a stream of thought that represented the Indian Yogācāra system of thought in East Asia. ... Bodhisena (Sanskrit. ... Kegon is the name of the Japanese transmission of the Huayan school of Chinese Buddhism, via the Korean Hwaeom tradition. ... Huayan (華嚴, Pinyin: huáyán, Sanskrit: Avatamsaka) or Flower Garland is a tradition of Mahayana Buddhist philosophy that flourished in China during the Tang period. ... Dry-lacquer statue of Jianzhen made shortly after his death. ... Pali or Sanskrit word meaning discipline. The Vinaya is the textual framework for the Buddhist monastic community, or sangha. ... Saichō (最澄, 767-822) is a Japanese Buddhist monk credited with founding the Tendai school in Japan, based around the Chinese Tiantai tradition he was exposed to during his trip to China beginning in 804. ... Tendai (天台) is a Japanese school of Buddhism, a descendant of the Chinese Tiantai or Lotus Sutra school. ... Tiantai (天台宗, Wade-Giles: Tien Tai) is one of the thirteen schools of Buddhism in China and Japan, also called the Lotus Sutra School. ... Kūkai (空海) or Kōbō-Daishi (弘法大師) , 774—835 CE: Japanese monk, scholar, and artist, founder of the Shingon or “True Word” school of Buddhism. ... Shingon (真言宗) is a major school of Japanese Buddhism, and the most important school of Vajrayana Buddhism outside of the Himalayan region. ... Honen Shonin (法然; 1133-1212) is credited with the establishment of Pure Land Buddhism as an independent sect in Japan. ... Jodo can mean: A Japanese martial art that uses the jo, a four-foot long wooden staff, see Jojutsu. ... The Buddha Amitabha, 13th century, Kamakura, Japan. ... Myōan Eisai, founder of the Rinzai School of Zen, 12th century. ... There is a disputed proposal that this article should be merged with Rinzai and Linji. ... Japanese painting of Linji Yixuan (Jap. ... Dōgen Zenji (道元禅師; January 19, 1200 - September 22, 1253) was a Japanese Zen Buddhist teacher and founder of the Soto school of Zen in Japan. ... Soto (曹洞宗; Japanese: sōtō-shū; Chinese Caodong Zong) is one of the two major Japanese Zen sects. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 - October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro, later Zesho-bo Rencho and sometimes called Nichiren Shonin or Nichiren Daishonin, was a Buddhist monk in 13th century Japan, and founder of Nichiren Buddhism, a Buddhist movement which continues today. ... Nichiren Shu (日蓮宗, lit. ... Nichiren Shōshū Buddhism (日蓮正宗) , with a growing number of believers worldwide, is a branch of Nichiren Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese Buddhist monk named Nichiren (1222-1282). ... Yinyuan Longqi (Chinese 隱元隆琦; pinyin yin yuan long qi; Japanese Ingen Ryuki) (Fuqing, Fujian, 1592 - Uji, 1673) was a Chinese Linji Chan Buddhist monk, poet, and calligrapher. ... Ōbaku (黄檗 Japanese Ōbaku, pinyin Huángbò) refers to three separate topics: Mount Huangbo, a mountain in Chinas Fujian province, noted for its Buddhist temples; Huangbo Xiyun (黄檗希運), a Chinese Chan Buddhist master; and the Japanese Obaku School of Zen Buddhism. ... Ōbaku (黄檗 Japanese Ōbaku, pinyin Huángbò) refers to three separate topics: Mount Huangbo, a mountain in Chinas Fujian province, noted for its Buddhist temples; Huangbo Xiyun (黄檗希運), a Chinese Chan Buddhist master; and the Japanese Obaku School of Zen Buddhism. ...

See also

Buddhist philosophy is the branch of Eastern philosophy based on the teachings of Gautama Buddha (c. ... Buddhism in China - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The history of Buddhism spans from the 6th century BCE to the present, starting with the birth of the Buddha Siddharta Gautama. ... Shinbutsu Shugo (神仏習合, the kanji stand for Shinto, Buddhism, learn, join together) is called the Japanese fusion of Buddhism and Shinto. ...

References

  • Asakawa, K and Lodge, Henry Cabot (Ed.). Japan From the Japanese Government History.
  • "Japanese Buddhism" by Sir Charles Eliot, ISBN 0710309678

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