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Encyclopedia > Janet Parker

Janet Parker (1938/1939September 11, 1978) was a British medical photographer, and is the last person known to have died from smallpox. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a highly contagious disease unique to humans. ...


At the time of her death Parker worked in the University of Birmingham Medical School, Birmingham, England, in a darkroom above a lab where research with live smallpox virus was being conducted. On August 11, 1978, Parker (who had received a smallpox vaccine twelve years prior) fell ill, complaining of a headache and muscular pains. She soon developed spots that were thought to be a rash. Ms Parker was admitted to East Birmingham (now Heartlands) Hospital on August 24 and diagnosed (by Professor Alasdair Geddes and Dr.Thomas Henry Flewett) as being infected with Variola major , the most lethal strain of smallpox. The next day smallpox virus was confirmed by electron microscopy of fluid from her rash. Janet Parker died of smallpox on September 11 in Catherine-de-Barnes then an isolation hospital. Many people were exposed to Janet before she was admitted, but only her mother contracted the disease. Janet's mother survived, but her father died of a heart attack while visiting Janet in the hospital. The University of Birmingham Medical School is one of Britains largest and oldest medical schools with a yearly undergraduate intake of 450 students. ... See also Birmingham, USA, and other places called Birmingham. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the United Kingdom anthem is God Save the Queen. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Thomas Henry Flewett was born on 29 June 1922 in India, where his father was a member of the Indian Civil Service. ... Map sources for Catherine-de-Barnes at grid reference SP179803 Catherine-de-Barnes (known to locals as Catney) is a village within the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull in the English county of West Midlands. ... A cardiac arrest, also known as cardiorespiratory arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest or circulatory arrest, is the abrupt cessation of normal circulation of the blood due to failure of the heart to contract effectively during systole. ...


Although the exact route by which Janet was exposed is unknown, the laboratory in which the experiments were being performed had no containment procedures apart from a "fume cupboard". An investigation concluded that Mrs Parker had probably been infected by a strain of smallpox called Abid (after one of its earlier victims, a three-year-old Pakistani boy), which was being handled in the smallpox laboratory on 24 and 25 July. The virus had travelled in air currents up a service duct from the laboratory below to a room in the Anatomy Department which was used for telephone calls; on 25 July Mrs Parker had spent much more time there than usual ordering photographic materials because the financial year was about to end.



On September 6, Professor Henry Bedson, the son of Sir Samuel Phillips Bedson and the head of the medical microbiology department, committed suicide at home by cutting his throat. His suicide note read "I am sorry to have misplaced the trust which so many of my friends and colleagues have placed in me and my work."


In 1977, the World Health Organisation (WHO) had told Henry Bedson that his application for his lab to become a Smallpox Collaborating Centre had been rejected. This was partly because of safety concerns and the WHO wanted as few laboratories as possible handling the virus. For other meanings of the acronym WHO, see WHO (disambiguation) WHO flag Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the World Health Organization (WHO) is an agency of the United Nations, acting as a coordinating authority on international public health. ...


In 1980, smallpox was declared eradicated by the World Health Organization. WHO recommended the cessation of vaccinations, and that stockpiles of the virus be limited. All known stocks of smallpox were destroyed, except the stocks at the United States Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Vector Institute in Koltsovo, Novosibirsk in Siberia. The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) that acts as a coordinating authority on international public health. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta is recognized as the lead United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people by providing credible information to enhance health decisions, and promoting health through strong partnerships with state health departments and other organizations. ... The Vector State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology, also known as the Vector Institute is a highly sophisticated biological research center in Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Oblast, Russia. ... “Siberian” redirects here. ...


See also

Rahima Banu (b. ... Ali Maow Maalin was the last person in the world known to be infected with naturally occurring smallpox. ... This is a list of unusual deaths – unique causes or extremely rare circumstances – recorded throughout history. ...

Reference

  • Tucker, Jonathan. Scourge: The Once and Future Threat of Smallpox. Grove Press, 2002, 304 pages. Includes an account of the Parker tragedy.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Janet Parker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (302 words)
Janet Parker (1938/1939 - September 11, 1978) was a British medical photographer, and is the last person known to have died from smallpox.
At the time of her death Parker worked in the University of Birmingham Medical School, Birmingham, England, in a darkroom above a lab where research with live smallpox virus was being conducted.
Janet's mother survived, but her father died of a heart attack while visiting Janet in the hospital.
Parker Links (572 words)
EDMUND PARKER, youngest son of PARKER of Horrackford, married JANET PARKER, daughter and heiress of ROBERT PARKER, of PARKER of BROWSHOLME, England in 1529.
Parker Family of Florida -- A genealogy about John H. Parker (1808-) and his wife, Honor Smith (1812-) of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida and their descendants who lived in Madison and Suwannee County, Florida.
Descendants of Robert Parker of Banrstable, Massachuesetts -- Robert Parker was born about 1630 somewhere in England, and came to America with his parents and one brother named Elisha and a sister named Jane about 1635, and landed at Cape Cod.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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