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Encyclopedia > Jamestown Settlement
Sketch of Jamestown c.1608
Sketch of Jamestown c.1608
Recreated Powhatan village at the Jamestown Settlement
Recreated Powhatan village at the Jamestown Settlement

The Jamestown Settlement was one of the first English settlements in North America. Named for King James I of England, Jamestown was founded in the Virginia Colony on May 14, 1607. In modern times, "Jamestown Settlement" is also a promotional name used by the Commonwealth of Virginia's portion of the historical attractions at Jamestown. It is adjacent and complementary to the Historic Jamestown attraction at Jamestown Island. Image File history File links Sketch of the Jamestown fort sent to King Philip III of Spain by his ambassador Zuniga. ... Image File history File links Sketch of the Jamestown fort sent to King Philip III of Spain by his ambassador Zuniga. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 1153 KB) Summary Jamestown Settlement, Powhatan Village Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 1153 KB) Summary Jamestown Settlement, Powhatan Village Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony from sea to sea The Virginia Colony refers to the English colony in North America that existed during the 17th and 18th centuries before the American Revolution. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... A statue commemorating the site of the first permanent English settlement in the New World. ... Jamestown was a village on an island in the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now. ...

Contents

Original settlement

Jamestown followed no fewer than eighteen earlier failed attempts at European colonization of North America, including the famous "Lost Colony" at Roanoke Island in what is now Dare County, North Carolina, and the ill-fated Spanish Ajacan Mission, established thirty-six years earlier by Jesuit priests less than fifteen miles from Jamestown, Virginia. The only successful settlement that preceded Jamestown was the Spanish settlement St. Augustine, Florida, established in 1565. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Colonialism. ... Lost Colony redirects here. ... , Roanoke Island is an island in Dare County near the coast of North Carolina, United States. ... Dare County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... The Ajacan Mission was a failed attempt in the 16th century by Spanish Jesuit priests to settle and bring Christianize the Native Americans on the Virginia Peninsula in the New World. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... At Jamestown Settlement, replicas of Christopher Newports 3 ships are docked in the harbour. ... Nickname: Location in St. ...


Late in 1606, English entrepreneurs set sail with a charter from the Virginia Company of London to establish a colony in the New World. After a particularly long voyage of five months duration, the three ships, named Susan Constant, The Discovery, and The Godspeed, under Captain Christopher Newport, made land in April 1607 at a place they named Cape Henry. Under orders to select a more secure location, they set up a cross and gave thanks for safe landing, then set about exploring what is now Hampton Roads and a Chesapeake Bay outlet they named the James River in honor of their sitting king, James I of England. Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French introduced and first defined by the Irish economist Richard Cantillon) is a person who operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Virginia Company of London Seal The London Company (also called the Virginia Company of London) was an English joint stock company established by royal charter by James I on April 10, 1606 with the purpose of establishing colonial settlements in North America. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Susan Constant was the largest of three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Discovery was a 70-ton fly-boat of the English East India Company, launched before 1602. ... Godspeed was one of the three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... Christopher Newport (c. ... Year 1607 (MDCVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Cape Henry is a cape on the Atlantic shore of Virginia. ... Also known as the Latin cross or crux ordinaria. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... The Chesapeake Bay - Landsat photo The Chesapeake Bay where the Susquehanna River empties into it. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


On May 14, 1607, Captain Edward Maria Wingfield, elected president of the governing council the day before, selected Jamestown Island on the James River, some 40 miles (67 kilometers) inland from the Atlantic Ocean, as a prime location for a fortified settlement. The island was surrounded by deep water, making it a navigable and defensible strategic point, qualities high in the minds of the Englishmen. However, the island was swampy and isolated, offered limited space, and was plagued by mosquitoes and brackish tidal river water unsuitable for drinking. Perhaps the best thing about it from an English point of view was that it was not inhabited by nearby Native American tribes, who regarded the site as too poor and remote for agriculture. Edward Maria Wingfield (born around 1560 in Stoneley (Huntingdonshire); died after 1613) was a soldier and English colonist in America. ... Jamestown was a village on an island in the James River in Virginia, about 45 miles southeast of where Richmond, Virginia, is now. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer) (symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... This article is about the insect; for the WWII aircraft see De Havilland Mosquito. ... This article is about tides in the ocean. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in...


Despite the inspired leadership of Captain John Smith early on, many of the colonists and their replacements died within the first five years. In 1608, arriving ships brought supplies and experts from Poland and Germany, who would help to establish the first factories in the colony. As a result, glassware became the first American product to be exported to Europe. After Smith was forced to return to England due to an explosion during a trading expedition, the colony was led by George Percy, who proved incompetent in negotiating with the native tribes. During what became called the "Starving Time" in 1609-1610, over 80% of the colonists perished, and the island was briefly abandoned that spring. However, on June 10, 1610, retreating settlers were intercepted a few miles downriver by a supply mission from London headed by a new governor, Lord De La Warr, who brought much-needed supplies and additional settlers. Lord De La Warr's ship was named The Deliverance. The settlers called this The Day of Providence, and the state of Delaware was eventually named after the timely governor. Fortuitously, among the colonists inspired to remain was John Rolfe, who carried with him a cache of untested new tobacco seeds from the Caribbean. (His first wife and their young son had already died in Bermuda, after being shipwrecked on the island during the voyage from England.) Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Captain/Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... This article refers to a colony in politics and history. ... Events March 18 - Sissinios formally crowned Emperor of Ethiopia May 14 - Protestant Union founded in Auhausen. ... A factory (previously manufactory) is a large industrial building where goods or products are manufactured. ... Glassware includes: Drinkware (for beverages) Vases Pitcher (container)s Art glass Art marbles Laboratory glassware Stained glass is not directly glassware, but is closely related. ... George Percy (September 4, ???1588) - 1631 was an English explorer and author. ... The Starving Time at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony occurred during the winter of 1609–10. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Thomas West, 3rd (or 12th) Baron De La Warr (July 9, 1577 - June 7, 1618), was the Englishman for whom the state, river, and American Indian tribe called Delaware (in the United States) were named. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the Virginia colonist. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in the genus Nicotiana. ... West Indies redirects here. ...


Due to the aristocratic backgrounds of many of the new colonists and the communal nature of their work load, progress through the first few years was inconsistent, at best. By 1613, six years after Jamestown's founding, the organizers and shareholders of the Virginia Land Company were desperate to increase the efficiency and profitability of the struggling colony. Without stockholder consent, Governor Dale assigned 3-acre plots to its "ancient planters" and smaller plots to the settlement's later arrivals. Measurable economic progress was made, and the settlers began expanding their planting to land belonging to local native tribes. Aristocracy is a form of government in which rulership is in the hands of an upper class known as aristocrats. ... Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. ...


The following year, 1614, John Rolfe began to successfully harvest American tobacco. Prosperous and wealthy, he married Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, bringing several years of peace between the settlers and natives. (Through their son, Thomas Rolfe, many of the First Families of Virginia trace both Native American and English roots.) However, at the end of a public relations trip to England in 1616, Pocahontas became sick and died. The following year, her father also died. As the settlers continued to leverage more land for tobacco farming, relations with the natives worsened. Powhatan's brother, a fierce warrior named Opchanacanough, became head of the Powhatan Confederacy. Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... For other uses, see Pocahontas (disambiguation). ... Thomas Rolfe (January 30, 1615 - c. ... First Families of Virginia is an informal association of people, some of whom can trace their ancestry to the original Virginian colonists from England who landed at primarily at Jamestown and along the James River and other navigable waters in the Virginia Colony during the 17th century. ... Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Opchanacanough Opechancanough or Opchanacanough (1554?-1644)was a chief of the Powhatan Confederacy of what is now Virginia in the United States. ... The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten) were a very powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in what is now Virginia at the time of the first European-Native encounters. ...


In 1619, the first representative assembly in America convened in a Jamestown church, "to establish one equal and uniform government over all Virginia" which would provide "just laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people there inhabiting." This became known as the House of Burgesses (forerunner of the Virginia General Assembly, which last met in Jamestown in January, 2007). Individual land ownership was also instituted, and the colony was divided into four large "boroughs" or "incorporations" called "citties" (sic) by the colonists. Jamestown was located in James Cittie. Initially only men of English origin were permitted to vote. The Polish artisans protested and refused to work if not allowed to vote. July 12 the court granted the Poles equal voting rights[1]. Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel The Virginia House of Burgesses formed, the first legislative body in colonial America. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... James City (or citiie as it was then called) was one of four incorporations established in the Virginia Colony in 1619 by the proprietor, the Virginia Company. ...


After several years of strained coexistence, Chief Opchanacanough and his Powhatan Confederacy attempted to eliminate the English colony once and for all. On the morning of March 22, 1622, a Good Friday, they attacked outlying plantations and communities up and down the James River in what became known as the Indian Massacre of 1622. The attack killed over 300 settlers, about a third of the English-speaking population. Sir Thomas Dale's progressive development at Henricus, which was to feature a college to educate the natives, and Wolstenholme Towne at Martin's Hundred, were both essentially wiped out. Jamestown was spared only through a timely warning. There was not enough time to spread the word to the outposts. Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Good Friday is the Friday before Easter (Easter always falls on a Sunday). ... Indian massacre of 1622, depicted as a woodcut by Theodore de Bry The Indian massacre of 1622 (also known as the Jamestown massacre) occurred in the Virginia Colony on March 22, 1622. ... Sir Thomas Dale (d. ... The Citie of Henricus was a city founded by Sir Thomas Dale in 1611 as an alternative to the swampy and dangerous area around Jamestown Settlement, Virginia. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Wolstenholme Towne was a fortified settlement in the Virginia Colony with a population of about 40 settlers of the Virginia Company of London which was located about 9 miles downstream from Jamestown. ... Martins Hundred was an early 17th century plantation located along about ten miles of the north shore of the James River in the Virginia Colony east of Jamestown in present-day James City County, Virginia. ...


Despite such setbacks, the colony continued to grow. In 1624, King James revoked the Virginia Company's charter, and Virginia became a royal colony. Ten years later, in 1634, by order of King Charles I, the colony was divided into the original eight shires of Virginia (or counties), in a fashion similar to that practiced in England. Jamestown was now located in James City Shire, soon renamed the "County of James City", better-known in modern times as James City County, Virginia, the nation's oldest county. Events January 24 - Alfonso Mendez, appointed by Pope Gregory XV as Prelate of Ethiopia, arrives at Massawa from Goa. ... Events Moses Amyrauts Traite de la predestination is published Curaçao captured by the Dutch Treaty of Polianovska First meeting of the Académie française The witchcraft affair at Loudun Jean Nicolet lands at Green Bay, Wisconsin Opening of Covent Garden Market in London English establish a settlement... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Eight Shires of Virginia were formed in 1634 in the Virginia Colony. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... James City Shire was formed in the British colony of Virginia in 1634. ... James City County, Virginia as shown on 1895 map James City County (formally, the County of James City) is a county located on the Virginia Peninsula in the Hampton Roads region of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ...


Another large-scale "Indian attack" in 1644 resulted in the capture of Chief Opchanacanough. He was murdered while in custody, and the Powhatan Confederacy was decimated. Most survivors assimilated into the general population, or began living on two reservations in present-day King William County, Virginia, where the Mattaponi and Pamunkey reservations continue in modern times. // Events February to August - Explorer Abel Tasmans second expedition for the Dutch East India Company maps the north coast of Australia. ... King William County is a county located on the Middle Peninsula in the state of Virginia. ... William Bradby dressed in Mattaponi regalia. ... The Pamunkey Native American tribe has been in existence since pre-Columbian times. ...


A generation later, during Bacon's Rebellion in 1676, Jamestown was burned, eventually to be rebuilt. During its recovery, the Virginia legislature met first at Governor William Berkeley's nearby Green Spring Plantation, and later at Middle Plantation, which had been started in 1632 as a fortified community inland on the Virginia Peninsula. When the statehouse burned again in 1698, this time accidentally, the legislature again temporarily relocated to Middle Plantation, and was able to meet in the new facilities of the College of William and Mary, which had been established after receiving a royal charter in 1693. Rather than rebuilding at Jamestown again, the capital of the colony was moved permanently to Middle Plantation in 1699. The town was soon renamed Williamsburg, to honor the reigning monarch, King William III. A new Capitol building and "Governor's Palace" were erected there in the following years. Bacons Rebellion or the Virginia Rebellion was an uprising in 1676 in the Virginia Colony, led by Nathaniel Bacon. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... For the 15th-century marquess, see Marquess of Berkeley. ... remains of ancillary structure at Green Spring Plantation site, James City County, Virginia photo by part of Colonial National Historical Park, National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior Green Spring Plantation in James City County about five miles west of Williamsburg, was the 17th century plantation of one of... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... William III of England, II of Scotland and III of Orange (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702) was a Dutch aristocrat, the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King...


Jamestown As a Rural Outpost

Originally, the first people of Jamestown were reluctant to work, as they were used to the luxury of having servants and possibly even slaves back in England.[citation needed] This was until Captain John Smith ordered that if the people did not do their share of work, then they would not get their food (for that day at least). Servant has a number of meaning: A servant is another word for domestic worker, a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ...


Early on in Jamestown's history, there was no known method of purifying the river water they drank, and many settlers unwittingly died from resulting diseases.


By the early 18th century, Jamestown was in decline, eventually reverting to a few scattered farms, the period of occupied settlement essentially over. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...


During the American Revolution, a military post was set up on the island to exchange American and British soldiers. During the American Civil War, Confederate soldiers erected a fort near the town church in 1861, but it later fell to Union troops. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


A site of historical interest

View of Jamestown Island today looking toward the statue of John Smith which was erected in 1909. The Jamestown Church, circa 1639, is in the left background.
View of Jamestown Island today looking toward the statue of John Smith which was erected in 1909. The Jamestown Church, circa 1639, is in the left background.

Late in the 19th century, Jamestown became the focus of renewed historical interest and efforts at preservation. In 1893, a portion of the island was donated to the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA) for that purpose. A seawall was constructed, which preserved the site where the remains of the original "James Fort" were to be discovered by archaeologists of the Jamestown Rediscovery project beginning in 1994, a century later. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1984 × 1488 pixel, file size: 1. ... Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Captain/Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up preservation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Founded in 1889, the Richmond, Virginia-based Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities was the United States first statewide historic preservation group. ... A seawall is a form of hard coastal defence constructed on the inland part of a coast to reduce the effects of strong waves and are built in the water. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Jamestown Rediscovery is an archaeological project of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA) investigating the remains of the original Jamestown Settlement established in the Virginia Colony beginning on May 14, 1607. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


In 1907, the Jamestown Exposition to celebrate the settlement's 300th anniversary was held at a more convenient location at Sewell's Point, near Norfolk. By the 1930s, all of the island was under protective ownership, and the Colonial National Historical Park was created by the National Park Service. Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Jamestown Exposition was one of the many worlds fairs and expositions that were popular in the United States early part of the 20th century. ... Hampton Roads, Virginia 1858 Sewells Point is a peninsula of land in the independent city of Norfolk, Virginia in the United States, located at the mouth of the salt-water port of Hampton Roads. ... Motto: Crescas (Latin for, Thou shalt grow. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Colonial National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located in the southeastern part of Virginia, near Williamsburg and Newport News. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


In 1957, the Jamestown Festival, a celebration of its 350th anniversary, was held at the original site (and nearby). The renovated "settlement" now linked by the bucolic Colonial Parkway with the other two points of Virginia's Historic Triangle, Colonial Williamsburg, and Yorktown, the festival was a great success. Tourism became continuous after 1957. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Colonial Parkway is a scenic 23-mile parkway linking the 3 popular attractions of Virginias Historic Triangle of colonial-era communities, Jamestown, Williamsburg, and Yorktown. ... Colonial Williamsburg is the historic district of the independent city of Williamsburg, Virginia. ... York Hall is a government building on Yorktowns historic Main Street. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...

See also: Jamestown Festival Park

Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and her consort Prince Phillip inspect replica of Susan Constant at Jamestown Festival Park in Virginia on October 16, 1957 Jamestown Festival Park was established at Jamestown, Virginia in 1957 to mark the 350th anniversary of the founding of the Jamestown Settlement. ...

Jamestown Settlement in the 21st century

The stern of the replicated Susan Constant, which is at port in Jamestown Settlement.
The stern of the replicated Susan Constant, which is at port in Jamestown Settlement.

The name "Jamestown Settlement" currently is used to describe the Commonwealth of Virginia's state-sponsored attraction, which began in 1957 as Jamestown Festival Park, created for the 350 anniversary of the original settlement. The actual location of the settlement is partially underwater, so officials built this attraction near the entrance to Jamestown Island. It includes a recreated English Fort and Native American Village, extensive indoor and outdoor displays, and features three popular replicas of the original settler's ships. It was greatly expanded early in the 21st century. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Susan Constant was the largest of three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and her consort Prince Phillip inspect replica of Susan Constant at Jamestown Festival Park in Virginia on October 16, 1957 Jamestown Festival Park was established at Jamestown, Virginia in 1957 to mark the 350th anniversary of the founding of the Jamestown Settlement. ... Replicas is an LP by Gary Numan and the Tubeway Army, released in 1979. ... 20XX redirects here. ...


On Jamestown Island itself, the National Park Service operates Historic Jamestowne. Over a million artifacts have been recovered by the Jamestown Rediscovery project with ongoing archaeological work, including a number of exciting recent discoveries. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Historic Jamestowne is the official name used for promotional purposes for the original site of the 1607 James Fort and the later 17th century city of Jamestown, located on the James River at Jamestown, Virginia. ... An artifact (also artefact) is a term coined by Sir Julian Huxley meaning any object or process resulting from human activity. ... Jamestown Rediscovery is an archaeological project of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA) investigating the remains of the original Jamestown Settlement established in the Virginia Colony beginning on May 14, 1607. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ...


Early in the 21st century, in preparation for the upcoming Jamestown 2007 event commemorating America's 400th Anniversary, new accommodations, transportation facilities and attractions were planned. The celebration began in the Spring of 2006 with the sailing of a new replica Godspeed to six major East Coast U.S. cities, where several hundred thousand people viewed it. Major corporate sponsors of Jamestown 2007 include Norfolk Southern Corporation, Verizon Communications, and Anheuser-Busch. Late in 2006, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip announced their intentions to pay another state visit to Jamestown in May 2007. The Virginia state quarter commerates Jamestons quadricentennial. ... Americas 400th Anniversary is commemorating one of the proudest moments of the new century! The very essence of modern America took root on the banks of the James River in 1607, at Jamestown, Virginia . ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Godspeed was one of the three ships of the English East India Company led by Captain Christopher Newport on the voyage which resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia in 1607. ... East Coast can refer to: East Coast of the United States East Coast hip hop East Coast Park East-coast liberal East Coast Railway East Coast Akalat East Coast bias East Coast Music Awards East Coast Bays East Coast Main Line East Coast Greenway East Coast Parkway East Coast Swing... Norfolk Southern Corporation (NYSE: NSC) is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... Verizon Communications, Inc. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten, formerly Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark), styled HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born 10 June 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... State visits usually involve a military review. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Films

For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Pocahontas is the thirty-third animated feature in the Disney animated features canon. ... Statue at Jamestown VA, photo Aug 2007 Captain/Sir John Smith (1580–June 21, 1631), was an English soldier, sailor, and author. ... The New World is a 2005 movie directed by Terrence Malick and starring Colin Farrell. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Colin James Farrell (born May 31, 1976) is an Irish actor who has appeared in several high-profile Hollywood films including Daredevil, Miami Vice, Minority Report, Phone Booth and S.W.A.T.. // Farrell was born prematurely. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Chickahominy also known as the Chick is a river in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of Virginia, near which several battles of the United States Civil War were fought in 1862 and 1864. ... The Citie of Henricus was a city founded by Sir Thomas Dale in 1611 as an alternative to the swampy and dangerous area around Jamestown Settlement, Virginia. ... Chesterfield County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia, a state of the United States. ...

Further reading

  • Lepore, Jill. "Our Town". The New Yorker, 2 April 2007, pp. 40-45.
  • Price, David A., Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of a New Nation (New York: Knopf, 2003)
  • Wingfield, Jocelyn R., Virginia's True Founder: Edward Maria Wingfield and His Times, 1650-1631 (Athens, GA: WFS, 1993)
  • A. Bryant Nichols Jr., Captain Christopher Newport: Admiral of Virginia, Sea Venture, 2007
  • Matthew Sharpe's third novel, Jamestown, reimagines the events of the settlement in the post-apocalyptic future, where New York City is in turmoil and send down men for food and oil.
  • Hoobler, Dorothy, Thomas Hoobler., Captain John Smith: Jamestown and the Birth of an American Dream (Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, 2006)

References

  1. ^ ibid

External links

  • Jamestown Settlement Official Webpage
  • Jamestown 2007 website
  • Jamestown 1607 website
  • Friends of Green Spring a large interactive web site with streaming video and more than a dozen essays ("The voices of Green Spring")
  • Historic Jamestowne website
  • National Geographic Magazine Jamestown Interactive
  • Virtual Jamestown Essays

  Results from FactBites:
 
History of Jamestown (904 words)
Recent discovery of the exact location of the first settlement and its fort indicates that the actual settlement site was in a more secure place, away from the channel, where Spanish ships, could not fire point blank into the Fort.
Although the suffering did not totally end at Jamestown for decades, some years of peace and prosperity followed the wedding of Pocahontas, the favored daughter of the Algonquian chief Powhatan, to tobacco entrepreneur John Rolfe.
Jamestown remained the capital of Virginia until its major statehouse, located on the western end of the APVA property, burned in 1698.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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