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Encyclopedia > James Young Simpson
James Young Simpson
James Young Simpson

Sir James Young Simpson, (June 7, 1811 born in Bathgate, West Lothian, died May 6, 1870), was a Scottish doctor and important figure in the history of medicine. James Young Simpson File links The following pages link to this file: James Young Simpson User:Ekem/images Categories: Author died more than 100 years ago public domain images ... James Young Simpson File links The following pages link to this file: James Young Simpson User:Ekem/images Categories: Author died more than 100 years ago public domain images ... Image File history File links James_Young_Simpson_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... Image File history File links James_Young_Simpson_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... Look up sir in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Bathgate on a misty day Bathgate is a town in West Lothian, Scotland, on the M8 motorway five miles west of Livingston. ... West Lothian or Linlithgowshire (Lodainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy area. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic)1 Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


He received an education at the local school and entered the University of Edinburgh when he was 14 years old. He became a Licentiate in 1830 before graduating in 1832. He was professor of midwifery at the University of Edinburgh and physician to Queen Victoria. The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... licentiate- noun Someone who holds a certificate of competence to practise a profession. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... // Midwifery is the term traditionally used to describe the art of assisting a woman through childbirth. ... The Doctor by Luke Fildes This article is about the term physician, one type of doctor; for other uses of the word doctor see Doctor. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ...


He discovered the anaesthetic properties of chloroform and — against medical and religious opposition — successfully introduced it for general medical use. Anesthesia (AE), also anaesthesia (BE), is the process of blocking the perception of pain and other sensations. ... For the song Chloroform by Spoon, see A Series of Sneaks Chloroform, also known as trichloromethane and methyl trichloride, is a chemical compound with formula CHCl3. ...

Contents

Career

Simpson completed his final medical examination at the age of 18 but, as he was too young, had to wait two years before he got his license to practice medicine. It was during this period that he became a Freemason, being initiated in a Lodge in his home town of Bathgate.


He developed an interest in obstetrics, and at the age of 28 became Chair of the Midwifery at the University of Edinburgh. He improved on the design of the obstetrical forceps and, like Semmelweis, he fought against the contagiousness of puerperal sepsis. His most noted contribution was the introduction of anesthesia to childbirth. Forceps are a hand-held instrument used for grasping and holding objects, similar in concept to tongs, tweezers or pincers. ... Ignaz Semmelweis on an old Austrian postage stamp Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (originally Ignác Fülöp Semmelweis) (July 1, 1818 - August 13, 1865) was the Hungarian physician who demonstrated that puerperal fever (also known as childbed fever) was contagious and that its incidence could be drastically reduced by enforcing... Anesthesia or anaesthesia (see spelling differences) has traditionally meant the condition of having the perception of pain and other sensations blocked. ... Childbirth (also called labour, birth, partus or parturition) is the culmination of a human pregnancy with the emergence of a newborn infant/s from the mothers uterus. ...


A free thinker by most accounts, his intellectual interests ranged from archeology to an almost taboo subject at the time: hermaphroditism. He was a very early advocate of the use of mid wifes in the hospital environment. To some extent that still has yet to happen; at least in North America. Many women visited his offices as well for their personal needs and it would not be an understatement to say he was gynecologist to European society.


It was his achievements and wide ranging interests that lead to his town house in Edinburgh? being a gathering point for many members of society; especially intellectual free thinkers. His impish sense of humour got the better of him on at least one of these occasions when he sat a Southern U.S. slave owner next to a freed slave at the dinner table. Since this town house was fairly busy at times he preferred to keep his wife and children at their country house near Bathgate.

The statue of Sir James Young Simpson, Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1149x1799, 1649 KB) }} File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1149x1799, 1649 KB) }} File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Obstetrical Anaesthesia

On January 19, 1847 he was the first to apply a modern anaesthetic, ether, to alleviate the pain of labour. Many opposed this practice, as it was viewed as an act against nature or the will of God. Despite such hostilities, Simpson searched further to find a better anaesthetic and discovered the effects of chloroform. Vindication of his efforts came when Queen Victoria used chloroform during the delivery of Prince Leopold in 1853. The anaesthetist was John Snow. January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Diethyl ether, also known as ether and ethoxyethane, is a clear, colorless, and highly flammable liquid with a low boiling point and a characteristic smell. ... In classical economics and all micro-economics labour is a measure of the work done by human beings and is one of three factors of production, the others being land and capital. ... For the song Chloroform by Spoon, see A Series of Sneaks Chloroform, also known as trichloromethane and methyl trichloride, is a chemical compound with formula CHCl3. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... His Royal Highness The Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany (Leopold George Duncan Albert) (7 April 1853 - 28 March 1884), was a member of the British Royal Family, a son of Queen Victoria. ... Dr. John Snow John Snow (1813 - 1858) was a British physician and a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene, and is often considered one of the fathers of epidemiology for his work in tracing the source of a cholera outbreak in Soho, Westminster, England in 1854. ...


Victo Dolore

Full recognition was quick to follow. He was the first man to be knighted for services to medicine. He died at the age of fifty. "Victo Dolore" (pain conquered) is the inscription of his coat of arms. A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


A spot for his burial in Westminster Abbey was offered to his family, but they declined and instead buried him closer to home in Warriston Cemetery, Edinburgh. Instead a memorial bust can be found in a niche at Westminster. The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


On the day of his funeral a Scottish holiday was declared, including the banks and stock markets with over 100,000 citizens lining the funeral cortege on its way to the cemetery while over 1,700 colleagues and business leaders took part in the procession itself.


Reference

  • Speert H: Obstetric and Gynecologic Milestones The MacMillan Company, New York, 1958.
  • Simpson, Myrtle: "Simpson the Obstetrician" Victor Gollancz, London?, 1972.
  • Gordon, B. Laing: "Sir James Young Simpson & Chloroform 1811-1870" T. Fischer Unwin, London, 1897.

External links

  • Overview of Sir James Young Simpson
  • Papers of Sir James Young Simpson (1811-1870)
  • Simpson Family Tree

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir James Young Simpson - LoveToKnow 1911 (490 words)
SIR JAMES YOUNG SIMPSON (1811-1870), Scottish physician, was born at Bathgate, Linlithgow, Scotland, on the 7th of June 1811.
His father was a baker in that town, and James was the youngest of a family of seven.
Simpson, who had been created a baronet in 1866, died in Edinburgh on the 6th of May 1870, and was accorded a public funeral; his statue in bronze now stands in West Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh.
James Young Simpson Summary (1712 words)
Simpson was the son of a village baker.
Simpson warned "The man laid on the operating table in one of our hospitals, is exposed to more chances of death than the English soldier on the field of Waterloo." Simpson's article led to major improvements in hospital administration, and contributed to the tearing down of many of the most offending European hospitals.
Simpson was born on June 7, 1811, in Bathgate, a village between the large Scottish cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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