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Encyclopedia > James Thurber
James Thurber

Born James Grover Thurber
December 8, 1894(1894-12-08)
Columbus, Ohio
Died November 2, 1961 (aged 66)
New York, New York
Occupation Humorist
Nationality American
Writing period 1929-1961
Genres short stories, cartoons, essays
Subjects humor, language
Notable work(s) My Life and Hard Times,
My World - And Welcome to It

James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. Thurber was best known for his contributions (both cartoons and short stories) to The New Yorker magazine. James A. Thurber James A. Thurber is Distinguished Professor of Government and Director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies at American University in Washington, D.C.. He was the principal investigator of a seven year grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts to the Campaign Management Institute to study... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2147x2786, 461 KB) (Note: high resolution version from http://memory. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A Gag Cartoon is a single-panel cartoon, usually including a written caption that appears beneath the drawing. ... Essay, a short work that treats of a topic from an authors personal point of view, often taking into account subjective experiences and personal reflections upon them. ... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... George Robert Bob Newhart (born September 5, 1929 in Oak Park, Illinois) is an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... Bukowski redirects here. ... This article is about the American author. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... A humorist is an author who specializes in short, humorous articles or essays. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... A Gag Cartoon is a single-panel cartoon, usually including a written caption that appears beneath the drawing. ... This article is in need of attention. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ...

Contents

Biography

Thurber was born in Columbus, Ohio to Charles L. Thurber and Mary Agnes (Mame) Fisher Thurber. Both of his parents greatly influenced his work. His father, a sporadically employed clerk and minor politician who dreamed of being a lawyer or an actor, is said to have been the inspiration for the small, timid protagonist typical of many of his stories. Thurber described his mother as a "born comedienne" and "one of the finest comic talents I think I have ever known." She was a practical joker, on one occasion pretending to be crippled and attending a faith healer revival, only to jump up and proclaim herself healed.[1] Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Thurber had two brothers, William and Robert. Once, while playing a game of William Tell, his brother William shot James in the eye with an arrow. Because of the lack of medical technology, Thurber lost his eye. This injury would later cause him to be almost entirely blind. During his childhood he was unable to participate in sports and activities because of his injury, and instead developed a creative imagination, which he shared in his writings.[1] For other uses, see William Tell (disambiguation). ...


From 1913 to 1918, Thurber attended The Ohio State University, where he was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity. He never graduated from the University because his poor eyesight prevented him from taking a mandatory ROTC course.[2] In 1995 he was posthumously awarded a degree.[3] The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... A Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program is a college-based, officer commissioning program, predominantely in the United States. ...


From 1918 to 1920, at the close of World War I, Thurber worked as a code clerk for the Department of State, first in Washington, D.C. and then at the American Embassy in Paris, France. After this Thurber returned to Columbus, where he began his writing career as a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch from 1921 to 1924. During part of this time, he reviewed current books, films, and plays in a weekly column called "Credos and Curios," a title that later would be given to a posthumous collection of his work. Thurber also returned to Paris in this period, where he wrote for the Chicago Tribune and other newspapers.[3] “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The Columbus Dispatch is a daily newspaper, based in Columbus, Ohio, that serves the central portion of the state. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ...


In 1925, he moved to Greenwich Village in New York City, getting a job as a reporter for the New York Evening Post. He joined the staff of The New Yorker in 1927 as an editor with the help of his friend and fellow New Yorker contributor, E.B. White. His career as a cartoonist began in 1930 when White found some of Thurber's drawings in a trash can and submitted them for publication. Thurber would contribute both his writings and his drawings to The New Yorker until the 1950s. The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. ...


Thurber was married twice. In 1922, Thurber married Althea Adams. The marriage was troubled and ended in divorce in May 1935.[1] Adams gave Thurber his only child, his daughter Rosemary. Thurber remarried in June, 1935 to Helen Wismer. His second marriage lasted until he died in 1961, at the age of 66, due to complications from pneumonia, which followed upon a stroke suffered at his home. His last words, aside from the repeated word "God," were "God bless... God damn," according to Helen Thurber.[4] This article is about human pneumonia. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ...


Career

Thurber worked hard in the 1920s, both in the U.S. and in France, to establish himself as a professional writer. However, unique among major American literary figures, he became equally well known for his simple, surrealistic drawings and cartoons. Both his skills were helped along by the support of, and collaboration with, fellow New Yorker staff member E. B. White. White insisted that Thurber's sketches could stand on their own as artistic expressions — and Thurber would go on to draw six covers and numerous classic illustrations for the New Yorker. Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899, Mount Vernon, New York – October 1, 1985, North Brooklin, Maine) was a leading American essayist, author, humorist, poet and literary stylist. ...


While able to sketch out his cartoons in the usual fashion in the 1920s and 1930s, his failing eyesight later required him to draw them on very large sheets of paper using a thick black crayon (also, on black paper using white chalk, from which they were photographed and the colors reversed for publication). Regardless of method, his cartoons became as notable as his writings; they possessed an eerie, wobbly feel that seems to mirror Thurber's idiosyncratic view on life. He once wrote that people said it looked like he drew them under water. (Dorothy Parker, contemporary and friend of Thurber, referred to his cartoons as having the "semblance of unbaked cookies."). The last drawing Thurber was able to complete was a self-portrait in yellow crayon on black paper, which appeared on the cover of the July 9, 1951, edition of Time Magazine.[5] The same drawing also appeared on the dust jacket of The Thurber Album (1952). Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... See also: 1951 in literature, other events of 1952, 1953 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


Many of his short stories are humorous fictional memoirs from his life, but he also wrote darker material, such as "The Whip-Poor-Will," a story of madness and murder. "The Dog Who Bit People" and "The Night the Bed Fell" are his most well known short stories; they can be found in My Life and Hard Times, the creative mix of autobiography and fiction which was his 'break-out' book. Also notable, and often anthologized, are "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," "The Catbird Seat," "A Couple of Hamburgers," "The Greatest Man in the World" and "If Grant Had Been Drinking at Appomattox," which can be found in The Thurber Carnival. The Middle Aged Man on the Flying Trapeze has several short stories with a tense undercurrent of marital discord. The book was published the year of his divorce and remarriage. His story "You Could Look It Up," about a midget being brought in to take a walk in a baseball game, is said to have been an inspiration for Bill Veeck's stunt with Eddie Gaedel with the St. Louis Browns in 1951. Veeck claimed an older provenance for the stunt, but was certainly aware of the Thurber story.[6] For the 1947 film, see The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947 film). ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... McLean house, April 1865. ... William Louis Veeck Jr. ... Edward Carl Eddie Gaedel (June 8, 1925 - June 18, 1961), born in Chicago, Illinois, was an American dwarf who became famous for participating in a Major League Baseball game. ... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ...


In addition to his other fiction, Thurber wrote over seventy-five fables, most of which were collected in Fables for Our Time & Famous Poems Illustrated (1940) and Further Fables for Our Time (1956). These usually conformed to the fable genre to the extent that they were short, featured anthropomorphic animals as main characters, and ended with a moral as a tagline. An exception to this format was his most famous fable, "The Unicorn in the Garden," which featured an all-human cast except for the unicorn, which didn't speak. Thurber's fables were satirical in nature, and the morals served as punchlines rather than advice to the reader. His stories also included several book-length fairy tales, such as The White Deer (1945) and The Wonderful O (1957). The latter was one of several of Thurber's works illustrated by Marc Simont. For other uses, see Fable (disambiguation). ... This article is about the use of the moral in storytelling. ... The Unicorn in the Garden is a short story written by James Thurber. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... For the phase, see Punch line Punchline is a North American punk rock band from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Marc Simont (born November 23, 1915 in Paris) is an artist, political cartoonist, and illustrator of more than a hundred childrens books. ...


Thurber's prose for The New Yorker and other venues also included numerous humorous essays. A favorite subject, especially toward the end of his life, was the English language. Pieces on this subject included "The Spreading 'You Know'," which decried the overuse of that pair of words in conversation, "The New Vocabularianism," "What Do You Mean It Was Brillig?" and many others. Thurber's short pieces, whether stories, essays or something in between, were referred to as "casuals" by Thurber and the staff of The New Yorker.[7] Thurber wrote a biographical memoir about The New Yorker's founder and publisher, Harold Ross, titled The Years with Ross (1958). For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. ...


Thurber also wrote a five-part New Yorker series, between 1947 and 1948, examining in depth the radio soap opera phenomenon, based on near-constant listening and researching over the same period. Leaving nearly no element of these programs unexamined, including their writers, producers, sponsors, performers, and listeners alike, Thurber re-published the series in his anthology, The Beast in Me and Other Animals (1948) under the section title "Soapland." The series was one of the first to examine such a pop culture phenomenon in depth and with just enough traces of Thurber's wit to make it more than just a sober piece of what would later be called investigative reporting. The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television...


Thurber teamed with college schoolmate (and actor/director) Elliot Nugent to write a major Broadway hit comic drama of the late 1930s, The Male Animal, which was made into a film in 1942, starring Henry Fonda, Olivia de Havilland, and Jack Carson. In 1947 Danny Kaye played the title character in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, a film that had little to do with the original short story and which Thurber hated. In 1951 animation studio United Productions of America announced a forthcoming feature to be faithfully compiled from Thurber's work, titled Men, Women and Dogs.[8] However, the only part of the ambitious production that was eventually released was the UPA cartoon The Unicorn in the Garden (1953).[9] The Male Animal is a 1942 movie starring Henry Fonda as a college English teacher being threatened with being fired for being a Communist because he intends to read some subversive literature in class. ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film and stage actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916) is a two-time Academy Award winning actress in American motion pictures and is the last surviving principal cast member from Gone with the Wind. ... Jack Carson (October 27, 1910 – January 3, 1963 was a Canadian actor. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is a 1947 movie, loosely based on a short story of the same name by James Thurber. ... United Productions of America, better known as UPA, was an animation studio of the 1940s through 1970s, and a distributor of Japanese films from Toho Studios from the 1970s onward. ... The Unicorn in the Garden is a short story written by James Thurber. ...


Near the end of his life, in 1960, Thurber finally was able to fulfill his long-standing desire to be on the professional stage by playing himself in 88 performances of the revue A Thurber Carnival, based on a selection of Thurber's stories and cartoon captions. Thurber appeared in the sketch "File and Forget," dictating fictional correspondence to his publisher.[10] Thurber won a special Tony Award for the adapted script of the Carnival.[11] What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ...


A network television series based on Thurber's writings and life entitled My World and Welcome to It was broadcast on NBC in 1969-70, starring William Windom as the Thurber figure. The show won a 1970 Emmy Award as the year's best comedy series, and Windom won an Emmy as well. The animation of Thurber's cartoons on My World and Welcome to It led to the 1972 Jack Lemmon film The War Between Men and Women, which concludes with an animated rendering of Thurber's classic anti-war work "The Last Flower." Windom went on to perform Thurber material in a one-man stage show. My World and Welcome to It was a half-hour situation comedy based on the writings of humorist and cartoonist James Thurber. ... This article is about the television network. ... William Windom playing the role of Dr. Seth Hazlitt on the television series Murder, She Wrote William Windom, (born September 28, 1923, New York, New York), great-grandson of U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, of the same name, is an American actor, best known for his work on television... An Emmy Award. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... The War Between Men and Women is a comedy film starring Jack Lemmon, Barbara Harris, and Jason Robards. ...


An annual award, the Thurber Prize, begun in 1997, honors outstanding examples of American humor. The Thurber Prize for American Humor, named after James Thurber, recognizes outstanding contributions in humor writing. ...


Books

  • Is Sex Necessary? or, Why You Feel The Way You Do (spoof of sexual psychology manuals, with E. B. White), 1929, 75th anniv. edition (2004) with foreword by John Updike, ISBN 0-06-073314-4
  • The Owl in the Attic and Other Perplexities, 1931
  • The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments, 1932
  • My Life and Hard Times, 1933 ISBN 0-06-093308-9
  • The Middle-Aged Man on the Flying Trapeze, 1935
  • Let Your Mind Alone! and Other More Or Less Inspirational Pieces, 1937
  • The Last Flower, 1939, re-issued 2007 ISBN 978-1-58729-620-8
  • The Male Animal (stage play), 1939 (with Elliot Nugent)
  • Fables for Our Time and Famous Poems Illustrated, 1940 ISBN 0-06-090999-4
  • My World--and Welcome To It, 1942 ISBN 0-15-662344-7
  • Many Moons, (children) 1943
  • Men, Women, and Dogs, 1943
  • The Great Quillow, (children) 1944
  • The Thurber Carnival (anthology), 1945, ISBN 0-06-093287-2
  • The White Deer, (children) 1945
  • The Beast in Me and Other Animals, 1948 ISBN 0-15-610850-X
  • The 13 Clocks, (children) 1950
  • The Thurber Album, 1952
  • Thurber Country, 1953
  • Thurber's Dogs, 1955
  • Further Fables For Our Time, 1956
  • The Wonderful O, (children) 1957
  • Alarms and Diversions (anthology), 1957
  • The Years With Ross, 1959 ISBN 0-06-095971-1
  • A Thurber Carnival (stage play), 1960
  • Lanterns and Lances, 1961

Posthumous Collections: Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899, Mount Vernon, New York – October 1, 1985, North Brooklin, Maine) was a leading American essayist, author, humorist, poet and literary stylist. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist, poet, short story writer and literary critic. ... My World and Welcome to It was a half-hour situation comedy based on the writings of humorist and cartoonist James Thurber. ... Many Moons is a childrens picture book written by James Thurber and illustrated by Louis Slobodkin. ... The White Deer is a childrens novel written by James Thurber in 1945. ... The Thirteen Clocks is a story written by James Thurber in 1950. ...

  • Credos and Curios, 1962
  • Thurber & Company, 1966 (ed. Helen W. Thurber)
  • Selected Letters of James Thurber, 1981 (ed. Helen W. Thurber & Edward Weeks)
  • Collecting Himself: James Thurber on Writing and Writers, Humor and Himself, 1989 (ed. Michael J. Rosen)
  • Thurber On Crime, 1991 (ed. Robert Lopresti)
  • People Have More Fun Than Anybody: A Centennial Celebration of Drawings and Writings by James Thurber, 1994 (ed. Michael J. Rosen)
  • James Thurber: Writings and Drawings, 1996, (ed. Garrison Keillor), Library of America, ISBN 978-1-88301122-2
  • The Dog Department: James Thurber on Hounds, Scotties, and Talking Poodles, 2001 (ed. Michael J. Rosen)
  • The Thurber Letters, 2002 (ed. Harrison Kinney, with Rosemary A. Thurber)

Garrison Keillor (born Gary Edward Keillor on August 7, 1942 in Anoka, Minnesota) is an American author, storyteller, humorist, columnist, musician, satirist, and radio personality. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...

Biographies of Thurber

  • Burton Bernstein Thurber (1975); William Morrow & Co (May, 1996) ISBN 0-688-14772-0
  • Thomas Fensch The Man Who Was Walter Mitty: The Life and Work of James Thurber (2001) ISBN 0-930-75113-2
  • Neil A. Grauer Remember Laughter: A Life of James Thurber (1994); University of Nebraska Press; Reprint edition (August, 1995) ISBN 0-8032-7056-9
  • Harrison Kinney James Thurber: His Life and Times (1995); Henry Holt & Co ISBN 0-8050-3966-X

Literature review

  • The Clocks Of Columbus: The Literary Career of James Thurber by Charles S. Holmes (1972). Atheneum ISBN 0689705743; Secker & Warburg, May 1973, ISBN 0-436-20080-5

References

  1. ^ a b c James (Grover) Thurber (1894-1961). Authors' Calendar (2004). Retrieved on 2008-03-19.
  2. ^ Thurber House. James Thurber. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  3. ^ a b Thurber House. James Thurber: His Life & Times. Retrieved on 2007-10-14.
  4. ^ Bernstein, Burton (1975). Thurber. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, pg 501. ISBN 0-396-07027-2. 
  5. ^ Time Magazine Cover: James Thurber - July 9, 1951. Time Archive: 1923 to the Present. Time Inc. (1951-07-09). Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  6. ^ Veeck, Bill; Ed Linn (1962). "A Can of Beer, a Slice of Cake—and Thou, Eddie Gaedel," from Veeck — As In Wreck: The Autobiography of Bill Veeck. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, pp 11-23. ISBN 0-226-85218-0. 
  7. ^ The Business of Being Funny. The New York Times. Time Inc. (1989-11-05). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  8. ^ Priceless Gift of Laughter. Time Archive: 1923 to the Present. Time Inc. (1951-07-09). Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  9. ^ The Unicorn In The Garden. The Big Cartoon Database. Retrieved on 2007-01-31.
  10. ^ Bernstein, Burton (1975). Thurber. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, pg 477. ISBN 0-396-07027-2. 
  11. ^ A Thurber Carnival. Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Retrieved on 2008-03-01.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thurber House is a literary center for readers and writers located in Columbus, Ohio, in the historic former home of author, humorist, and New Yorker cartoonist James Thurber. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thurber House is a literary center for readers and writers located in Columbus, Ohio, in the historic former home of author, humorist, and New Yorker cartoonist James Thurber. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dodd, Mead and Company was a publishing company in New York City. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Louis Veeck Jr. ... The University of Chicago Press is the largest university press in the U.S. It is operated by the University of Chicago and publishes a wide variety of academic titles, including The Chicago Manual of Style, dozens of academic journals including Critical Inquiry, and a wide array of texts covering... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dodd, Mead and Company was a publishing company in New York City. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Persondata
NAME Thurber, James Grover
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American humorist
DATE OF BIRTH December 8, 1894(1894-12-08)
PLACE OF BIRTH Columbus, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH November 2, 1961
PLACE OF DEATH New York City
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Fairfield, Delaware Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City 212. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
James Thurber - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1264 words)
James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist.
Thurber teamed with college schoolmate (and actor/director) Elliot Nugent to write a major Broadway hit comic drama of the late 1930's, "The Male Animal" (made into a film in 1942, starring Henry Fonda, Olivia de Haviland, and Jack Carson.).
Near the end of his life, Thurber finally was able to fulfill his long-standing desire to be on the professional stage by playing himself in a few performances of the anthology "A Thurber Carnival," made up of various acted-out stories and cartoon captions.
The Thurber House | James Thurber (319 words)
James Thurber, one of the outstanding American humorists of the twentieth century, is known for his distinctively funny cartoons and short stories.
Thurber was born in Columbus on December 8, 1894.
Thurber died of complications from pneumonia on November 2, 1961.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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