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Encyclopedia > James Thomson (cell biologist)

James "Jamie" Alexander Thomson (born in Oak Park, Illinois) is an American developmental biologist who also serves as a professor of anatomy in the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and as the chief pathologist at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Downtown (Oak Park Avenue) Ernest Hemingway Museum Oak Park, Illinois Lake Theater and shops along Lake Street. ... Views of a Foetus in the Womb, Leonardo da Vinci, ca. ... Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health is the professional school for the study of medicine and public health at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Madison, Wisconsin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Contents

Education

Thomson graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a B.S. in biophysics at the University of Illinois in 1981. He then entered the Veterinary Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Pennsylvania, receiving his doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1985, and his doctorate in molecular biology in 1988. His doctoral thesis, conducted under the supervision of Davor Solter at the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia, PA, involved understanding genetic imprinting in early mammalian development. The Phi Beta Kappa Key The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Biophysics (also biological physics) is an interdisciplinary science that applies the theories and methods of physics, to questions of biology. ... The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), is the largest campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... The Wistar Institute is a scientific institute located on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States specializing in the fields of immunology and cell biology. ... This article refers to the largest city of Pennsylvania. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in female mammary glands and the presence of hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex region in the...


Dr. Thomson joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison after spending two years as a post-doctoral research fellow in the Primate In Vitro Fertilization and Experimental Embryology Laboratory at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. The University of Wisconsin–Madison (also known as UW–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin, or UW) is a highly selective public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a technique in which egg cells are fertilized outside the mothers body in cases where conception is difficult or impossible through normal intercourse. ... Now a part of Oregon Health & Science University, the Oregon National Primate Research Center does a wide variety of scientific work with primates. ...


Current employment

In addition to being a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he is also a member of the Genome Center of Wisconsin.


Thomson's research

Since joining the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, he has conducted pioneering work in the isolation and culture of non-human primate and human embryonic stem cells, undifferentiated cells that have the ability to become any of the cells that make up the tissues of the body. Dr. Thomson directed the group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a non-human primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998. Families 15, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ... Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) in the family Hominidae (the great apes). ... Drawing of the structure of cork as it appeared under the microscope to Robert Hooke from Micrographia which is the origin of the word cell. Cells in culture, stained for keratin (red) and DNA (green). ... Biological tissue is a collection of interconnected cells that perform a similar function within an organism. ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ...


On November 6, 1998, Science published the results of his research, "Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Derived from Human Blastocysts". [1] Science is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ...


Thomson's patents

Three of Thomson's patents (5,843,780, 6,200,806, and 7,029,913) are being challenged by the Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights and the Public Patent Foundation. In a preliminary rejection of the patents, the United States Patent and Trademark Office wrote: "It would have been obvious to one skilled in the art at the time the invention was filed to the method of isolating ES cells from primates and maintaining the isolated ES cells on feeder cells for periods longer than one year. A person skilled in the art would have been motivated to isolate primate (human) ES cells, and maintained in undifferentiated state for prolonged periods, since ES cells are pluripotential and can be used in gene therapy." [2] [3]. However, it is highly likely that the patent holder, the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) will hold on to its stem cell patent rights[4]. Public Patent Foundation, or PUBPAT, is a nonprofit organization that seeks to limit perceived abuse of the U.S. Patent system. ... PTO headquarters in Alexandria The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ...

  • Primate Embryonic Stem Cells, 1998, U.S. Patent 5,843,780 
  • Human Embryonic Stem Cells, 2001, U.S. Patent 6,200,806 
  • Hematopoietic Differentiation of Pluripotent hESCs, 2001, U.S. Patent 6,280,718 
  • Method of Making Embryoid Bodies from Primate Embryonic Stem Cells, 2003, U.S. Patent 6,602,711 
  • Hematopoietic Differentiation of Pluripotent hESCs, 2003, U.S. Patent 6,613,568 
  • Method of In Vitro Differentiation of Transplantable Neural Precursor Cells from Primate Embryonic Stem Cells, 2005, U.S. Patent 6,887,706 
  • Method for Generating Primate Trophoblasts, 2006, U.S. Patent 7,148,062 
  • Primate Embryonic Stem Cells, 2006, U.S. Patent 7,029,913 
  • Serum Free Cultivation of Primate Embryonic Stem Cells, 2006, U.S. Patent 7,005,252 

Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

References

  1. ^ "Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Derived from Human Blastocysts", Science, November 6, 1998
  2. ^ PTO REJECTS HUMAN STEM CELL PATENTS AT BEHEST OF CONSUMER GROUPS: Re-examination Was Initiated by Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights and Public Patent Foundation, 2007-04-02
  3. ^ U.S. Revokes Stem Cell Patent, The New York Times, 2007-04-03
  4. ^ WARF is likely to hold on to stem cell patent rights, 2007-04-12

Science is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

External links

  • http://ink.primate.wisc.edu/~thomson/

  Results from FactBites:
 
UW-Madison: University Communications: News Photos (934 words)
Thomson directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
Thomson, a developmental biologist and professor of anatomy, directed the research group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines from a nonhuman primate in 1995, work that led his group to the first successful isolation of human embryonic stem cell lines in 1998.
These cells, which arise at the earliest stages of development, are blank slate cells capable of differentiating into any of the 220 types of cells or tissues in the human body.
UWFox :: What's New :: Stem Cell Researcher to Speak at UW-Fox Valley (315 words)
James Thomson, a pioneer in the isolation and culture of non-human primate and human embryonic stem cells, will speak at the University of Wisconsin-Fox Valley in Menasha on Monday, November 7 from noon to 1 p.m., in the Student Union.
Thomson directed the group that reported the first isolation of embryonic stem cell lines, or undifferentiated cells that have the ability to become any of the cells that make up the tissues of the body, from a non-human primate in 1995.
Thomson is a University of Wisconsin-Madison developmental biologist who also serves as a professor of anatomy in the UW-Madison Medical School and as the chief pathologist at the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center on the UW-Madison campus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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