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Encyclopedia > James P. Hogan (writer)

James Patrick Hogan (born June 27, 1941, London) is a science fiction author. He was raised in the Portobello Road area on the west side of London. He left school at the age of sixteen and worked various odd jobs until, after receiving a scholarship, he began a five-year program at the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough covering the practical and theoretical sides of electrical, electronic, and mechanical engineering. He first married at the age of twenty and had two other subsequent marriages and six children.[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (948x1137, 636 KB) James P. Hogan at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow, August 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (948x1137, 636 KB) James P. Hogan at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow, August 2005. ... The Clyde Auditorium with the main SECC building behind it The 63rd World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) was Interaction, which was held in Glasgow, Scotland 4-8 August, 2005. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Farnborough Airport or TAG London Farnborough Airport (IATA: FAB, ICAO: EGLF) (previously called RAE Farnborough) is an airport situated in Farnborough, Hampshire in England. ...


He worked as a design engineer for several companies and eventually moved into sales in the 1960s, travelling around Europe as a sales engineer for Honeywell. In the 1970s he joined Digital Equipment Corporation's Laboratory Data Processing Group and in 1977 moved to Boston, Massachusetts to run their sales training program. He published his first novel, Inherit the Stars, in the same year to win an office bet. He quit DEC in 1979 and began writing full time, moving to Orlando, Florida for a year where he met his third wife Jackie. They then moved to Sonora, California.[1] Honeywell Heating Specialties Company Stock Certificate dated 1924 signed by Mark C. Honeywell - courtesy of Scripophily. ... The DEC logo Digital Equipment Corporation was a pioneering American company in the computer industry. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, Athens of America, The Hub (of the Universe)1 Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area    - City  89. ... Nickname: The City Beautiful, O-Town, 407 Location in Orange County and the state of Florida. ... Sonora is the county seat of Tuolumne County, California. ...


Hogan's style of science fiction is sometimes considered hard science fiction; in his earlier work he conveyed a sense of what science and scientists were about. His philosophical view on how science should be done comes through in many of his novels; theories should be formulated based on empirical research, not the other way around. If a theory does not match the facts, he postulates that theory should be discarded, not the facts. This is very evident in the Giants series, which begins with the discovery of a 50,000 year-old human body on the Moon. This discovery leads to a series of investigations, and as facts are discovered, theories on how the astronaut's body arrived on the Moon 50,000 years ago are elaborated, discarded and replaced. The series shows both the strength and weakness of early Hogan, since the resolution of the mystery is impossible on astrophysical grounds. Hard science fiction, or hard SF, is a category of science fiction characterized by an emphasis on scientific detail and/or accuracy. ... Empirical research is any activity that uses direct or indirect observation as its test of reality. ...


In recent years, however, Hogan's preferred theories have tended towards those widely considered "fringe" or pseudoscientific. He is a serious proponent of Immanuel Velikovsky's version of catastrophism,[2] of creationism over Evolution,[3] and of the theory that AIDS is caused by pharmaceutical use rather than HIV (see AIDS reappraisal).[4] While such theories may seem to contradict his views on scientific rationality, they are consistent with the view that scientific theories should not be accepted simply because they are widely held (see, for instance, argument from authority). Hogan has also espoused the idea that the Holocaust didn't happen, writing that he finds the work of Arthur Butz and Mark Weber to be "more scholarly, scientific, and convincing than what the history written by the victors says."[5] Phrenology is regarded today as a classic example of pseudoscience. ... Immanuel Velikovsky photographed by Fima Noveck, ca. ... Catastrophism is the theory that Earth has been affected by sudden, short-lived, violent events that were sometimes worldwide in scope. ... The Creation of Light by Gustave Doré. Creation refers to the concept that all humanity, life, the Earth, or the universe as a whole was created by a deity (often referred to as God). ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... This article is about the syndrome. ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections. ... The AIDS reappraisal movement (or AIDS dissident movement) is a loosely connected group of activists, journalists, scientists, and HIV-positive persons who dispute the scientific consensus that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). ... An appeal to authority or argument by authority is a type of argument in logic, consisting on basing the truth value of an otherwise unsupported assertion on the authority, knowledge or position of the person asserting it. ... Richard Harwoods Did Six Million Really Die? Holocaust denial refers to the claims of a small number of amateur historians who argue that the Holocaust is either exaggerated or completely falsified. ... Image:Butz. ... External links Meet Mark Weber ...


Hogan's fiction also reflects anti-authoritarian social views. Many of his novels have strong anarchist or libertarian themes, often promoting the idea that new technological advances render certain social conventions obsolete (e.g. the effectively limitless availability of energy that would result from the development of controlled nuclear fusion would make it unnecessary to limit access to energy resources. In essence, energy would become free). This melding of scientific and social speculation is clearly present in the novel Voyage from Yesteryear (strongly influenced by Eric Frank Russell's famous story, And Then There Were None), which describes the contact between a high-tech anarchist society on a planet in the Alpha Centauri system, with a starship sent from Earth by a dictatorial government. The story uses many elements of civil disobedience. Bold text:This article applies to political ideologies. ... It has been suggested that Origins of anarchism and History of anarchism be merged into this article or section. ... In English-speaking countries, libertarianism usually refers to a political philosophy maintaining that every person is the absolute owner of their own life and should be free to do whatever they wish with their person or property, as long as they respect the liberty of others. ... The Sun is a natural fusion reactor. ... Voyage from Yesteryear is a 1982 science fiction novel by the author James P. Hogan. ... Eric Frank Russell (January 6, 1905 - February 28, 1978) was an English science fiction author, producing some of the best humorous science fiction of his time. ... The Great Explosion is a satirical science-fiction novel by Eric Frank Russell, first published in 1962. ... Alpha Centauri (α Cen / α Centauri) is the brightest star system in the southern constellation of Centaurus. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A dictatorship is an autocratic form of government in which the government is ruled by a dictator. ... An anti-war activist is arrested for civil disobedience on the steps of the Supreme Court of the United States on February 9, 2005. ...


Writings

His novels include:

  • Inherit the Stars - May 1977 (1st book in Giants series)
  • The Genesis Machine - April 1978
  • The Gentle Giants of Ganymede - May 1978 (2nd book in Giants series)
  • The Two Faces of Tomorrow - June 1979
  • Thrice Upon a Time - March 1980
  • Giants' Star - July 1981 (3rd book in Giants series)
  • Voyage from Yesteryear - July 1982
  • The Minervan Experiment - November 1982 (omnibus edition of the first three books of the "Giants" series)
  • Code of the Lifemaker - June 1983 (exploring ideas of a Clanking replicator robotic system)
  • The Proteus Operation - October 1985
  • Endgame Enigma - August 1987
  • The Mirror Maze - March 1989
  • The Infinity Gambit - March 1991
  • Entoverse - October 1991 (4th book in Giants series)
  • The Multiplex Man - December 1992
  • Out of Time 1993 (novella)
  • The Immortality Option - February 1995 (sequel to "Code of the Lifemaker")
  • Realtime Interrupt - March 1995
  • Paths to Otherwhere - February 1996
  • Bug Park - April 1997
  • Star Child - June 1998
  • Outward Bound - March 1999
  • Cradle of Saturn - June 1999
  • The Legend that was Earth - October 2000
  • Martian Knightlife - October 2001
  • The Anguished Dawn - June 2003 (sequel to "Cradle of Saturn")
  • Mission to Minerva - May 2005 (5th Book in the Giants series)
  • Echoes of an Alien Sky - February 2007

Short story collections include: Cover sample of Inherit The Stars Book 1 in the Series. ... Cover sample of Inherit The Stars Book 1 in the Series. ... Cover sample of Inherit The Stars Book 1 in the Series. ... Cover sample of Inherit The Stars Book 1 in the Series. ... Voyage from Yesteryear is a 1982 science fiction novel by the author James P. Hogan. ... Code of the Lifemaker is a 1983 novel by science fiction author James P. Hogan. ... A clanking replicator is an artificial self-replicating system that relies on conventional large-scale technology and automation. ... Cover sample of Inherit The Stars Book 1 in the Series. ... Cover sample of Inherit The Stars Book 1 in the Series. ...

  • Minds, Machines & Evolution - 1988 (re-published by Baen, Dec. 1999)
  • Rockets, Redheads & Revolution - April 1999 (short stories and essays)
  • Catastrophes, Chaos & Convolutions (title as published; was to be Catastrophes, Creation & Convolutions) - December 2005 (short stories and essays)

Non-fiction science writings

  • Mind Matters - Exploring the World of Artificial Intelligence - March 1997
  • Kicking the Sacred Cow - July 2004

References

  1. ^ a b Hogan, James P.. Biography. Jamesphogan.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  2. ^ Hogan, James P.. The Case for Taking Velikovsky Seriously. Retrieved on 2006-06-18.
  3. ^ Hogan, James P.. The Rush to Embrace Darwinism. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  4. ^ Hogan, James P.. Bulletin Board: AIDS Skepticism. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  5. ^ Hogan, James P. (2006). FREE-SPEECH HYPOCRISY (February 22 2006 commentary). Retrieved on 2006-05-03.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Bibliography on SciFan

  Results from FactBites:
 
James P. Hogan (writer) - definition of James P. Hogan (writer) in Encyclopedia (487 words)
James P. Hogan (born June 27, 1941, London, U.K.) is a science fiction author.
Hogan's style of science fiction is often compared to Arthur C. Clarke's for its research in science.
In recent years, however, Hogan's preferred theories have tended towards those widely considered "fringe" or pseudoscientific.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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