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Encyclopedia > James McNair Baker

James McNair Baker was born July 20, 1821, in Robeson County, North Carolina, a son of Archibald Baker and Katherine McNair. He graduated from Davidson College in Davidson, North Carolina, in 1844. His family has long been associated with the college, and the Baker Sports Complex there is named for them. July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Robeson County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 28th 139,509 km² 805 km 240 km 9. ... Name Davidson College Location Davidson, North Carolina, USA Established 1837 President Robert F. Vagt Community Suburban Type Private Students Coeducational Accreditation Commision on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Mascot Wildcat Colors Red and Black Motto Alenda Lux Ubi Orta Libertas (Let Learning Be Cherished Where Liberty... Davidson is a town located in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, bordering on Iredell County, North Carolina. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Initially, Baker set up a law practice in Lumberton, North Carolina. But, after a bout with typhoid fever, he determined to move to a warmer climate and traveled to Florida on horseback. He re-established his practice of the law for a time at Old Columbia on the Suwannee River. But, he then moved to the town of Alligator, where he encouraged the residents to change the uninviting name to the modern Lake City. Lumberton is a city located in Robeson County, North Carolina. ... This about the disease typhoid fever. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 22nd 170 451 km² 260 km 800 km 17. ... Suwannee River, Florida The Suwannee River (also spelled Suwanee River) is a major river of southern Georgia and northern Florida in the United States. ... Lake City is a city located in Columbia County, Florida. ...


In 1852, Baker was named State's Attorney for the Suwannee Circuit, and served as a delegate to the Whig National Convention in Baltimore. There, despite the protests of the Florida delegation, the party nominated General Winfield Scott for President of the United States. Scott was extremely unpopular in the state due to his prosecution of the Seminole Wars, and the decision to put him at the top of the party's ticket alienated many voters. So, it was no surprise in 1856 when Baker failed to win election to the U.S. Congress as a Whig candidate despite his extensive horseback travels across the state. While the Whigs (along with the Tories) are often described as one of the two political parties in late 17th to mid 19th century Great Britain, it is more accurate to describe them as loose political groupings or tendencies. ... This article is about the city in the US state of Maryland. ... Winfield Scott Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States Army lieutenant general, diplomat, and presidential candidate. ... The presidential seal was used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Osceola, Seminole leader, detail from an 1838 lithograph The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three wars or conflicts in Florida between the Seminole Native American tribe and the United States. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...


In 1859, Baker succeeded in winning election as the state judge for the 4th Judicial District, which met in Suwannee. The same year, he married Miss Fanny Gilchrist. 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ...


During the tumultuous Election of 1860, Judge Baker supported the failed Constitutional Union ticket of Bell and Everett and opposed Florida's secession after the election of Abraham Lincoln. But, once the secession ordinance passed, he loyally supported the decision of his adopted state. Summary The election of 1860 is widely considered to be a realigning election. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


Judge Baker was still on the bench in 1861, when the Florida legislature created Baker County in his honor. The following year, the same body selected him to serve as one of the state's two senators in the Confederate Congress. So, he moved to Richmond, Virginia, for the duration of the U.S. Civil War. 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Florida Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Florida. ... Century GothicCentury Gothic Baker County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... Nickname: River City Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra Official website: http://www. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy...


Returning to Florida after the defeat of the South in 1865, Baker was quickly appointed a Justice of the Florida Supreme Court by Governor David S. Walker. However, ratification of the state's Reconstruction constitution in 1868 forced his resignation and return to private practice. Over the next several years, he gained his greatest professional reputation for litigation associated with the disposition of lands held by the state's Internal Improvement Fund--which had been created in 1855 to attract Northern capital and spur development. 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... David Shelby Walker (May 2, 1815 - July 20, 1891) was the eighth governor of Florida. ... Reconstruction-era military districts in the South For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


By 1876, Baker was an active member of the state's Democratic Executive Committee, and worked hard to bring about an end to the Reconstruction Era in Florida. 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


In 1881, he was returned as a judge on the state's 4th Judicial Circuit by Govenror Bloxham. He was re-appointed in 1885 by his successor Governor Perry. But, he resigned due to declining health in 1890. 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Map sources for Bloxham at grid reference SP4335 Bloxham is an Oxfordshire village on the edge of the Cotswolds in the central part of England. ... Traditional perry (poiré in French) is bottled champagne-style in Normandy Perry or pear cider is an alcoholic beverage made of fermented pear juice. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ...


Judge Baker retired in Jacksonville, where he became an elder in the Presbyterian church. He died at his home in that city on June 20, 1892, one month shy of his seventy-first birthday, and was buried at the nearby Evergreen Cemetery. He was survived by his wife and five children, including two sons who followed in his professional footsteps as prominent Florida attorneys. Members of his family also gained prominence as the founders of Florida Rock Industries. The Jacksonville skyline and the Acosta Bridge. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
James McNair Baker - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (635 words)
James McNair Baker (July 20, 1821 – June 20, 1892) was a lawyer, politician, and Senator from Florida in the Confederate Congress during the American Civil War.
Baker was born in Robeson County, North Carolina, a son of Archibald S. Baker and Catherine McCallum.
In 1852, Baker was named State's Attorney for the Suwannee Circuit, and served as a delegate to the Whig National Convention in Baltimore.
Baker County, Florida - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (432 words)
Baker County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida.
It was named for James McNair Baker, a judge and Confederate Senator.
About 11.40% of families and 14.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.20% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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