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Encyclopedia > James Madison University
James Madison University

Motto: Knowledge is Liberty
Established: 1908
Type: Public university
Endowment: $50.7[1] million
President: Dr. Linwood H. Rose
Faculty: 2,659
Students: 17,918
Undergraduates: 16,414
Postgraduates: 1,504
Location: Harrisonburg, Virginia, U.S.
Campus: Small city, 655 acres (2.65 km²)
Colors: Purple and Gold            
Nickname: James Madison Dukes
Mascot: Duke Dog
Athletics: NCAA Division I, CAA
Website: www.jmu.edu

James Madison University (also known as JMU, Madison, or James Madison) is a public coeducational research university located in Harrisonburg, Virginia, U.S. Founded in 1908 as the State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg, the university has undergone four name changes until settling with James Madison University.[2] The university is situated in the Shenandoah Valley, with the campus quadrangle located on South Main Street in Harrisonburg. Liverpool John Moores University is a university in Liverpool, England. ... James Madison College (often abbreviated to JMC or simply Madison) is a college of public affairs and international relations within Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. ... The JMU seal, only used by the JMU Board of Visitors or the Office of the President, certifies official university documents. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Image:LinwoodRose. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in Virginia Coordinates: , County Independent City Founded 1737 Government  - Mayor Rodney Eagle[1] Area  - City 45. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The James Madison University Dukes are the athletics teams of James Madison University. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Duke Dog The Duke Dog is the official mascot for the James Madison University Dukes. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Colonial Athletic Association, also known as the CAA, is a NCAA Division I college athletic conference whose members are located in East Coast states from Massachusetts to Georgia. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3000x1407, 224 KB)James Madison University logo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Nickname: Location in Virginia Coordinates: , County Independent City Founded 1737 Government  - Mayor Rodney Eagle[1] Area  - City 45. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... U.S. Route 11 is a north-south United States highway extending 1,645 miles[1] (2,647 km) across the eastern United States. ...


The university is also home to the Edith J. Carrier Arboretum, the only active publicly-oriented arboretum on a Virginia state-supported university campus, and the student run radio station WXJM, as well as National Public Radio station WMRA. JMU made national sports headlines in 2004 with its first NCAA Division I-AA national football championship.[3] The Edith J. Carrier Arboretum is an arboretum and botanical garden on the James Madison University campus, located in Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA in the Shenandoah Valley. ... WXJM is a student-run radio station owned by James Madison University with a broadcasting area covering the Harrisonburg, Virginia, area. ... NPR redirects here. ... WMRA is a noncommercial public radio station located in Harrisonburg, Virginia and operated by James Madison University, whose signal, with its satellite stations, covers a large part of central Virginia. ...

Contents

History

Wilson Hall, centerpiece of the JMU quad.
Wilson Hall, centerpiece of the JMU quad.

The university was established by the Virginia General Assembly in 1908 as the State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg. In 1914, the name of the university was changed to the State Normal School for Women at Harrisonburg. At first, academic offerings included only today's equivalent of technical training or junior college courses, however authorization to award bachelor's degrees was granted in 1916. During this initial period of development, the campus plan was established and six buildings were constructed.[4] Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 795 KB)Wilson Hall at James Madison University. ... Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 795 KB)Wilson Hall at James Madison University. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ...


The university became the State Teachers College at Harrisonburg in 1924 and continued under that name until 1938, when it was named Madison College in honor of the fourth president of the United States. In 1976 the university's name was changed to James Madison University.[4]


The first president of the university was Julian Ashby Burruss. The university opened its doors to its first student body in 1909 with an enrollment of 209 students and a faculty of 15. Its first 20 graduates received diplomas in 1911.[4] Julian Ashby Burruss (August 16, 1876 - January 4, 1947[1]) was the first President of James Madison University, although at the time of his service the university was the State Normal and Industrial School for Women. ...


In 1919, Dr. Burruss resigned the presidency to become president of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Samuel Page Duke was then chosen as the second president of the university. During Duke's administration, nine major buildings were constructed. [4] Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... Samuel Page Duke was the second President of James Madison University, serving from 1919 to 1945. ...

Aerial view of campus from 1937, showing the original campus plan, prior to major expansions of the campus.
Aerial view of campus from 1937, showing the original campus plan, prior to major expansions of the campus.

In 1946 men were first enrolled as regular day students. Dr. G. Tyler Miller became the third president of the university in 1949, following the retirement of Duke. During Miller's administration, from 1949 to 1970, the campus was enlarged by 240 acres (1 km²) and 19 buildings were constructed. Major curriculum changes were made and the university was authorized to grant master's degrees in 1954. [4] Image File history File links JMU_Aerial_view. ... Image File history File links JMU_Aerial_view. ... G. Tyler Miller was the third President of James Madison University, serving from 1945 to 1971. ...


In 1966, by action of the Virginia General Assembly, the university became a coeducational institution. Dr. Ronald E. Carrier, JMU's fourth president, headed the institution from 1971 to 1998. During Carrier's administration, student enrollment and the number of faculty and staff tripled, doctoral programs were authorized, more than twenty major campus buildings were constructed and the university was recognized repeatedly by national publications as one of the finest institutions of its type in America. Carrier Library is named for him.[4] Ronald E. Carrier was the fourth President of James Madison University, serving from 1971 to 1998. ...


In the 2000's, the university continued to expand, not only through new construction east of Interstate 81, but also on the west side of campus. In early 2005, JMU purchased the Rockingham Memorial Hospital building north of the main campus. JMU is expected to occupy the building following the hospital's move to its new location.[5] Additionally, the university has expanded across South High Street with the finalizing of the purchase of the former Harrisonburg High School building after initially leasing it for a year, operating it as Memorial Hall.[6] The university also received state and private funding to begin construction of a state of the art Performing Arts Complex near the quad in 2007. A second, $30 million library is also currently being constructed on the east side of campus, near the CISAT building.


Academics

James Madison University is considered "More Selective" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. For the Class of 2010, the university received over 17,765 applications for 3,748 freshman spots.[7]


Currently, James Madison University offers more than 100 degree programs on the bachelor's, master's, educational specialist and doctoral levels. The university comprises seven colleges and 78 academic programs.


Colleges

On June 24, 2005, the Board of Visitors approved the Madison College Proposal, which created the College of Visual and Performing Arts out of the College of Arts and Letters. The new College of Visual and Performing Arts includes the School of Art and Art History, the School of Music, the School of Theatre and Dance, and the Madison Art Collection. The College of Business is an academic college of James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) is an academic program at James Madison University which combines studies of the natural sciences, mathematics, technology, the social sciences, and business into a single program. ... The College of Visual and Performing Arts is an academic college of James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On January 9, 2007, a new School of Engineering was approved by the Virginia higher education governing body.[8] The school will begin accepting undergraduates in Fall 2008. The theme of the program is sustainability with a large focus on the environmental sciences, and will only offer general engineering degrees with no specializations. is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ...


School of Music

Keezell Hall, home of the university's English and Foreign Language departments
Keezell Hall, home of the university's English and Foreign Language departments

The School of Music is nationally renowned and features degrees in music composition, performance, education, theater, and music industry. Currently, the University is home to over ten ensembles. Among them is The Wind Ensemble, The JMU Brass Band, a Pep Band, several choirs, and The Marching Royal Dukes, a 350 plus member marching band who were the recipients of the Sudler Trophy, the highest honor available for a college marching band. In 2005, the School of Music received an anonymous gift of 65 Steinway Pianos worth $1 million.[9] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1075 KB) Keezell Hall, a building on the campus of James Madison University. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1075 KB) Keezell Hall, a building on the campus of James Madison University. ... The College of Visual and Performing Arts is an academic college of James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... The Wisconsin Band, known for its unique stop at the top high step, performs at the HHH Metrodome during a football game against arch-rival Minnesota. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Steinway & Sons grand piano on stage Steinway & Sons is a piano maker, since 1853 in New York City. ...


Rankings

The school is nationally recognized for its academics. U.S. News & World Report has ranked JMU as the top public, masters-level university in the South for 14 consecutive years.[10] The University is also ranked 21st overall in value for money in the nation amongst public colleges and universities, according to Kiplinger Magazine's 100 Best Values in Public Colleges.[11] According to BusinessWeek magazine in its 2006 ranking of undergraduate colleges of business, JMU's undergraduate business school is ranked 35th in the nation, and 3rd in Virginia.[12] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Kiplinger is a publishing company that was established in 1920 by W.M. Kiplinger [1] with what became the Kiplinger Letter and grew to encompass a number of other publications: Kiplingers Retirement Report Kiplinger. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ...


Money Magazine ranks JMU 5th in the nation for best value among in-state students.[13] Princeton Review, in its 2007 rankings, called JMU one of "America's Best Value Colleges".[14] Cover of Money magazine Money is a Time Warner financial magazine. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Campus

Newman Lake
Newman Lake

The campus of JMU originally consisted of two buildings, known today as Jackson and Maury Halls. Today, the campus of James Madison University has 102 major buildings on 655 acres.[15] The campus is divided into six parts: Bluestone, Hillside, Lakeside, Ridge, Skyline, and the Village.[16] The Ridge and Skyline areas are located on the east side of Interstate 81, while the rest of the campus is located on the west side. The two sections are connected both by a bridge and a tunnel underneath the highway (Duke Dog Alley).[17] Other unique features on the campus include Newman Lake, a 9.7 acre pond located in the Lake Area next to Greek Row and Sonner Hall[18], the Edith J. Carrier Arboretum, and one set of railroad tracks passing directly through the campus. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Interstate 81 (abbreviated I-81) is an interstate highway in the eastern part of the United States. ...


The campus was originally situated between South Main Street and Interstate 81, but has since expanded across the Interstate with the addition of The College of Integrated Science and Technology (CISAT), the University Recreation Center (UREC), the Festival Conference and Student Center, the Leeolou Alumni Center, several residence halls, and athletic fields since the late-1990's. The Chemistry and Physics Building, which houses the chemistry department as well as the department of Physics and Astronomy, is one of the most recently added building to the east side of JMU's campus. Interstate 81 (abbreviated I-81) is an interstate highway in the eastern part of the United States. ... Integrated Science and Technology (ISAT) is an academic program at James Madison University which combines studies of the natural sciences, mathematics, technology, the social sciences, and business into a single program. ...


Currently, the university is overseeing construction of the new $22.7 million East Campus Library. The 5-story, 106,000 sq. ft. facility will house primarily science, technology, and health sciences collections. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2008.[19]


Several new construction projects on the campus of James Madison University have been included in Governor Tim Kaine's $1.65 billion higher education bond package. Governor Kaine's proposal designates more than $96 million for JMU projects. Among the projects included in the proposal are the construction of a new biotechnology building ($44.8 million) and the renovation and expansion of Duke Hall ($43.4 million). The proposal also includes $8.6 million as the final installment payment for Rockingham Memorial Hospital. [20]


Student life

Students on the James Madison University quad
Students on the James Madison University quad

The Princeton Review also recognized James Madison as one of 81 schools in America "with a conscience", and in the latest year ranked behind only the University of Virginia in the number of Peace Corps volunteers it sent from its student body among "medium-sized" universities.[21] Alcohol use on and around campus is prevalent, as with most universities, and The Princeton Review ranked JMU sixteenth for the most beer usage on campus.[14] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1314 KB) Students on the James Madison University quad. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1314 KB) Students on the James Madison University quad. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


The school has 35 residence halls, eight of which serve as sorority houses.[22] While most residence halls are only for housing, several halls are used for multiple purposes. For example, Chandler Hall, located in the Lake area, has a basement dining facility and a computer lab, in addition to upperclass housing.[23] As freshmen must live on campus, a large portion of JMU's housing availability is set aside for incoming students. Consequently, most upperclassmen and graduate students live off campus; those who wish to live on campus must apply for housing each year. While occasional exceptions are granted, generally freshmen are not granted parking permits. [24] JMU's Greek life is less popular than most other public universities, with roughly 12%[citation needed] of the student body participating in related activities.


Administration

CISAT side of campus with Potomac Hall (left) and Chesapeake Hall (right).
CISAT side of campus with Potomac Hall (left) and Chesapeake Hall (right).

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 573 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): James Madison University Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 573 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): James Madison University Metadata This file...

Board of Visitors

Like all public universities in Virginia, James Madison is governed by a Board of Visitors, mostly appointed by the Governor of Virginia.[25] In addition to the 15 members appointed by the governor, the speaker of the Faculty Senate and an elected student representative serve as representatives for the faculty and the student body respectively. The appointed members serve for a maximum of two consecutive 4 year terms, while the student representative is limited to two one-year terms. The faculty representative serves for as long as he or she remains the speaker of the JMU Faculty Senate. [25]


President

Main article: Linwood H. Rose

Dr. Linwood H. Rose has served as the university's fifth president since September 1998. Before being named president, Rose served as a member of the institution's administration for 23 years, including service as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. Image:LinwoodRose. ...


Past presidents

Julian Ashby Burruss (August 16, 1876 - January 4, 1947[1]) was the first President of James Madison University, although at the time of his service the university was the State Normal and Industrial School for Women. ... Samuel Page Duke was the second President of James Madison University, serving from 1919 to 1945. ... G. Tyler Miller was the third President of James Madison University, serving from 1945 to 1971. ... Ronald E. Carrier was the fourth President of James Madison University, serving from 1971 to 1998. ...

Community relations

The University’s rapid expansion has created tension in the city-university relationship with issues such as growth planning. [26] The Board of Visitors recently approved the invocation of eminent domain against a neighboring business to make way for the school's new Performing Arts Center, which is slated for groundbreaking in 2007. Before eminent domain was exercised, the property owner chose to accept a purchase offer from the University.[27] In the May 2006 city election, incumbent mayor Larry Rogers, who also serves on JMU’s Board of Visitors, lost his bid for reelection. [28] JMU has nearly doubled in size in the last 20 years.[29] JMU purchased the former Harrisonburg High School building, and promised to keep some of the important features intact for the benefit of the community. [30]


Athletics

Main article: James Madison Dukes
Duke Dog Athletics Identity.
Duke Dog Athletics Identity.

James Madison University's athletic teams use the name "Dukes" in competition, with the Duke Dog, a gray bulldog dressed in a purple cape and crown, as the school's mascot. "Dukes" is in honor of Samuel Page Duke, the university's second president. Madison competes in the NCAA's Division I (Football Championship Subdivision for football), the Colonial Athletic Association, and the Eastern College Athletic Conference. The Dukes played football in the Atlantic 10 Football Conference until it disbanded after the 2006 season and currently play in the Colonial Athletic Association, which picked up the Atlantic 10's football operations beginning fall 2007[31] Students compete in football, basketball, soccer, swimming, diving, women's volleyball, baseball, women's lacrosse, field hockey, golf, track and field, and softball. James Madison's two national championships ranks them tied for third most national titles in Virginia. James Madison's baseball team advanced to the 1983 College World Series, the only Division I institution in Virginia to do so. The JMU women's field hockey gave the university their first national title in 1994. JMU football also won the NCAA Division I-AA National title in 2004 and appeared in the playoffs in 2006 and 2007. [32] In 2006, considerable controversy arose after the decision to cut 10 varsity teams (including both mens' and women's teams) was deemed necessary to comply with Title IX restrictions. The James Madison University Dukes are the athletics teams of James Madison University. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Duke Dog The Duke Dog is the official mascot for the James Madison University Dukes. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... This article is about the NCAA division. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... Logo for the 2007 NCAA Division I Football Championship Game // The NCAA Division I Football Championship is a college football game played to determine the champion of the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as Division I-AA). ... Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, now known as the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in honor of its principal author, but more commonly known simply as Title IX, is a 76-word United States law enacted on June 23, 1972 that states: No person...


Notable alumni

Marcia Angell, M.D. Marcia Angell, M.D. (born 1939) is an American physician, author, and the first woman to serve as editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). ... The New England Journal of Medicine (New Engl J Med or NEJM) is a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the Massachusetts Medical Society. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Margaret Becker is an American Christian rock singer, guitarist, and songwriter. ... Steve Buckhantz is the television play-by-play announcer for the Washington Wizards. ... Washington Bullets redirects here. ... Gary C. Clark (born May 1, 1962 in Radford, Virginia) is a former professional American Football wide receiver who played for the Washington Redskins (1985-1992), Phoenix Cardinals (1993-1994) and Miami Dolphins (1995) in the National Football League. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Ross Copperman (born 1983) is an American singer-songwriter. ... Lindsay Czarniak is a sports reporter for NBC 4 television in Washington, DC. She attended Centreville High School and James Madison University. ... WRC-TVs studios and tower (1962) WRC-TV NBC4 is a television station in Washington, D.C. NBC owned and operated, the station broadcasts its analog signal on channel 4 and its digital television signal on channel 48. ... NBC 4 is the on-air branding used by several television stations carrying the NBC affiliation in the United States, such as: WNBC-TV New York City, flagship of NBC (Identifies as NBC 4 HD, since they broadcast in High Definition) KNBC-TV Los Angeles WRC-TV Washington, D.C... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Charles Lewis Haley (born January 6, 1964, Lynchburg, Virginia) is a former American Football Linebacker/Defensive End who played for the San Francisco 49ers (1986-1991, 1999) and the Dallas Cowboys (1992-1996). ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division... Barbara Hall (17 July 1961-) is an American writer and producer of television series. ... Joan of Arcadia is an American television fantasy/family drama, which aired on Fridays, 8-9 p. ... Steve James is a movie producer and director of several documentaries. ... Hoop Dreams is a 1994 documentary film directed by Steve James. ... Akeem Jordan (born August 17, 1985 in Harrisonburg, Virginia) is an American football linebacker for the Philadelphia Eagles. ... City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Team colors Midnight Green, Black, White, and Silver Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern Conference (1953-1969) Capitol... Karen McCullah Lutz is an American screenwriter and novelist. ... Legally Blonde is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon, produced by Marc E. Platt for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and directed by Robert Luketic. ... 10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American romantic comedy film. ... Scott Allan Norwood (born July 17, 1960 in Alexandria, Virginia) is a former National Football League kicker who played predominately for the NFLs Buffalo Bills. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Buffalo Bills (disambiguation). ... WUSA, channel 9, is the Washington, D.C. affiliate of the CBS television network. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... ... The Junkies, formerly known as The Sports Junkies, are a group of four radio personalities who host a morning-drive radio show broadcast in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area. ... WJFK-FM (106. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Ed Perry (born September 1, 1974 in Richmond, Virginia) is an American football player in the National Football League. ... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966–1969) Eastern Division (1966–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC East (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Aqua, Coral, Navy, White Mascot T. D. Personnel Owner H. Wayne Huizenga (50%) and Stephen M. Ross (50%) General Manager... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC West (1970-present) Current uniform Team colors Red, White and Gold Mascot K. C. Wolf (1985-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) Personnel Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt... John Roberts (b. ... Elliott Sadler (left) talking with teammate Dale Jarrett. ... Jeff Burton (99), Elliott Sadler (38), Ricky Rudd (21), Dale Jarrett (88), Sterling Marlin (40), Jimmie Johnson (48), and Casey Mears (41) practice for the 2004 Daytona 500 The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) is the largest sanctioning body of motorsports in the United States. ... Billy Sample (born April 2, 1955 in Roanoke, Virginia), is a former professional baseball player who played in the Major Leagues primarily as an outfielder from 1978-1986. ... Chris Sprouse (born in Alexandria, Virginia on July 30, 1966) is an American comic book artist. ... // Steven Smith first got into music after hearing the Starland Vocal Band’s “Afternoon Delight” when he was 5 years old. ... Fuse is a music video-oriented television channel. ... Phoef Sutton is an Emmy-Award-winning American television writer and producer and feature film writer best known for his contributions to the classic sitcom Cheers and the drama series Boston Legal. ... An Emmy Award. ... This article is about the TV series. ... The Naked Truth was an American television sitcom that aired from 1995 to 1998, starred Téa Leoni and co-starred Holland Taylor. ... Boston Legal is an American dramedy television series that began airing on ABC on October 3rd, 2004. ... The Fan is a 1996 thriller film starring Robert De Niro and Wesley Snipes. ... Mrs. ... LeRoi Moore is the saxophonist for the Dave Matthews Band. ... Butch Taylor (Born Clarence Francis Taylor on April 13, 1961 in Shawsville, Virginia) is a composer, writer, keyboardist and long time guest musician with the Dave Matthews Band. ... Michael Robert Venafro (born August 2, 1973 in Takoma Park, Maryland) was a Major League Baseball pitcher for the Texas Rangers, Oakland Athletics, Tampa Bay Devil Rays, and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1999 to 2004. ... Phil Vassar (born May 28, 1964 in Lynchburg, Virginia[1]) is an American country music artist, most notable for his songwriting and use of a piano as his most prominent backing instrument. ... Andrew York Andrew York is an American classical guitarist and composer. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Yao (姚) Yao Ming (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born September 12, 1980, in Shanghai, China) is a Chinese professional basketball player and is arguably the best center in the National Basketball Association (NBA) today. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ...

References

  1. ^ All Institutions Listed by FY 2006 Market Value of Endowment Assets With Percent Change Between 2006 and 2007 Endowment Assets (HTML) (English). NACUBO. Retrieved on 2008-01-24.
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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... WHSV-TV, channel 3, is an ABC affiliate for the Harrisonburg, Virginia market. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Richmond Times-Dispatch (RTD or TD for short) is the primary daily newspaper in Richmond, Virginia the capital of Virginia, and is commonly considered the newspaper of record for events occurring in much of the state. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Montpellier is the name of a Southern French city. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... WRC is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, as described below: World Rally Championship, a series of automobile rally races and World Rally Car, the class of cars involved in them Will Rice College, a residential college of Rice University Western Reserve College, a prep school in Hudson, Ohio... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SPEED Channel, based in Charlotte, NC, was launched on New Years Day 1996, by Roger Werner, as SpeedVision. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roanoke Times is the main newspaper in Roanoke, Virginia. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Papers of James Madison, University of Virginia (1991 words)
Madison lost the election for the 1777 session of the House of Delegates, purportedly because he refused to provide liquor for the voters, a tradition affectionately referred to as "swilling the planters with bumbo." However, his good offices in the legislature were not forgotten.
In 1785, Madison was appointed a delegate to a convention on interstate trade to be held in Annapolis in September 1786.
As secretary of state, Madison was charged with a host of duties besides the conduct of American foreign policy, ranging from publishing and distributing the public laws to serving as liaison between the federal government and the governors of the states and territories.
James Madison University (449 words)
James Madison University, located in Harrisonburg, Virginia, was founded in 1908 as a school for women.
The university was established by the Virginia General Assembly in 1908 as the State Normal and Industrial School for Women at Harrisonburg.
The university became the State Teachers College at Harrisonburg in 1924 and continued under that name until 1938, when it was named Madison College in honor of the fourth president of the United States.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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