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Encyclopedia > James Foulis
James Foulis with the U.S Open trophy, and wearing the winner's medal.
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James Foulis with the U.S Open trophy, and wearing the winner's medal.

James Foulis (1870-1928), often known as Jim Foulis, was a Scottish born professional golfer who won the second U.S. Open Championship. Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... The United States Open Golf Tournament is an annual mens golf tournament staged by the United States Golf Association each June. ...


Foulis was born in the "Home of Golf", St Andrews in Scotland. His father was foreman at Old Tom Morris's golf shop and clubmaking business, and Foulis spent some time working at the shop. In 1895 he travelled to the United States to take up a job as golf professional at Chicago Golf Club, which was the first club in the United States to have an eighteen whole course. He was the first golf professional in the western States. Location within the British Isles. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country in northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain. ... Tom Morris, Sr. ...


Foulis was one of the eleven players who took part in the first U.S. Open in 1895, and he came third. The following year he won the tournament at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club on Long Island. He was representing the Chicago Golf Club and he won $200. He was helped out by the fact that twice British Open champion Willie Park, Jnr, who would have been odds-on favourite if he had reached the United States in time to play, didn't dock in America until the day after the tounament. The following year the Open was played at Foulis's home club, and he finished third. The most notable aspect of his game was his driving; it is said that he often drove over three hundred yards using the relatively primitive clubs of his day. He continued to compete in the U.S. Open until 1906, but didn't win again. Image of Long Island taken by NASA. Long Island, New York, is an island off the North American coast, some 118 miles (190 km) long, and from 12 to 20 miles (32 km) wide, extending from New York Harbor into the North Atlantic Ocean. ... Willie Park, Jnr (b. ...


Jim Foulis and his brother Dave ran a golf shop at the Chicago Golf Club, and were played a significant part in the evolution of golf equipment. They invented the bramble patterning for Coburn Haskell's new rubber coated ball. In response to the demands of the new ball the developed the "mashie-niblick", the modern seven iron, which fell between the traditional mashie (5-iron) and niblick (9-iron), and patented the design. Jim Foulis also worked as a golf course designer from 1996 until his death, designing the first golf courses in many communities across the Mid West.


Foulis had four brothers, all of whom also moved to the United States. Robert and Dave were also golf professionals, Simpson was a fine amateur golfer, and John was an expert ballmaker who also worked as a bookkeeper at Chicago golf from 1901 to his untimely death in 1907. All five brothers are buried in Wheaton Cemetery, adjacent to Chicago Golf Club.


  Results from FactBites:
 
James Foulis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (449 words)
James Foulis (1870-1928), often known as Jim Foulis, was a Scottish born professional golfer who won the second U.S. Open Championship.
Foulis was born in the "Home of Golf", St Andrews in Scotland.
Foulis was one of the eleven players who took part in the first U.S. Open in 1895, and he came third.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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