FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones, 2004
Born Todd Jones
January 17, 1931 (1931-01-17) (age 77)
Arkabutla, Mississippi, U.S.
Years active 1950s-present
Spouse(s) Cecilia Hart (1982-present)
Julienne Marie

James Earl Jones (born January 17, 1931) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of film and stage well known for his deep basso voice. The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Great White Hope is a Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony Award-winning play written by Howard Sackler and first produced by Arena Stage in Washington, DC in 1967 that was the basis for the 1970 film of the same name. ... The NAACP Image Award is an award presented annually by the NAACP to honor the top African-Americans in film, television, music and literature. ... The NAACP Image Award winners for Outstanding Actor in a Television Movie, Mini-Series or Dramatic Special: Categories: NAACP Image Awards ... Gabriels fire, an American televison series that ran on ABC in the USA in 1990-1991. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Great White Hope is a Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony Award-winning play written by Howard Sackler and first produced by Arena Stage in Washington, DC in 1967 that was the basis for the 1970 film of the same name. ... Fences is a play by August Wilson; it was his second play to go to Broadway. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... An Emmy Award. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... A bass (or basso in Italian) is a male singer who sings in the deepest vocal range of the human voice. ...

Contents

Background

Childhood

Jones was born Todd Jones in Arkabutla Township, Tate County, Mississippi, the son of Ruth (née Connolly), a teacher and maid, and Robert Earl Jones (1910-2006), an actor, boxer, butler, and chauffeur who left the family before James Earl's birth.[1][2] Jones and his father reconciled many years later in the 1980s and 1990s. Jones was raised by his maternal grandparents, farmers Maggie and John Henry Connolly,[3] and is of African, Irish, Choctaw and Cherokee descent.[4][5] Arkabutla is a small town in Northern Mississippi. ... Tate County is a county located in the state of Mississippi. ... Née redirects here. ... Robert Earl Jones (February 3, 1910 - September 7, 2006) was an American actor and the father of actor James Earl Jones. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ... Mother with her child (Sculpture) A mother is typically the biological or social female parent of a child or offspring while the male parent is the father. ... ... For other uses, see Farmer (disambiguation). ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Choctaw (disambiguation). ... This page contains special characters. ...


He moved to his grandparents' farm in Jackson, Michigan at the age of five, but the adoption was traumatic and he developed a stutter so severe he refused to speak aloud. When he moved to Brethren, Michigan in later years a teacher at the Brethren schools started to help him with his stutter. He remained functionally mute for eight years until he reached high school. He credits his high school teacher, Donald Crouch, who discovered he had a gift for writing poetry, with helping him out of his silence.[2] The teacher believed forced public speaking would help him gain confidence and insisted he recite a poem in class each day. "I was a stutterer. I couldn't talk. So my first year of school was my first mute year, and then those mute years continued until I got to high school."[6] Nickname: Location of Jackson within Jackson County, Michigan Country United States State Michigan County Jackson Government  - Mayor Jerry Ludwig Area  - City  11. ... Stuttering is a speech disorder in which pronunciation of the (usually) first letter or syllable of a word is repeated involuntarily. ... Selective mutism is a social anxiety disorder in which a person who is normally capable of speech is unable to speak in given situations. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... This article is about the art form. ... A modern day speaker addressing an audience through microphones Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ...


Education

In 1949, Jones entered the University of Michigan with a plan to study medicine.[2] He joined the Reserve Officer Training Corps, and excelled. He felt comfortable within the structure of the military environment, and enjoyed the camaraderie of his fellow cadets in the Pershing Rifles Drill Team and Scabbard and Blade Honor Society. During the course of his studies, Jones discovered he was not cut out to be a doctor. Instead he refocused himself on drama, with the thought of doing something he enjoyed, before, he assumed, he would have to go off to fight in the Korean War. After four years of college, Jones decided to leave without his degree. With the war intensifying in Korea, Jones supposed he would be shipped off to the war as soon as he received his officers commission. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... ROTC links here. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung...


Military

Instead, he went home. As he waited for his orders to active duty, he found a part-time stage crew job at the Manistee Summer Theater, where he had performed before. By the end of summer 1953, Jones received his second lieutenants commission, his official orders, and was off to Fort Benning to attend Basic Infantry Officers School. While there, Jones went through Ranger training. Jones graduated from Ranger training, and received his black and gold arc tab insignia. His first duty station was supposed to be at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. But his orders changed, and his unit was instead sent to Colorado where the Army planned to establish a cold weather training command at the old Camp Hale near Aspen, Colorado. His regiment was established as training unit, to train in the bitter cold weather and the rugged terrain of the Rocky Mountains.[7] Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... Fort Benning is a United States Army base, located southwest of Columbus in Muscogee and Chattahoochee counties in Georgia and Russell County, Alabama It is part of the Columbus, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... Fort Leonard Wood is a United States Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) post located in the Missouri Ozarks. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Camp Hale, between Red Cliff and Leadville in the Eagle River valley in Colorado, was a United States Army training facility constructed in 1942 for what became the 10th Mountain Division. ... The City of Aspen is a Home Rule Municipality that is the most populous city and the county seat of Pitkin County, Colorado, United States. ... For individual mountains named Rocky Mountain, see Rocky Mountain (disambiguation). ...


Film and stage career

Early career

Jones had his acting career beginnings at the Ramsdell Theatre in Manistee, Michigan. In 1953 he was a stage carpenter. During the 1955 – 1957 seasons he was an actor and stage manager. He performed his first portrayal of Shakespeare’s Othello in this theater in 1955.[8] River waterfront in downtown Manistee Manistee is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ...


His first film role was as a young and trim B-52 crewman in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb in 1964 which was more famous for the work of Peter Sellers and Slim Pickens. His first big role came with his portrayal of boxer Jack Jefferson in the film version of the Broadway play, The Great White Hope which was based on the life of boxer Jack Johnson. For his role, Jones was nominated Best Actor by the Academy, with George C. Scott ultimately taking home the Oscar for his role in Patton. He was the second African-American male performer following Sidney Poitier to receive a nomination.[2] B-52 can refer to the following: The Boeing B-52 Stratofortress strategic bomber aircraft A hairstyle popular in the 1950s and 1960s, named after the aircraft A rock band, The B-52s, named after the hairstyle A cocktail This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... This article is about the British actor. ... Slim Pickens riding the bomb in the movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Louis Bert Lindley, Jr. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Great White Hope is a Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony Award-winning play written by Howard Sackler and first produced by Arena Stage in Washington, DC in 1967 that was the basis for the 1970 film of the same name. ... John Arthur Johnson (March 31, 1878 – June 10, 1946), better known as Jack Johnson and nicknamed the Galveston Giant, was an American boxer and arguably the best heavyweight of his generation. ... The Academy Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... George Campbell Scott (October 18, 1927 - September 22, 1999) was a stage and film actor, director, and producer. ... Patton (UK: Patton: Lust for Glory) is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Patton during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. ... Not to be confused with Sydney Tamiia Poitier. ...


In 1969, Jones participated in making test films for a proposed children's television series called Sesame Street; these shorts, combined with animated segments, were shown to groups of children to gauge the effectiveness of the then-groundbreaking Sesame Street format. As cited by production notes included in the DVD release Sesame Street: Old School 1969-1974, the short that had the greatest impact with test audiences was one showing bald-headed Jones counting slowly to ten. This and other segments featuring Jones were eventually aired as part of the Sesame Street series itself when it debuted later in 1969 and Jones is often cited as the first celebrity guest on that series, although a segment with Carol Burnett was the first to actually be broadcast.[2] Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933 in San Antonio, Texas) is an Emmy Award-winning actress, comedian, singer, dancer, and writer. ...


Star Wars

He has appeared in many roles since, but is best known as the sinister voice of Darth Vader in the Star Wars films. Darth Vader was portrayed in costume by David Prowse in the original films, with Jones dubbing Vader's dialogue in postproduction. At his own request, he was originally uncredited for the first two released films: A voice actor (also a voice artist) is a person who provides voices for animated characters (including those in feature films, television series, animated shorts), voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. ... For information on this characters appearance in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, see Anakin Skywalker. ... This article is about the series. ... David Dave Prowse, MBE (born July 1, 1935 in Bristol, United Kingdom) is an English body-builder, weightlifter and actor, most widely known for his role as the physical form of Darth Vader. ... The cover of the 2004 DVD widescreen release of the revamped original Star Wars Trilogy. ... In filmmaking, dubbing or looping is the process of recording or replacing voices for a motion picture. ... Post production is the general term for the last stage of film production in which photographed scenes (also called footage) are put together into a complete film. ...

When Linda Blair did the girl in The Exorcist, they hired Mercedes McCambridge to do the voice of the devil coming out of her. And there was controversy as to whether Mercedes should get credit. I was one who thought no, she was just special effects. So when it came to Darth Vader, I said, no I'm just special effects. But it became so identified that by the third one, I thought, OK I've been denying it, I've been saying it sounds like the uncola nut guy Holder. Geoffrey Holder! ... But for the third one, I said OK, I'll let them put my name on it.[9]

While many assume he is the uncredited, briefly heard voice of Darth Vader at the conclusion of Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, Jones, when specifically asked if he had supplied the voice, either newly or from a previous recording, told Newsday, "You'd have to ask Lucas about that. I don't know".[9] Linda Denise Blair (born January 22, 1959 in St. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted by two... Mercedes Agnes Carlotta McCambridge (March 16, 1916 – March 2, 2004), nicknamed Mercy, was an Academy Award-winning American film actress, also known for her acting in radio dramas. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ... 7 Up (or Seven Up) is a brand of a lemon-lime flavored soft drink. ... Geoffrey Holder as Baron Samedi in Live and Let Die. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... Newsday is a daily tabloid-size newspaper that primarily serves Long Island and the New York City borough of Queens, although it is sold throughout the New York City metropolitan area. ...


Other voice over work

His other voice roles include Mufasa in the 1994 film Disney animated feature The Lion King, and its sequel The Lion King II: Simba's Pride, and the Emperor of the Night in Pinocchio and the Emperor of the Night. He also has done the CNN tagline, "This is CNN"; the opening for NBC's coverage of the 2000 and 2004 Summer Olympics' "the Big PI in the Sky" (God) in the computer game Under a Killing Moon; a Claymation film about The Creation; and several guest spots on The Simpsons. He is also credited in the movie Robots with the voice of Darth Vader from a voice module. Mufasa was a fictional lion who first appeared in Disneys popular 1994 animated feature film The Lion King. ... The year 1994 in film involved some significant events. ... Disney redirects here. ... This article is about Disneys 1994 film. ... Pinocchio and the Emperor of The Night is an animated feature film that was released in December 1987. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article is about the television network. ... The Summer Olympic Games are an international multi-sport event held every four years, organised by the International Olympic Committee. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Under a Killing Moon (1994) was the third installment in the Tex Murphy series of adventure games produced by Access Software. ... The term Claymation is a registered trademark created by Will Vinton Studios to describe their clay animated movies; the more generic term is clay animation, but the portmanteau claymation has entered the English language as a genericized trademark. ... The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn, and considered by many to be his masterpiece. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Robots is a computer-animated film produced by Blue Sky Studios for 20th Century Fox (the same companies behind the film Ice Age), and was released theatrically (both in normal theaters and in IMAX theaters) on March 11th, 2005. ...


Notable film roles

He also played the character Terence Mann in the baseball film Field of Dreams; the feared neighbor and owner of the dog Hercules, in The Sandlot; King Jaffe Joffer in Coming to America, Reverend Stephen Kumalo in Cry, The Beloved Country; Admiral James Greer in The Hunt for Red October; Patriot Games, and Clear and Present Danger; the villain Thulsa Doom in Conan the Barbarian; and author Alex Haley in the television mini-series Roots: The Next Generations.[2] Field of Dreams (1989) is a movie about a farmer who becomes convinced by a mysterious voice that he is supposed to construct a baseball diamond in his corn field. ... The Sandlot is a 1993 film about young baseball players. ... For the reality television series starring Victoria Beckham, see Victoria Beckham: Coming to America. ... Cry, the Beloved Country is a 1995 drama / thriller film directed by Darrell Roodt. ... The Hunt for Red October was a 1990 film based on the best-selling novel of the same name. ... Patriot Games is a film based on the novel of the same name by Tom Clancy. ... Clear and Present Danger is a 1994 film directed by Phillip Noyce, based on the book of the same name by Tom Clancy. ... Thulsa Doom is a villainous fictional character first appearing in the Kull novel Delcardes Cat by Robert E. Howard. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Alexander Murray Palmer Haley (August 11, 1921 – February 10, 1992) was an American writer. ...


Notable stage roles

Jones is an accomplished stage actor as well; he has won Tony awards in 1969 for The Great White Hope and in 1987 for Fences, and his performance of Othello is considered one of the greatest in history. Other Shakespearean roles include King Lear, Oberon in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Abhorson in Measure for Measure, and Claudius in Hamlet. He received Kennedy Center Honors in 2002. What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... The Great White Hope is a Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony Award-winning play written by Howard Sackler and first produced by Arena Stage in Washington, DC in 1967 that was the basis for the 1970 film of the same name. ... Fences is a play published in 1985 by African-American playwright August Wilson. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ... William Shakespeare—born April 1564; baptised April 26, 1564; died April 23, 1616 (O.S.), May 3, 1616 (N.S.)—has a reputation as the greatest of all writers in English. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... For other uses, see A Midsummer Nights Dream (disambiguation). ... Claudio and Isabella (1850) by William Holman Hunt Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, written in 1603. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ...


In February 2008, he began starring on Broadway as Big Daddy in a limited-run, all-African-American production of Tennessee Williams's Pulitzer Prize-winning drama Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, directed by Debbie Allen and mounted at the Broadhurst Theatre. He appears alongside stage veterans Phylicia Rashad (Big Mama) and Anika Noni Rose (Maggie), as well as film actor Terrence Howard making his Broadway debut as Brick. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Thomas Lanier Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983), better known as Tennessee Williams, was a major American playwright who received many of the top theatrical awards. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... This article is about the play. ... Debbie Allen (born Deborrah Kaye Allen on January 16, 1950 in Houston, Texas) is an American actor, choreographer, film director, television producer and a member of the Presidents Committee on the Arts and Humanities. ... The Broadhurst Theatre, 2006. ... In a Mothers Day survey, Rashads character on The Cosby Show, Claire Huxtable, was named, TV mom closest to your own mom in spirit. ... Anika Noni Rose (born September 6, 1972 in Bloomfield, Connecticut) is a Tony Award-winning American singer and actress. ... Terrence Dashon Howard (born March 11, 1969) is an Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actor. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ...


Other work

His other works include his portrayal of GDI's commanding general James Solomon in Command & Conquer: Tiberian Sun, a starring role in the television program Under One Roof as widowed police officer Neb Langston for which he received an Emmy nomination, and television and radio advertising for Verizon Business DSL and Verizon Online DSL from Verizon Communications. The emblem of the United Nations Global Defense Initiative The Global Defense Initiative (GDI) is a fictional military faction in the science fiction computer game Command & Conquer. ... This page lists the characters of the Global Defense Initiative, one of the primary factions in the Tiberian series of Westwood Studios popular Command & Conquer series of computer and video games. ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... Under One Roof was a short-lived 1995 U.S. television series about three generations of an African American family sharing a house. ... An Emmy Award. ... Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. ... DSL redirects here. ... Verizon Communications, Inc. ...


From 1989 to 1993, Jones served as the host of the children's TV series Long Ago and Far Away. An opening screenshot from Long Ago and Far Away Long Ago and Far Away is an award-winning TV series that aired on PBS Television from 1989 until 1993. ...


He has guest-starred on such sitcoms as Frasier, Will & Grace and Everwood. Jones also lent his voice for a narrative part in the Adam Sandler comedy, Click, released in June 2006. His voice is also used to create an audio version of the King James Bible. Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... Will & Grace is a popular American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on NBC from 1998 to 2006. ... Everwood is a prime time television drama which initially aired in the United States on The WB. The series is set in the fictional small town of Everwood, Colorado. ... Adam Richard Sandler (born September 9, 1966) is an American comedian, actor, musician, screenwriter, and film producer. ... Click is a 2006 comedy/drama/fantasy film directed by Frank Coraci and written by Steve Koren and Mark OKeefe. ...


On April 7, 2005, James Earl Jones and Leslie Uggams headed the cast in an African-American Broadway revival version of On Golden Pond, directed by Leonard Foglia and produced by Jeffrey Finn.[2] April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Personal life

Jones has been married to Cecilia Hart since 1982, with whom he has two children, Flynn Earl Jones and Shaquonique Shantell Jones. He was previously married to actress and singer Julienne Marie. They had no children. Both actors had played the role of Desdemona in the same production in which Jones played Othello.[2] Desdemona by Frederic Leighton Desdemona is a fictional character in the play Othello by William Shakespeare. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ...


Awards

Emmy Award An Emmy Award. ...

  • 1991 Outstanding Lead Actor - Drama Series
  • 1991 Outstanding Supporting Actor - Miniseries or a Movie
  • 1999 Outstanding Performer - Children's Special

Tony Award This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winners: 1974: Telly Savalas - Kojak 1975: Robert Blake - Baretta 1976: Peter Falk - Columbo 1977: James Garner - The Rockford Files 1978: Edward Asner - Lou Grant 1979: Ron Leibman - Kaz 1980: Edward Asner - Lou Grant... This is a list of the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winners: 1979: Marlon Brando - Roots: The Next Generations 1980: George Grizzard - The Oldest Living Guard 1981: David Warner - Masada 1982: Laurence Olivier - Brideshead Revisited 1983: Richard Kiley - The Thorn Birds 1984: Art... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ...

Other Awards The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a play, whether a new production or a revival. ...

  • 1991 Common Wealth Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Dramatic Arts

Filmography

  • Looking for Richard (1996)
  • Good Luck (1996)
  • Gang Related (1997)
  • What the Deaf Man Heard (1997)
  • New York... Come Visit the World (1998)
  • Primary Colors (1998) (voice)
  • The Lion King II: Simba's Pride (1998) (voice)
  • Summer's End (1999)
  • Our Friend, Martin (1999) (voice)
  • On the Q.T. (1999)
  • Undercover Angel (1999)
  • The Annihilation of Fish (1999)
  • Fantasia 2000 (1999)
  • Tiberian Sun (1999)
  • Ennis' Gift (2000)
  • Antietam: A Documentary Drama (2000)
  • The Papp Project (2001)
  • Black Indians: An American Story (2001)
  • Finder's Fee (2001)
  • Recess Christmas: Miracle on Third Street (2001)
  • Muhammad Ali: Through the Eyes of the World (2001)
  • The Great Year (2004)
  • Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson (2004)
  • Robots (2005) (voice)
  • The Reading Room (2005)
  • The Sandlot 2 (2005)
  • Malcolm X: Prince of Islam documentary (2006) (narration only)
  • Kingdom Hearts II (2006)
  • The Benchwarmers (2006) (voice)
  • Scary Movie 4 (2006)
  • Click (2006) (voice) (As Himself)
  • The Trail of Tears: Cherokee Legacy (2006)
  • Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins (2008)
  • Jack and the Beanstalk (2008) (voice)
  • Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey (2009) (voice)

For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... The Comedians is a novel by Graham Greene, first published in 1966. ... The Great White Hope is a Pulitzer Prize-winning and Tony Award-winning play written by Howard Sackler and first produced by Arena Stage in Washington, DC in 1967 that was the basis for the 1970 film of the same name. ... The Man is a 1972 political drama starring James Earl Jones. ... Diahann Carroll portrays a welfare mother with six children in the 1974 film Claudine. ... (1976) Filmed in Macon, Georgia, The Bingo Long Traveling Allstars & Motor Kings starred actors Billy Dee Williams, Richard Pryor and James Earl Jones. ... Swashbuckler (1976) movie poster. ... The Greatest is a 1977 film about the life of boxer Muhammad Ali, in which Ali plays himself. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Exorcist II: The Heretic is a 1977 American horror film and the sequel to The Exorcist. ... The Last Remake of Beau Geste is a 1977 comedy film starring, directed and co-written by Marty Feldman. ... A Piece of the Action (1977). ... Picture of Robert Powell playing Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Star Wars Holiday Special was a two-hour television special (including commercials) set in the Star Wars galaxy. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... The Bushido Blade was a 1981 movie about a samurai sword given to Commodore Matthew Perry by the Emperor of Japan that was stolen by a band of thieves who oppose the treaty about to be signed. ... The Flight of Dragons is a 1982 animated movie produced by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin Jr. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ... Soul Man is a comedy movie made in 1986 about a man who undergoes transracial transformation with pills to qualify for an affirmative action placement at Harvard Law School. ... Gardens of Stone is a 1987 film by Francis Ford Coppola. ... Movie poster Allan Quatermain and the Lost City of Gold is a movie directed by Gary Nelson and released on May 16, 1987 in the USA. It is based on the novel by H. Rider Haggard of the same name. ... My Little Girl is 1986 Merchant Ivory Film. ... Pinocchio and the Emperor of The Night is an animated feature film that was released in December 1987. ... Matewan is a 1987 drama by John Sayles, illustrating the events of a coal mine-workers strike and attempt to unionize in 1920 in Matewan, a small town in the hills of West Virginia. ... For the reality television series starring Victoria Beckham, see Victoria Beckham: Coming to America. ... Three Fugitives is a 1989 comedy film starring Nick Nolte, Martin Short and James Earl Jones and directed by Francis Veber. ... Field of Dreams (1989) is a movie about a farmer who becomes convinced by a mysterious voice that he is supposed to construct a baseball diamond in his corn field. ... Best of the Best is a 1989 martial arts film. ... By Dawn’s Early Light is an HBO Original Movie, aired in 1990 and set in the year 1991. ... The Hunt for Red October was a 1990 film based on the best-selling novel of the same name. ... The Ambulance is a 1990 thriller film written and directed by Larry Cohen. ... Grim Prairie Tales is a 1990 American horror film, directed and written by Wayne Coe, and starring James Earl Jones and Brad Dourif. ... Redesigned Scorchers DVD Cover An star-filled ensemble cast came together to make this 1991 film, which is largely about the love lives of three women, and which takes place in cajun Louisiana on the wedding night of a young woman named Splendid (played by Emily Lloyd). ... Patriot Games is a film based on the novel of the same name by Tom Clancy. ... Freddie as F.R.O.7 is a 1992 British animated film written and directed by Jon Acevski. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... The 1993 motion picture Sommersby was directed by Jon Amiel and stars Richard Gere, Jodie Foster, Bill Pullman and James Earl Jones. ... The Sandlot is a 1993 film about young baseball players. ... The Meteor Man is a 1993 film by director/writer/star Robert Townsend about a superhero. ... Released by MGM in 1994, it stars Dana Carvey and Valeria Golino. ... This article is about Disneys 1994 film. ... Clear and Present Danger is a 1994 film directed by Phillip Noyce, based on the book of the same name by Tom Clancy. ... Jefferson in Paris is a 1995 movie about the US historical figure Thomas Jefferson before he becomes US President. ... Judge Dredd is a 1995 action film based on the Judge Dredd strip in the British comic 2000 AD. Certain elements of the film were altered from the comic series, but it still did not find wide mainstream appeal. ... Cry, the Beloved Country is a 1995 drama / thriller film directed by Darrell Roodt. ... 1996 documentary directed by and starring Al Pacino, both a staging of William Shakespeares Richard III and a broader examination of Shakespeares continuing role and relevance in popular culture. ... Gang Related (1997) is a film written and directed by Jim Kouf which stars Tupac Shakur and James Belushi. ... What the Deaf Man Heard was a 1997 Hallmark TV movie about a boy who pretends to be deaf, when really he can hear perfectly well. ... This article is about the book. ... Our Friend, Martin is a 1999 animated childrens educational film about Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Undercover Angel video cover Undercover Angel, also known as Un vrai petit ange (Canada: French title), is a 1999 movie which was a romantic comedy that starred Yasmine Bleeth and Dean Winters. ... Fantasia 2000 is an animated feature produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. ... This page lists the characters of the Global Defense Initiative, one of the primary factions in the Tiberian series of Westwood Studios popular Command & Conquer series of computer and video games. ... Finders Fee is an American film. ... Robots is a computer-animated film produced by Blue Sky Studios for 20th Century Fox (the same companies behind the film Ice Age), and was released theatrically (both in normal theaters and in IMAX theaters) on March 11th, 2005. ... The Sandlot 2 is a direct-to-DVD 2005 sequel to The Sandlot. ... Kingdom Hearts II ) is an action role-playing game developed by Square Enix and published by Square Enix and Buena Vista Games (now Disney Interactive Studios) in 2005 for the Sony PlayStation 2 video game console. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Scary Movie 4 is the fourth film of the Scary Movie franchise and is directed by David Zucker, written by Jim Abrahams, Craig Mazin and Pat Proft, and produced by Craig Mazin and Robert K. Weiss. ... Click is a 2006 comedy/drama/fantasy film directed by Frank Coraci and written by Steve Koren and Mark OKeefe. ... Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins a comedy film starring Martin Lawrence, Michael Clarke Duncan, Mike Epps, MoNique, Cedric the Entertainer and James Earl Jones. ...

References

  1. ^ James Earl Jones Biography (1931-). Film Reference. Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Bandler, Michael J. (March 2008). ""This is James Earl Jones"". NWA World Traveler. Northwest Airlines. Retrieved on 2008-04-03. 
  3. ^ James Earl Jones -- Academy of Achievement. A Museum of Living History. Academy of Achievement. Retrieved on 2008-04-03.
  4. ^ Levesque, Carl (01 August 2002). "Unconventional wisdom: James Earl Jones speaks out". Association Management. The Gale Group. Retrieved on 2008-02-20. 
  5. ^ Dorothy Davis. "Speaking with James Earl Jones", Education Update, February 2005. Retrieved on 2008-02-20. 
  6. ^ James Earl Jones. Interview with the American Academy of Achievement for the National Medal of Arts. Sun Valley, Idaho. 29 June 1996. (Interview [Audio/Transcript]). Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  7. ^ Soldiers to Celebrities: James Earl Jones - U.S. Army. Hollywood Hired Guns. Hired Guns Productions (20 January 2008). Retrieved on 2008-02-20.
  8. ^ Ramsdell Theatre History
  9. ^ a b Newsday: "Fast Chat: James Earl Jones", March 16, 2008

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Academy of Achievement is a nonprofit organization that seeks to educate and inspire youth. ... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Awards
Preceded by
Ed Harris
for Precious Sons
Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play
1986-1987
for Fences
Succeeded by
Ron Silver
for Speed-the-Plow
Persondata
NAME Jones, James Earl
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Todd Jones
SHORT DESCRIPTION actor
DATE OF BIRTH 17 January 1931
PLACE OF BIRTH Arkabutla, Mississippi
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Historic Ramsdell Theatre, home of the Manistee Civic Players and the Manistee Art Institue in Manistee, Michigan USA (336 words)
A 1949 graduate of Brethren, MI High School, longtime Manistee area residents remember James Earl Jones as an outstanding student and athlete, excelling in both forensics and track.
Jones was a member of the Manistee Summer Theatre Company at the Ramsdell Theatre during the 1953, 1955, 1956 and 1957 seasons.
Jones, renew old friendships and obtain his signature on the initial public release of his book.
James Earl Jones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1273 words)
The son of Robert Earl Jones was raised by his maternal grandparents and is of Irish, Cherokee and African-American descent.
James Earl Jones as Thulsa Doom in Conan the Barbarian.
Jones' death was erroneously announced in 1998 by Pittsburgh Pirates radio baseball commentator Lanny Frattare when James Earl Ray died.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m