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Encyclopedia > James Dobson
James Dobson

Born April 21, 1936 (1936-04-21) (age 72)
Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
Nationality American
Education Point Loma Nazarene University
University of Southern California
Occupation Psychologist
Author
Radio Broadcaster
Title Chairman of the Board
Political party Republican
Board member of Focus on the Family
Religious beliefs Christian
Spouse Shirley Dobson
Children Danae Dobson
Ryan Dobson

James Clayton "Jim" Dobson (born April 21, 1936 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American evangelical Christian and chairman of the board of Focus on the Family, a nonprofit organization he founded in 1977, from which he has never drawn a salary, but which has promoted his related books and publications, yielding him substantial royalties.[1] As part of his role in the organization, he produces the daily radio program Focus on the Family, which is broadcast in more than a dozen languages and on over 7,000 stations worldwide, and heard daily by more than 220 million people in 164 countries, according to Focus on the Family's own statements.[2][3] Focus on the Family is also carried by about 60 U.S. television stations daily.[2] He founded the Family Research Council in 1981. He is an evangelical Christian[4] with conservative views on theology and politics. He was recently named "The Most Influential Evangelical Leader in America" by Christianity Today magazine, and Slate has termed him the successor to evangelical leaders Billy Graham, Jerry Falwell, and Pat Robertson.[5] In January 24, 1989, he was able to interview notorious American serial killer Ted Bundy right before Bundy's execution.[6] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... : Port City , River City , Ratchet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... Point Loma Nazarene University is a liberal arts university located in San Diego, California on the Point Loma oceanfront. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... A psychologist is an expert in psychology, the systematic investigation of the human body, including behavior, cognition, and affect. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... GOP redirects here. ... Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shreveport, Louisiana is the third largest metropolitan city in the state of Louisiana, USA. It is located in Caddo Parish, and as of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 200,145. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Look up Evangelical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... The Family Research Council (FRC) is a Christian conservative non-profit lobbying organization, formed in the United States by James Dobson in 1981 and incorporated 1983. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Christianity Today is an Evangelical Christian periodical based in Carol Stream, Illinois. ... Slate is an online news and culture magazine created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and owned by Microsoft (as part of MSN). ... For other persons named Billy Graham, see Billy Graham (disambiguation). ... This article is about Jerry Falwell, Sr. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Theodore Robert Ted Bundy (November 24, 1946 – January 24, 1989) was an American serial killer. ...

Contents

Biography

Background

Dobson's "Christmas Jacket" on display at Focus on the Family's headquarters in Colorado Springs.
Dobson's "Christmas Jacket" on display at Focus on the Family's headquarters in Colorado Springs.

James C. Dobson Jr. was born to Myrtle and James Dobson, and from his earliest childhood, religion was a central part of his life. He once told a reporter that he learned to pray before he learned to talk. In fact, he says he gave his life to Jesus at the age of three, in response to an altar call by his father.[7] He is the son, grandson, and great-grandson of Nazarene evangelists. To this day, he remains a member of this evangelical denomination, the largest denomination to come out of the 19th century Holiness Movement.[8] His father, James Dobson Sr., (1911-1977) never went to college, choosing instead the life of a traveling evangelist. Pastor Dobson was well-known in the southwest, and he and Mrs. Dobson often took their young son along so that he could watch his father preach. Theirs was a patriarchal home, in which Mrs. Dobson always deferred to her husband in every major decision.[citation needed] Like most Nazarenes, dancing and going to movies were forbidden, so young "Jimmie Lee" (as he was called) concentrated on his studies, and also became good at tennis.[9] Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... Colorado Springs is a middle-sized city, located just east of the geographic center of the state of Colorado in the United States. ... The Church of the Nazarene, more commonly called the Nazarene Church, is an Christian evangelical denomination. ... Evangelism is the proclaiming of the Christian Gospel. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ... For other senses of this word, see denomination. ... The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ...


But James Jr. was drawn to the study of psychology, which in the 50s and 60s was not looked upon favorably by most evangelicals. He came to believe that he was being called to become a Christian counselor or perhaps a Christian psychologist.[7] He decided to pursue a degree in psychology, and ultimately received his doctorate in that field in 1967. Psychological science redirects here. ... Look up Counselor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A psychologist is an expert in psychology, the systematic investigation of the human body, including behavior, cognition, and affect. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


Dobson first became well-known with the publication of Dare to Discipline, a book that became a cultural phenomenon among followers.[citation needed] Dobson's social and political opinions are widely read among many evangelical church congregations in the United States.[citation needed] Dobson publishes monthly bulletins also called Focus on the Family which are dispensed as inserts in some Sunday church service bulletins.[citation needed] Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ...


Dobson and his wife Shirley have two children, Danae and Ryan. Ryan Dobson, who graduated from Biola University in L.A., is a public speaker in his own right[citation needed], often[specify] speaking on issues relating to youth, the philosophical belief in ontological truth, and the pro-life movement. Ryan Dobson was adopted by the Dobsons and is an ardent supporter of adoption, especially adoption of troubled children. Biola University is a private evangelical Christian college, located in Southern California that is known for its conservative evangelical theology. ... In philosophy, ontology (from the Greek , genitive : of being (part. ... Time Saving Truth from Falsehood and Envy, François Lemoyne, 1737 For other uses, see Truth (disambiguation). ... This article is about the social movement. ...


Degrees, positions, and awards

Dr. Dobson attended Pasadena College (now Point Loma Nazarene University) where he was team captain of the tennis team, most valuable player in 1956 and 1958, and later returned to coach in 1968-1969.[10] Dobson earned a doctorate in child development from the University of Southern California in 1967. He was an Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Southern California School of Medicine for fourteen years. He spent seventeen years on the staff of the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles in the Division of Child Development and Medical Genetics. Dobson is a licensed psychologist in the State of California.[11] Point Loma Nazarene University is a liberal arts university located in San Diego, California on the Point Loma oceanfront. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...


At the invitation of Presidents and Attorneys General,[3] Dobson has also served on government advisory panels and testified at several government hearings. Among many other awards[specify], he has been given the "Layman of the Year" award by the National Association of Evangelicals in 1982, "The Children's Friend" honor by Childhelp USA (an advocate agency against child abuse) in 1987, and the Humanitarian Award by the California Psychological Association in 1988. In 2005, Dobson received an honorary doctorate (his 16th and most recent) from Indiana Wesleyan University and was inducted into IWU's Society of World Changers, while speaking at the university's Academic Convocation.[2] The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) is an agency dedicated to coordinating cooperative ministry for evangelical denominations of Christians in the United States. ... Child abuse is the physical, psychological or sexual abuse or neglect of children. ... Indiana Wesleyan University (IWU) is a private Christian liberal arts college located in Marion, Indiana that is affiliated with the evangelical Wesleyan Church. ...


Social views

Views on marriage

James Dobson is a strong proponent of what he calls "traditional marriage".[12] According to his view, women are not deemed inferior to men because both are created in God's image, but each gender has biblically-mandated roles.[13] He recommends that married women with children under the age of 18 focus on mothering, rather than work for income outside the home. He believes this provides a stable environment for growing children.[14]


In the 2004 book Marriage Under Fire: Why We Must Win This Battle, Dobson explains what he believes to be the Bible's view of marriage. Dobson suggests that falling heterosexual marriage rates in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden[citation needed] are due to the recognition of same-sex relationships by those countries during the 1990s (pp. 8-9). He remarks that traditional marriage "is rapidly dying" in these countries[citation needed] as a result, with most young people cohabiting or choosing to remain single (living alone) and illegitimacy rates rising in some Norwegian counties up to 80%.[citation needed] Dobson writes that "every civilization in the world has been built upon [heterosexual marriage]," (p. 7) and describes the institution of marriage as "the bedrock of culture in Asia, Africa, Europe, North America, South America, Australia, and even Antarctica" (p. 8). He also believes that homosexuality is a learned moral choice and he cites as evidence the life of actress Anne Heche[15] who at one time claimed to be a lesbian but no longer does so. Criticising "the realities of judicial tyranny," Dobson has written that "[t]here is no issue today that is more significant to our culture than the defense of the family. Not even the war on terror eclipses it" (pp. 84-85). Matrimony redirects here. ...


Critics, such as the Human Rights Campaign point out that Dobson's views on homosexuality do not represent the mainstream views of the mental health community.[15] Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center opined that such views prompt violence, "We have reports that clearly show this kind of rhetoric paves the way to violence. Without question, gay men and lesbians are the most attacked group — and the hate crimes toward them are more violent."[16] HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is one of the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. ... Homosexuality and psychology have a closely intertwined history. ... The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal organization, whose stated purpose is to combat racism and promote civil rights through research, education and litigation. ...


Views on schooling

Dobson and Focus on the Family support private school vouchers and tax credits for religious schools, and they reject education efforts that support or normalize homosexuality.[citation needed] According to Focus on the Family website, Dr. Dobson believes that parents are ultimately responsible for their children's education. He encourages parents to visit their children's schools to ask questions and to join the PTA so that they may voice their opinions.[17] Dobson opposes sex education curricula that are not abstinence-only. According to People for the American Way, concerned citizens have used Focus on the Family's material when challenging a book or curriculum in the public schools.[3] Critics, such as People for the American Way, allege that Focus on the Family encourages Christian teachers to establish prayer groups in public schools.[3][18] Dobson supports student-led prayer in public schools.[3] Dobson does not believe his campaign for public funding of private Christian schools or the mandating of Christian prayer in schools violates the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.[citation needed] A Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) is a voluntary organization bringing together parents and teachers of pupils in a particular school or school district, usually for fund-raising, building parental involvement at school and other activities relating to the welfare of the school, rather than the progress of individual pupils. ... People For the American Way (PFAW) is a liberal, self described progressive advocacy organization in the United States. ...


Views on discipline within the family

In his book Dare to Discipline, Dobson advocated the spanking of children of up to eight years old when they misbehave, but warns that "corporal punishment should not be a frequent occurrence" and that "discipline must not be harsh and destructive to the child's spirit." He does not advocate what he considers harsh spanking because he thinks "It is not necessary to beat the child into submission; a little bit of pain goes a long way for a young child. However, the spanking should be of sufficient magnitude to cause the child to cry genuinely."[19] [1] This article is about the use of spanking as discipline. ...


Dobson recognizes the dangers of child abuse, and therefore considers disciplining children to be a necessary but unpleasant part of raising children that should only be carried out by qualified parents: "Anyone who has ever abused a child—or has ever felt himself losing control during a spanking—should not expose the child to that tragedy. Anyone who has a violent temper that at times becomes unmanageable should not use that approach. Anyone who secretly 'enjoys' the administration of corporal punishment should not be the one to implement it."[20]


In his book The Strong-Willed Child, Dobson suggests that if authority is portrayed correctly to a child, the child will understand how to interact with other authority figures: "By learning to yield to the loving authority... of his parents, a child learns to submit to other forms of authority which will confront him later in his life—his teachers, school principal, police, neighbors and employers."[21]


Dobson stresses that parents must uphold their authority and do so consistently, comparing the relationship between parents and disobedient children to a battle: "When you are defiantly challenged, win decisively."[19] In The Strong-Willed Child, Dobson draws an analogy between the defiance of a family pet and that of a small child, and concludes that "just as surely as a dog will occasionally challenge the authority of his leaders, so will a little child — only more so.[19] (emphasis in original)


When asked "How long do you think a child should be allowed to cry after being punished? Is there a limit?" Dobson responded:

"Yes, I believe there should be a limit. As long as the tears represent a genuine release of emotion, they should be permitted to fall. But crying quickly changes from inner sobbing to an expression of protest... Real crying usually lasts two minutes or less but may continue for five. After that point, the child is merely complaining, and the change can be recognized in the tone and intensity of his voice. I would require him to stop the protest crying, usually by offering him a little more of whatever caused the original tears. In younger children, crying can easily be stopped by getting them interested in something else."[22]

Views on tolerance and diversity

In the winter of 2004-2005, the We Are Family Foundation sent American elementary schools approximately 60,000 copies of a free DVD using popular cartoon characters (most notably Sponge Bob) to "promote tolerance and diversity."[23] Dobson contended that "tolerance and diversity" are "buzzwords" that the We Are Family Foundation misused as part of a hidden agenda to promote homosexuality.[24] The New York Times noted Dobson asserting: "tolerance and its first cousin, diversity, 'are almost always buzzwords for homosexual advocacy.'"[25] He stated on the Focus on the Family website that "childhood symbols are apparently being hijacked to promote an agenda that involves teaching homosexual propaganda to children."[26] He offered as evidence the association of many leading LGBT rights organizations, including GLAAD, GLSEN, HRC, and PFLAG, with the We Are Family Foundation and the foundation's distribution of elementary school lesson plans which included discussions of compulsory heterosexuality.[27] The We Are Family Foundation was founded by Nile Rodgers in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... This article is about the cartoon series. ... It has been suggested that toleration be merged into this article or section. ... Recently diversity has been used in a political context to justify recruiting international students or employees. ... The We Are Family Foundation was founded by Nile Rodgers in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks. ... Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation or GLAAD is an organization intended to promote and ensure fair, accurate and inclusive representation of people and events in the media as a means of eliminating homophobia and discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation. ... Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network or GLSEN, is a national network of parents, students, teachers and others in the USA that wish to put an end to discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity/expression in K-12 schools. ... HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is one of the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. ... PFLAG contingent at San Francisco Pride 2004. ... One version of a Heterosexuality symbol Heterosexuality is sexual or romantic attraction between opposite sexes, and is the most common sexual orientation among humans. ...


The We Are Family Foundation countered that Dobson had mistaken their organization with "an unrelated Web site belonging to another group called 'We Are Family,' which supports gay youth."[28] Foundation attorney Mark Barondess suggested that anyone who thought the video promoted homosexuality "needs to visit their doctor and get their medication increased."[23][28] Dobson countered, "I want to be clear: the We Are Family Foundation — the organization that sponsored the video featuring SpongeBob and the other characters was, until this flap occurred, making available a variety of explicitly pro-homosexual materials on its Web site. It has since endeavored to hide that fact, but my concerns are as legitimate today as they were when I first expressed them in January".[27] In September 2005, Tolerance.org published a follow-up message advertising the DVD's continued availability, including We Are Family Foundation president Nancy Hunt's speculation that many of the DVDs may be "still sitting in boxes, unused, because of Dobson's vitriolic attack."[24]


Views on homosexuality

Dobson believes that homosexuality is but a preference that is influenced through the child's environment. In his view any sexual activity outside of marriage including homosexuality, deviates from the God-ordained male-female marriage, which he describes as the central stabilizing institution of society. He states that homosexual behavior has been and can be corrected through some type of Conversion therapy, such as counseling.[citation needed] Despite Dobson being a formerly licensed clinical psychologist[11] and expressing his views on homosexuality in psychological terms, his views are not supported by the mainstream mental health community. His Focus on the Family ministry sponsors the monthly conference Love Won Out, where participants hear "powerful stories of ex-gay men and women."[15] However several gay and lesbians who formerly participated in the Love Won Out conference have spoken out against the conference, debunking both its methodology and supposed success.[citation needed] In regards to the conference, Dobson has said "Gay activists come with pre-conceived notions about who we are and what we believe and about the hate that boils from within, which is simply not true. Regardless of what the media might say, Focus on the Family has no interest in promoting hatred toward homosexuals or anyone else. We also don't wish to deprive them of their basic constitutional rights." and "The Constitution applies to all of us."[29] Dobson strongly opposes the movement to legitimize same-sex relationships. In his book Bringing Up Boys, Dobson states that "Homosexuals deeply resent being told that they selected this same-sex inclination in pursuit of sexual excitement or some other motive."[30] Conversion therapy (sometimes called sexual reorientation therapy) refers to methods aimed at changing gay, lesbian, and bisexual peoples sexual orientations to heterosexual, or at eliminating or diminishing same-sex desires and behaviors. ... Homosexuality and psychology have a closely intertwined history. ... The ex-gay or exodus movement claims that homosexuals can become heterosexual or otherwise leave homosexuality behind through counselling, prayer, and other therapies if they choose to do so. ...


Dobson has been quoted as saying that it is the responsibility of a father to raise his son to be a "man", and to encourage his son's masculinity.[citation needed]


Dobson has been criticized for claiming that sociological studies show that gay couples do not make good couples; sociologist Judith Stacey, the author of one such study, responded that Dobson's claim "is a direct misrepresentation of my research."[31] In response to Dobson's claim that "there have been more than ten thousand studies that have showed [sic] that children do best when they are raised with a mother and a father who are committed to each other," Stacey replied that "[a]ll of those studies that Dobson is referring to are studies that did not include gay or lesbian parents as part of the research base."[32]


Dobson believes that bills expanding the prohibition of sexual-orientation-based discrimination will lead to a situation where, "every woman and little girl will have to fear that a predator, bisexual, cross-dresser or even a homosexual or heterosexual male might walk in and relieve himself in their presence."[33]


Views on the environment

In 2007, Dobson was one of 25 evangelicals who called for the ouster of Rev. Richard Cizik from his position at the National Association of Evangelicals for taking a stance urging evangelicals to take global warming seriously.[34] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) is an agency dedicated to coordinating cooperative ministry for evangelical denominations of Christians in the United States. ...


Political and social influence

Although Dobson initially remained somewhat distant from Washington politics, in 1981 he founded the Family Research Council as a political arm through which "social conservative causes" could achieve greater political influence.[35] The Family Research Council (FRC) is a Christian conservative non-profit lobbying organization, formed in the United States by James Dobson in 1981 and incorporated 1983. ...


In late 2004, Dobson led a campaign to block the appointment of Arlen Specter to head of the Senate Judiciary Committee because of Specter's stance on abortion.[36] Responding to a question by Alan Colmes on whether he wanted the Republican Party to be known as a "big-tent party," he replied, "I don't want to be in the big tent... I think the party ought to stand for something."[37] In 2006, Family Research Council spent more than a half million dollars to promote a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage in its home state of Colorado.[38] Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... Alan B. Colmes (b. ... The Family Research Council (FRC) is a Christian conservative non-profit lobbying organization, formed in the United States by James Dobson in 1981 and incorporated 1983. ...


In a Salon interview, author Chris Hedges opined that he believed Dobson wanted to impose a totalitarian system, and referred to Dobson as a "really dark figure."[39] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


A May 2005 article by Chris Hedges in Harpers described Dobson as "perhaps the most powerful figure in the Dominionist movement" and "a crucial player in getting out the Christian vote for George W. Bush."[40] Discernment Ministries, a site that describes dominionism as a heresy, characterized Dobson as belonging to the Patriotic American brand of dominionism, calling him "One of its most powerful leaders.[41] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Symbol of the Harpers The Harpers are a fictional, semi-secret, organization in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. ... This article is on the political-religious concept of dominionism. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


In November 2004, Dobson was described by the online magazine Slate.com as "America's most influential evangelical leader."[5] The article explained "Forget Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson, who in their dotage have marginalized themselves with gaffes... Dobson is now America's most influential evangelical leader, with a following reportedly greater than that of either Falwell or Robertson at his peak... Dobson may have delivered Bush his victories in Ohio and Florida."[5] Further, "He's already leveraging his new power. When a thank-you call came from the White House, Dobson issued the staffer a blunt warning that Bush 'needs to be more aggressive' about pressing the religious right's pro-life, anti-gay rights agenda, or it would 'pay a price in four years.'... Dobson has sometimes complained that the Republican party may take the votes of social conservatives for granted, and has suggested that evangelicals may withhold support from the GOP if the party does not more strongly support conservative family issues: "Does the Republican Party want our votes, no string attached--to court us every two years, and then to say, 'Don't call me, I'll call you'--and not to care about the moral law of the universe? ... Is that what they want? Is that the way the system works? Is this the way it's going to be? If it is, I'm gone, and if I go, I will do everything I can to take as many people with me as possible."[3] Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... This article is about Jerry Falwell, Sr. ... Marion Gordon Pat Robertson (born March 22, 1930) is a televangelist from the United States. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


However, in 2006, Dobson said that, while "there is disillusionment out there with Republicans" and "that worries me greatly," he nonetheless suggested voters turn out and vote Republican in 2006. "My first inclination was to sit this one out," but according to The New York Times, Dobson then added that "he had changed his mind when he looked at who would become the leaders of Congressional committees if the Democrats took over."[35]


Dobson garnered national media attention once again in February 2008 after releasing a statement in the wake of Senator John McCain's expected success in the so-called "Super Tuesday" Republican primary elections. In his statement, Dobson said: "I cannot, and will not, vote for Sen. John McCain, as a matter of conscience," and indicated that he would refrain from voting altogether were Senator McCain to become the Republican candidate, echoing other conservative commentators' concerns about the Senator's conservatism.[42] He has since endorsed Mike Huckabee for president. On June 24, 2008, Dobson publicly criticized statements made by U.S. Presidential candidate Barack Obama in Obama's 2006 "Call to Renewal"[43] address. Dobson stated that Obama was "distorting the traditional understanding of the Bible to fit his own worldview".[44] McCain redirects here. ... Huckabee redirects here. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


Dobson is a frequent guest on Fox News Channel.[37] Fox News redirects here. ...


Publications

Dobson has authored or co-authored 36 books, including:


Books as sole author

  • Dobson, James C. (2003). Bringing Up Boys: Practical Advice and Encouragement for Those Shaping the Next Generation of Men. Focus on the Family. ISBN 0-8423-5266-X. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2000-09-29). The Complete Marriage and Family Home Reference Guide. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842352678. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1977-02). Dare to Discipline. Bantam Books. ISBN 0553228412. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1986-11). Dr. Dobson Answers Your Questions about Feelings and Self-Esteem. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842306218. 
  • Dobson, James (1982). Dr. Dobson Answers Your Questions About Raising Children. Tyndale House. ISBN 084230620X. 
  • Dobson, James (2004-10-31). Dr. James Dobson on Parenting. World Publishing. ISBN 0884863395. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1984-11-1). Emotions: Can You Trust Them?. Bantam Books. ISBN 055325751X. 
  • Dobson, James (2000-10-24). Life on the Edge. Thomas Nelson. ISBN 0849909279. 
  • Dobson, James (2004-03-09). Love for a Lifetime: Building a Marriage That Will Go the Distance. Multnomah Books. ISBN 1590520874. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2007-04-16). Love Must Be Tough: New Hope for Families in Crisis. Tyndale House. ISBN 141431745X. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1996). The New Dare to Discipline. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842305068. 
  • Dobson, James (2001-02-01). The New Hide or Seek: Building Confidence in Your Child. Revell. ISBN 0800756800. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2007). The New Strong-Willed Child. Tyndale House. ISBN 1414313632. 
  • Dobson, James (1987-01-01). Parenting Isn't for Cowards: Dealing Confidently With the Frustrations of Child-Rearing. Word. ISBN 084990630X. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2003-10-01). Parents' Answer Book. Living Books. ISBN 0842387161. 
  • Dobson, James (1980-07-23). Preparing for Adolescence. Vision House. ISBN 0884491129. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2004-01). Romantic Love: How to Be Head Over Heels and Still Land on Your Feet. Regal Books. ISBN 0830732381. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1997-07-09). Solid Answers. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842306234. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2007-05-29). Stories of Heart and Home. Tyndale House. ISBN 1414317476. 
  • Dobson, James (2000-06-06). Straight Talk to Men. Thomas Nelson. ISBN 0849942101. 
  • Dobson, James (1995-09-26). Straight Talk: What Men Should Know, What Women Need to Understand. Thomas Nelson. ISBN 0849938589. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1992-09). The Strong-Willed Child. Living Books. ISBN 084232335X. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1986-04-01). Temper Your Child's Tantrums. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842369945. 
  • Dobson, James C. (1981-10-01). What Wives Wish Their Husbands Knew About Women. Living Books. ISBN 0842378960. 
  • Dobson, James C. (2001-11-20). When God Doesn't Make Sense. Living Books. ISBN 0842370625. 

Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Thomas Nelson {nyse:TNM} is a publishing firm that began in Scotland and is now a significant American Christian publisher. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ...

Books with others

  • (1999-10-1) The Focus on the Family Complete Book of Baby and Child Care. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842335129.  (Foreward)
  • Sutherland, Mark I.; William J. Federer, Roy Moore, James Dobson, Alan Keyes, Ed Meese, Phyllis Schlafly, Matthew D. Staver, Alan Sears (2005-07-04). Judicial Tyranny: The New Kings of America?. Amerisearch. ISBN 0975345567. 
  • Dobson, James C.; Shirley Dobson (2007-04-16). Marriage Under Fire: Why We Must Win This Battle. Tyndale House. ISBN 1414317565. 
  • Dobson, James C.; Shirley Dobson (2007-04-16). Night Light: A Devotional for Couples. Tyndale House. ISBN 1414317492. 
  • Dobson, James C.; Shirley Dobson (2007-04-20). Night Light for Parents: A Devotional. Tyndale House. ISBN 1414317514. 

Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... For the baseball player, see Roy Moore (baseball). ... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... Edwin Meese III (born December 2, 1931) served as the seventy-fifth Attorney General of the United States (1985 - 1988). ... Phyllis Schlafly (born August 15, 1924, in St. ... Alan Sears is president and CEO of the Alliance Defense Fund, an organization that funds litigation defending religious liberty. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ... Tyndale House is a publisher founded in 1962 by Kenneth Taylor, in order to publish his paraphrase of the Epistles, which he had composed while commuting to work at Moody Press in Chicago. ...

Notable articles and reports

The final report of the Attorney Generals Commission on Pornography (sometimes called The Meese Report for Attorney General Edwin Meese) is the result of a comprehensive investigation into pornography ordered by President Ronald Reagan. ... Porn redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the concept of time. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  1. ^ Welsome, Eileen (2006-08-01). James and the Giant Jihad. 5280 magazine. Retrieved on 2008-06-19. "Dobson has never drawn a salary from Focus. He derives his income from royalties on books sold through venues such as Barnes & Noble, The Tattered Cover, or Amazon.com. Dobson waives the royalties on any books sold through the ministry’s bookstore or website, which can mean hundreds of thousands of dollars of income for the nonprofit and a hefty tax write-off for Dobson."
  2. ^ a b c "Press Biographies > Dr. James Dobson", Focus on the Family. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Focus on the Family", People For the American Way, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-10-10. 
  4. ^ "Evangelical Leader Threatens to Use His Political Muscle Against Some Democrats", New York Times, 2005-01-01. Retrieved on 2007-05-09. 
  5. ^ a b c Crowley, Michael. "James Dobson: The Religious Right's New Kingmaker.", Slate.com, 2004-11-12. Retrieved on 2008-06-20. 
  6. ^ Dobson's interview of Bundy is available on YouTube in several parts:Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, Part Five, and Part Six
  7. ^ a b Apostolidis, Paul (2000-05). Stations of the Cross: Adorno and Christian Right Radio. Duke University Press, 22. ISBN 0822325411. 
  8. ^ "A Righteous Indignation", US News & World Report, 1998-05-04.  reprinted at SkepticTank.org
  9. ^ Stepp, Laura. "The Empire Built on Family and Faith", Washington Post, 1990-8-8, pp. C1-3. 
  10. ^ Year/Coach/Record/MVP. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  11. ^ a b Psychologist license. State of California. Retrieved on 2008-06-24. While previous versions of this page indicated his license had expired in April of 2008, the website was updated in June 2008 to reflect a 2010 expiration date.
  12. ^ Dobson, James C. (2007-11). The Love of a Lifetime. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  13. ^ Dobson, James (2001). Why Boys Are So Different. FocusonYourChild.com. Focus on the Family. Retrieved on 2007-09-07.
  14. ^ Dobson, James. Is it important for mothers to stay home during the teen years?. Focus on the Family.
  15. ^ a b c Johnson, Alex (2005-06-23). ‘Healed’ by God: Evangelical group sponsors conference on nature of gays. MSNBC.
  16. ^ Bagby, Dyana (2005-06-03). Efforts of ‘anti-gay industry’ chronicled in new report: Civil rights group targets religious conservatives. Southern Voice. Retrieved on 2008-06-21.
  17. ^ What can parents do to improve public schools?. Focus on the Family. Retrieved on 2008-06-21.
  18. ^ Zirin, Dave (2006-07-28). You Can Keep the Faith. The Nation. Retrieved on 2008-06-21.
  19. ^ a b c *Dobson, James C. (1977-02). Dare to Discipline. Bantam, 7. ISBN 0553228412. 
  20. ^ Dobson, James (2004-11-21). Good-Natured Child Needs His Share of Parents' Attention. Focus on the Family. Retrieved on 2008-06-21.
  21. ^ Dobson, James C. (1992-09). The Strong-Willed Child. Living Books, 235. ISBN 084232335X. 
  22. ^ Discipline problems. Retrieved on 2008-05-04.
  23. ^ a b US right attacks SpongeBob video. BBC News (2005-01-20). Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  24. ^ a b 'We Are Family' DVD Still Available. Southern Poverty Law Center (2005-09-06). Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  25. ^ Zernike, Kate (2005-01-30). Buzzwords; Hello, Synergy, Begone, Crisis. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  26. ^ Religious Right Attacks Tolerance Pledge. Southern Poverty Law Center (2005-03). Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  27. ^ a b Chang, Pauline J. (2005-01-28). Dobson Clarifies Pro-Gay SpongeBob Video Controversy. The Christian Post. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  28. ^ a b Kirkpatrick, David D. (2005-01-20). Conservatives Pick Soft Target: A Cartoon Sponge. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  29. ^ Kwon, Lillian. "Gays Still Looking for Love from Christians", March 19, 2008. 
  30. ^ Bringing Up Boys, Focus on the Family 2003, p. 115-116
  31. ^ Paulson, Steven K. (2006-07-17), “Gay rights group: Dobson manipulated research”, Boston Globe, <http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2006/07/17/gay_rights_group_dobson_manipulated_data/?rss_id=Boston.com+%2F+News> 
  32. ^ YouTube - Dr. Judith Stacey on James Dobson's Distortions
  33. ^ Ingold, John (2008-05-30). Anti-bias measure inked: Governor signs bill covering sexual orientation, religious beliefs. The Denver Post. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  34. ^ Cooperman, Alan (2007-03-03). Evangelical Angers Peers With Call for Action on Global Warming. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2008-06-19.
  35. ^ a b Kirkpatrick, David D.. "The 2004 Campaign: Evangelical Christians--Warily, a Religious Leader Lifts His Voice in Politics", The New York Times, 2004-05-13, p. A22. 
  36. ^ Conservative leader targets Specter. CNN (2004-11-09). Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  37. ^ a b What Will a New Bush Term Mean for the American Family?. FOX News (2004-11-15). Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  38. ^ Asay, Paul (2006-08-23). Focus backing state amendment. The Gazette. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  39. ^ Goldberg, Michelle (2007-01-08). The holy blitz rolls on. Salon. Retrieved on 2008-06-20. Salon: "You say they would like to impose a totalitarian system. How much of a conscious goal do you think that is at the upper levels of organizing, with, say, somebody like Rod Parsley?" Hedges: "I think they're completely conscious of it. The level of manipulation is quite sophisticated. These people understand the medium of television, they understand the despair and brokenness of the people they appeal to, and how to manipulate them both for personal and financial gain. I look at these figures, and I would certainly throw James Dobson in there, or Pat Robertson, as really dark figures."
  40. ^ Hedges, Chris (2005-05). Feeling the hate with the National Religious Broadcasters. Harpers.(subscription required, reprinted here.)
  41. ^ Leslie, Sarah. Dominionism and the Rise of Christian Imperialism. Discernment Ministries. Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  42. ^ Stoddard, Ed. "Super Tuesday: Dobson delivers blow to McCain candidacy", Reuters, 2008-02-05. Retrieved on 2008-06-20. 
  43. ^ Obama, Barack (2006-06-28). 'Call to Renewal' Keynote Address. Retrieved on 2008-06-25.
  44. ^ Gorski, Eric (2008-06-24). Dobson accuses Obama of `distorting' Bible. Associated Press. Retrieved on 2008-06-24.
  45. ^ Commissioner Biographies (1986-07). Retrieved on 2008-06-20.

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The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Microsoft subsidiaries | Websites | The Washington Post ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... Southern Voice is the main lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender newspaper in Atlanta, Georgia and the Southeast United States. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Focus on the Familys Visitors Welcome Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal organization, whose stated purpose is to combat racism and promote civil rights through research, education and litigation. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is an American non-profit legal organization, whose stated purpose is to combat racism and promote civil rights through research, education and litigation. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Denver Post is a daily newspaper and online website published in Denver, Colorado. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gazette is a newspaper based in Colorado Springs, Colorado that is lauded for its local reporting and large margins that make it easier to read. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Symbol of the Harpers The Harpers are a fictional, semi-secret, organization in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
James Dobson - Focus on the Family - Column by Dr. James Dobson - ArcaMax Publishing (1492 words)
Dr. James Dobson's "Focus on the Family" is seen and heard around the world on television, radio, and in syndicated columns.
Dobson is founder and chairman of the board of the nonprofit organization Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995(
COPYRIGHT 2008 JAMES DOBSON INC. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise without the written permission of uclick and Universal Press Syndicate.
James Dobson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2439 words)
James Dobson, Ph.D. James Clayton Dobson, Ph.D. (born April 21, 1936 in Shreveport, Louisiana), is a conservative Protestant Christian and psychologist who presents a daily radio program called Focus on the Family on over 6,000 stations worldwide in more than a dozen languages.
Dobson contended that "tolerance and diversity" are "buzzwords" that the We Are Family Foundation misused as part of a hidden agenda to promote homosexuality.
Dobson suggests that falling heterosexual marriage rates in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway are due to the recognition of same-sex relationships by political leaders in those countries during the 1990s (pp.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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