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Encyclopedia > James Bradley

James Bradley (March 1693July 13, 1762) was an English astronomer, Astronomer Royal from 1742. He is best known for discovering the aberration of light. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (536x682, 308 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: James Bradley ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a scientist whose area of research is astronomy or astrophysics. ... Astronomer Royal is a senior post in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... The aberration of light (also referred to as astronomical aberration or stellar aberration) is an astronomical phenomenon which produces an apparent motion of celestial objects. ...


Life & work

Bradley was born at Sherborne, near Cheltenham in Gloucestershire, in March 1693. He entered Balliol College, Oxford, on March 15, 1711, and took degrees of B.A. and M.A. in 1714 and 1717 respectively. His early observations were made at the rectory of Wanstead in Essex, under the tutelage of his uncle, the Rev. James Pound (himself a skilled astronomer) and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on November 6, 1718. Cheltenham (or Cheltenham Spa) is a spa town and borough in Gloucestershire, England, near Gloucester and Cirencester. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (75th in Leap years). ... // Events February 24 - The London premiere of Rinaldo by George Friderich Handel, the first Italian opera written for the London stage. ... // Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... // Events The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ...


He took orders on becoming vicar of Bridstow in the following year, and a small sinecure living in Wales was also procured for him by his friend Samuel Molyneux. He resigned his ecclesiastical preferments in 1721, when appointed to the Savilian chair of astronomy at Oxford, while as reader on experimental philosophy (1729 - 1760) he delivered 79 courses of lectures at the Ashmolean Museum. For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom, England and Wales and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Philosopher in Meditation (detail), by Rembrandt. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Ashmolean Museum (in full the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology) in Oxford, England is the worlds first university museum. ...


His memorable discovery of the aberration of light was announced to the Royal Society in January 1729 (Phil. Trans. xxxv. 637). The observations upon which it was founded were made at Molyneux’s house on Kew Green. He did not announce the supplementary detection of nutation until February 14, 1748 (Phil. Trans. xlv. I), when he had tested its reality by minute observations during an entire revolution (18.6 years) of the moon’s nodes. In 1742, he had been appointed to succeed Edmund Halley as Astronomer Royal; his enhanced reputation enabled him to apply successfully for a set of instruments costing £1000; and with an 8-foot quadrant completed for him in 1750 by John Bird, he accumulated at Greenwich in ten years materials of inestimable value for the reform of astronomy. A crown pension of £250 a year was conferred upon him in 1752. Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... Rotation (green), Precession (blue) and Nutation (red) of the Earth Nutation is a slight irregular motion (etymologically a nodding) in the axis of rotation of a largely axially symmetric object, such as a gyroscope or a planet. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... Edmond Halley. ... Astronomer Royal is a senior post in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... John Bird (1709 – 1776) was an astronomer and scientific instrument maker who made important developments in astronomical instrument design. ... Greenwich (pronounced grenn-itch , or by the locals) is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


He retired in broken health, nine years later, to the Cotswold village of Chalford in Gloucestershire, where he died at Skiveralls House on 13 July 1762. The publication of his observations was delayed by disputes about their ownership; but they were finally issued by the Clarendon Press, Oxford, in two folio volumes (1798, 1805). The insight and industry of Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel were, however, needed for the development of their fundamental importance. Map sources for Chalford at grid reference SO898028 Chalford is a small village in the Frome Valley of the Cotswolds in England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel (July 22, 1784 – March 17, 1846) was a German mathematician, astronomer, and systematizer of the Bessel functions (which, despite their name, were discovered by Daniel Bernoulli). ...


References

Rigaud’s Memoir prefixed to Miscellaneous Works and Correspondence of James Bradley, D.D. (Oxford, 1832), is practically exhaustive. Other sources of information are: New and General Biographical Dictionary, xii. 54 (1767); Biog. Brit. (Kippis); Fouchy’s Eloge, Paris Memoirs (1762), p. 231 (Histoire); Delambre’s Hist. de l’astronomie au 18e siècle, p. 413. 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Andrew Kippis (March 28, 1725 - October 8, 1795), was an English nonconformist clergyman and biographer. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Preceded by:
Edmond Halley
Astronomer Royal
1742–1762
Succeeded by:
Nathaniel Bliss

  Results from FactBites:
 
James Bradley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (412 words)
James Bradley (March 1693 – July 13, 1762) was an English astronomer, Astronomer Royal from 1742.
Bradley was born at Sherborne, near Cheltenham in Gloucestershire, in March 1693.
His early observations were made at the rectory of Wanstead in Essex, under the tutelage of his uncle, the Rev. James Pound (himself a skilled astronomer) and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on November 6, 1718.
Bradley Nowell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3022 words)
Bradley James Nowell (commonly known as Brad Nowell) (February 22, 1968 – May 25, 1996), was an influential ska musician, who served as lead singer and guitarist of rock band Sublime.
Bradley's early departure from college is perhaps ironic because after the establishment of his music career the college audiences of southern California became the first audience to embrace his music.
The widow Nowell said that Bradley Nowell had wanted to be a father, reconnect with his family, to have a band that achieved "glory", and record a wonderful album [4].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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