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Encyclopedia > James Bowdoin
James Bowdoin
James Bowdoin

In office
1785 – 1787
Lieutenant(s) Thomas Cushing
Preceded by Thomas Cushing (acting)
Succeeded by John Hancock

Born August 7, 1726
Boston, Massachusetts
Died November 6, 1790
Boston Massachusetts
Political party None

James Bowdoin (August 7, 1726November 6, 1790) was an American political and intellectual leader from Boston, Massachusetts during the American Revolution. He served in both the colonial council (senate) and house and was President of the state's constitutional convention. After independence he was governor of Massachusetts. Image File history File links James Bowdoin, governor of Massachusetts, 1785-1787. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1 Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area    - City 232. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Category: ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1 Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area    - City 232. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution was a political movement during the last half of the 18th century that resulted in the creation of... A constitutional convention is a gathering of delegates for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. ...


His grandfather (Pierre Boudouin) was a Huguenot refugee from France. Pierre took his family first to Ireland, then to Portland, Maine, finally settling in Boston in 1690. His father, also James Bowdoin, was a successful merchant in Boston when James was born there on August 8, 1727. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... Nickname: The Forest City Country United States State Maine County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Mayor Nicholas Mavodones, Jr Area    - City 136. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ...


Young James attended Boston Latin School, then graduated from Harvard in 1745. When his father died in 1747, he inherited a considerable fortune. He took an early interest in Natural History, and had several papers read to the Royal Society in London by his friend and correspondent, Benjamin Franklin. Motto Sumus Primi Founded April 23, 1635 Head Master Corneila Kelley School type Public high school Grades 7–12 Enrollment c. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... // Events January 31 - The first venereal diseases clinic opens at London Dock Hospital April 9 - The Scottish Jacobite Lord Lovat was beheaded by axe on Tower Hill, London, for high treason; he was the last man to be executed in this way in Britain May 14 - First battle of Cape... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now usually viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...


Bowdoin was elected to the colonial assembly in 1753 and served there until named to the Council in 1756. By the end of Sir Francis Bernard's term as governor he spoke and wrote against the royal governors and their actions. He was proposed as a continuing Council member in 1769, but the new governor Thomas Hutchinson rejected his membership. Boston promptly elected him to the assembly. When Hutchinson was formally commissioned as governor in 1760, he restored Bowdoin to the Council, reasoning that he was less dangerous there than as an outspoken critic in the assembly. The organization and structure of Colonial governments in America shared many attributes. ... 1753 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Francis Bernard (1712-1779) was a British colonial administrator who served as Governor in New Jersey and Massachusetts. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711-June 3, 1780) was the American colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1771 to 1774 and a prominent Loyalist in the years before the American Revolutionary War. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Bowdoin as named as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1774 but did not attend, citing health reasons. In 1775 he was elected President of the Council and held that office until 1777. With the turmoil of the American Revolutionary War, he sometimes acted as council president in an executive, rather than legislative role. The Continental Congress is the label given to two successive bodies of representatives of the inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774, to October 26, 1774. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... ... Year 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants American Revolutionaries, France, Dutch Republic, Spain, American Indians Great Britain, German mercenaries, Loyalists, American Indians Commanders George Washington, Comte de Rochambeau, Nathanael Greene, Bernardo de Gálvez Sir William Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, Lord Cornwallis (more commanders) The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War...


When Massachusetts wrote its own constitution in 1779, he was president of the Convention which created it, and chairman of the committee that drafted it. His son, James Bowdoin III, also sat in this convention. Under the new state government, governor John Hancock appointed him to a commission to revise and consolidate the laws from colonial days. 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Bowdoin III (September 22, 1752-October 11, 1811) was an American philanthropist and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ...


In 1785, Bowdoin was elected Governor of Massachusetts, but his terms were not peaceful. He called up the militia and took vigorous action to put down Shays' Rebellion, and as a result lost the election of 1787 as Hancock was swept back into office. In 1788 he served as a member of the Massachusetts' convention that ratified the United States Constitution. 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker A militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Shays Rebellion was an armed uprising in western Massachusetts from 1786 to 1787. ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


Throughout this period, he maintained his interest in learning a natural history. In 1780 he was primarily responsible for the creation of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, He served as its first president until his death and left the society his library. Bowdoin continued to publish not only scientific papers, but verse in both English and Latin. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Edinburgh, made a fellow of Harvard, and was a member of the Royal Society of both London and Edinburgh. 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ...


He died of consumption on November 6, 1790 in Boston. Bowdoin College in Maine was named in his honor. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system, lymphatic system, circulatory system, genitourinary system, bones and joints. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Bowdoin College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1794, located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ...


One of his relitives founded Bowdoin in Maine


See also

Dudley-Winthrop Family The Dudley-Winthrop Family is a U.S. political family. ...


External Link

  • Official Commonwealth of Massachusetts Governor Biography
Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Cushing
Governor of Massachusetts
17851787
Succeeded by
John Hancock
Flag of the Governor of Massachusetts Governors of Massachusetts
 Colony 

EndecottWinthropT. DudleyHaynes • Vane • WinthropT. DudleyBellinghamWinthropEndecottT. DudleyWinthropEndecottT. DudleyEndecottBellinghamEndecottBellinghamLeverettBradstreet Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... Image File history File links Massachusetts_governors_flag. ... John Hancock, the first Governor The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Endicott (c. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Gov. ... Sir Henry Vane (1613 - June 14, 1662), son of Henry Vane the Elder, served as a statesman and Member of Parliament in a career spanning England and Massachusetts. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Richard Bellingham (1592 - December 7, 1672) was a colonial magistrate, laywer, and several-time governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... John Endicott (c. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... John Endicott (c. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Endicott (c. ... Richard Bellingham (1592 - December 7, 1672) was a colonial magistrate, laywer, and several-time governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Endicott (c. ... Richard Bellingham (1592 - December 7, 1672) was a colonial magistrate, laywer, and several-time governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... John Leverett (1616 - March 16, 1679) was a colonial magistrate, merchant, soldier and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony John Leverett was born, perhaps, in Boston, England. ... Simon Bradstreet (March 18, 1603–March 27, 1697) was a colonial magistrate, businessman and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ...

 Dominion 

J. DudleyAndrosBradstreet The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... Sir Edmund Andros Sir Edmund Andros (December 6, 1637 - February 24, 1714), was an early colonial governor in North America, and head of the short-lived Dominion of New England. ... Simon Bradstreet (March 18, 1603–March 27, 1697) was a colonial magistrate, businessman and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ...

 Province 

W. PhipsStoughtonCooteStoughtonGovernor's CouncilJ. DudleyGovernor's CouncilJ. DudleyTailerShuteDummerBurnetDummerTailerBelcherShirleyS. PhipsShirleyS. PhipsGovernor's CouncilPownallHutchinsonBernardHutchinsonGage The Province of Massachusetts Bay was a crown colony organized October 7, 1691 in North America by the monarch of England. ... Sir William Phips (1651-1695) Sir William Phips (or Phipps) (February 2, 1651 or 1650 – February 18, 1694 or 1695), colonial governor of Massachusetts, was born at Woolwich, Maine, near the mouth of the Kennebec River. ... William Stoughton (30 September 1631 – 7 July 1701) acted as judge and prosecutor during the Salem Witch Trials. ... Richard Coote, 1st Earl of Bellomont, (1636–5 March 1701) was colonial governor of New York from 1698 to 1701 and of Massachusetts from 1699 to 1700. ... William Stoughton (30 September 1631 – 7 July 1701) acted as judge and prosecutor during the Salem Witch Trials. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Joseph Dudley (September 23, 1647 - April 2, 1720), colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1702 to 1715, the son of Thomas Dudley, was born and died in Roxbury, Massachusetts. ... William Tailer (1676 - March 8, 1732) was the son of Bostonian William Tailer and a Colonial-era politician. ... Samuel Shute (January 12, 1662 - April 15, 1742) was born in London. ... William Dummer was born in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1677, and died there on October 10, 1761. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into William Burnet (1688-1728). ... William Dummer was born in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1677, and died there on October 10, 1761. ... William Tailer (1676 - March 8, 1732) was the son of Bostonian William Tailer and a Colonial-era politician. ... Jonathan Belcher (1682-1757) was colonial governor of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and New Jersey. ... William Shirley (1694-1771) William Shirley (1694-1771) was the British governor of Massachusetts from 1741 to 1759. ... Spencer Phips (1685–April, 1757) took office twice as acting Governor of Massachusetts in the absence of William Shirley. ... William Shirley (1694-1771) William Shirley (1694-1771) was the British governor of Massachusetts from 1741 to 1759. ... Spencer Phips (1685–April, 1757) took office twice as acting Governor of Massachusetts in the absence of William Shirley. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Thomas Pownall (1722 - February 25, 1805), British colonial statesman and soldier, was born at Saltfleetby, Lincolnshire, England. ... Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711-June 3, 1780) was the American colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1771 to 1774 and a prominent Loyalist in the years before the American Revolutionary War. ... Sir Francis Bernard (1712-1779) was a British colonial administrator who served as Governor in New Jersey and Massachusetts. ... Thomas Hutchinson (September 9, 1711-June 3, 1780) was the American colonial governor of Massachusetts from 1771 to 1774 and a prominent Loyalist in the years before the American Revolutionary War. ... Engraving of Thomas Gage Sir Thomas Gage (1719 – April 2, 1787) was a British general and commander in chief of the North American forces from 1763 to 1775 during the early days of the American Revolution. ...

 Commonwealth 

HancockCushingBowdoinHancockAdamsSumnerGillGovernor's CouncilStrongSullivanLincoln, Sr.GoreGerryStrongBrooksEustisMortonLincoln, Jr.DavisArmstrongEverettMortonDavisMortonBriggsBoutwellCliffordWashburnGardner • Banks • AndrewBullockClaflinWashburnTalbotGastonRiceTalbotLongButlerRobinsonAmesBrackettRussellGreenhalgeWolcottCraneBatesDouglasGuildDraperFossWalshMcCallCoolidgeCoxFullerAllenElyCurleyHurleySaltonstallTobinBradfordDeverHerterFurcoloVolpePeabodyVolpeSargentDukakisKingDukakisWeldCellucciSwiftRomney State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation; first Governor of Massachusetts; and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... Samuel Adams (September 27, 1722 – October 2, 1803) was the chief Massachusetts leader of the Patriot cause leading to the American Revolution. ... Increase Sumner (November 27, 1746 – June 7, 1799) was a U.S. political figure. ... Moses Gill (1746 - May 20, 1800) was a U.S. political figure. ... The Governors Council (also known as the Executive Council) of Massachusetts is a popularly-elected board which oversees judicial nominations. ... Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. ... For the Olympic athlete, see James P. Sullivan. ... Levi Lincoln, Sr. ... Christopher Gore (September 21, 1758 - March 1, 1827) was a prominent Massachusetts lawyer, Federalist politician, and diplomat. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced , rhymes with merry) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American politician, a member of the Jeffersonian Republican Party. ... Caleb Strong (January 9, 1745 - November 7, 1819) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Brooks, Jr. ... William Eustis (June 10, 1753–February 6, 1825) was an early American statesman. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... Levi Lincoln, Jr. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Samuel Turell Armstrong (1784 - 1850) was a U.S. political figure. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... John Davis (January 13, 1787 – April 19, 1854) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Marcus Morton, painted c. ... George N. Briggs was a member of the Whig Party and seven-term Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, from 1844 to 1851. ... George Sewall Boutwell (January 28, 1818–February 27, 1905) was an American statesman who served as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... John H. Clifford was Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for a single term, from 1853 to 1854. ... Emory Washburn (1800–1877) was a United States political figure. ... Henry Joseph Gardner (June 14, 1819 – July 21, 1892) was the Governor of Massachusetts from 1855—1858. ... Nathaniel P. Banks, engraving from a Mathew Brady Carte de visite Nathaniel Prentice (or Prentiss)[1] Banks (January 30, 1816 – September 1, 1894), American politician and soldier, served as Governor of Massachusetts, Speaker of the House of the United States House of Representatives, and as a Union general in the... John Albion Andrew (1818 - 1867) was a U.S. political figure. ... Alexander Hamilton Bullock (March 2, 1816–January 17, 1882) was Governor of Massachusetts from 1866 to 1868. ... William Claflin (1818-1905) was an industrialist and philanthropist who served as Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1869-1872 and as a member of Congress from 1877-1881. ... William Barrett Washburn (January 31, 1820–October 5, 1887) was an American politician from Massachusetts, serving in the United States House of Representatives and as Governor of Massachusetts. ... Thomas Talbot (September 7, 1818 – October 6, 1886) was a governor of Massachusetts. ... William Gaston (1820-1894) was Governor of Massachusetts in 1875-1876. ... Alexander Hamilton Rice (August 30, 1818 – July 22, 1895) was Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts from 1856-1857, a U.S. Congressman during the American Civil War, and the Governor of Massachusetts from 1876–78. ... Thomas Talbot (September 7, 1818 – October 6, 1886) was a governor of Massachusetts. ... John Davis Long (1838–1915) was a U.S. political figure. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and later served as its governor. ... George Dexter Robinson (born George Washington Robinson) (January 20, 1834–February 22, 1896) was born in Lexington, Massachusetts. ... Oliver Ames (February 4, 1831 - October 22, 1895) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Quincy Adams Brackett (June 8, 1842–April 6, 1918) was born in Bradford, New Hampshire to Ambrose S. Brackett and Nancy (Brown) Brackett. ... William Eustis Russell (January 6, 1857 - July 16, 1896) was a U.S. political figure. ... Frederic Thomas Greenhalge (born Greenhalgh) (July 19, 1842–March 5, 1896) was born in Clitheroe, England and immigrated with his parents to the United States in early childhood. ... Roger Wolcott (September 2, 1847 - December 21, 1900) was a significant U.S. political figure. ... Winthrop Murray Crane (1853 - 1920) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Lewis Bates (September 18, 1859–June 8, 1946) was born in North Easton, Massachusetts to Rev. ... William Lewis Douglas (1845 - 1924) was a U.S. political figure. ... Curtis Guild, Jr. ... Ebenezer Sumner Draper (1858 - 1915) was a U.S. political figure. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... David Ignatius Walsh (November 11, 1872 - June 11, 1947) was a United States politician from Massachusetts. ... Samuel Walker McCall (February 28, 1851 - November 4, 1923) was Governor of Massachusetts. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Channing Harris Cox (October 28, 1879 _ August 20, 1968) was a Massachusetts Republican politician and Governor born in Manchester, New Hampshire. ... Alvan Tufts Fuller (February 27, 1878-April 30, 1958) was an American political figure, and Governor of Massachusetts from 1925 until 1929. ... Frank G. Allen (October 6, 1874-October 5, 1950) was a governor of the state of Massachusetts. ... Joseph Buell Ely (February 22, 1881-June 13, 1956) was a governor of the state of Massachusetts. ... James Michael Curley (November 20, 1874-November 12, 1958) was an American political figure who served in the United States House of Representatives, as the mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, and as governor of Massachusetts. ... Charles Francis Hurley (November 24, 1893-March 24, 1946) was a governor of the state of Massachusetts. ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ... Maurice Joseph Tobin (May 22, 1901–July 19, 1953) was a Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, governor of the U.S. state of Massachusetts, and U.S. Secretary of Labor. ... Robert Fiske Bradford (December 15, 1902–March 18, 1983) was an American politician who served one term as Governor of Massachusetts, from 1947 to 1949. ... Paul Andrew Dever (January 15, 1903 - April 11, 1958) was a Democratic politician from Boston, Massachusetts. ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State Christian Herter For Christian Herter, 19th-century New York decorator, see Herter Brothers. ... John Foster Furcolo (July 29, 1911 - July 5, 1995) was born in New Haven, Connecticut. ... John Anthony Volpe (December 8, 1908 - September 11, 1994) was a Governor of Massachusetts and a U.S. Secretary of Transportation. ... Endicott Peabody (February 15, 1920–December 1, 1997) was a Governor of Massachusetts Peabody was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, served in the United States Navy during World War II, and received a BA and a law degree from Harvard University. ... John Anthony Volpe (December 8, 1908 - September 11, 1994) was a Governor of Massachusetts and a U.S. Secretary of Transportation. ... Francis William Sargent (July 29, 1915 - October 21, 1998) was Governor of Massachusetts from 1969 to 1975. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Edward Joseph King (born May 11, 1925) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Massachusetts from 1979 to 1983. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... William Weld William Floyd Weld (born July 31, 1945) was the Republican Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from 1991 to 1997, resigning to pursue the ambassadorship to Mexico. ... Paul Cellucci Argeo Paul Cellucci (born April 24, 1948) better known as Paul Cellucci, is an American politician and diplomat, former Governor of Massachusetts, and former Ambassador to Canada. ... Jane Maria Swift (born February 24, 1965) is an American politician from Massachusetts. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
James Bowdoin - LoveToKnow 1911 (221 words)
JAMES BOWDOIN (1726-1790), American political leader, was born of French Huguenot descent, in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 7th of August 1726.
Bowdoin was a member of the state convention which in February 1788 ratified for Massachusetts the Federal Constitution, his son being also a member.
His son, James Bowdoin (1752-1811), was born in Boston on the 22nd of September 1752, graduated at Harvard in 1771, and served, at various times, as a representative, senator and councillor of the state.
James Bowdoin Summary (1150 words)
James Bowdoin was descended from a Huguenot refugee who had arrived in the British colonies in the 1680s.
Bowdoin's last public service was in January 1788 as a delegate to the state convention which ratified the new constitution for the United States.
Bowdoin was elected to the colonial assembly in 1753 and served there until named to the Council in 1756.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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