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Encyclopedia > James Blish
Science fiction writer
Books · Authors · Films · Television
James Benjamin Blish
Pseudonym(s): William Atheling Jr.
Born: May 23, 1921
East Orange, New Jersey
Died: July 30, 1975
Henley-on-Thames, England
Occupation(s): Science Fiction Writer, Fantasy Writer, Science Fiction Critic
Nationality: USA
Writing period: 1956 - 1975
Genre(s): Science Fiction, Fantasy
Debut work(s): They Shall Have Stars
Influences: James Branch Cabell
Website: www.blish.org

James Benjamin Blish (East Orange, New Jersey, May 23, 1921 – Henley-on-Thames, July 30, 1975) was an American author of fantasy and science fiction. Blish also wrote criticism of science fiction using the pen-name William Atheling Jr. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This page lists a broad variety of science fiction novels (and novel series)--some old, some new; some famous, some obscure; some well-written, some ill-written--and so may be considered a representative slice of the field. ... Note that this partial list contains some authors whose works of fantastic fiction would today be called science fiction, even if they predate, or did not work in that genre. ... Poster for 2001: A Space Odyssey, an archetypal science fiction film Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... A pseudonym (Greek pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons true name. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... East Orange is a city located in Essex County, New Jersey. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... July 30 is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Henley-on-Thames from by the playground near the Rail Station River Thames, the five arched Henley Bridge and Leander Club (to the far left) Henley-on-Thames is a town on the north side of the River Thames in south Oxfordshire, England, about 10 miles downstream and north-east... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... James Branch Cabell photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1935 James Branch Cabell (April 14, 1879 - May 5, 1958) was an American author of fantasy fiction and belles lettres. ... East Orange is a city located in Essex County, New Jersey. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Henley-on-Thames from by the playground near the Rail Station River Thames, the five arched Henley Bridge and Leander Club (to the far left) Henley-on-Thames is a town on the north side of the River Thames in south Oxfordshire, England, about 10 miles downstream and north-east... July 30 is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other definitions of fantasy see fantasy (psychology). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ...

Contents

Biography

Blish trained as a biologist at Rutgers and Columbia University, and spent 19421944 as a medical technician in the U.S. Army. After the war he became the science editor for the Pfizer pharmaceutical company. His first published story appeared in 1940, and his writing career progressed until he gave up his job to become a professional writer. “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Pfizer, Incorporated (NYSE: PFE) (pronounced faɪzəɹ or faɪzÉ™), is the worlds largest pharmaceutical company. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


He is credited with coining the term gas giant, in the story "Solar Plexus" as it appeared in the anthology Beyond Human Ken, edited by Judith Merril. (The story was originally published in 1941, but that version did not contain the term; Blish apparently added it in a rewrite done for the anthology, which was first published in 1952.) This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Judith Merril (January 21, 1923, New York, New York - September 12, 1997, Canada) was an North American science fiction author and anthologist. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Blish was married to the literary agent Virginia Kidd from 1947 to 1963.


Between 1967 and his death in 1975, Blish became the first author to write short story collections based upon the classic TV series Star Trek. In total, Blish wrote 11 volumes of short stories adapted from episodes of the 1960s TV series, as well as an original novel, Spock Must Die! in 1970 — the first original novel for adult readers based upon the series (since then hundreds more have been published). He died midway through writing Star Trek 11; his wife, J. A. Lawrence, completed the book, as well as two additional volumes of Star Trek episode adaptations. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Spock Must Die! (ISBN 0553246348) is a non-canonical Star Trek novel by James Blish released in 1970. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


Blish lived in Milford, Pennsylvania at Arrowhead until the mid-1960s. In 1968, Blish emigrated to England, and lived in Oxford until his death from lung cancer in 1975. He is buried in Holywell Cemetery, Oxford, near the grave of Kenneth Grahame. Arrowhead, August 2004 Arrowhead is the name that science fiction writer James Blish and his wife, literary agent and science fiction writer Virginia Kidd, gave to their home in Milford, Pennsylvania. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Grahames grave stone in Holywell Cemetery, Oxford. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a Scottish novelist. ...


Works

A Life For The Stars, Analog Science Fact Science Fiction, September, 1962

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Cities in Flight

Perhaps Blish's most famous works were the "Okies" stories, known collectively as "Cities in Flight", published in the science-fiction digest magazine Astounding Science Fiction. The framework for these was set in the first of four eventual novels, They Shall Have Stars, which shows two essential features of the series. The first was the invention of the anti-aging drug ascomycin; Blish's employer Pfizer makes a thinly disguised appearance as Pfitzner in a section showing the screening of biological samples for interesting activity. (Pfizer also appears in disguise as one of the sponsors of the polar expedition in a subsequent book, Fallen Star). The second was the development of an antigravity device known as the "spindizzy". Since the device became more efficient as its field of influence was increased, entire cities were lifted from Earth and sent roving amongst the stars. Digestion is the process whereby a biological entity processes a substance, in order to chemically convert the substance into nutrients. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... AntiGravity is a group of New York gymnasts/performance artists. ... The spindizzy is a fictional anti-gravity device invented by James Blish for his series Cities in Flight. ... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... STARS can mean: Shock Trauma Air Rescue Society Special Tactics And Rescue Service, a fictional task force that appears in Capcoms Resident Evil video game franchise. ...


They Shall Have Stars is dystopian science fiction of a type common in the era of McCarthyism. The second, A Life For The Stars, is a coming of age story set amid flying cities. The third, Earthman, Come Home, is a series of loosely connected short stories detailing the adventures of a flying New York City; it was selected as one of the best novellas prior to 1965 by the Science Fiction Writers of America and as such, was reprinted in The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two. A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- and τόπος, alternatively, cacotopia[1], kakotopia or anti-utopia) is a fictional society that is the antithesis of utopia. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... It has been suggested that Coming of Age (Unitarian Universalism) be merged into this article or section. ... This article is in need of attention. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A novella is a narrative work of prose fiction somewhat longer than a short story but shorter than a novel. ... Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA, (SFWA is pronounced seff-wah) was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight and James Blish. ... The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time (1973) is an anthology edited by Ben Bova. ...


Blish set the end of his literature's universe in 4004 AD.[1] (The chronology in early editions of They Shall Have Stars differed somewhat from the later reprints, indicating that Blish, or his editors, may not have planned this at the beginning of the series.) A film version of Cities in Flight was in pre-production by Spacefilms in 1979, but never materialized.[2]


After Such Knowledge

Blish declared that another group of novels was a trilogy, each dealing with an aspect of the price of knowledge, and given the overall name of "After Such Knowledge" (the title taken from a T. S. Eliot quote). The first published, A Case of Conscience (a winner of the 1959 Hugo Award as well as 2004/1953 Retrospective Hugo award for Best Novella), showed a Jesuit priest confronted with an alien intelligent race, apparently unfallen, which he eventually concludes must be a Satanic fabrication. The second, Doctor Mirabilis, is a historical novel about the medieval proto-scientist Roger Bacon. The third, actually two very short novels, Black Easter and The Day after Judgement, was written using the assumption that the ritual magic for summoning demons as described in grimoires actually worked. Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ... A Case of Conscience is a science fiction novel by James Blish, first published in 1959. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... For other uses, see Satan (disambiguation). ... For the Nova Scotia premier see Roger Bacon (politician). ... Hugo Award nominated fantasy novel by James Blish in which an arms dealer hires a black magacian to unleash all the Demons of Hell on earth for a single day. ... “Fiend” redirects here. ... This design for an amulet comes from the Black Pullet grimoire. ...


The Seedling Stars (Pantropy)

Blish's most famous short stories are the "Pantropy" tales, collected in the book The Seedling Stars. In these stories, humans are modified to live in various alien environments, this being easier and vastly cheaper than terraforming. Artists conception of a terraformed Mars in four stages of development. ...

  • Book One (Seeding Program) is about the inception of Pantropy, when the Pantropy program appears to have deteriorated into hideous genetic experimenting and has been outlawed. It describes Sweeney, a modified ("adapted") human whose metabolism is based on liquid ammonia and sulphur bonds and whose bones are made from ice IV, who is inserted into a colony on Ganymede by the Terran Port Authority (a para-military organisation) to capture a renegade scientist and end his plans to seed modified humans on distant worlds. However, the government really only tries to derail pantropy because it will cut their profits from terraforming attempts. Sweeney is surprised to find a well established, functioning community on Ganymede and eventually realizes that he was just used as an expendable agent and that he has been fed false hopes about the possibility of being changed into a normal human being who could live on earth. Having found a real home, he switches sides and with his help the Ganymede colony manages to launch their seed ships to secret destinations, beyond the reach of the corrupt government.
  • Book Two (The Thing in the Attic) depicts a very successful seeding project. It tells the story of a small group of intellectuals from a primitive culture of modified monkey-like humans living in the trees of their jungle world. Having openly voiced the opinion that the godly giants do not literally exist as put down in the book of laws, they are banished from the treetops for heresy. In their exile on the ground they have to adapt to vastly different circumstances, fight monsters resembling dinosaurs, and finally happen upon the godly giants - who turn out to be human scientists who have just arrived on the world to monitor the progress of the local adapted humans. The protagonists are told by the scientists that their whole race must eventually leave the treetops to conquer their world and that they have become pioneers of some sort for accomplishing survival.
  • Book Three (Surface Tension) gives another example of a culture of adapted humans: A pantropy starship crashes on an ocean world. With no hope for rescue, the few survivors modify their own genetic material to seed microscopic aquatic "humans" into the lakes and puddles of the world and leave them a message engraved in tiny metal plates. The story then tells how over many seasons, the adapted human newcomers explore their aquatic environment, make alliances, invent tools, fight wars with hostile beings and finally gain dominance over the sentient beings of their world. They develop new technologies and manage to decipher some of the message on the metal plates. Finally they build a wooden "space ship" (which turns out to be two inches long) to overcome the surface tension and travel to "other worlds" - the next puddle - in search of their ancestry, as they have come to realize that they are not native to their world.
  • Book Four (Watershed) takes a look at the more distant future. A very long time after the beginning of the Pantropy program, a starship crewed by "standard" humans is enroute to some unimportant backwater planet to deliver a pantropy team who are "adapted" humans resembling seals more than humans. Due to racial prejudices, tension mounts between the crew and the passengers onboard. When the captain decides to restrict the passengers to their cabins to prevent the situation from escalating, the leader of the adapted humans informs him that the planet ahead is Earth, where the "normal" human form once developed. He challenges the "normal" humans to follow him onto the surface of their ancestral home planet and prove that they are superior to the "adapted" seal people who will now be seeded there - or admit that they were beaten on their own grounds. The story concludes as the captain and his lieutenant silently ponder the possibility that they, being "standard" humans, are just a minority, and an obsolete species.

(The German title of the anthology is Auch sie sind Menschen..., literally "They, too, are humans". The stories' titles are Aussaatplan, Himmel und Hölle, Oberflächenspannung and Rückkehr respectively, which would literally translate back into English as "Seeding plan", "Heaven and Hell", "Surface tension" and "Return" or "Homecoming". However, except for Surface Tension the original English titles seem to be different.) Snowflakes by Wilson Bentley, 1902 Ice is the name given to any one of the 14 known solid phases of water. ... A paramilitary is a group of civilians trained and organized in a military fashion. ...


Other

Blish collaborated with Norman L. Knight on a series of stories set in a world with a population a thousand times that of today, and followed the efforts of those keeping the system running, collected in one volume as A Torrent of Faces.

James Blish's grave marker.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 576 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1560 pixel, file size: 352 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)I took this photo with my own camera. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 576 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 1560 pixel, file size: 352 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)I took this photo with my own camera. ...

Selected bibliography

Cities in Flight

  • They Shall Have Stars (1956) (also published under the title Year 2018!)
  • A Life for the Stars (1962)
  • Earthman Come Home (1955) G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York.
  • A Clash of Cymbals, (published in the US as The Triumph of Time) (1959)

A one-volume collection of all four Cities in Flight books exists, first published in the US by Avon (1970), ISBN 0-380-00998-6 and later in the UK by Arrow (1981), ISBN 0-09-926440-4, which includes an analysis of the work (pp.597 onwards) as an Afterword by Richard D. Mullen, derived from an original article by Leland Shapiro in the publication Riverside Quarterly. It is now available in hardcover and trade paperback from Overlook Press. Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After Such Knowledge

(Black Easter and The Day After Judgment were combined in The Devil's Day, first Baen printing, 1990) A Case of Conscience is a science fiction novel by James Blish, first published in 1959. ... if, subtitled Worlds of Science Fiction, was launched in March 1952, the creation, apparently, of James L. Quinn of the Quinn Publishing Company, not to be confused with Robert Guinn, who later published both If and its sister magazine Galaxy. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Hugo Award nominated fantasy novel by James Blish in which an arms dealer hires a black magacian to unleash all the Demons of Hell on earth for a single day. ... if, subtitled Worlds of Science Fiction, was launched in March 1952, the creation, apparently, of James L. Quinn of the Quinn Publishing Company, not to be confused with Robert Guinn, who later published both If and its sister magazine Galaxy. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... The Puppet Masters by Robert A. Heinlein in Galaxy, Sept. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Baen Books is a publishing house that publishes science fiction and fantasy novels, including numerous military science fiction genre works. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Others

  • The Warriors of Day (1951}
  • Jack of Eagles (1952}
  • The Seedling Stars (1957)
  • Fallen Star (1957) — Set in the International Geophysical Year of 1958, it tells the story of a disaster-ridden polar expedition that finds a meterorite containing fossil life forms.
  • The Triumph of Time (1958)
  • VOR (1958) Avon Publications, Inc., New York, in wrappers (paperback).
  • Galactic Cluster (stories, 1959)
  • So Close to Home (stories, 1961)
  • The Star Dwellers (1961}
  • Titans' Daughter (also under the title Beanstalk) (1961)
  • The Night Shapes (1962)
  • The Duplicated Man (with R. W. Lowndes, 1959)
  • Best Science Fiction Stories of James Blish (stories, 1965)
  • Mission to the Heart Stars (1965}
  • Welcome to Mars! (1967}
  • A Torrent of Faces (with Norman L. Knight, 1967)
  • The Vanished Jet (1968)
  • Midsummer Century (1972)
  • The Quincunx of Time (1973}
  • Star Trek 1-11 (1967-1975) Novelizations of the scripts of the well-known TV series.
  • Spock Must Die! (1970) An original Star Trek novel, the first such to be published.

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The International Geophysical Year or IGY was an international scientific effort that lasted from July 1, 1957, to December 31, 1958. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Quincunx of Time is a short science fiction novel by James Blish. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... James Blish wrote a series of short stories adaptations of Star Trek episodes from 1967 onwards, called simply Star Trek. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series and media franchise. ... Spock Must Die! (ISBN 0553246348) is a non-canonical Star Trek novel by James Blish released in 1970. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...

Anthologies

  • New Dreams This Morning (1966)

1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...

Non-fiction

Blish wrote criticism of science fiction (some quite scathing) under the name of William Atheling Jr, as well as reviewing under his own name.: the Atheling articles were reprinted in two collections, The Issue at Hand (1964) and More Issues at Hand (1970), and the posthumous The Tale That Wags The God 1987 collects Blish essays. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He was a fan of the works of James Branch Cabell, and for a time edited Kalki, the journal of the Cabell Society. James Branch Cabell photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1935 James Branch Cabell (April 14, 1879 - May 5, 1958) was an American author of fantasy fiction and belles lettres. ...


More on James Blish

  • Imprisoned in a Tesseract, the life and work of James Blish by David Ketterer ISBN 0-87338-334-6
  • April 1972 issue of Fantasy and Science FictionSpecial James Blish Issue

Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ...

Honors, Awards and Recognition

For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Sculpture near the entrance of the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame The Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame bills itself as the worlds premier science fiction museum. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Brian Wilson Aldiss, OBE, (born August 18, 1925 in East Dereham, Norfolk) is a prolific English author of both general fiction and science fiction. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... The British Science Fiction Association (BSFA) annually presents four awards (though numbers have differed in previous years) based on a vote of BSFA members and recently also members of EasterCon. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Eastercon is the common name for the British National Science Fiction Convention, which since the 1960s has been held over the four-day Easter holiday weekend although the traditional numbering of the conventions goes back to 1948, when the national convention was held over the three-day Whitsun bank holiday... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... It has been suggested that World Science Fiction Society be merged into this article or section. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ Choosing 4004 AD is a satirical reference to the year "4004 BC", inferred by Bishop James Ussher to be the year of the creation of the universe, based on his study of the Book of Genesis.
  2. ^ Perakos, Peter S. (June 1979). "John Flory's Monument: An SF Saga in the Works". Starlog (23). 

Archbishop James Ussher (1581-1656) James Ussher (sometimes spelled Usher) (4 January 1581–21 March 1656) was Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625–1656 and a prolific religious scholar who most famously published a chronology which calculated the date of Creation as 4004 BC. // Ussher...

References

  • Tuck, Donald H. (1974). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy. Chicago: Advent, 51-53. ISBN 0-911682-20-1. 
  • Tymn, Marshall B.; Kenneth J. Zahorski and Robert H. Boyer (1979). Fantasy Literature: A Core Collection and Reference Guide. New York: R.R. Bowker Co., 52-54. ISBN 0-8352-1431-1. 

Author of A Handbook of Science Fiction and Fantasy. ... Advent: Publishers is a publishing house founded by Earl Kemp and other members of the University of Chicago Science Fiction Club in 1956, to publish criticism, history, and bibliography of the science fiction field, beginning with James Blishs The Issue at Hand. ...

External links

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
James Blish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1251 words)
Blish trained as a biologist at Rutgers and Columbia University, and spent 1942-1944 as a medical technician in the U.S. Army.
Of Blish's short stories, his most famous are the 'Pantropy' stories (collected in The Seedling Stars), in which humans are modified to live in various alien environments, this being easier and vastly cheaper than terraforming.
Blish collaborated with Norman L. Knight on a series of stories set in a world with a population a thousand times that of today, and followed the efforts of those keeping the system running, collected in one volume as A Torrent of Faces.
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