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Encyclopedia > James A. Campbell
James A. Campbell
Born September 11, 1854
Ohltown, Ohio
Died September 20, 1933
Youngstown, Ohio

James A. Campbell (September 11, 1854 - September 20, 1933) was a business leader best known for his role as chairman of Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company, one of the largest steel-production plants in the United States.[1] Campbell served as director of the American Iron and Steel Institute during World War I.[2] September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio Counties Mahoning Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) is an association of North American steel producers formed in 1855. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nikolay II Aleksey Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert H. Asquith D. Lloyd George Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna...

Contents

Early years

Campbell was born in the village of Ohltown, Ohio. As a child he suffered from tuberculosis and was predicted to die at a young age. He recovered his health, however, and eventually excelled at sports such as baseball and boxing.[1] As a young man, Campbell enrolled at Hiram College, where he studied business.[1] Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left) versus Rafael Ortíz Boxing, called pugilism (from Latin), prizefighting (when referring to professional boxing) or the sweet science[1] is a sport and martial art in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with their fists in a series... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


His early employment included stints as a hardware salesman and furniture store manager. In the late 1800s, Campbell settled permanently in Youngstown, Ohio, where he organized and managed the Youngstown Ice Company. Later, he became associated with the Trumbull Iron Company.[1] Location within the state of Ohio Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio Counties Mahoning Founded 1796 Incorporated 1848 (village) - 1867 (city) Government  - Mayor Jay Williams (I) Area  - City  34. ...


Industrial career

Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co., 1920s
Youngstown Sheet & Tube Co., 1920s

In 1895, Campbell became superintendent of the Mahoning Valley Iron Company, but he resigned five years later, when the firm was absorbed by Republic Steel Company.[1] That same year, Youngstown-area industrialist George Wick appointed Campbell as secretary of what became the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company. Two years later, he rose to the position of vice president, and in 1904, he became president of the company.[1] Republic Steel was once the third largest steel producer in the United States. ...


Campbell led the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company through a tumultuous period that included the East Youngstown riot of 1916, a nationally reported incident that required the intervention of the National Guard. [1] (East Youngstown was officially renamed as Campbell in 1922. While this gesture was largely intended to honor James Campbell, it was also an attempt to distance the city from the memory of the infamous riot.)[3] The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... Campbell is a city located in Mahoning County, Ohio. ...


As director of the American Iron and Steel Institute during World War I, Campbell was responsible for the allocation of steel tubular products.[2] For his outstanding wartime service, he later received the emblem of the French Legion of Honor.[1] In 1919, Campbell led Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company through a steel strike of unprecedented magnitude.[1] French Legion of Honor The Légion dhonneur (in Legion of Honor (AmE) or Legion of Honour (ComE)) is an Order of Chivalry awarded by the President of France. ...


Final years

L. Campbell
L. Campbell

Campbell's last years were marred by tragedy and disappointment. During World War I, the industrialist's only son, Louis J. Campbell, contracted a progressive disease while fighting in the trenches of France.[4] The degenerative condition, which resulted in the amputation of Louis Campbell's right leg, forced the younger man to take frequent breaks from his position as treasurer of the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company. Ultimately, Louis Campbell survived his father by less than two years.[4] Trench warfare is a form of war in which both opposing armies have static lines of defense. ... Partial hand amputation For the song Amputations by Death Cab for Cutie, see You Can Play these Songs with Chords Amputation is the removal of a body extremity by trauma (also referred to as avulsion) or surgery. ... In many governments, a treasurer is the person responsible for running the treasury. ...


Meanwhile, James Campbell was frustrated in his efforts to create what might have been the nation's second largest steel corporation.[5] In 1931, he attempted to merge the Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company with Bethlehem Steel, a move that was bitterly, and successfully, opposed by other local industrialists.[1] Opponents of the merger were backed financially by Cyrus S. Eaton, founder of Republic Steel, who feared the implications of a strengthened Bethlehem Steel.[6] Bethlehem Steel Corporations flagship manufacturing facility in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions or M&A refers to the aspect of corporate finance strategy and management dealing with the merging and acquiring of different companies as well as assets. ... Eaton on the cover of Time, 1930 Cyrus Stephen Eaton (December 27, 1883–May 9, 1979) was a Canadian-American financier, industrialist and philanthropist. ...


James Campbell died on the evening of September 20, 1933, of an apparent stroke. Funeral services were held at his sprawling mansion in Liberty, Ohio.[1] Those who praised Campbell's achievements included Eugene Grace, president of Bethlehem Steel Company. "In the death of Mr. Campbell, the steel industry loses one of its outstanding personages", Grace said.[7] September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Liberty Township is an urban township located in Trumbull County, Ohio, just north of Youngstown. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Death Ends J. A. Campbell's Career; Sudden Attack Is Fatal to Sheet & Tube's Builder", The Youngstown Vindicator, September 21, 1933, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Fuechtmann, Thomas G. (1989). Steeples and Stacks: Religion and Steel Crisis in Youngstown. New York: Cambridge University Press, p. 12. 
  3. ^ Fuechtmann, Thomas G. (1989). Steeples and Stacks: Religion and Steel Crisis in Youngstown. New York: Cambridge University Press, p. 13. 
  4. ^ a b "Death Takes L. J. Campbell; Long Illness Ends Fatally for Son of Late S. & T. Founder", The Youngstown Vindicator, January 7, 1935, p. 17.
  5. ^ "Bethlehem Merger Great Blow of Last Years", The Youngstown Daily Vindicator, September 21, 1933.
  6. ^ Fuechtmann, Thomas G. (1989). Steeples and Stacks: Religion and Steel Crisis in Youngstown. New York: Cambridge University Press, p. 14. 
  7. ^ "Dalton, Grace Laud Campbell", The Associated Press, September 21, 1933.

 
 

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