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Encyclopedia > Jamaican sound system
Music of Jamaica

Kumina - Nyabinghi- Mento - Ska - Rocksteady - Reggae - Sound systems - Lovers rock - Dub - Dancehall - Dub poetry - Toasting - Raggamuffin - Roots reggae Jamaica is known as the birthplace of many popular musical genres including raggamuffin, ska, reggae and dub. ... Kumina is both the religion and the music practiced by the people of eastern Jamaica. ... Nyabinghi is a legendary Amazon queen, who was said to have possesed a Ugandan woman named Muhumusa in the 19th century. ... Mento is a style of Jamaican folk music that predates and has greatly influenced ska and reggae music. ... Ska (pron. ... Rocksteady is the name given to a style of music popular in Jamaica between 1966 and 1968. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Lovers Rock is the United Kingdoms main contribution to reggae. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ragga. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Toasting, chatting, or DJing is the act of talking or chanting over a rhythm or beat. ... Raggamuffin (or ragga) is a kind of reggae that includes digitized backing instrumentation. ... Roots reggae is a spiritual Rastafari subgenre of reggae music with lyrics that often include praise for Jah Ras Tafari Makonnen, Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia; the Emperor of Ethiopia. ...

Anglophone Caribbean music
Anguilla - Antigua and Barbuda - Bahamas - Barbados - Bermuda - Caymans - Grenada - Jamaica - Montserrat - St. Kitts and Nevis - St. Vincent and the Grenadines - Trinidad and Tobago - Turks and Caicos - Virgin Islands
Sound samples
Other Caribbean music
Aruba and the Dutch Antilles - Cuba - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Haiti - Hawaii - Martinique and Guadeloupe - Puerto Rico - St. Lucia - United States - United Kingdom

In Jamaica, a Sound System is a popular type of nomadic outdoor concert/party. The sound system scene is generally regarded as an important part of Jamaican cultural history and as being responsible for the rise of modern Jamaican musical styles such as ska and dub. The Cayman Islands are a Caribbean island chain, currently a territory of the United Kingdom. ... Timeline and Samples Pop genres Calypso - Chutney - Dancehall - Dub - Junkanoo - Ragga - Rapso - Reggae - Ripsaw - Rocksteady - Scratch - Ska - Soca - Spouge - Steelpan Other islands Aruba and the Dutch Antilles - Cuba - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Haiti - Martinique and Guadeloupe - Puerto Rico - Saint Lucia The Turks and Caicos Islands are an overseas dependency of the... 1966 in music Download sample of Alton Ellis rocksteady track Girl Youve Got a Date. Download sample of Cincinatti Kid by Prince Buster, a legendary ska artist. ... Aruba and the five main islands of the Netherlands Antilles are part of the Lesser Antilles island chain. ... The music of Hawaii includes an array of traditional and popular styles, ranging from native Hawaiian folk music to modern rock and hip hop. ... The former French colonies of Martinique and Guadeloupe are small islands in the Caribbean. ... Communities of nomadic people move from place to place, rather than settling down in one location. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ... Chehel Sotouns Wall painting, that dates back to the Safavid era, depicts a Chaharshanbe Suri celebration. ... Ska (pron. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History

The sound system concept first became popular in the 1950's, in the ghettos of Kingston. DJs would load up a truck with a generator, turntables, and huge speakers and set up street parties. In the beginning, the DJs played American R&B music, but as time progressed and more local music was created, the sound migrated to a local flavor. Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica. ... A disc jockey scratching a record. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ...


The sound systems were big business, and represented one of the few sure ways to make money in the unstable economy of the area. The promoter (the DJ) would make his profit by charging a minimal admission, and selling food and alcohol. Competition between these sound systems was fierce, and eventually two DJs emerged as the stars of the scene: Clement 'Coxsone' Dodd, and Duke Reid. It was not uncommon for thousands of people to be in attendance. Clement Seymour Sir Coxsone Dodd (Kingston, Jamaica, January 26, 1932 – May 5, 2004) was a Jamaican record producer who was influential in the development of reggae and other forms of Jamaican music in the 1950s, 60s and later. ... Duke Reid was a Jamaican record producer, DJ and label owner. ...


The popularity of a sound system was mainly contingent on one thing: having new music. In order to circumvent the release cycle of the American record labels, the two sound system superstars turned to record production. Initially, they produced only singles for their own sound systems, known as "Exclusives" or Dubplates - a limited run of one copy per song. A dubplate is an acetate disc — usually 12 inches, 10 inches or 7 inches in diameter — used in mastering studios for quality control and test recordings before proceeding with the final master, and subsequent pressing of the record to be mass produced on vinyl. ...


What began as an attempt to copy the American R&B sound using local musicians became Jamaica's first unique music: Ska. As this new musical form became more popular, both Dodd and Reid began to move more seriously into music production. Coxsone Dodd's production studio became the famous Studio One, while Duke Reid founded the famous Treasure Isle. Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Ska (pron. ... Studio One is one of reggaes most renowned record labels and recording studios, having been described as the Motown of Jamaica. ...


Today one of the leading sound system in located in St Elizabeth Black River The "Ruffcutsound" own by a very wise individual Kevin Barrett. Kevin Start his career as a box lifter in the late 90s on a sound system by the name of super mix movement, own by another indivdual hamley daley known as Mickey. After Mickey terminate his sound system he left Jamaica in 2001. That when Kevin decided to take a foot step futher in the music industry. He ask Mickey for some help his request was grand on he excel. Kevin Barret AKA Ruffcut is now futhering his education at the university of Technology Jamaica UTECH studying Construction Technology.


References

Sound Systems

  • Duke Reid - The Trojan
  • Coxsone Dodd - Coxsone Downbeat
  • King Edwards The Giant
  • Sinclair The Lion
  • Count Boysie
  • Prince Buster
  • King Tubby's Hi-Fi
  • ARROWS Hi-Fi
  • EMPEROR FAITH
  • Bells The President
  • Lloyd Daley - Lloyd The Matador
  • Percival Tibby - Sir Percy
  • Percel Chin - Admiral Chin
  • Joe Chin - Unitone
  • Ken Hamilton - Duke Hamilton
  • Roy Muncey - Count Muncey
  • Mr Chung - Cavaliers
  • King Prof
  • Bass Odyssey
  • Ruffcutsound (fr-Black River)
  • Kilimanjaro
  • Hoo Kim Brothers - Channel One
  • Power Mix (Los Angeles - Dj Legend) [[1]]
  • Stone Love [[2]]
  • Harry Mudie - Mudies Hi-Fi
  • Socialist Roots Sound System
  • Fire Links
  • Code Red Sound
  • Renaissance Disco
  • {Vybes Master}-Dj Dre
  • Silver Hawk
  • City Rock
  • Metro Media
  • Swatch International
  • Mighty Crown (Japan)
  • Adonia
  • Billy Slaughter
  • Tony Matterhorn
  • Black Chiney
  • Ignite Entertainment (DJ Xces & Doc Dre)
  • Ticka Music
  • Pieces
  • Black Kat
  • Sound Trooper
  • Byron Lee & the Dragonaires
  • Muzikmixx Interactiv(Crazy Dean)
  • DJ Maca Roots

Duke Reid was a Jamaican record producer, DJ and label owner. ... Clement Seymour Sir Coxsone Dodd (Kingston, Jamaica, January 26, 1932 – May 5, 2004) was a Jamaican record producer who was influential in the development of reggae and other forms of Jamaican music in the 1950s, 60s and later. ... Cecil Bustamente Campbell (born May 28, 1938), better known as Prince Buster, is a musician from Kingston, Jamaica and regarded as one of the most important figures in the history of ska and rocksteady music. ... King Tubby King Tubby (born Osbourne Ruddock, January 28, 1941 – February 6, 1989) was a Jamaican electronics and sound engineer, known primarily for his influence on the development of dub in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Lloyd Daleys Matador Productions 1968-1972: Reggae Classics from the Originator compiled by Heartbeat Lloyd Daley also know as Matador (Born in 1942, Kingston, Jamaica) is a Jamaican electronic technician, sound system pioneer and reggae producer. ... Joseph Jo Jo Hoo Kim (1942?-) is a Jamaican reggae record producer. ... Channel One is a recording studio in Maxfield Avenue, West Kingston, Jamaica. ... Harry A. Mudie (b. ... Socialist Roots Hi-Fi was a Jamaican reggae sound system and record label owned by Tony Welch (aka Papa Roots) in the 1970s and early 1980s, it stood alongside Stur Gav, Channel One, Virgo, Jah Love and Jack Ruby as a Heavy Weight sound of the time. ... Tony Matterhorn is a popular Jamaican dancehall deejay. ... Black Chiney is a Jamaican sound system based in Miami, Florida. ... Byron Lee and the Dragonaires is one of the best known Jamaican band . ...

Reggae Sound Systems in the UK

  • Sir Coxsone Outernational
  • Saxon
  • David Rodigan
  • Unity
  • Qualitex
  • Immortal
  • Infinity
  • Iration Steppas
  • High Pressure
  • Symbiosis
  • Jah Shaka
  • Channel One
  • King Earthquake
  • Jah Youth
  • Freedom Masses
  • Aba-Shanti-I
  • Jah Voice
  • Operation Sound System
  • Jah Tubbys
  • RDK Hifi
  • Rebel Lion Sound System
  • Toxic Sound System
  • Axis Sound System
  • Gladdy Wax Sound System
  • Jah Baron
  • Jungleman
  • Megatone
  • Bubblers Hi Quality
  • Wassifa
  • V.Rocket
  • Killaman Taurus
  • Jah Observer
  • Mighty Tabot
  • Roots Ting
  • Sequoia
  • Strike Force Int'l
  • Dib Dub soundsystem
  • Mellow-Vibes

Liberation collective Photo of Jah Shaka on his own soundsystem used on the cover of the Authentic Dubwise album. ...


Reggae Sound Systems in Africa

Empire sound system (kadoma zimbabwe)

  • Fahari Sound High Powa
  • Stereo One (Zimbabwe)
  • Admiral & Jah Seed (South Africa)
  • Silver Stone (Zimbabwe)
  • African Exodus Batanai (Zimbabwe)
  • Small Axe (Zimbabwe)
  • Sweet Ebony (Zimbabwe)
  • Root'Sound (Burkina Faso)

See also

This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... A sound system is a group of DJs and engineers contributing and working together as one, often playing and producing one particular kind of music. ... A sound reinforcement system is a functional arrangement of electronic components that is designed to reinforce a live sound source. ... Ska (pron. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
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Jamaican sound system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (486 words)
The sound system scene is generally regarded as an important part of Jamaican cultural history and as being responsible for the rise of modern Jamaican musical styles such as ska and dub.
The sound system concept first became popular in the 1950's, in the ghettos of Kingston.
Competition between these sound systems was fierce, and eventually two DJs emerged as the stars of the scene: Clement 'Coxsone' Dodd, and Duke Reid.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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