FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Jagiellonian" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Jagiellonian

The Jagiellons were a royal dynasty which reigned in some Central European countries between the 14th and 16th century. Members of the dynasty were grand dukes of Lithuania 1377-1392 and 1440-1572, kings of Poland 1386-1572, kings of Hungary 1440-1444 and 1490-1526, and kings of Bohemia 1471-1526. The family was a branch of the Lithuanian Gediminaičiai dynasty.


The name (other variations used in English include: Jagiellonians, Jagiellos, Jogailos) comes from Jogailo (Polish Jagiełło), the first Polish king of that dynasty. In Polish, the dynasty is known as Jagiellonowie (singular: Jagiellończyk); in Lithuanian it is called Jogailaičiai (sing.: Jogailaitis), in BelarusianЯгайлавічы (Jagajłavičy, sing.: Ягайлавіч, Jagajłavič), in HunagarianJagellók (sing.: Jagelló), and in CzechJagellonci (sing.: Jagellonský). In all variations of that name, the letter J should be pronounced as in "Hallelujah" (or as Y in "yes"), and G – as in "get".

Enlarge
At the end of the 15th century, the Jagiellons reigned over vast territories stretching from the Baltic to the Black to the Adriatic Sea.

The dynastic union between the two countries (converted into a full administrative union only in 1569) is the reason for the common appellation "Poland-Lithuania" in discussions about the area from the late Middle Ages onwards. Two Jagiellonians also ruled Hungary and Bohemia, which briefly (1440-44) shared their king with Poland.


Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania and the founder of the dynasty in Poland, became king of Poland as Ladislaus II after converting to Christianity and marrying Jadwiga, second of Poland's Angevin rulers. The former Polish ruling house of Piast (c.962-1370) had ended with the death of Casimir III.


Jagiellons were hereditary rulers of Poland and Lithuania.


The Jagiellon rulers of Poland-Lithuania (with dates of ruling in brackets) were:

Enlarge
Genealogical tree of the Jagiellon dynasty

Sigismund's heir was his sister, Catherine Jagiellonica, who married John III Vasa of Sweden; as a result, the main branch of the Jagiellons merged with the House of Vasa, which ruled Poland from 1587 until 1668.


The Jagiellons at one point also established dynastic control over the kingdoms of Bohemia and Hungary, with Ladislaus Jagiello followed by his son Louis Jagiello. However, after Louis' sudden death, that royal line was extinguished.




See also

External links

  • Pages and Forums on the Lithuanian History (http://www.istorija.net/)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jagiellon dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (407 words)
The dynastic union between the two countries (converted into a full administrative union only in 1569) is the reason for the common appellation "Poland-Lithuania" in discussions about the area from the Late Middle Ages onwards.
Two Jagiellonians also ruled Hungary and Bohemia, which briefly (1440–44) shared their king with Poland.
Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania and the founder of the dynasty in Poland, became king of Poland as Ladislaus II after converting to Christianity and marrying Jadwiga, second of Poland's Angevin rulers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m