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Encyclopedia > Jade Emperor
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Taoism


Taoism (Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... Image File history File links Yin_yang. ...


Fundamentals
Tao · De · Xiulian This article is about the Chinese character and the philosophy it represents. ... De (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: te) is a key concept in Chinese philosophy, usually translated inherent character; inner power; integrity in Daoism, moral character; virtue; morality in Confucianism and other contexts, and quality; virtue (guna) or merit; virtuous deeds (punya) in Chinese Buddhism. ...

Prominent Taoists
Laozi · Zhuangzi
Zhang Daoling · Zhang Jiao
Ge Hong · Chen Tuan
Wang Chongyang Chen Po (Chen Tuan, Chen Hsi I) 871-989 Ge Hong 284–364 Ho Yen Guo Xiang (Kuo Hsiang) d. ... Laozi (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Lao Tzu; also Lao Tse, Laotze, Lao Zi, and in other ways) was an ancient Chinese philosopher. ... Zhuangzi (Traditional: 莊子; Simplified: 庄子, Pinyin: Zhuāng Zǐ, Wade-Giles: Chuang Tzŭ, lit. ... Celestial Master Zhang Daoling Zhang Daoling (Chang Tao-ling), aka Zhang Ling. ... Zhang Jiao or Zhang Jue (d. ... Ge Hong(葛洪) (284-364, also known as Zhichuan) was a minor southern official during the Jin dynasty (263-420), best known for his interest in Daoism, alchemy, and techniques of longevity. ... Chen Tuan (陳摶) (birthname: Chen Tuan, name as a sage: Chen Hsi I, Chen Xi Yi) (871-989) was a legendary Taoist sage. ... Wang Chongyang (11 January 1113 – 22 January 1170) [Chinese calendar: 宋徽宗政和二年十二月廿二 – 金世宗大定十年正月初四] (Traditional Chinese: 王重陽; Simplified Chinese: 王重阳; pinyin: Wáng Chóngyáng) was a Song Dynasty Taoist who was one of the founders of Quanzhen Taoism in the twelfth century. ...

Deities and Immortals
Three Pure Ones
Jade Emperor · Xi Wangmu
Eight Immortals Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ... Xian (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: hsien) is a Chinese word for an enlightened person, translatable in English as: spiritually immortal; transcendent; super-human; celestial being (in Daoist/Taoist philosophy and cosmology) physically immortal; immortal person; immortalist; saint (in Daoist religion and pantheon) alchemist; one who seeks the elixir of life... The Three Pure Pellucid Ones (Chinese: 三清; Cantonese: Sarm Tsing; Mandarin: San-ching), also translated as The Three Pure Ones, The Three Clarities, or The Three Purities, are the three highest Taoist deities. ... Xi Wangmu (西王母), in Chinese mythology, literally Queen Mother of the West, is the ruler of the western paradise and goddess of immortality. ... The Eight Immortals crossing the sea, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner. ...

Main Sects
Quanzhen School
Tianshi Dao
Zhengyi Dao
Shangqing School
Lingbao School
the Quanzhen School is an important school in Chinese Taoism. ... Tianshi Dao (Simplified Chinese:天师道, Traditional Chinese: 天師道, pinyin: Tiān Shī Dào) or Way of the Celestial Masters is a Chinese Daoist movement that was founded by Zhang Daoling in 142 CE. At its height, the movement controlled a theocratic state in Sichuan. ... The Shangqing School (Chinese:上清) is a Daoist movement that began during in the aristocracy of the Western Jin dynasty. ... Lingbao refers to a branch of Taoism that originated in the late 4th century CE. Lingbao can be translated as numinous gem or spiritual treasure. ...

Taoist Texts
Tao Te Ching · Zhuangzi
Daozang The Tao Te Ching (道德經, Pinyin: D Jīng, thus sometimes rendered in recent works as Dao De Jing; archaic pre-Wade-Giles rendering: Tao Teh Ching; roughly translated as The Book of the Way and its Virtue (see dedicated chapter below on translating the title)) is... Zhuangzi (Traditional: 莊子; Simplified: 庄子, Pinyin: Zhuāng Zǐ, Wade-Giles: Chuang TzÅ­, lit. ... The Daozang (Daoist Cannon) consists of almost 5000 individual texts that were collected circa C.E. 400 (quite some time after the Dao De Jing and Zhuang Zi which are the core Daoist texts). ...

Taoist Precepts
The Five Precepts
See also the Buddhist Five Precepts. ...

Sacred Sites
Shizhou Sandao
Grotto-heavens
Sanshiliu Xiaodongtian
Qishi'er Fudi Grotto-heavens (Chinese:洞天; Pinyin: Dongtian) are a type of sacred Daoist site. ...


Portal:Taoism

The Jade Emperor (Chinese: 玉皇; pinyin: Yù Huáng or 玉帝 Yù Dì), are known by many names including Heavenly Grandfather (天公 Tiān Gōng), the Pure August Jade Emperor, August Personage of Jade (玉皇上帝 Yu Huang Shangdi or 玉皇大帝 Yu Huang Dadi), is formally known as Peace-Absolving Central-August-Spirit Exalted-Ancient-Buddha-Most-Pious-and-Honourable His-Highness-Jade-Emperor Xuanling High Sovereign 太-平-普-度 皇-靈-中-天 至-聖-仁-義-古-佛 玉-皇-大-天-尊 玄靈高上帝 or Xuanling High Sovereign in brief, is the ruler of Heaven and all realms of existence below including that of Man and Hell. Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... Photograph of a nude man by Wilhelm von Gloeden, ca. ... For other uses, see Hell (disambiguation). ...


According to Understanding Heaven and Hell 洞冥寶記 and The Feast of Immortal Peaches 蟠桃宴記, the Jade Emperor is selected by a panel of deities who had to pass a test by his predecessor. He is one of the most important gods in the Chinese Taoist Buddhist and Confucius pantheon. Understanding Heaven and Hell or 洞冥寶記(洞冥記) is a highly controversial book originally dating back to the West Han Dynasty during the reign of Wu Di 武帝 (140 to 87 BCE) which was a slightly different book(Note 1). ... For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Confucius (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kung-fu-tzu), lit. ... A pantheon (from Greek Πάνθειον, temple of all gods, from πᾶν, all + θεός, god) is a set of all the gods of a particular religion or mythology, such as the gods of Hinduism, Norse, Egyptian, Shintoism, Greek, vodun, Yoruba Mythology and Roman mythology. ...


The current Jade Emperor as described in the Understanding Heaven and Hell, is Guan Yu 關羽 (160–219 BCE) who is the eighteen sovereign inaugurated in 1924 CE (甲子年). He is referred in many Taoist books and sift-texts 乩文 as Guan Sheng Di(Jun) 關聖帝(君). The seventeen sovereign was formally called Xuanchuang High 玄穹高上帝 who held the throne for over seven thousand years. There are no formal Taoist texts to verify the names and titles of the sixteen preceding sovereigns before him. One term of the office of the Jade Emperor last for 60 years corresponding to one cycle of the chinese zodiac calender permutation. Guan Sheng Di is now in his second term as the Jade Emperor. Understanding Heaven and Hell or 洞冥寶記(洞冥記) is a highly controversial book originally dating back to the West Han Dynasty during the reign of Wu Di 武帝 (140 to 87 BCE) which was a slightly different book(Note 1). ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Guan (é—œ) Guan Yu (關羽) (160–219) was a general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of China. ... For other uses of the words tao and dao, see Dao (disambiguation). ... Chinese astrology (占星術 pinyin: zhan4 xing1 shu4; 星學 pinyin: xing1 xue2; 七政四餘 pinyin: qi1 zheng4 si4 yu2; and 果老星宗 pinyin: guo3 lao3 xing1 zong1) is related to the Chinese calendar, particularly its 12-year cycle of animals (aka Chinese Zodiac), and...


A crater on Saturn's moon Rhea discovered by Voyager 2 spacecraft was named after him. This article is about the planet. ... Atmosphere none Rhea (ree-a, Greek ‘Ρέα) is the second largest moon of Saturn and was discovered in 1672 by Giovanni Domenico Cassini. ... Trajectory Voyager 2 is an unmanned interplanetary spacecraft, launched on August 20, 1977. ...

Contents

Chinese mythology

There are many stories in Chinese mythology involving the Jade Emperor. Chinese mythology is a collection of cultural history, folktales, and religions that have been passed down in oral or written form. ...


The origin of the Jade Emperor

It was said that the Jade Emperor was originally the crown prince of the kingdom of Pure Felicity and Majestic Heavenly Lights and Ornaments. At birth he emitted a wondrous light that filled the entire kingdom. When he was young, he was kind, intelligent and wise. He devoted his entire childhood to helping the needy (the poor and suffering, the deserted and single, the hungry and disabled). Furthermore, he showed respect and benevolence to both men and creatures. After his father died, he ascended the throne. He made sure that everyone in his kingdom found peace and contentment. After that, he told his ministers that he wished to cultivate Tao on the Bright and Fragrant Cliff. After 1,550 kalpas, each kalpa lasting for 129,600 years, he attained Golden Immortality. After another one hundred million years of cultivation, he finally became the Jade Emperor. (Using the given figures, this period before his becoming the Jade Emperor lasted for a total of about 200,880,000 years.) This article is about the Chinese character and the philosophy it represents. ...


The Jade Emperor vanquishing evil

Jade Emperor

There is a little known myth which tells of how the Jade Emperor became the monarch of all the deities in heaven. It is one of the few myths in which the Jade Emperor really shows his might. In the beginning of time, the earth was a very difficult place to live. Men were having tremendous difficulty coping with existence; not only did men have to deal with harsh conditions, but also with all kinds of monstrous beings. At this time, there were also not many gods or deities to protect men. Furthermore, a lot of powerful, evil demons were defying the immortals of heaven. The Jade Emperor was still an ordinary immortal who roamed earth to help as many people as he could. However, he felt sad because his powers were limited and could only ease the sufferings of men. He decided to retreat in a mountain cave and cultivate his Dao. He passed 3,200 trials, each trial lasted for about 3 million years. Unfortunately, a powerful, evil entity which dwelt on earth had the ambition to conquer the immortals and gods in heaven and proclaim sovereignty over the entire universe. He went into retreat later than the Jade Emperor. This evil entity retreated himself too and went into meditation to expand his power. He passed through 3,000 trials each trial lasting for about 3 million years too. After he passed his final trial, he felt confident that no one could defeat him anymore. He re-entered the world again, and recruited an army of demons with the purpose of attacking heaven. The immortals being aware of the threat gathered themselves and prepared for war. The gods were unable to stop the powerful demon and all were defeated by him. The Three Pure Ones were leading the celestial beings at that time. Fortunately, the Jade Emperor finished his cultivation in the midst of this war. He was changing the land to make it more liveable for men and repelling all kinds of monstrous beasts. Suddenly, he saw an evil glow emitting from heaven and knew something was amiss. He ascended and saw that a war was going on, he saw that the demon was too powerful to be stopped by any of the gods present. He went up and challenged the demon, and a battle ensued between them. Mountains shook and rivers and seas toppled; however, the Jade Emperor stood victorious due to his deeper and wiser cultivation, not for might but for benevolence. After totally annihilating the demon, all the other demons were scattered by the gods and immortals. Because of his noble and benevolent deeds, the gods, immortals and mankind proclaimed the Jade Emperor the supreme sovereign of all. Jade Emperor File links The following pages link to this file: Jade Emperor Categories: Images with unknown source ... Jade Emperor File links The following pages link to this file: Jade Emperor Categories: Images with unknown source ... The Three Pure Pellucid Ones (Chinese: 三清; Cantonese: Sarm Tsing; Mandarin: San-ching), also translated as The Three Pure Ones, The Three Clarities, or The Three Purities, are the three highest Taoist deities. ...


Creation myth

According to one creation myth, the Jade Emperor fashioned the first humans from clay, but as he left them to harden in the sun, it rained, misshaping some of the figures, thus explaining the origin of sickness and physical abnormalities. (The most common alternative Chinese creation myth states that human beings were once fleas on the body of Pangu.) The story above is also told as Nüwa who fashions humans out of the mud from the Yellow River by hand. Those she made herself became the richer people of the earth. After getting lazy she used a rope and swung it around. The drops that fell from the rope became the poorer humans. Creation beliefs and stories describe how the universe, the Earth, life, and/or humanity came into being. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the character Nu Wa in the Chinese novel Fengshen Yanyi, see Nu Wa Niang Niang Nüwa iconograph in Shan Hai Jing In Chinese mythology, Nüwa (Traditional Chinese: 女媧; Simplified Chinese: 女娲; Pinyin: nÇšwā) is mythological character best known for reproducing people after a great calamity. ...


The princess and the cowherd

Main article: Cowherd and Weaver Girl Qi Xi (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; literally The Night of Sevens), sometimes called Chinese Valentines Day or Magpie Festival, falls on the seventh day of the seventh lunar month on the Chinese calendar; thus its name. ...


In another story, popular throughout Asia and with many differing versions, the Jade Emperor has a daughter named Chih'nü (Simplified Chinese: 织女; Traditional Chinese: 織女; pinyin: zhī nǚ literally: weaver girl). She is most often represented as responsible for weaving colorful clouds in the heaven, in some versions she is instead a seamstress who works for the Jade Emperor. Everyday Chih'nü descended to earth with the aid of a magical robe to bathe. One day, a lowly cowherd named Niu Lang (Chinese: 牛郎; pinyin: niú láng) spotted Chih'nü as she bathed in a stream. Niu Lang fell instantly in love with her and stole her magic robe which she had left on the bank of the stream, leaving her unable to escape back to Heaven. When Chih'nü emerged from the water, Niu Lang grabbed her and carried her back to his home. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ...


When the Jade Emperor heard of this matter, he was furious but unable to intercede, since in the meantime his daughter had fallen in love and married the cowherd. As time passed, Chih'nü grew homesick and began to miss her father. One day, she came across a box containing her magic robe which her husband had hidden. She decided to visit her father back in Heaven, but once she returned, the Jade Emperor summoned a river to flow across the sky (the Milky Way), which Chih'nü was unable to cross to return to her husband. The Emperor took pity on the young lovers, and so once a year on the seventh day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, he allows them to meet on a bridge over the river. For other uses, see Milky Way (disambiguation). ... A lunar calendar is a calendar oriented at the moon phase. ...


The story refers to constellations in the night sky. Chih'nü is the star Vega in the constellation of Lyra east of the Milky Way, and Niu Lang is the star Altair in the constellation of Aquila west of the Milky Way. Under the first quarter moon (7th day) of the seventh lunar month (around August), the lighting condition in the sky causes the Milky Way to appear dimmer, hence the story that the two lovers are no longer separated in that one particular day each year. The seventh day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar is a holiday in China called Qi Xi, which is a day for young lovers much like Valentine's Day in the West; in Japan, it is called Tanabata (star day). If it rains on that day, it is said to be Zhi'nü crying tears at being reunited with her husband. Photo of the familiar constellation Orion. ... STAR is an acronym for: Organizations Society of Ticket Agents and Retailers], the self-regulatory body for the entertainment ticket industry in the UK. Society for Telescopy, Astronomy, and Radio, a non-profit New Jersey astronomy club. ... For other uses, see Vega (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... Altair (α Aql / α Aquilae / Alpha Aquilae / Atair ) is the brightest star in the constellation Aquila and the twelfth brightest star in the nighttime sky, at visual magnitude 0. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Qi Xi (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; literally The Night of Sevens), sometimes called Chinese Valentines Day or Magpie Festival, falls on the seventh day of the seventh lunar month on the Chinese calendar; thus its name. ... For other uses, see Valentines Day (disambiguation). ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... People dressed in yukata at Tanabata Tanabata ), meaning Seven Evenings) is a Japanese star festival, derived from Obon traditions and the Chinese star festival, Qi Xi. ...


The zodiac

There are several stories as to how the twelve animals of the Chinese zodiac were chosen. In one, the Jade Emperor, although having ruled Heaven and Earth justly and wisely for many years, had never had the time to actually visit the Earth personally. He grew curious as to what the creatures looked like. Thus, he asked all the animals to visit him in heaven. The cat, being the most handsome of all animals, asked his friend the rat to wake him on the day they were to go to Heaven so he wouldn't oversleep. The rat, however, was worried that he would seem ugly compared to the cat, so he didn't wake the cat. Consequently, the cat missed the meeting with the Jade Emperor and was replaced by the pig. The Jade Emperor was delighted with the animals and so decided to divide the years up amongst them. When the cat learned of what had happened, he was furious with the rat and that, according to the story, is why cats and rats are enemies to this day. For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Chinese astrology (占星術 pinyin: zhan4 xing1 shu4; 星學 pinyin: xing1 xue2; 七政四餘 pinyin: qi1 zheng4 si4 yu2; and 果老星宗 pinyin: guo3 lao3 xing1 zong1) is related to the Chinese calendar, particularly its 12-year cycle of animals (aka Chinese Zodiac), and... Hai (亥) is the twelfth sign of the Earthly Branches. ...


His predecessor and successor

The Jade Emperor was originally the assistant of the Divine Master of the Heavenly Origin, Yuan-shi tian-zun. Yuan-shi tian-zun is said to be the supreme beginning, the limitless and eternal creator of Heaven and Earth, who picked Yu-huang, or the Jade Emperor, as his personal successor. The Jade Emperor will eventually be succeeded by the Heavenly Master of the Dawn of Jade of the Golden Door. The characters for both are stamped on the front of the arms of his throne. The Pure Ones Yuan-shi tian-zun, also known as the Celestial Venerable of the Primordial Beginning, is one of the highest deities of religious Taoism. ...


Worship and festivals

The Jade Emperor featured on the Hell Bank Note.

The Jade Emperor's Birthday is said to be the ninth day of the first lunar month. On this day Daoist temples hold a Jade Emperor ritual (拜天公 bài tiān gōng, literally "heaven worship") at which priests and laymen prostrate themselves, burn incense, and make food offerings. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The widely used $10,000 Hell note. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ... Incense is composed of aromatic organic materials. ...


Chinese New Year's Eve is also a day of worship as it is said to be the day the Jade Emperor makes his annual inspection of the deeds of mortals and rewards or punishes them accordingly. On this day incense is burned in the home and offerings are made to the Jade Emperor and also to Zao Jun, the god of kitchen who reports to the Emperor on each family. A banner of the celebration of Chinese New Year. ... Zao Jun - God of the Kitchen Zao Jun - The Kitchen God, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner In Chinese mythology Zao Jun (灶君 Pinyin: Zào Jūn), or Stove Master, is the kitchen god, the most important of a plethora of Chinese domestic gods...


A temple in Hong Kong is located at A Kung Ngam and is also called "Yù Huáng Po Tin" (玉皇寶殿 Yu Huang Bao Dian). In the mid 19th century, people from Huizhou and Chaozhou mined stones in the hill for the development of the central urban area. They set up a shrine to worship Yuk Wong. At the beginning of the 20th century, the shrine was developed into a small temple and was renovated many times. The latest renovation was in 1992. A Kung Ngam (阿公岩) is a village, part of Shau Kei Wan, in Eastern district, in the north of Hong Kong Island. ... Huizhou (Simplified Chinese: 惠州; Pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in Guangdong province, Peoples Republic of China. ... Chaozhou (Chinese: 潮州 lit. ... Temple of Hephaestus, an Doric Greek temple in Athens with the original entrance facing east, 449 BC (western face depicted) For other uses, see Temple (disambiguation). ...


The Jade Emperor in fiction

Lord Yu, as seen in Stargate SG-1.
Lord Yu, as seen in Stargate SG-1.

In the television series Stargate SG-1, the Goa'uld System Lord Yu is presumably based on the Jade Emperor, though whether Lord Yu is supposed to be the originator of the related myth, or merely impersonated the deity among the ancient Chinese (as was the case with several other Goa'uld, who impersonated Egyptian gods, among others) is unclear. Image File history File links Yu_aboard_a_Goa'uld_space_station. ... Image File history File links Yu_aboard_a_Goa'uld_space_station. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Supreme System Lord Ra The System Lord Apophis The System Lord Anubis The System Lord Baal In the science fiction television show Stargate SG-1, the System Lords are the leaders of the Goauld, the dominant alien race of the Milky Way Galaxy. ... Yu is a Goauld System Lord on the sci-fi television show, Stargate SG-1. ...


Akito, the antagonist of the anime and manga, Fruits Basket, is based upon the Jade Emperor. Akito Sohma ) is a character in the manga and anime series entitled Fruits Basket. ... This article is about the manga and anime series. ...


The true identity of Tai Yi-Jun (aka Tai Itsuken), the oracle who created the Universe of the Four Gods, is eventually revealed towards the end of Fushigi Yūgi to be the Jade Emperor. Serialized in Shōjo Comic Animerica Extra Original run May 1992 – July 1996 No. ...


References

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Great Jade Emperor (643 words)
The Jade Emperor is the emperor of all heavens, king of all Immortals, lord of saints, the highest divinity of the ten thousand spirits in the three realms and of all Immortals of the Three Grottoes
Therefore, the Jade Emperor is the master of the three fundamentals in charge of the pivot of Heaven, Earth and Man. The Jade Emperor sends the Great Emperor of the North Pole Star of Purple Subtlety
In north China, sacrifices to the Jade Emperor were held in the past, where an image of the Jade Emperor was paraded around the village.
Jade Emperor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1716 words)
It was said that the Jade Emperor was originally the crown prince of the kingdom of Pure Felicity and Majestic Heavenly Lights and Ornaments.
Consequently, the cat missed the meeting with the Jade Emperor and was replaced by the pig.
The Jade Emperor was originally the assistant of the Divine Master of the Heavenly Origin, Yuan-shi tian-zun.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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