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Encyclopedia > Jacques Anquetil

Jacques Anquetil (January 8, 1934 - November 18, 1987), was a French cyclist and the first cyclist to win the Tour de France five times, in 1957 and from 1961 to 1964.He stated before the 1961 Tour de France that he would gain the yellow jersey on day one and wear it all through the tour, a tall order with 2 previous winners in the field - Gaul and Bahamontes but he did just that. January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar with 43 days remaining. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A cyclist is a person who engages in cycling whether as a sport or rides a bicycle for recreation or transportation. ... The Tour de France (French for Tour of France), often referred to as La Grande Boucle, Le Tour or The Tour, is the most famous and prestigious road bicycle race in the world. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


Born the son of a peasant farmer in Mont-Saint-Aignan, near Rouen in Normandy, north-west France, Anquetil took the French amateur road title in 1952, one year after he began racing. In 1953, his first year as an independent ot semi-professional rider, he won the 19th Grand Prix des Nations individual time trial, then considered the equal of a world championship. He won the the Grand Prix des Nations a record nine times (1953-58, 1961, 1965/66). On the Vigorelli track in Milan, on 29 June 1956, he broke the 14-year-old hour world record of the legendary Fausto Coppi (46.159 kilometres). In 1967, eleven years later, Anquetil again broke the hour record with 47.493 kilometers, but the record was disallowed because he refused to take the newly-introduced post-race doping test. He objected to what he saw as the indignity of having to urinate in a tent in front of a crowded velodrome and said he would take the test later at his hotel. The international judge ruled against the idea and a scuffle ensued that involved Anquetil's manager, Raphaël Géminiani. Mont-Saint-Aignan is a town of Normandy in northwestern France. ... Location within France Rouen Cathedral The entrance to Rouen Cathedral Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, (chevet) in Rouen Rouen, medieval house Rouen (pronounced in French, sometimes also ) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northwestern France, and presently the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région. ... Mont Saint Michel, one of the famous symbols of Normandy. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... The Grand Prix des Nations was an individual time trial (a race against the clock or contre la montre) for Europes leading professional racing cyclists. ... An Individual Time Trial (ITT) is a road bicycle race in which cyclists race alone against the clock (in French: contre la montre - literally against the watch). There are also track-based time trials where riders compete in velodromes, and team time trials (TTT). ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the track time trial, a track cycling event, cyclists compete individually against the clock to record the fastest time over the specified distance from a standing start. ... Fausto Coppi Fausto Coppi (September 15, 1919 in Castellania, province of Alessandria - January 2, 1960, Tortona) was an Italian racing cyclist. ...


In 1957 Anquetil, won the Grand Prix des Nations' and - at his first attempt - the Tour de France with nearly 15 minutes' lead and wins in four stages. The stone of his success was his performance in time trial stages, where his ability to pedal with clockwork smoothness and at constant speed brought him the nickname Monsieur Chrono. His supremacy in time-trials went with his ability to stay with if not attack the best climbers in the mountains. Anquetil, it was said, was a rider who could drop nobody but whom nobody could drop. 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After three moderate years without tour stage success, Anquetil began a second victory streak in 1961, winning the Tour de France thereafter until 1964. He was the first rider to win four successive times, breaking the record of three set by Philippe Thys and Louison Bobet. He was also the first to win five times in total, a feat since emulated by Eddy Merckx, Bernard Hinault and Miguel Induraín. Only Lance Armstrong has won more Tours. 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Philippe Thys Philippe Thys (October 8, 1890 - January 16, 1971) was a Belgian cyclist and three-time winner of the Tour de France. ... French cycling star Louison Bobet (March 12, 1925 - March 13, 1983) is one of just eight riders to win the Tour de France at least three times. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bernard Hinault (born 14 November 1954) is a French cyclist best known for his five victories in the Tour de France. ... Miguel Ángel Induráin Larraya (born July 16, 1964, Villava, Navarre) is a retired Spanish cyclist. ... Lance Armstrong (born on September 18, 1971 in Plano, Texas) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ...


His last Tour victory (in 1964) was also his most famous, featuring, as it did, a legendary elbow-to-elbow duel against public favourite Raymond Poulidor on the roads up the Puy de Dôme mountain. Suffering badly from indigestion after his excesses on a rest day, Anquetil is reputed to have received treatment from his team manager in the form of a swallow of champagne - a story that Anquetil's wife says is untrue. Poulidor gained precious time on that stage but when they reached Paris, Anquetil had a 55-second lead over the eternal second Poulidor. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Raymond Poulidor, often nick-named Pou Pou (born April 15, 1936, Masbaraud-Merignat, France), was a professional bicycle racer. ... Puy-de-Dôme, a cumulo-dome (tholoid) volcano, is one of the youngest volcanoes in the Chaîne des Puys region of Massif Central in south-central France. ... Champagne is often drunk as part of a celebration Champagne is a sparkling wine (fizzy wine) produced by inducing the in-bottle secondary fermentation of wine to effect carbonation. ...


Anquetil won all three of the Grand Tours - the first cyclist to do so. Anquetil twice won the Giro d'Italia (1960, 1964) and won the Vuelta a España once (1963). He also won the season-long Super Prestige Pernod International competition four times, in 1961, 1963, 1965 and 1966 - a record only surpassed by Eddy Merckx. In road bicycle racing, a Grand Tour refers to one of the three major European professional cycling stage races: Tour de France - Tour of France Giro dItalia - Tour of Italy Vuelta a España - Tour of Spain Collectively they are termed the Grand Tours, and all three are similar... The Giro dItalia, also simply known as the Giro, is a long distance road bicycle race for professional cyclists held over three weeks in May or early June in and around Italy. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Vuelta a España bicycle race is one of the three Grand Tours of Europe and, after the Tour de France and the Giro dItalia, the third most important road cycling stage race in the world. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... The UCI World Cup was a season-long competition for European professional racing cyclists, organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the governing body of competitive cycling. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


More constantly popular in Britain than in his native France (he used to tell fans that he was only "in it for the money"), Anquetil was invited to the RTTC's awards ceremony at London's Albert Hall in 1961 to present trophies to champions Brian Kirby and Beryl Burton. Cycling Time Trials is the British bicycle racing organisation which supervises individual and team time trials in the UK. It took over the work of the Road Time Trials Council in 2002. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England and is the most populous city in the European Union. ... Albert P. Hall (born November 10, 1937 in Boothton, Alabama) is an African-American actor. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Beryl Burton (12 May 1937 – 8 May 1996) was an English racing cyclist and arguably one of Britains greatest ever sportspersons. ...


Anquetil was not as successful with the classical single stage races but toward the end of his career he won once in each of three of the Classics: The Classic cycle races are the most prestigious one-day professional cycling road races in Europe. ...

  • Gent-Wevelgem (1964)
  • the 600km Bordeaux-Paris (1965)
  • Liège-Bastogne-Liège (1966)

In 1965, Anquetil won the eight-day, Alpine Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré stage race at 3pm, sat through two hours of interviews and receptions, took a 6:30pm chartered flight to Bordeaux and won the world's longest single-day classic, the Bordeaux-Paris the following day. There are strong and undenied rumours that the jet laid on to get Anquetil to Bordeaux was provided through state funds on the orders of President Charles de Gaulle. The Gent-Wevelgem is a professional cycle road race held in Belgium in early April each year. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Bordeaux-Paris professional cycle race was one of mainland Europes Classic cycle races, and the longest in the professional calendar, covering a distance of approximately 350 miles (560 kilometres) - more than twice the distance of most single day races. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Liège-Bastogne-Liège, often called La Doyenne (the oldest woman), is one of the five Monuments of the European professional road cycling calendar, and the oldest. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... The Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré is an annual cycling road race, run over eight stages in the Dauphiné region in France during the first half of June. ... New city flag (traditional tri-crescent) City coat of arms Motto: The fleur-de-lis alone rules over the moon, the waves, the castle, and the lion Coordinates : , Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) Administration Département Gironde (33) Région Aquitaine Mayor Hugues Martin (UMP) (since 2004) Intercommunality Urban Community... The Bordeaux-Paris professional cycle race was one of mainland Europes Classic cycle races, and the longest in the professional calendar, covering a distance of approximately 350 miles (560 kilometres) - more than twice the distance of most single day races. ...


He was famous for preparing for races by staying up all night before drinking and playing cards.


Anquetil finished in the top 10 in the World Championship on six occasions, but second place in 1966 was the nearest he ever came to winning the Rainbow Jersey. The professional World Cycling Championship is a one-day cycling event organised by the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), and is a single massed start road race, the winner being the first across the line at the completion of the full race distance. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


Despite his tremendous successes, which made him one of the best French cyclists of all time, the always cool, calculating and dissociated Maître Jacques was never as popular with the French public as his rival Poulidor. He retired to Normandy in 1969 to be a gentleman farmer. 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ...


In 1987, after battling stomach cancer, Jacques Anquetil died in his sleep at the St. Hilaire Clinic in Rouen. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stomach cancer (also called gastric cancer) can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs, particularly the esophagus, small intestine. ... Location within France Rouen Cathedral The entrance to Rouen Cathedral Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, (chevet) in Rouen Rouen, medieval house Rouen (pronounced in French, sometimes also ) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northwestern France, and presently the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région. ...


Anquetil's marriage produced no children. However, his wife, Jeanine, had two children from a previous marriage. In 2004, Sophie Anquetil, the daughter of Anquetil's step-daughter, published the book Pour l'amour de Jacques in which she affirmed what had been widely-rumored to be true: that she was Anquetil's daughter. Anquetil also had a son with his daughter-in-law.


Anquetil will be remembered not simply for the five Tour wins and his unique success in the Grand Prix des Nations. He will be remembered for his stand on the drugs issue that was beginning to concern professional cycling and which came to public attention with the death of the British rider, Tom Simpson, in the Tour de France of 1967. Anquetil never hid that he took drugs - a common practice at the time - and in a debate with a government minister on French television said that only a fool would imagine it was possible to ride Bordeaux-Paris on just water. Anquetil argued that professional riders were workers and had the same right to treat their pains as, say, a geography teacher. It was an argument many found increasingly hard to support as more riders were reported to have died or suffered health problems through drug-related incidents.


There was great support in the cyclist community, however, for the way Anquetil argued that, if there were to be rules and tests, the tests should be carried out consistently and with dignity. It was professional dignity, the right of a champion not to be ridiculed in front of his public, that he said led to his refusal to take a test in the centre of the Vigorelli track.


The unrecognised time that Anquetil set that day was in any case quickly broken by the Belgian rider, Ferdi Bracke. Anquetil was hurt that the French government had never sent him a telegram of congratulations but sent one to Bracke, who wasn't French. It was a measure of the unacceptability of his arguments, as was the way he was quietly dropped from future French teams.


He retired to become a farmer, an occasional race director, and a radio commentator. His radio analyses were considered especially sharp and he gained a notoriety in Belgium for telling Luis Ocaña, the Spanish rider living in France, how to beat the Belgian star Eddy Merckx.


Anquetil is buried beside the church in the village of Quincampoix, north of Rouen, where a large black monument by the traffic lights lists all his achievements. There is a further monument at the Piste Municipale track in Paris, where the centre is named after him.


Quotes

  • When I was small, he was for me the champion cyclist. But above all he was a gentleman for his personal qualities as much as his sporting achievements. I have always been irritated by the game of comparing champions from different times but to be compared to him was an honour.Bernard Hinault
  • Jacques simply tries harder than anyone I have met. In a time trial you can hear him catching you, you don't have to look round, there is this hoarse sound of breath being drawn in gulps, and then he's past you. Then it's like being in a thunderstorm, with the sweat simply pouring off him as he goes by.Tom Simpson

Bernard Hinault (born 14 November 1954) is a French cyclist best known for his five victories in the Tour de France. ... Tom Simpson (30 November 1937 - 13 July 1967) was a top British road racing cyclist of the 1960s who famously died of exhaustion on the slopes of Mont Ventoux during the 13th stage of the Tour de France on Friday 13 July 1967. ...

External links

  • Complete Palmarès
Preceded by:
Roger Walkowiak
Winner of the Tour de France
1957
Succeeded by:
Charly Gaul
Preceded by:
Gastone Nencini
Winner of the Tour de France
1961-64
Succeeded by:
Felice Gimondi
Preceded by:
Charly Gaul
Winner of the Giro d'Italia
1960
Succeeded by:
Arnaldo Pambianco
Preceded by:
Franco Balmamion
Winner of the Giro d'Italia
1964
Succeeded by:
Vittorio Adorni
Preceded by:
Rudi Altig
Winner of the Vuelta a Espana
1963
Succeeded by:
Raymond Poulidor

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jacques Anquetil @ Sport.y2u.co.uk (1404 words)
Anquetil never hid that he took drugs - a common practice me - and in a debate with a government minister on French television said that only a fool would imagine it was possible to ride Bordeaux-Paris on just water.
Anquetil argued that professional riders were workers and had the same right to treat their pains as, say, a geography teacher.
Anquetil is buried beside the church in the village of Quincampoix, north of Rouen, where a large fl monument by the traffic lights lists all his achievements.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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