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Encyclopedia > Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius

Jacobus Arminius (aka Jacob Arminius, James Arminius, and his Dutch name Jacob Harmenszoon or Jakob Hermann) (15601609) was a Dutch heretical theologian and (until 1603) professor in theology at the University of Leiden. He wrote many books about theological problems. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (701x908, 92 KB) From http://runeberg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (701x908, 92 KB) From http://runeberg. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... It has been suggested that Christian theological controversy be merged into this article or section. ... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. ...


Life

See also: History of Calvinist-Arminian Debate The history of the Calvinist-Arminian debate arguably extends back to the first century church but was not formulated until the fifth century. ...


Arminius was born at Oudewater, Utrecht, on October 10, 1560. Arminius is a Latinized form of Hermannsoon or Hermansen. His father died while Jacobus was an infant, leaving his mother a widow with small children. A priest, Theodorus Aemilius, adopted Jacobus and sent him to school at Utrecht. His mother was slain during the Spanish massacre of Oudewater in 1575. About that year Arminius was sent to study theology at the University of Leiden by the kindness of friends (Rudophus Snellius). Oudewater is a municipality and a town in the central Netherlands. ... Utrecht is the smallest province of the Netherlands, and is located in the center of the country. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in Leap years). ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... Utrecht ( (help· info)) is a municipality and the capital city of the Dutch province of Utrecht. ... Events February 13 - Henry III of France is crowned at Reims February 14 - Henry III of France marries Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont June 28 - Oda Nobunaga defeats Takeda Katsuyori in the battle of Nagashino, which has been called Japans first modern battle. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. ...


Arminius remained at Leiden from 1576 to 1582. His teachers in theology included Lambertus Danaeus, Johannes Drusius, Guillaume Feuguereius, and Johann Kolmann. Kolmann believed and taught that high Calvinism made God both a tyrant and an executioner. Under the influence of these men, Arminius studied with success and had seeds planted that would begin to develop into a theology that would later compete with the dominant Reformed theology of John Calvin. Arminius began studying under Theodore Beza at Geneva in 1582. He was called to pastor at Amsterdam and was ordained in 1588. He was reputed to be a good preacher and faithful pastor. In 1590 he married Lijsbet Reael. Events May 5 - Peace of Beaulieu or Peace of Monsieur (after Monsieur, the Duc dAnjou, brother of the King, who negotiated it). ... Events January 15 - Russia cedes Livonia and Estonia to Poland February 24 - Pope Gregory XIII implements the Gregorian Calendar. ... Calvinism is a system of Christian theology and an approach to Christian life and thought, articulated by John Calvin, a Protestant Reformer in the 16th century, and subsequently by successors, associates, followers and admirers of Calvin and his interpretation of Scripture. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was an important French Christian theologian during the Protestant Reformation and is the namesake of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Events January 15 - Russia cedes Livonia and Estonia to Poland February 24 - Pope Gregory XIII implements the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1588 was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Events March 14 - Battle of Ivry - Henry IV of France again defeats the forces of the Catholic League under the Duc de Mayenne. ...


Theology

Part of the series on
Arminianism
Jacobus Arminius

Background
Protestantism
Reformation
Calvinist-Arminian Debate // For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (701x908, 92 KB) From http://runeberg. ... Protestantism is a movement within Christianity, representing the splitting away from the Roman Catholic Church during the mid-to-late Renaissance in Europe—a period known as the Protestant Reformation. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... The history of the Calvinist-Arminian debate arguably extends back to the first century church but was not formulated until the fifth century. ...

People
Jacobus Arminius
Hugo Grotius
The Remonstrants
John Wesley
Hugo Grotius Hugo Grotius (Huig de Groot, or Hugo de Groot; Delft, 10th April 1583 - Rostock, 28th August 1645) worked as a jurist in the United Provinces (now the Netherlands) and laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. ... Remonstrants, the name given to those Dutch Protestants who, after the death of Arminius, maintained the views associated with his name, and in 1610 presented to the states of Holland and Friesland a remonstrance in five articles formulating their points of departure from stricter Calvinism. ... John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ...

Doctrine
Total depravity
Prevenient grace
Substitutionary atonement
Unlimited atonement
Conditional election
Conditional preservation Total depravity (also called total inability and total corruption) is a theological doctrine that derives from the Augustinian doctrine of original sin and is advocated in many Protestant confessions of faith and catechisms, including those of Lutheranism,1 Anglicanism and Methodism,2 and especially Calvinism. ... Prevenient Grace is a Christian theological concept embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... Substitutionary atonement is the act of restoring balances by substitution. ... The Atonement is the central doctrine of Christianity: everything else derives from it. ... Conditional election is the doctrine that states that Gods election (or choosing) is not determined arbitrarily or according to some hidden motive undiscernable to humans. ... The term Conditional Preservation of the Saints is used to describe the belief that a Christians salvation can be lost. ...

Arminius is best known as the founder of the anti-Calvinistic school in Reformed Protestant theology, and thereby lent his name to a movement which resisted some of the tenets of Calvinism — Arminianism. The early Dutch followers of Arminius' teaching were also called the Remonstrants, after they issued a document containing five points of disagreement with classic Calvinism, entitled Remonstrantiœ (1610). In attempting to defend Calvinistic predestination against the onslaughts of Dirck Volckertszoon Coornhert, it is contended that Arminius began to doubt and thus modified some parts of his view. However, in a much less severe way compared to John Calvin's difference on the issue of limited atonement from his Institutes of the Christian Religion to his later commentaries. He became a professor of theology at Leiden in 1603. Jacobus Arminius died in Leiden on October 19, 1609. The theology of Arminianism was not fully developed during Arminius' time, but was systematized after his death and formalized in the Five articles of the Remonstrants in 1610. The works of Arminius (in Latin) were published at Leiden in 1629, and at Frankfort in 1631 and 1635. After his death the Synod of Dordrecht (16181619) judged his theology and its adherents anathemas. // For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ... Remonstrants, the name given to those Dutch Protestants who, after the death of Arminius, maintained the views associated with his name, and in 1610 presented to the states of Holland and Friesland a remonstrance in five articles formulating their points of departure from stricter Calvinism. ... The Calvinist doctrine of predestination, is the religious doctrine sometimes referred to as double predestination. The term double predestination is usually used in a disparaging way to refer to the Calvinist belief that God has not only appointed the eternal destiny of some to salvation (Unconditional election), but by necessary... Dirck Volckertszoon Coornhert (born in Amsterdam, 1522-died October 29, 1590 in Gouda) was a Dutch politician and theologian, the youngest son of Volckert Coornhert, cloth merchant. ... Institutes of the Christian Religion is John Calvins seminal work on Protestant theology. ... Leyden redirects here. ... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... Remonstrants, the name given to those Dutch Protestants who, after the death of Arminius, maintained the views associated with his name, and in 1610 presented to the states of Holland and Friesland a remonstrance in five articles formulating their points of departure from stricter Calvinism. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Events March 4 - Massachusetts Bay Colony is granted a Royal charter. ... Frankfort is the name of several places: Frankfort, Illinois Frankfort, Indiana Frankfort, Kentucky Frankfort, Michigan Village of Frankfort, New York Town of Frankfort, New York Frankfort, Ohio Frankfort, Wisconsin Frankfort, South Africa Today, Frankfurt, the name of two cities in Germany, is known as that in English. ... // Events February 5 - Roger Williams emigrates to Boston. ... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... The Synod of Dort met in the city of Dordrecht in 1618-1619, as a national assembly of the Dutch Reformed Church, to which were invited representatives from the Reformed churches in eight foreign countries. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... Events May 13 - Dutch statesman Johan van Oldenbarnevelt is executed in The Hague after having been accused of treason. ... Anathema (Greek Word -Ανάθεμα-: meaning originally something lifted up as an offering to the gods; later, with evolving meanings, it came to mean 1. ...


John Wesley, founder of the Methodist movement, embraced Arminian theology and became its most prominent champion. Today, Methodism remains committed to Arminian theology, and Arminianism itself has become one of the dominant theological systems in the United States. John Wesley (June 17, 1703–March 2, 1791) was an 18th-century Anglican clergyman and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ... The Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ...


External links

  • Jacobus Arminius - from The New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge
  • The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 1
  • The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 2
  • The Works of James Arminius, Vol. 3

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jacobus Arminius - LoveToKnow 1911 (1351 words)
JACOBUS ARMINIUS (1560-1609), Dutch theologian, author of the modified reformed theology that receives its name of Arminian from him, was born at Oudewater, South Holland, on the 10th of October 1560.
Arminius, fresh from Geneva, familiar with the dialectics of Beza, appeared to many the man able to speak the needed word, and so, in 1589, he was simultaneously invited by the ecclesiastical court of Amsterdam to refute Coornhert, and by Martin Lydius, professor at Franeker, to combat the two infralapsarian ministers of Delft.
Arminius died, worn out by uncongenial controversy and ecclesiastical persecution, before his system had been elaborated into the logical consistency it attained in the hands of his celebrated successor, Simon Episcopius; but though inchoate in detail, it was in its principles clear and coherent enough.
Jacobus Arminius (1946 words)
Most pointedly Arminius insists that grace is the love of God meeting humankind as sinful; grace is not a synonym for "decree" or "will" or "sovereignty"; i.e., grace is God's love addressing humans in their depravity rather than "affecting" them as creatures without reference to their sin.
Consonant with his understanding of the free will, Arminius eschewed the notion of the Christian life as the "state" of grace (and therefore static), preferring to understand it as dynamic: graced concurrence acknowledges and appropriates greater grace in an upward spiral that also finds the believer advancing in godliness through greater immersion in grace.
generation Magisterial Reformers, Arminius is a scholastic evincing immense affinities with the scholastic "family" whether Roman Catholic and predestinarian (Banez and Baius), Roman Catholic and non-predestinarian (Suarez and Molina), Protestant and predestinarian (Junius and Gomarus) or Protestant and non-predestinarian (his successors, Episcopius and Limborch).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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