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Encyclopedia > Jacobs School of Music
The Simon Music Center of the Jacobs School of Music

The Jacobs School of Music of Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, known from 1921–2005 as Indiana University School of Music, is considered to be one of the best music schools in the world. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2114x1320, 745 KB) w:Jacobs School of Music on the campus of w:Indiana University Bloomington. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2114x1320, 745 KB) w:Jacobs School of Music on the campus of w:Indiana University Bloomington. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County Monroe Mayor Mark Kruzan Area    - City 51. ...

Contents

Academics and programs

With more than 1,600 students — approximately half of whom are undergraduates — the Jacobs School of Music is one of the largest in the nation (the University of North Texas College of Music is slightly larger depending on the semester). The breadth and number of performance opportunities are unparalleled in college music study, with the school offering more than 1,100 performances a year, including eight fully staged operas. UNT redirects here. ...


Admissions

Admissions to Jacobs are regarded as among the most competitive in the country. Though the admissions process differs slightly for some students, the general process consists of one audition at the school itself, in which two to three prepared pieces are performed. For singers and pianists, a preliminary screening CD or tape must be sent in. If the applicant passes that round, a live audition is then scheduled. The acceptance rate was about 20 percent for the entering class of 2011--the most selective year in the history of Jacobs. Jacobs also offers a masters of music technology degree at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... For the meaning of cassette in genetics, see cassette (genetics). ...


Awards and honors for Jacobs School of Music

U.S. News & World Report has consistently showered the school with praise and acclaim. Here is a short list of rankings in various categories. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

In addition to U.S. News & World Report, the school has been ranked first in the nation by Change magazine and the Chronicle of Higher Education. The Master of Music (M.M. or M.Mus. ... The Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester (also known more simply as The Eastman School, Eastman, or ESM) is a music conservatory located in the United States. ... The Juilliard School is a performing arts conservatory in New York City, informally but definitively identified as simply Juilliard, and most famous for its musically-trained alumni. ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


The School of Music as a whole was recently listed first among the "Top Ten Voice Schools in America" by Classical Singer. School of Music voice students are frequent winners in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions in New York City each spring. The school has had five grand winners in the last five years and 33 grand winners overall. An unparalleled twenty students and alumni have received BMI Student Composer Awards. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Faculty

The school has more than 170 full-time faculty members that include performers, scholars, and teachers of international renown. In addition, many top musicians and scholars come to the school each year to give master classes and guest lectures or to serve as visiting artistic directors, conductors, and faculty. Over the last two years the school has hired pianists André Watts and Arnaldo Cohen, violinist Jaime Laredo, and soprano Carol Vaness as faculty members. Other notable faculty members include: André Watts (born June 20, 1946) is a classical pianist and Professor at the Jacobs School of Music of Indiana University in Bloomington. ... Jaime Laredo (born June 7, 1941 in Cochabamba, Bolivia) is a violinist and conductor. ... Carol Vaness (born July 27, 1952) is an American lyric soprano. ...

  • Atar Arad, violist
  • David Baker, jazz cellist and educator
  • Joshua Bell, violinist
  • Alan Bennett, tenor
  • Myron Bloom, horn
  • Kevin Bobo, percussion
  • Bruce Bransby, double bass
  • James Campbell, clarinetist
  • Edmund Cord, trumpet
  • Costanza Cuccaro, coloratura soprano
  • Eli Eban, clarinetist
  • David Effron, conductor
  • Luke Gillespie, jazz pianist
  • Steve Houghton, percussion
  • Lawrence Hurst, double bass
  • Paul Kiesgen, bass
  • Howard Klug, clarinetist
  • Carl Lenthe, trombonist
  • William Ludwig, bassoonist
  • Michael McCraw, baroque bassoonist
  • Susann McDonald, harp
  • Sylvia McNair, soprano
  • Otis Murphy, classical saxophone [1]
  • Jeffrey Nelsen, horn
  • Timothy Noble, baritone
  • Daniel Perantoni, tubist
  • John Poole, conductor [2]
  • Menahem Pressler, pianist and commander in Order of Arts and Letters
  • John Rommel, trumpet
  • Marietta Simpson, mezzo-soprano
  • Leonard Slatkin, conductor
  • János Starker, cellist
  • M. Dee Stewart, trombonist
  • John Tafoya, timpani and percussion
  • Joey Tartell, trumpet
  • Carol Vaness, soprano
  • Arthur Weisberg, bassoonist

Atar Arad is among the leading viola professors today. ... David Baker may refer to: David J. Baker (1792–1869), US Senator from Illinois David Baker (composer) (born 1931), American symphonic jazz composer David Baker (biochemist), American biochemist David H. Baker (food chemist), American food chemist C. David Baker, American commissioner of the Arena Football League J David Baker (born... Joshua David Bell (born 9 December 1967) is an American Grammy Award-winning violinist. ... James Campbell (b. ... David Effron is an American conductor and educator. ... Sylvia McNair (born June 23, 1956 in Mansfield, Ohio) is a two-time Grammy Award-winning singer who is equally at home on the stages of Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall and in the intimate environs of the Rainbow Room and the Algonquin’s legendary Oak Room. ... Otis Murphy (b. ... Menahem Pressler (born 16 December 1923, Magdeburg) is a German pianist. ... See: Ordre des Arts et des Lettres ... John Rommel Professor, Jacobs School of Music Indiana University (Trumpet) Education: B.M. , University of Louisville, 1980 Background: John Rommel was principal trumpet of the Louisville Orchestra from 1988 until 1996, and has performed throughout the United States, France, and Germany. ... Leonard Slatkin (born September 1, 1944) is an American conductor. ... János Starker (b. ... Carol Vaness (born July 27, 1952) is an American lyric soprano. ... Arthur Weisberg (born 1938) is an American bassoonist, conductor, and author. ...

Facilities

The school's facilities, including five buildings located in the heart of the IU Bloomington campus, comprise outstanding recital halls, more than 170 practice rooms, choral and instrumental rehearsal rooms, and more than 100 offices and studios.


Musical Arts Center

The Musical Arts Center, known as the MAC, is the school's largest performance facility. The Musical Arts Center (MAC) was completed in 1972 at a cost of $11.2 million. It is equipped with an opera theater with European-style seating for 1,460 and room for a 100-piece orchestra. The MAC also houses studios, classrooms, and rehearsal facilities for music and ballet. The 90x60 foot stage is often compared to that of the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. It features acoustical design and technical capabilities that are among the best in the nation. The backstage area occupies more than half of the building and provides state-of-the-art technical space for producing eight fully staged operas and three ballets a year. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ...


Peau Rouge Indiana, a large sculpture by Alexander Calder, sits on the lawn in front of the MAC. It was renovated over the course of two months during the Fall 2007 semester. [3] For other persons named Alexander Calder, see Alexander Calder (disambiguation). ...


Simon Music Center

The Simon Music Center (pictured at the top of the page) opened after an extensive renovation in 1995 and houses the William and Gayle Cook Music Library, Auer Hall, Ford-Crawford Hall, Sweeney Lecture Hall, classrooms, and administrative and faculty offices.


History

In 1907, Charles Campbell arranged for a recital of the Schellschmidt Quartet of Indianapolis, the proceeds of which established a music fund, "to lead ultimately to the equipment of a school of music in the university." In 1909, he offered a series of noncredit lectures on the history of music, which eventually lead to a full fledged music department. In 1919 Barzille Merrill took the position of department head and worked to create a separate school of music. He campaigned for a new music building as well, which was dedicated in 1937, and renamed Merril Hall in 1989. In 1921 the Department of Music officially became the School of Music. The Indianapolis skyline Indianapolis is the capital of the U.S. state of Indiana. ...


In 1938 Robert L. Sanders was appointed Dean and remains the school's youngest-ever dean. Through his efforts, the school gained membership in the National Association of Schools of Music and built the Hall of Music (now known as the Indiana University Auditorium). In 1941 the Indiana University Auditorium was dedicated and offered 15 events including appearances by the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and the San Carlo Opera Company.


In 1942 the school staged its first full opera. Cavalleria Rusticana. That year the Metropolitan Opera Company visited IU for the first time, performing Aida, and would return again for the next 15 years, presenting two operas each visit. Cavalleria rusticana (Rustic Chivalry) is an opera in one act by Pietro Mascagni to a libretto by Targioni-Tozzetti and Menasci, adapted from a short story by Giovanni Verga. ... The Metropolitan Opera is located at Lincoln Center in New York, New York. ... This article is about the opera. ...


In 1982 Leonard Bernstein spent six weeks at the school to work on his final opera, A Quiet Place. In 1980, the School of Music launched a weekly radio chamber music series produced by WFIU. In its first year, the series featured student and faculty performers and was broadcast on six Indiana stations. By 1981 (and through 1984), "Music from Indiana" had achieved national syndication on American Public Radio, and in 1983, the number of stations carrying the program had jumped to 54. Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... A Quiet Place is a 1983 an opera by Leonard Bernstein. ... WFIU is a public radio FM station broadcasting from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. ...


In 2005 the school announced it had received a gift of $40.6 million from Barbara and David H. Jacobs for the school of music. [4] It is the largest single gift for a school of music at a public university and it is also the largest single gift ever given by individuals to IU. The school will use $20 million of the gift to endow graduate student fellowships and $10 million to endow undergraduate scholarships. The gift also establishes endowed faculty positions, including the Dean Charles H. Webb Chair in Music, the Henry A. Upper Chair in Music and the David H. Jacobs Chair in Music. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable alumni

  • Jamey Aebersold, jazz educator
  • David Baker, jazz composer
  • Joshua Bell, violinist
  • Chris Botti, jazz trumpeter
  • Michael Brecker, jazz saxophonist
  • Carl Broemel, lead guiarist/vocalist/saxophone for My Morning Jacket
  • Angela Brown, internationally acclaimed soprano
  • Lawrence Brownlee, internationally acclaimed tenor
  • Andres Cardenes, violinist, Concertmaster of the Pittsburgh Symphony
  • Hoagy Carmichael, songwriter and actor, author of the famous songs Stardust and Georgia on My Mind
  • Corey Cerovsek, violinist
  • John Clayton, jazz and classical bassist, composer and arranger
  • Frederic Chiu, pianist
  • Jeremy Denk, pianist
  • Hank Dutt, violist, founding member of the Kronos Quartet
  • Donald Erb, composer
  • Peter Erskine, jazz drummer and educator
  • Elizabeth Futral, soprano
  • Vivica Genaux, internationally acclaimed mezzo soprano
  • Heidi Grant Murphy, soprano
  • Tom Gullion, jazz saxophonist
  • Elizabeth Hainen, harpist, principal harp of the Philadelphia Orchestra
  • Jeff Hamilton, jazz drummer
  • Mike Flynn, Producer/Recording Engineer
  • Gary Hoffman, cellist and solo artist
  • Jacques Israelievitch, violinist, concertmaster of the Toronto Symphony
  • Jean Jeanrenaud, cellist, former member of the Kronos Quartet
  • Booker T. Jones, songwriter, producer and frontman of the band Booker T. and the MGs
  • Paul Katz, cellist, founding member of the Cleveland Quartet
  • Gordon Lee, jazz pianist, educator and composer
  • Sebastien Lipman, harpist, former principal harp of the Berlin Philharmonic
  • Sylvia McNair, internationally acclaimed soprano
  • Edgar Meyer, bassist, MacArthur Fellow
  • William Preucil, violinist, concertmaster of the Cleveland Orchestra
  • Larry Ridley, jazz bassist and music educator
  • Richard Roberts, violinist, principal concertmaster of the Montreal Symphony
  • Leonard Slatkin, conductor
  • Richard Stillwell, baritone
  • Michael Sweeney, composer of Concert Band literature
  • Pharez Whitted, jazz trumpet and composer
  • Jeffrey Zeigler, cellist, member of the Kronos Quartet
  • DaXun Zhang, classical double bass
  • Kenny Aronoff, drumset
  • Meagan Searles Todd, Lyric Soprano

Jamey Aebersold as pictured on the cover of instructional DVD Jazz: Anyone Can Improvise Jamey Aebersold (born July 21, 1939) is an American jazz saxophonist and educator. ... David Baker may refer to: David J. Baker (1792–1869), US Senator from Illinois David Baker (composer) (born 1931), American symphonic jazz composer David Baker (biochemist), American biochemist David H. Baker (food chemist), American food chemist C. David Baker, American commissioner of the Arena Football League J David Baker (born... Joshua David Bell (born 9 December 1967) is an American Grammy Award-winning violinist. ... Christopher Botti or Chris Botti (born October 12, 1962) is a trumpeter and composer; born in Portland, Oregon. ... Michael Brecker (March 29, 1949 – January 13th, 2007) was a popular US jazz saxophonist and composer. ... My Morning Jacket is an American rock band known for their reverb-heavy sound, their eclectic mix of indie rock, country rock, psychedelic, and jam band styles, and enthusiastic and energetic live shows. ... Image:Angie photo1. ... Hoagland Howard Hoagy Carmichael (November 22, 1899 – December 27, 1981) was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Georgia on My Mind is a song written in 1930 by Stuart Gorrell (lyrics) and Hoagy Carmichael (music). ... ... Peter Erskine (born June 5, 1954) is an American jazz drummer. ... Vivica Genaux (born in Fairbanks, Alaska) is an American mezzo-soprano. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Jeff Hamilton is a jazz drummer. ... Jacques Israelievitch (born May 6, 1948 in Cannes, France) is a French violinist, and one of Canadas foremost chamber musicians. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Booker T. & the M.G.s is a soul band, most prominent in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Gordon Lee was an English association footballer and football manager. ... Sylvia McNair (born June 23, 1956 in Mansfield, Ohio) is a two-time Grammy Award-winning singer who is equally at home on the stages of Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall and in the intimate environs of the Rainbow Room and the Algonquin’s legendary Oak Room. ... Edgar Meyer (born November 24, 1960) is a prominent contemporary bassist. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... Larry Ridley born September 3,1937 is an American jazz bassist and music educator. ... Leonard Slatkin (born September 1, 1944) is an American conductor. ... Pharez Whitted - Jazz Trumpet Since 1982, jazz trumpeter, composer, and producer Pharez Whitted has performed throughout the United States and overseas, including gigs at the 1988 Presidential Inauguration, The Arsenio Hall Show, The Billboard Music Awards, Carnegie Hall, and the MoTown Music Showcase. ...

The Musical Ivy League

JSM is considered to be a member of the "Musical Ivy League", a group of music schools considered to be, in many ways, the finest in the world.


External links

  • Official site

 
 

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