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Encyclopedia > Jacksonville
The Jacksonville skyline and the Acosta Bridge.
The Jacksonville skyline and the Acosta Bridge.

Jacksonville is a city located in Duval County, Florida, USA. It is the county seat of Duval County 6. Download high resolution version (2048x548, 150 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2048x548, 150 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The original Acosta Bridge with the adjacent railroad bridge. ... Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... State nickname: Sunshine State, Everglade State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... A county seat is a town which is the capital of a county. ... Shortcut: {{GR|#}} {{Cite:GR|#}} The following is a list of sources used in the creation of Wikipedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ...


Geographically, it is the largest city in the contiguous 48 states of the United States in terms of land area. It is also the largest city in Florida in terms of population in the city proper (ultimately ranking 14th in the country). The Jacksonville metropolitan area reached over one million residents in 1996. Jacksonville also has the distinction of being the largest city in the South outside of Texas. 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None. ...


Jacksonville and Duval County are consolidated. All areas of Duval County are considered to be part of Jacksonville, but the communities of Baldwin, Neptune Beach, Atlantic Beach and Jacksonville Beach have their own municipal governments as well. Baldwin is a town located in Duval County, Florida. ... Neptune Beach is a city located in Duval County, Florida. ... Atlantic Beach is a city located in Duval County, Florida. ... Jacksonville Beach is a city located in Duval County, Florida. ...


The area of Jacksonville is 874.3 square miles (2,264.5 km²). Jacksonville was originally named Cowford because the St. Johns River is narrow there, allowing cattlemen to ford (herd) cows across the river. The city was renamed in 1822 for the first territorial governor of Florida and the future 7th U.S. President, Andrew Jackson. Cowford, early 1800s Cowford was the original name of the city now known as Jacksonville, Florida. ... The St. ... Order: 7th President Vice President: John C. Calhoun (1829-1832) Martin Van Buren (1833-1837) Term of office: March 4, 1829 – March 3, 1837 Preceded by: John Quincy Adams Succeeded by: Martin Van Buren Date of birth: March 15, 1767 Place of birth: Waxhaws area of North Carolina Date of...



Jacksonville, Florida
City flag City seal
City motto: "Where Florida Begins"

Image:Map of Florida highlighting Duval County.png
Location of the city proper in the state of Florida City Flag for Jacksonville, FL. I created this image myself, based on picutre of the flag at the city website (www. ... Seal of Jacksonville. ... A flag is a piece of cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually intended for signaling or identification. ... Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... A motto is a phrase or collection of words intended to describe the motivation or intention of a sociological grouping or organization. ... Public domain map courtesy of The General Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin, modified to show counties. ... State nickname: Sunshine State, Everglade State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ...

Founded 9 February 1832
County Duval County
Mayor John Peyton (R)
Area
 - Total
 - Water

2,264.5 km² (874.3 mi²)
302.1 km² (116.7 mi²) 13.34%
Population
 - City (2000)
 - Metropolitan
 - Density

735,617
1,122,750
374.9/km²
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5
Latitude
Longitude
30°19' N
81°39' W
City of Jacksonville Official Website

Contents

February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... A mayor (from the Latin maÄ«or, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... John Peyton (born July 28, 1964) is a politician of the Republican Party, serving as mayor of Jacksonville, Florida since July 1, 2003. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Population density can be used as a measurement of any tangible item. ... Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ...


Geography

Jacksonville is located at 30°19'10" North, 81°39'36" West (30.319406, -81.659999)1. Shortcut: {{GR|#}} {{Cite:GR|#}} The following is a list of sources used in the creation of Wikipedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2,264.5 km² (874.3 mi²). 1,962.4 km² (757.7 mi²) of it is land and 302.1 km² (116.7 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 13.34% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ...


History

Pre Colonial

Archaeological evidence indicates 6,000 years of human habitation in the area. The Timucua Indians were the predominate local tribe when European explorers arrived. The largest Timucua town in the region was Ossachite, which stood approximately where the courthouse stands today. Its name is the earliest recorded name for the area. The Timucua were a Native American tribe that lived in North Central Florida, mainly around the St. ...


Colonial and territorial history

In 1513, Spanish explorers landed in Florida and claimed their discovery for Spain. In 1562, the French Huguenot explorer Jean Ribault explored the St. Johns River area and in 1564 the French established Fort Caroline. Spanish troops, led by Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, from nearby St. Augustine attacked the fort and drove off the French in 1565. Spain ceded Florida to the British in 1763, who then gave control back to Spain in 1783. The first permanent settlement was founded at Cow Ford in 1791 and Florida became a United States territory in 1821. On June 15th, 1822 settlers sent a petition to the U.S. Secretary of State asking that Jacksonville be named a port of entry; this is the first recorded use of the name. The charter for a town government was approved by the Florida Legislative Council on February 9, 1832. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... Jean Ribault (1520 - October 12, 1565) was a French naval officer, navigator, and a colonizer of what would become the southeastern United States. ... The St. ... Fort Caroline was the first permanent French colony in North America, located near present-day Jacksonville, Florida. ... Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles Pedro Menendez de Aviles (born 1519 in Avilés, Spain, dead in Santander on September 17, 1574), was the first Spanish governor of Florida. ... Five flags have flown over St. ... February 9 is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Civil War

During the Civil War, Jacksonville was a key supply point for hogs and cattle leaving Florida and aiding the Confederate cause. Throughout most of the war, the US Navy maintained a blockade around Florida's ports, including Jacksonville. In October 1862 Union forces captured a Confederate battery at St. Johns Bluff and occupied Jacksonville. Throughout the war Jacksonville would change hands several times, though never with a battle. On February 20, 1864 Union soldiers from Jacksonville marched inland and confronted the Confederate Army at the Battle of Olustee which resulted in a Confederate victory. By the end of the war in 1865, a Union commander commented that Jacksonville had become "pathetically dilapidated, a mere skeleton of its former self, a victim of war." A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of Olustee was a battle in the American Civil War which took place near Lake City, Florida on February 20, 1864. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Winter Resort Era

Following the Civil War, during Reconstruction and afterward, Jacksonville and nearby St. Augustine became popular winter resorts for the rich and famous of the Gilded Age. Visitors arrived by steamboat and (beginning in the 1880s) by railroad, and wintered at dozens of hotels and boarding houses. The area declined in importance as a resort destination when Henry Flagler extended the Florida East Coast Railroad to the south, arriving in Palm Beach in 1894 and in the Miami area in 1896. Not even hosting the Subtropical Exposition, a Florida-style world's fair attended by President Grover Cleveland in 1888, served to provide a lasting boost for tourism in Jacksonville. A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... Augustine is the name of two important Saints: Augustine of Hippo (354-430) -- philosopher and theologian, author of The City of God, Confessions Augustine of Canterbury (d. ... The term Gilded Age refers to the political and economic nature situation of the United States from approximately 1876-1900. ... Henry Morrison Flagler (January 2, 1830 – May 20, 1913) was a United States tycoon, real estate promoter, railroad developer and Rockefeller partner. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ...


Yellow Fever Epidemics

Jacksonville's prominence as a winter resort was dealt another blow by major yellow fever outbreaks in 1886 and 1888, during the latter of which nearly ten percent of the more than 4,000 victims, including the city's mayor, died. In the absence of scientific knowledge concerning the cause of yellow fever, nearly half of the city's panicked residents fled, despite the imposition of quarantines and the (ineffectual) fumigation of inbound and outbound mail. Not surprisingly, Jacksonville's reputation as a healthful tourist destination suffered.


Spanish American War

During the Spanish American War, gunrunners helping the Cuban rebels used Jacksonville as the center for smuggling illegal arms and supplies to Cuba. Duval county sheriff, and future state governor, Napoleon Bonaparte Broward was one of many gunrunners operating out of the city. Author Stephen Crane travelled to Jacksonville to cover the war. The Spanish-American War took place in 1898, and resulted in the United States of America gaining control over the former colonies of Spain in the Caribbean and Pacific. ... Napoleon Bonaparte Broward (April 19, 1857–October 1, 1910) was the nineteenth governor of the U.S. state of Florida from January 3, 1905 to January 5, 1909. ... For other notable men with this name see: Stephen Crane (disambiguation). ...


Great Fire of 1901

On May 3, 1901 hot ash from a shantyhouse's chimney landed on the drying moss at Cleaveland's Fiber Factory. At half past noon most of the Cleaveland workers were at lunch, but by the time they returned the entire city block was engulfed in flames. The fire destroyed the business district and rendered 10,000 residents homeless in the course of eight hours. Florida Governor William S. Jennings declared a state of martial law in Jacksonville and dispatched several state militia units to Jacksonville. Reconstruction started immediately, and the city was returned to civil authority on May 17. Famed New York architect Henry Klutho helped rebuild the city. Klutho and other architects, enamored of the "Prairie Style" of architecture then being popularized by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in Chicago and other Midwestern cities, designed exuberant local buildings with a Florida flair. While many of Klutho's buildings were demolished by the 1980s, a number of his creations remain, including the St. James Building from 1911 (a former department store that is now Jacksonville's City Hall) and the Morocco Temple from 1910. The Klutho Apartments, in Springfield, were recently restored and converted into office space by local charity Fresh Ministries. Despite the losses of the last several decades, Jacksonville still has one of the largest collections of Prairie Style buildings (particularly residences) outside the Midwest. May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Sherman Jennings (March 24, 1863 - February 27, 1920) was a U.S. politician. ... Martial law is the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice (and usually of the whole state). ... A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... Prairie School was a late 19th and early 20th century style of design in the Midwestern United States developed by architect Louis Sullivan and his followers William Gray Purcell and George Grant Elmslie. ... Frank Lloyd Wright Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the most prominent architects of the first half of the 20th century. ... Springfield in Jacksonville, Florida is a historic neighborhood dating back to the mid-1800s. ... Fresh Ministries is a non-profit charity based in Jacksonville, Florida. ...


Motion Picture Industry

In the early 1900s, Jacksonville was a center of the fledgling motion picture industry. The city's warm climate, excellent rail access, and low costs all helped to make Jacksonville the "Winter Film Capital of the World". By the early 1910s, Jacksonville hosted over 30 studios employing over 1000 actors. However, some residents objected to the hallmarks of the early movie industry, such as car chases in the streets, simulated bank robberies and fire alarms in public places, and even the occasional riot scene. In 1917, a conservative mayor was elected on the platform of taming the city's movie industry. Subsequently the film studios opted to move to a more hospitable political climate in California. State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ...


"Gateway to Florida"

The 1920s brought significant real estate development and speculation to the city during the great Florida land boom (and bust). Hordes of train passengers passed through Jacksonville on their way south to the new tourist destinations of South Florida, as most of the passenger trains arriving from the population centers of the North were routed through Jacksonville. Completion of the Dixie Highway (portions of which became U.S. Highway 1) in the 1920s began to draw significant automobile traffic as well. An important entry point to the state since the 1870s, Jacksonville now justifiably billed itself as the "Gateway to Florida." The history of Florida began at least 12,000 years ago, long before it became a U.S. state. ... Dixie Highway in St. ... United States Highway 1 is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ...


US Navy

A significant part of Jacksonville's growth in the 20th century came from the presence of navy bases in the region. October 15, 1940, Naval Air Station Jacksonville ("NAS Jax") on the westside became the first navy installation in the city. This base was a major training center during World War II, with over 20,000 pilots and aircrewmen being trained there. After the war, the Navy's elite Blue Angels were established at NAS Jax. Today NAS Jax is the third largest navy installation in the country and employs over 23,000 civilian and active-duty personnel. October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in Leap years). ... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Naval Air Station Jacksonville, located in Jacksonville, Florida, is the third-largest naval installation in the United States. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... US Navy Blue Angels in tight diamond formation. ...


In June 1941, land in the westernmost side of Duval County was earmarked for a second naval air facility. This became NAS Cecil Field, which during the Cold War was designated a Master Jet Base, the only one in the South. RF-8 Crusaders out of Cecil Field detected missiles in Cuba, precipitating the Cuban Missile Crisis. In 1993 the Navy decided to close NAS Cecil Field and in 1999 this was completed. The land once occupied by this installation is now known as the "Cecil Commerce Center". The Cold War was the open yet restricted rivalry that developed after World War II between the United States and its allies and the Soviet Union and its allies. ... The Cuban Missile Crisis Gooney was a tense confrontation between the Soviet Union and the United States over the Soviet deployment of nuclear missiles in Cuba. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


December 1942 saw the addition of a third naval installation to Jacksonville: Naval Station Mayport at the mouth of the St. Johns River. This port developed through World War II and today is the home port for many types of navy ships, most notably the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy. NS Mayport current employs about 14,000 personnel. December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1942 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The USS departing NS Mayport, Florida Naval Station Mayport is a major U. S. Navy base near Jacksonville, Florida. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... USS (CV-67) (or Big John) is a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier. ...


Jacksonville is also not far from Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in St. Marys, Georgia, which is home to part of the US Navy's nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) fleet. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is a base of the United States Navy in Camden County, in southeast Georgia. ... St. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... SSBN is the United States Navy Hull classification symbol for a fleet ballistic missile submarine. ...


The naval base became a key training ground in the 1950s and 1960s and as such, the population of the city rose dramatically. More than half of the residents in Jacksonville had some tie to the naval base, whether it be a relative stationed there, or due to employment opportunities, by 1970. While the city is more independent from the Navy today, it is still a strong influence in the community. Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium // Events and trends The 1950s in Western society was marked with a sharp rise in the economy for the first time in almost 30 years and return to the 1920s-type consumer society built on credit and boom-times, as well as the... This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1960s. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


Racial tension

Jacksonville has a history of racial segregation and violence. This came to a head on "Ax Handle Saturday", August 27, 1960. A group of white men (allegedly some were also members of the Ku Klux Klan) armed with baseball bats and ax handles attacked civil rights protesters conducting sit-ins at segregated downtown restaurants. The violence spread, and the white mob started attacking all African-Americans in sight. Rumors were rampant on both sides that the unrest was spreading around the county (in reality, the violence stayed in relatively the same location, and did not spill over into the mostly-white, upper-class Cedar Hills neighborhood, for example). The police did not make an attempt to stop the violence until the "blacks started holding their own." Racial segregation is a kind of formalized or institutionalized discrimination on the basis of race, characterized by the races separation from each other. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (240th in leap years), with 126 days remaining. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ...


Before the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, African-Americans in Jacksonville were denied healthcare services at every hospital except the all-black Brewster Hospital, even when their condition was critical or life-threatening. President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... Brewster Hospital served African Americans in Jacksonville, USA from 1901 to 1966. ...


In the aftermath of the Civil Rights Act and Ax Handle Saturday, the previously segregated African-American and European-American communities worked together in open dialog, integration, and participatory government.


Despite the progress, racial tension was very evident when the public schools in Jacksonville were integrated in 1967. The black students attending integrated schools endured racial epithets, being spit on and, in some extreme cases, being stoned by their white classmates. 1967 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ...


On June 1, 2003, John Peyton became Mayor of Jacksonville after defeating African-American Sheriff Nat Glover. Matt Carlucci, a white Republican endorsed Glover (a Democrat) after being defeated in the open primary. Afterwards, Carlucci's business was vandalized with the words "NIGGER LOVER", and Glover's campaign headquarters was vandalized with "NO NIGGER MAYOR". The only witness to the crime said he saw two black males running from the scene. June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The designation for the chief executive for the city of Jacksonville is mayor. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


It should be noted that Nat Glover was the first (and only) African-American sheriff in the state of Florida since Reconstruction, winning two elections before running for mayor. Before he joined the police force, he was one of the youths who were involved in the axe handle riots.


Government

History

After World War II, the government of the City of Jacksonville began to increase spending to fund new building projects in the boom that occurred after the war. Mayor Haydon Burns' "Jacksonville Story" resulted in the construction of a new city hall, civic auditorium, public library and other projects that created a dynamic sense of civic pride. However, the development of suburbs and a subsequent wave of "white flight" left Jacksonville with a much poorer population than before. Much of the city's tax base dissipated, leading to problems with funding education, sanitation, and traffic control within the city limits. In addition, residents in unincorporated suburbs had difficulty obtaining municipal services such as sewage and building code enforcement. In 1958, a study recommended that the City of Jacksonville begin annexing outlying communities in order to create the needed tax base to improve services throughout the county. Voters outside the city limits rejected annexation plans in six referendums between 1960 and 1965. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... White flight is a colloquial term for the demographic trend of upper and middle class Americans (predominantly white) moving away from (predominantly non-white) inner cities, finding new homes in nearby suburbs or even moving to new locales entirely, e. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the mid 1960s, corruption scandals began to arise among many of the city's officials, who were mainly elected through the traditional good ol' boy network. After a grand jury was convened to investigate, several officials were indicted and more were forced to resign. Consolidation began to win more support during this period, from both inner city blacks (who wanted more involvement in government) and whites in the suburbs (who wanted more services and more control over the center city). Lower taxes, increased economic development, unification of the community, better public spending and effective administration by a more central authority were all cited as reasons for a new consolidated government. This article provides extensive lists of events and significant personalities of the 1960s. ... In the southern United States, the good ol boy network refers to a stereotype of informal social, religious, business, and political associations among usually older, white Southern men (the good ol boys). In most rural areas of the South and even in many large cities, the good ol boy network... A grand jury is a type of common law jury; responsible for investigating alleged crimes, examining evidence, and issuing indictments. ...


A consolidation referendum was held in 1967, and voters approved the plan. On October 1, 1968, the governments merged to create the Consolidated City of Jacksonville. 1967 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in Leap years). ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... In United States local government, a consolidated city-county is a city and county that have a merged government, and is considered both a city and a county under the laws of the State. ...


Structure

Jacksonville uses the Mayor-Council form of city government. The mayor is the Chief Executive and Administrative officer, called the Strong-Mayor form. He holds veto power over all resolutions and ordinances made by the city council. He also has the power to hire and fire the head of various city departments. The city council has nineteen members, fourteen of whom are elected from districts, and five who are elected at-large. Four municipalities within Duval County voted not to join the consolidated government. These communities consist of only 6% of the total population within the county. The municipalities are Baldwin, Neptune Beach, Atlantic Beach and Jacksonville Beach. Not all city services were merged, making for a less-than-full consolidation of the city-county. Several authorities remain independent of the combined city-county government, including the school board, electric authority, port authority, and airport authority. Fire, police, health and welfare, recreation, public works, and housing and urban development were all combined under the new government. The four separate communities provide their own services, while maintaining the right to contract the consolidated government to provide services for them. Under the new government structure, anyone living in Duval County is eligible to run for Mayor of the City of Jacksonville, even those living in the four separate municipalities. Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments. ... The designation for the chief executive for the city of Jacksonville is mayor. ...


Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there are 735,617 people, 284,499 households, and 190,614 families residing in the city. The population density is 374.9/km² (970.9/mi²). There are 308,826 housing units at an average density of 157.4/km² (407.6/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 64.48% White, 29.03% Black or African American, 0.34% Native American, 2.78% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.33% from other races, and 1.99% from two or more races. 4.16% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Shortcut: {{GR|#}} {{Cite:GR|#}} The following is a list of sources used in the creation of Wikipedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 284,499 households out of which 33.9% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% are married couples living together, 16.0% have a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% are non-families. 26.2% of all households are made up of individuals and 7.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.53 and the average family size is 3.07. Marriage is a relationship and bond, most commonly between a man and a woman, that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ...


In the city, the population is spread out with 26.7% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 32.3% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.3% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 34 years. For every 100 females there are 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 90.6 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $40,316, and the median income for a family is $47,243. Males have a median income of $32,547 versus $25,886 for females. The per capita income for the city is $20,337. 12.2% of the population and 9.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 16.7% of those under the age of 18 and 12.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the number of people. ... The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Weather

Traditionally, Jacksonville enjoys mild weather in the winter and hot weather in the summer. High temperatures average between 50 and 90 degrees (10-32 degrees Celsius) throughout the year. High heat indices are not uncommon for the summer months in the Jacksonville area. High Temperatures can reach mid to high 90s with heat index ranges of 105-115F. Conversely, the area can experience many freezes and hard freezes during the night in the winter months. In some years, the area sees snow, though this is uncommon. Heat Index (HI) is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to determine an apparent temperature — how hot it actually feels. ...


Jacksonville is one of the few cities on the Eastern seaboard that have been spared from the wrath of numerous hurricanes. The only major hurricane to hit the city has been Hurricane Dora, in 1964 with winds that had just barely diminished to 110mph, making it a strong Category 2, borderline Category 3. This area receives a brush with a Tropical Storm or better every 3.05 years. While not directly impacted, this area did receive major wind damage from Hurricanes Frances and Jeanne in 2004. Hurricane Dora was the first and last hurricane to make landfall on the coast of northeast Florida; more specifically, the metropolitan area of Jacksonville. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Rainfall averages around 52 inches a year, with the wetter months being June through September.


Higher education

Jacksonville is home to Edward Waters College, Jacksonville University, and the University of North Florida, as well as the Florida Community College at Jacksonville, Trinity Baptist College, Jones College, Florida Technical College, Logos Christian College, and Florida Coastal School of Law. Jacksonville University is a university located in Jacksonville, Florida on the shore of the St. ... The University of North Florida (UNF) is a public university located in Jacksonville, Florida. ... The Florida Community College at Jacksonville (FCCJ) is located in Jacksonville, Florida, USA. It has five campuses in the Jacksonville area, and five additional centers which host classes and programs for students. ... Trinity Baptist College (TBC) is a small private college located in Jacksonville, Florida. ...


Former mayor John Delaney has been president of the University of North Florida since July 2003, parlaying his widespread popularity in the city into a highly coveted spot of leadership in the state university system. Categories: People stubs | Jacksonville ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... The State University System of Florida is a system of universities indirectly governed by the State of Florida. ...


Transportation

Interstate Highways 10 and 95 intersect in Jacksonville. Interstate Highway 10 ends at this intersection (the other end being in California). The eastern terminus of US-90 is in nearby Jacksonville Beach near the Atlantic Ocean. Additionaly, several other roads as well a major local expressway, J. Turner Butler Boulevard (SR 202) also connect Jacksonville to the beaches. Public transportation is provided by the Jacksonville Transportation Authority. The city has the Jacksonville Skyway Monorail, which loops around the central business district and is fairly cheap to use. However, there are very few Skyway stations and as such, traffic is quite light. Interstate 10, or I-10, is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... Interstate 95 or (I-95) is an interstate highway that runs 1907 miles (3070 kilometers) north and south along the eastern United States coast. ... Interstate 10, or I-10, is the southernmost east-west, coast-to-coast interstate highway in the United States. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... United States Highway 90 is an east-west United States highway. ... Jacksonville Beach is a city located in Duval County, Florida. ... Florida State Road 202 (SR 202) is a limited access expressway that extends for about 13 miles from US 1 (Philips Highway) in Jacksonville to SR A1A (3rd street) in Jacksonville Beach near the Atlantic Ocean, just north of Ponte Vedra Beach, FL and includes a bridge over the Intercostal... A section of the Jacksonville Skyway downtown. ... The Walt Disney World Monorail A monorail is a metro or railroad with a track consisting of a single rail (actually a beam), as opposed to the traditional track with two parallel rails. ...


Interstate 95 has a bypass route, I-295, which currently bypasses the city to the west. I-295 will eventually become a loop when State Road 9A is completed in the southeastern portion of the county. Jacksonville is also home to the world headquarters of CSX Transportation. Interstate 95 or (I-95) is an interstate highway that runs 1907 miles (3070 kilometers) north and south along the eastern United States coast. ... The 35. ... SR 9A is also the unsigned number for Interstate 95 south of the Golden Glades Interchange. ... Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Railway companies of the United States | Alabama railroads | Connecticut railroads | Delaware railroads | Florida current railroads | Georgia railroads | Illinois railroads | Indiana railroads | Kentucky railroads | Louisiana railroads | Maryland railroads | Massachusetts railroads | Michigan railroads | Mississippi railroads | New Jersey railroads | New York railroads | North Carolina railroads | Ohio railroads | Pennsylvania...


There are also numerous bridges over the St. Johns River at Jacksonville. They include (starting from furthest downstream) the Dames Point Bridge, the Mathews Bridge, the Isaiah D. Hart Bridge, the Main Street Bridge, the Acosta Bridge, the Fuller Warren Bridge (which carries I-95 traffic) and the Buckman Bridge (which carries I-295 traffic). The St. ... Categories: Bridges in Florida | Cable-stayed bridges | Jacksonville | Stub ... Categories: Bridges in Florida | Jacksonville | US geography stubs ... External links City of Jacksonville article about the bridges (PDF) Categories: Substubs | Jacksonville | Bridges in Florida ... The Main Street Bridge seen from the Acosta Bridge. ... The original Acosta Bridge with the adjacent railroad bridge. ... Categories: Bridges in Florida | Jacksonville | Stub ... Interstate 95 or (I-95) is an interstate highway that runs 1907 miles (3070 kilometers) north and south along the eastern United States coast. ... Eastbound on the Buckman Bridge. ... The 35. ...


Major commercial air service in Jacksonville operates out of Jacksonville International Airport. Smaller planes can fly to Craig Airport on the southside and Herlong Airport on the westside. The city also operates an airfield at Cecil Commerce Center that is intended for aerospace manufacturing companies. Jacksonville International Airport, seen in an aerial shot on opening day on October 31, 1968. ... Craig Airport is a mid-sized facility for personal aircraft and small commuter planes on the southside of Jacksonville, Florida. ...


Amtrak passenger railroad serves Jacksonville from a station on Clifford Lane in the Northwest section of the city. Amtrak is the trademark name of the intercity passenger train system created on May 1, 1971 in the United States. ...


In 2003, the JAXPORT Cruise Terminal opened, providing cruise service to Key West, Florida, The Bahamas, and Mexico. 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Key West buoy at the Southernmost point in the continental United States Key West is a city located in Monroe County, Florida, United States. ...

St. Johns River crossings in the Jacksonville, Florida area
south of downtown Shands Bridge (to be replaced or supplemented) - Buckman Bridge - Timuquana Bridge (never built)
south from downtown Fuller Warren Bridge - Acosta Bridge - Main Street Bridge
east from downtown Hart Bridge - Mathews Bridge - 20th Street Extension (never built)
east of downtown Dames Point Bridge - SR 113A (never built) - Mayport Ferry

The St. ... Shands Bridge at dedication, October 30, 1963. ... Eastbound on the Buckman Bridge. ... Categories: Bridges in Florida | Jacksonville | Stub ... The original Acosta Bridge with the adjacent railroad bridge. ... The Main Street Bridge seen from the Acosta Bridge. ... External links City of Jacksonville article about the bridges (PDF) Categories: Substubs | Jacksonville | Bridges in Florida ... Categories: Bridges in Florida | Jacksonville | US geography stubs ... Categories: Bridges in Florida | Cable-stayed bridges | Jacksonville | Stub ...

Tourism and recreation

Jacksonville is home to a number of professional sports teams:

Jacksonville was named as the site for Super Bowl XXXIX, becoming the third city in the state of Florida (Miami and Tampa being the others) to host the event. The game was held on February 6, 2005 and featured halftime entertainment by former Beatle Sir Paul McCartney. Due to the milder climate and lesser amount of hotel space, many media critics decried Jacksonville as a sub-standard host for a Super Bowl, although local leaders felt the criticism was unwarranted. The game itself was played under ideal football weather (about 55 degrees Fahrenheit), and the New England Patriots defeated the Philadelphia Eagles, 24-21. Conference AFC Division South Founded 1995 Home Field ALLTEL Stadium City Jacksonville, Florida Colors Dark teal, black, and gold Head Coach Jack Del Rio All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 86-82-0 The Jacksonville Jaguars (Jags for short) are a National Football League team... NFL logo The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most popular professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities. ... Categories: Baseball stubs | Minor league baseball teams | Jacksonville sports ... The Southern League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the Southern United States. ... A Class A California League game in San Jose, California (1994) Minor leagues are baseball leagues which are at a lower pay level and generally play in smaller cities and towns than Major League Baseball. ... The Jacksonville Barracudas are a World Hockey Association 2 (WHA2) ice hockey team based in Jacksonville, Florida. ... The Southern Professional Hockey League (SPHL for short) is a professional ice hockey league with 8 teams located in cities throughout the southeastern United States. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Date February 6, 2005 Stadium ALLTEL Stadium City Jacksonville, Florida Attendance 78,125 MVP Deion Branch, Wide receiver National Anthem Combined choirs of the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Air Force Academy, the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and West Point, and U.S. Army Herald Trumpets. ... The Miami skyline, as it is seen from the northeast on Biscayne Bay. ... Franklin Street, looking North, Tampa c. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show during their first United States tour, promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Paul McCartney, as photographed by John Kelley for the 1968 LP The Beatles (aka The White Album). Sir James Paul McCartney, KBE, MBE (born June 18, 1942), better known as Paul McCartney, is a British musician, composer, and producer, who first came to prominence as a member of The Beatles. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... Conference AFC Division East Founded 1960 Home Field Gillette Stadium City Foxborough, Massachusetts Colors Red, white, blue, and silver Head Coach Bill Belichick All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 344-349-9 The New England Patriots are a National Football League team based in Foxborough... Conference NFC Division East Founded 1933 Home Field Lincoln Financial Field City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Colors Midnight green, black, silver, and white Head Coach Andy Reid All-Time Record (W-L-T) (At Start of 2005 Season) 471-516-25 The Philadelphia Eagles are a National Football League team based in...


Jacksonville is also a hub for the world famous golf opportunities of North Florida. In Ponte Vedra lies the Tournament Players Club at Sawgrass, one of the most famous golf courses in the world and home to the annual PGA TPC (The Player's Championship) tournament. Nearby St. Augustine is home to the World Golf Village and World Golf Hall of Fame. Jacksonville also features dozens of other golf courses and country clubs. Ponte Vedra Beach is a seaside village 20 miles south east of Jacksonville, Florida. ... Sawgrass (or saw-grass) is a sedge (not a true grass), belonging to the Genus Cladium. ... PGA means one of the following things: Professional Golfers Association The PGA TOUR, the principal mens professional golf tour in the United States Producers Guild of America Peoples Global Action pin grid array, a type of packaging for integrated circuits Plastic grid array professional graphics adapter, a video interface... Five flags have flown over St. ... The World Golf Hall of Fame [1] is located in St. ...


Professional tennis is in town each year when the WTA holds the Bausch & Lomb Championships at Amelia Island Plantation near Fernandina Beach, just north of Jacksonville. Other sports events include the annual Kingfish Tournament held in July, the Florida-Georgia football game, commonly known as "The World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party" held every October, and the Gator Bowl held in early January. University of North Florida, Jacksonville University and Edward Waters College also field athletic teams in a number of sports. WTA stands for Womens Tennis Association, and is also known as the WTA Tour, and is to womens tennis what the ATP is to mens tennis. ... Bausch and Lomb is an American company based in Rochester, New York, specialized in medical optics like contact lenses and surgical instruments. ... Amelia Island is the southernmost in a chain of barrier islands stretching from North Carolina to Florida. ... Fernandina Beach is a city located in Nassau County in the state of Florida in the United States of America and on Amelia Island. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Century Tower, University of Florida. ... The Worlds Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party is a common name for the annual college football game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgia Bulldogs. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The Gator Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played in Jacksonville, Florida. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... The University of North Florida (UNF) is a public university located in Jacksonville, Florida. ... Jacksonville University is a university located in Jacksonville, Florida on the shore of the St. ...


The city's biggest cultural event is the Jacksonville Jazz Festival, an annual event featuring many of the biggest names in jazz. Jacksonville also features two art museums, the Cummer Gallery of Art and the Jacksonville Museum of Modern Art. The Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra makes regular performances at the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts near downtown.


Jacksonville also has significant natural beauty from the St. Johns River and Atlantic Ocean. The city center includes the Jacksonville Landing shopping center and the Riverwalk. Downtown Jacksonville has a memorable skyline with the tallest building being the Bank of America Building, constructed in 1990 with a height of 617ft (188m). Other notable structures include the Modis Building (once the defining building in the Jacksonville skyline, owned by Independent Life) with its distinctive flared base and the Riverplace Tower, which is the tallest pre-cast, post-tension concrete structure in the world. Bank of America (BofA) (NYSE: BAC), based in Charlotte, North Carolina, is the third largest bank in the United States of America, measured in assets. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Local media

Newspapers and Magazines

Daily:


Weekly: The Florida Times-Union, based in Jacksonville, Florida, USA, is the major daily newspaper in northeast Florida. ... Categories: British newspapers | Scotland | Newspaper stubs ...


Monthly: Folio Weekly is a weekly alternative newspaper containing articles about people, issues, and events in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia. ... Business Journal of Jacksonville is a weekly American City Business Journals publication containing articles about business people, issues, and events in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia. ...

Jacksonville Magazine is a monthly publication featuring articles about people, issues, and events in Jacksonville, Florida. ...

Television

  • WJXT Channel 4, a longtime CBS affiliate before turning independent in 2002.
  • WUFT Channel 5, the PBS affiliate for the University of Florida in Gainesville, but has higher ratings in the metro area than local PBS affiliate WJCT (see below).
  • WJCT Channel 7, a PBS affiliate broadcasting since 1958. A radio station (89.9 FM) with the same callsign commenced broadcasts in 1972.
  • WTLV Channel 12, an NBC affiliate since 1988. Formerly WFGA from 1957 to 1975, and an ABC affiliate from 1980 to 1988.
  • WJWB Channel 17, the WB Formerly WJKS and the original ABC affiliate until 1980 when it became an NBC affiliate, only to change back to an ABC affliate in 1988, lost the ABC affiliation to start up WJXX in 1997, changed its call letters to WJWB and switched to WB network, and is the highest rated WB affliate in the nation.
  • WPXC Channel 21, PAX used to be WBSG and simulcated the ABC network with WJXX from 1997 until 2000.
  • WJXX Channel 25, the ABC affiliate for the area since 1997.
  • WAWS Channel 30, the FOX affiliate
  • WTEV Channel 47, originally an independent station with mainly Christian programming under the call letters of WXAO and later WNFT. It later changed its call letters to WTEV (then became a UPN affiliate), the channel has broadcasted CBS programming since July 2002.
  • WJEB Channel 59, carries religious programing from TBN.

WJXT is an independent television station serving Jacksonville, Florida and surrounding communities. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... WUFT is the callsign of both the television and FM radio stations that operate from the University of Floridas main campus in Gainesville. ... Century Tower, University of Florida. ... Gainesville is a city located in Alachua County, Florida, most known for the University of Florida, home to the Florida Gators football team. ... WJCT is a public television station serving the Jacksonville, Florida metropolitan area. ... PBS re-directs here; for alternate uses see PBS (disambiguation) PBS logo The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is a non-profit public broadcasting television service with 349 member TV stations in the United States. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... WTLV has been the NBC affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida since 1988. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American radio and television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... WJWB (WB 17, cable 9) is the WB affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida. ... Warner Bros. ... In computer security, PaX is a patch for the Linux kernel that implements least privilege protections for memory pages. ... The ABC Circle logo, designed by Paul Rand in 1962. ... WJXX is the ABC affiliate serving the Jacksonville, Florida area. ... The ABC Circle logo, designed by Paul Rand in 1962. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... WAWS (Fox 30) is the FOX/UPN affiliate in Jacksonville, Florida owned by Clear Channel Communications. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox, is a television network in the United States. ... WTEV is the CBS affiliate for Jacksonville, Florida, and its surrounding areas, which stretch from St. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... The Trinity Broadcasting Network, or TBN, is the worlds largest Christian television network, with a larger U.S. viewership than its three main competitor networks combined. ...

Radio

See Radio Stations in Jacksonville, Florida

Jacksonville Area FM WNCM 88. ...

Current issues

Some issues the city deals with today include how to fix the school system (including violence on school buses), controversies over a public high school named for Ku Klux Klan founder Nathan Bedford Forrest, and how to solve transportation problems (The Better Jacksonville Plan). Jacksonville also faces a double-edged sword of development. While the population increases, the city is forced to deal with maintaining an infrastructure that keeps up with this growth. Roads are increasingly clogged with more cars and public schools are crowded with more students. The city is struggling to keep a balance between traditionally lower taxes and accommodating its rising population. Nathan Bedford Forrest Nathan Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821 – October 29, 1877), was a Confederate general and perhaps the American Civil Wars most highly regarded cavalry and guerrilla leader. ...


Also, Super Bowl XXXIX in 2005 presented a host of problems and challenges for the Jacksonville area. Many of the current transportation issues revolved around this event, and many services, such as the Jacksonville monorail system known as the Skyway, have been underutilized for many years. The Skyway, specifically, has been criticized in that it goes from "nowhere to nowhere" in its limited route. Date February 6, 2005 Stadium ALLTEL Stadium City Jacksonville, Florida Attendance 78,125 MVP Deion Branch, Wide receiver National Anthem Combined choirs of the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Air Force Academy, the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and West Point, and U.S. Army Herald Trumpets. ...


Famous Jacksonville Natives


Famous Jacksonville Music Artists James Weldon Johnson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 - June 26, 1938) was a leading African American author, poet, early civil rights activist, and prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance. ... John Rosamond Johnson John Rosamond Johnson (1873 - 1954) was an American composer & singer. ... Asa Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 - May 16, 1979) was a socialist active in the labor movement and the US civil rights movement. ... King Kong, 1933 Merion C. Cooper (1893 - 1973) was an influential Hollywood director, producer, writer, cinematographer, and actor. ... Glamour photo Wanda Hendrix (November 3, 1928 – February 1, 1981) was an American film actress. ... For author Jack London (who likely had the birth name John Chaney), see his article. ... Philip Donald Estridge (1937 - August 2, 1985), known as Don Estridge, led development of the original IBM Personal Computer (PC), and thus is known as father of the IBM PC. His decisions dramatically changed the computer industry, resulting in a vast increase in the number of personal computers sold and... 1969 Daytona 500 Winner (Ford Cobra) LeeRoy Yarbrough (born September 17, 1938 in Jacksonville, Florida, died December 7, 1984) was a NASCAR auto driver. ... Robert Lee Hayes (December 20, 1942 _ September 18, 2002) was an American track and field athlete and American football player. ... Norman Earl Thagard (born July 3, 1943) is an astronaut for NASA. Early life He was born in Marianna, Florida, but considers Jacksonville, Florida, to be his hometown. ... Patrika Darbo Patrika Darbo (born April 6, 1948 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an American actress. ... Mark McCumber (b. ... Merciless Ray Mercer is an American professional boxer. ... Vincent Maurice Coleman (born September 22, 1961 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a former Major League Baseball player for the St. ... Miss America 1993 Leanza Cornett (born June 10, 1971 in Big Stone Gap, Virginia; raised in Jacksonville, Florida) was crowned Miss Florida 1992 and Miss America 1993. ... Laveranues Coles (born December 29, 1977 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a receiver who signed with the Washington Redskins in the 2002 offseason, after having played for the New York Jets. ... Yoanna House (born April 9, 1980 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an American model. ...


Famous Jacksonville Bands (chronological by year band was formed) Blind Blake Blind Blake (born Arthur Blake, circa 1893, Jacksonville, Florida; died: circa 1933) was an influential blues singer and guitarist. ... Billy Daniels Billy Daniels (September 12, 1915 - October 7, 1988) was a big band vocalist and an actor, performing in musicals, films, and television. ... Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him one of the most popular performers of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Nick Todd Nick Todd (born Nicholas Boone, June 1, 1935 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a pop singer. ... Im Nobodys Baby, 1959 Jo Ann Campbell (born July 20, 1938 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an American pop singer. ... Johnny Tillotson Johnny Tillotson (born April 20, 1939 in Jacksonville, Florida; raised in Palatka, Florida) is an American singer and songwriter. ... Gary U.S. Bonds (born June 6, 1939) is an American rock and roll singer. ... Jackie Moore Jackie Moore (born 1946 in Jacksonville, Florida) is an American R&B singer. ... Butch Trucks, promo photograph Butch Trucks (born Claude Hudson Trucks on May 11, 1947 in Jacksonville, Florida) is one of the founding members and one half of the drumming duo of The Allman Brothers Band, along with drummer Jai Johnny Johanson. ... The original Allman Brothers Band The Allman Brothers Band is a pioneering and innovative Southern rock group from Macon, Georgia originally popular in the 1970s, described by Rolling Stones George Kimball in 1971 as the best . ... Greg Eklund (born April 18, 1970 in Jacksonville, Florida) is the drummer for American rock band Everclear. ... Everclear is a rock band founded in 1992 (see also 1992 in music) after frontman Art Alexakis former band, Colorfinger, broke up. ... Mase (a. ...

Lynyrd Skynyrd, 1973 Lynyrd Skynyrd is an American Southern rock band, described by All Music Guides Stephen Thomas Erlewine as the definitive Southern rock band, fusing the overdriven power of blues-rock with a rebellious, Southern image and a hard rock swagger. ... Traces Classics IV (1969) Classics IV was a rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1965. ... Blackfoot were a southern rock band from America. ... Molly Hatchet is a southern rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1975 (see 1975 in music), known primarily for their hit song Flirtin With Disaster from the album of the same title. ... The band . ... Rein Sanction was an indie rock band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... 69 Boyz 69 Boyz are a hip hop group from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Limp Bizkit Logo Limp Bizkit is a five-piece American nu metal band. ... Inspection 12 is a pop punk band from Jacksonville, Florida. ... Cold is a hard rock band from Jacksonville, Florida, USA. With the release of its self-titled debut, Cold, in 1998, the band quickly became known for its angsty lyrics and the singers distinctive voice. ... Yellowcard is a band based in Los Angeles, California. ... Shinedown is a Rock and Roll band originating in Jacksonville, Florida. ...

Other

Jacksonville has several sister cities.[1] In 1967, Bahia Blanca, Argentina became Jacksonville's first sister city. In 1975, Murmansk, Russia became the second. In 1983, Masan, South Korea became the third. In 1984, Nantes, France became the fourth. In 1990, Yingkou, China became the fifth. In 2000, Port Elizabeth, South Africa became the sixth. The Sister Cities International in 2000 awarded Jacksonville's the Innovation Arts & Culture Award for the city's program with Nantes, France. This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... 1967 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Bah a Blanca is a city in eastern Argentina in Buenos Aires Province and a seaport at the head of the Bah Blanca (White Bay - an arm of the Atlantic Ocean). ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... Murmansk, Archangelsk, Dikson, Tiksi, on the Arctic Ocean Murmansk coin Murmansk (Му́рманск) is a city in the extreme northwest of Russia (north of the Arctic circle) with a seaport on the Kola Gulf, 20 miles from the Barents Sea on the northern shore of the Kola Peninsula, not far from... 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Masan is a city in South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For a place in Brazil, see Nantes, Brazil City motto: Favet Neptunus eunti. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yingkou (营口; pinyin: Yíngkǒu shì) is a prefecture-level city of Liaoning province, in northeastern China. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Port Elizabeth is a city in South Africa, situated in the Eastern Cape Province, at 33°58′ S 25°36′ E. The city is located on Algoa Bay, and is one of the major seaports in South Africa. ...


Points of interest

The Palm and Cycad Arboretum at the Florida Community College at Jacksonville is located on the south campus at 11901 Beach Boulevard, Jacksonville, Florida. ... The Florida Community College at Jacksonville (FCCJ) is located in Jacksonville, Florida, USA. It has five campuses in the Jacksonville area, and five additional centers which host classes and programs for students. ...

Home of

Jacksonville is the home of:

  • CSX Transportation
  • Winn-Dixie
  • Stein Mart
  • Landstar
  • Gate Petroleum Company
  • Florida Rock Industries
  • Sally Corporation
  • Regency Centers
  • Husk Jennings

Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Railway companies of the United States | Alabama railroads | Connecticut railroads | Delaware railroads | Florida current railroads | Georgia railroads | Illinois railroads | Indiana railroads | Kentucky railroads | Louisiana railroads | Maryland railroads | Massachusetts railroads | Michigan railroads | Mississippi railroads | New Jersey railroads | New York railroads | North Carolina railroads | Ohio railroads | Pennsylvania... Winn-Dixie logo. ...

External links

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:

Government Resources Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...


Non-Profits and Social Services


Higher Education

Further reading

  • Andino, Alliniece T. (August 25, 2000). 40 years ago this weekend, Jacksonville gave itself a national reputation for violence. The Florida Times-Union. Online Article
  • DeCamp, David (May 3, 2003). Racial graffiti found at Glover's headquarters. The Florida Times-Union. Online Article
  • Foley, Bill; Wood, Wayne (2001). The great fire of 1901 (1st ed.). Jacksonville, Florida: The Jacksonville Historical Society. ISBN 0971026106

See also: Orange Park, Duval County, Florida, List of mayors of Jacksonville, Florida Orange Park is a town located in Clay County, Florida, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 9,081. ... Duval County is a county located in the U.S. state of Florida. ... The designation for the chief executive for the city of Jacksonville is mayor. ...

Regions of Florida Flag of Florida
Central Florida | Emerald Coast | First Coast | Florida Panhandle | Florida Keys | Lee Island Coast | Nature Coast | Orlando Area | Redneck Riviera | Space Coast | Treasure Coast | South Florida | Sun Coast | Tampa Bay Area
Largest cities
Cape Coral | Clearwater | Coral Springs | Fort Lauderdale | Hialeah | Hollywood | Jacksonville | Miami | Miramar | North Miami | Orlando | Pembroke Pines | Plantation | Pompano Beach | Port St. Lucie | St. Petersburg | Sunrise | Tallahassee | Tampa | West Palm Beach
Counties
Alachua | Baker | Bay | Bradford | Brevard | Broward | Calhoun | Charlotte | Citrus | Clay | Collier | Columbia | DeSoto | Dixie | Duval | Escambia | Flagler | Franklin | Gadsden | Gilchrist | Glades | Gulf | Hamilton | Hardee | Hendry | Hernando | Highlands | Hillsborough | Holmes | Indian River | Jackson | Jefferson | Lafayette | Lake | Lee | Leon | Levy | Liberty | Madison | Manatee | Marion | Martin | Miami-Dade | Monroe | Nassau | Okaloosa | Okeechobee | Orange | Osceola | Palm Beach | Pasco | Pinellas | Polk | Putnam | Santa Rosa | Sarasota | Seminole | St. Johns | St. Lucie | Sumter | Suwannee | Taylor | Union | Volusia | Wakulla | Walton | Washington

  Results from FactBites:
 
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Information on Jacksonville and our city government is readily available on this Web site or by accessing the links to other organizations you'll see as you browse.
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The City of Jacksonville ethics hotline is available to facilitate disclosure of ethical concerns.
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