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Encyclopedia > Jackie Gleason
Jackie Gleason

Gleason as Minnesota Fats in The Hustler (1961).
Born Herbert Walton Gleason, Jr.
February 26, 1916(1916-02-26)
Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York
Died June 24, 1987 (aged 71)
Lauderhill, Florida
Years active 1941–1986
Spouse(s) Genevieve Halford
(1936–1970)
Beverly McKittrick (1970–1975)
Marilyn Taylor (1975–1987)

Herbert Walton Gleason, Jr. , baptized John Herbert "Jackie" Gleason (February 26, 1916June 24, 1987) was an iconic American comedian, actor, and musician. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Bushwick is a neighborhood in the northeastern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... This article is about the state. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Lauderhill is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... The Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Awards, recognize achievement in live American theatre and are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League [1] at an annual ceremony in New York City. ... The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. ... Take Me Along Sam Shubert Theatre Opened: Thursday, October 22, 1959 Producer: David Merrick Director: Peter Glenville Music and Lyrics: Bob Merrill Book: Joseph Stein and Robert Russell Original NY production Musical based on Ah, Wilderness! Nat Miller - Walter Pidgeon Essie Miller - Una Merkel Art Miller - James Cresson Richard Miller... The National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actor is one of the annual film awards given by the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. ... The Hustler is a 1961 American drama film. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ...


One of the most popular stars of early television, Gleason was respected for both comedic and dramatic roles. However, his major legacy was his brash visual and verbal comedy styling, especially as delivered by the character Ralph Kramden on the pioneering sitcom The Honeymooners. Cover of a book about the Honeymooners. ... For the 2005 film, see The Honeymooners (film). ...

Contents

Biography

The early years

Gleason was born in Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York, the son of Mae, a subway change-booth attendant, and Herb Gleason, an insurance auditor.[1] One of two sons of a father from Ireland who abandoned the family (his brother died when Jackie was a boy), Gleason was raised by a loving, but troubled, overworked Irish mother who died when he was 19. (Gleason sometimes pushed the date of death back three years to 16; biographer William A. Henry III wrote of Gleason's tendency to both exaggerate and obscure his hardscrabble childhood.) He attended but did not graduate from Bushwick High School. His first recognition as an entertainer came on Broadway, when he appeared in Follow the Girls. In his 1985 appearance on the Tonight Show, Gleason told Johnny Carson that he had played pool frequently, since childhood; he later utilized his experiences when he appeared in the film The Hustler as Minnesota Fats. Bushwick is a neighborhood in the northeastern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... This article is about the state. ... This biography does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For other persons named John Carson, see John Carson (disambiguation). ... The Novel The Hustler was a 1959 novel by American writer Walter Tevis, which tells the story of a young pool player who challenges the legendary Minnesota Fats but loses, sending his life into a tailspin. ... Rudolph Walter Wanderone Jr. ...


By the 1940s, Gleason was in the movies, first at Warner Brothers as "Jackie C. Gleason" in such films as Navy Blues with Ann Sheridan and Martha Raye and All Through the Night with Humphrey Bogart; then at Columbia Pictures for the B military comedy Tramp, Tramp, Tramp; and finally, at Twentieth Century-Fox (Gleason played the Glenn Miller band's bassist in Orchestra Wives). Warner Bros. ... Ann Sheridan (February 21, 1915 – January 21, 1967) was an American film actress. ... Martha Raye (August 27, 1916 – October 19, 1994) was an American comic actress and singer who performed in movies, and later on television. ... Bogart redirects here. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... This article is about the jazz musician. ...


But Gleason—whom Orson Welles in due course tagged "The Great One"—didn't make a strong impression in Hollywood at first. At the same time, he developed a well-received nightclub act that included both comedy and music. He also became somewhat known for hosting all-night parties—swapping stories while flanked by attractive women—at his hotel suite. "Anyone who knew Jackie Gleason in the 1940s," wrote CBS historian Robert Metz, "would tell you The Fat Man would never make it. His pals at Lindy's watched him spend money as fast as he soaked up the booze." Metz also noted the legend that Gleason one night hired a full orchestra just to keep him company. Henry has written that Gleason had a reputation as a paradox even then: a man who could be excessively generous one moment and excessively cruel the next. George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


Enter television

Gleason's first big break arrived in 1949, when he landed the role of blunt but softhearted aircraft worker Chester A. Riley for the first television version of the radio hit The Life of Riley. (William Bendix originated the role on radio, but was unable to take the television role at first because of film commitments.) The show received modest ratings but positive reviews; however, Gleason, according to Metz, left the show, thinking he could do better things. William Bendix as Chester A. Riley The Life of Riley, with William Bendix in the title role, was a popular radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film and continued as a long-running television series during the 1950s. ... William Bendix (January 14, 1906 - December 14, 1964) was an American film actor. ...


The Life of Riley finally became a television hit in the early 1950s with William Bendix in the role he popularized on radio; this version has been widely rebroadcast. A film-originated program, the original Gleason version survives, but episodes have rarely been aired on cable television. By that time, however, Gleason's nightclub act began receiving attention from New York City's inner circle and the small DuMont Television Network. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The DuMont Television Network was the worlds first commercial television network, beginning operation in the United States in 1946. ...


"And awaaay we go!"

Gleason was hired to host DuMont's Cavalcade of Stars variety hour in 1950, balancing glitzy entertainment with his comic versatility. He framed the show with splashy dance numbers, developed sketch characters he would refine over the next decade, and became enough of a presence that CBS wooed and won him over to their network in 1952 (his show was one of DuMont's few major hits). The DuMont Television Network was the worlds first commercial television network, beginning operation in the United States in 1946. ... The Jackie Gleason Show was a popular television variety show that starred Jackie Gleason and ran in a variety of incarnations, from 1952 to 1970. ...


Renamed The Jackie Gleason Show, it soon became the country's second-highest-rated television show. Gleason amplified the show with even splashier opening dance numbers, inspired by Busby Berkeley screen dance routines and featuring the precision-choreographed June Taylor Dancers. Following the dance performance, he did an opening monologue. Then, accompanied by "a little travelin' music" ("That's A-Plenty," a Dixieland chestnut from 1914), he would shuffle toward the wing, clapping his hands inversely and hollering, "And awaaay we go!" The phrase became one of his trademarks and a national catchphrase. The Jackie Gleason Show was a popular television variety show that starred Jackie Gleason and ran in a variety of incarnations, from 1952 to 1970. ... Kaleidoscopic Choreography from Footlight Parade, 1933 Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895 – March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... Choreography (also known as dance composition) is the art of making structures in which movement occurs, the term composition may also refer to the navigation or connection of these movement structures. ... June Taylor ( 14 Dec 1917-17 May 2004) was an American choreographer. ...


Gleason continued developing comic characters, including Reginald Van Gleason III, the top-hatted millionaire with a taste for both the good life ("Ummmmmmm-boy! That's good booze!") and the wild invention or fantasy; boisterous, boorish Rudy the Repairman; gregarious Joe the Bartender, with friendly words for the never-seen Mr. Dennehy, who always entered his bar first; and, especially, the Poor Soul, a silent character who could and often did come to grief in the least expected places or show sweet gratitude at things no more complicated than being allowed to share a newspaper on a subway.


A regular riot: The Honeymoon begins

By far his most popular character was blustery bus driver Ralph Kramden, who lived with his tart but tenderhearted wife, Alice Kramden, in a two-room Brooklyn walkup, one floor below his best friend, sense-challenged New York City sewer worker Ed Norton ("The first time I took the test for the sewer, I flunked. I couldn't even float!") and his likewise tart wife, Trixie. Norton was portrayed from the start by Art Carney. Cover of a book about the Honeymooners. ... Cover of a book about the Honeymooners. ... For the 2005 film, see The Honeymooners (film). ... Arthur William Matthew Carney (November 4, 1918 – November 9, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American actor in film, stage, television, and radio. ...


Possibly inspired by another radio hit, The Bickersons, and largely drawn from Gleason's harsh Brooklyn childhood ("Every neighborhood in Brooklyn had its Ralph Kramdens," he said years later), these sketches became known as The Honeymooners and customarily centered on Ralph's incessant get-rich-quick schemes, the tensions between his ambitiousness and Norton's scatterbrained aid and comfort, and the inevitable clash ("Bang! Zoooooom!"; "One of these days... one of these days... pow! Right in the kisser!; "I'll give you the world of tomorrow, Alice—you're goin' to the moon!") when sensible Alice tried pulling her husband's head back down from the clouds. However, in the later episodes, it was always clear that Kramden's threats were the bluffs of a blowhard; Alice never backed down, and invariably he would hug her at the end of the show, proclaiming, "Baby, you're the greatest!" The Bickersons, an American radio comedy (1946-1951)---born on The Chase and Sanborn Hour and refined on the lesser-remembered Drene Time---stood the already-typical domestic presentation of radio and its infant offspring, television, so squarely on its head that there were those who feared the show---whose...


The Honeymooners first appeared on Cavalcade of Stars on October 5, 1951, with Carney as Norton (a cop in the first sketch) and spirited character actress Pert Kelton as Alice. Darker and fiercer than they later became with Audrey Meadows as Alice, the sketches proved popular with critics and viewers. As Kramden, Gleason played a frustrated bus driver with a battle-ax wife in harrowingly realistic arguments; when Meadows (who was 19 years younger than Kelton) took over the role after Kelton was blacklisted, the tone softened considerably. In fact, early sketches come as something of a shock to some modern critics. The Jackie Gleason Show was a popular television variety show that starred Jackie Gleason and ran in a variety of incarnations, from 1952 to 1970. ... Pert Kelton (1907-1968) was an American vaudeville, movie, and television actress. ... Audrey Meadows (February 8, 1926 – February 3, 1996), born Audrey Cotter, was an Emmy Award-winning American actress best known for playing the deadpan housewife, Alice Kramden in the 1950s American television comedy, The Honeymooners. ... Protestors opposing the jailing of the Hollywood Ten in 1950 (from the 1987 documentary Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist). ...


When Gleason moved to CBS, Kelton was not part of the move, since her name had turned up in Red Channels, the book that listed and described reputed Communists and/or Communist sympathizers in television and radio. Gleason reluctantly let her leave the cast, with a cover story for the media that she had "heart trouble." He also turned down Audrey Meadows as Kelton's replacement, at least at first. Meadows wrote in her memoir that she slipped back to audition again and frumped herself up to convince Gleason that she could handle the role of a frustrated but loving working-class wife (although this story has been disputed repeatedly). Rounding out the cast with an understated but effective role, Joyce Randolph played Trixie Norton. Elaine Stritch had played the role as a tall and attractive blonde in the first sketch, but she was quickly replaced by the plainer-looking Randolph (some critics have speculated that Gleason didn't want Carney's character to have a more attractive wife). Randolph went on to make the character her own, just as Meadows did with Alice. Red Channels Red Channels: The Report of Communist Influence in Radio and Television was an anti-communist pamphlet published in the United States. ... Joyce Randolph, born Joyce Sirola… in Detroit, Michigan on October 21, 1925, is an actress, best known for playing Trixie Norton on The Honeymooners. ... Elaine Stritch (born on February 2, 1925) is an Irish-American actress and singer. ...


The Honeymooners sketches proved popular enough that Gleason gambled on making it a separate series entirely in 1955. These are the so-called Classic 39 episodes, although they only became "classic" years after they aired, since the show didn't draw strongly in the ratings at the time. But they were filmed with a new DuMont process, Electronicam, which allowed live television to be preserved on high-quality film. That turned out to be the most prescient move the show made, since—a decade after they first aired—the half-hour Honeymooners in syndicated reruns started to build a loyal and growing audience that made the show a television icon. Its popularity was such that even today, a life-size statue of Jackie Gleason, in full uniform as bus driver Ralph Kramden, stands outside the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City. For the 2005 film, see The Honeymooners (film). ... Electronicam was a television recording system, based on a camera that shot film and television at the same time through a common lens. ... For the British television series, see Pop Idol. ... Cover of a book about the Honeymooners. ... Port Authority Bus Terminal at Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street The Port Authority Bus Terminal is the main gateway for interstate buses into Manhattan in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


The mood musician

Throughout the 1950s and '60s, Gleason enjoyed a secondary music career, lending his name to a series of best-selling "mood music" albums with jazz overtones for Capitol Records. Gleason felt there was a ready market for romantic instrumentals. He recalled seeing Clark Gable play love scenes in movies, and the romance was, in his words, "magnified a thousand percent" by background music. Gleason reasoned, "If Gable needs music, a guy in Brooklyn must be desperate!" Light Music is a generic term applied to a mainly British musical style of light orchestral music, which began post-World War One and had its heyday during the mid-20th Century, although arguably lasts to the present day. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label owned by EMI and located in Hollywood, California. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ...


Gleason could not read or write music in a conventional sense; he was said to have conceived melodies in his head and described them vocally to assistants. These included the well-remembered themes of both The Jackie Gleason Show ("Melancholy Serenade") and The Honeymooners ("You're My Greatest Love"). There has been some controversy over the years as to how much credit Gleason should have received for the finished products; Henry has written that beyond the possible conceptualizing of many of the songs, Gleason had no direct involvement (such as conducting) in the making of these recordings. Red Nichols, a jazz great who had fallen into hard times and led one of the groups recorded, did not even get session-leader pay from Gleason. Ernest Loring Red Nichols (May 8, 1905–June 28, 1965) was a United States jazz cornettist. ...


Some of that music turns up once in a while today. "It's Such a Happy Day," which often turned up as a theme behind numerous Gleason television sketches, was used as background music for a jaunty scene involving heart transplant recipient Minnie Driver bicycling around her Chicago neighborhood in the 2000 romantic comedy Return to Me. "Melancholy Serenade" is used as the closing theme for the "Camelot" episode of The Sopranos (Episode 59, Season 5). Minnie Driver (born January 31, 1970) is an Emmy- and Academy Award-nominated English actress and singer-songwriter. ... Return to Me is a romantic movie rated PG. Return to Me was directed by Bonnie Hunt and starred David Duchovny as Bob and Minnie Driver as Grace. ... This article is about the mythical castle. ... This article is about the television series. ...


The American Scene Magazine

Gleason restored his original variety hour—including The Honeymooners—in 1956, but abandoned the show in 1957, leaving weekly television for a year. He returned in 1958 with a half-hour show that featured Buddy Hackett (Carney and Meadows were not part of this program). However, this version of the Gleason show did not catch on. Buddy Hackett (August 31, 1924 – June 30, 2003) was an American comedian and actor. ...


His next foray into television was with a game show, You're in the Picture, which survived its disastrous premiere episode only because of Gleason's now-legendary humorous on-the-air apology in the following week's time slot. ("It laid... the biggest... bomb!") For the rest of the scheduled run, the program became a talk show that was once again named The Jackie Gleason Show. Youre in the Picture was an American television game show that aired on CBS for only one true episode, on January 20, 1961 (the same day John F. Kennedy was sworn in as 35th President of the United States). ...


In 1962, he resurrected his variety show with a little more splashiness (the June Taylor Dancers' routines became more elaborately choreographed and costumed than before) and a new hook—a fictitious general-interest magazine through whose format Gleason trotted out his old characters in new scenarios. He also added another catchphrase to the American vernacular, first uttered in the 1962 film Papa's Delicate Condition: "How sweet it is!" Papas Delicate Condition is a 1963 comedy film starring Jackie Gleason and Glynis Johns. ...


The Jackie Gleason Show: The American Scene Magazine was a hit and continued in this format for four seasons. Each show began with Gleason delivering a monologue and commenting on the loud outfits of bandleader Sammy Spear. Then the "magazine" features would be trotted out, from Hollywood gossip (reported by comedienne Barbara Heller) to news flashes (played for laughs with a stock company of second bananas, chorus girls, and midgets). Comedienne Alice Ghostley occasionally appeared as a downtrodden tenement resident, sitting on her front step and listening to boorish boyfriend Gleason for several minutes. After the boyfriend took his leave, the smitten Ghostley would exclaim, "I'm the luckiest girl in the world!" Veteran comics Johnny Morgan, Sid Fields, and Hank Ladd were occasionally seen opposite Gleason in comedy sketches. Alice Ghostley (born August 14, 1926 in Eve, Vernon County, Missouri, died September 21, 2007 Studio City, California), is a Tony Award-winning American actress, best known for playing the characters Bernice Clifton on Designing Women (Emmy Nomination, Best Supporting Actress; 1992), Esmerelda on Bewitched, and Cousin Alice on Mayberry...


The final sketch was always set in Joe the Bartender's saloon, with Joe singing "My Gal Sal" and greeting his regular customer, the unseen Mr. Dennehy (actually the TV audience, with Gleason speaking to the camera), who was named after a neighbor who took Gleason in after he was orphaned. During the sketch, Joe the Bartender would tell Dennehy about an article he read in the fictitious "American Scene" magazine, holding a copy across the bar. It had two covers: one featured the New York skyline and the other palm trees (after the show was moved to Florida in 1964). Then, Joe would bring out Frank Fontaine as Crazy Guggenheim, who would regale Joe with the latest adventures of his neighborhood pals and sometimes showed Joe his current Top Cat comic book. Joe usually asked Crazy to sing, almost always a sentimental ballad sung in a lilting baritone. (Fontaine had played the same sort of goofy Brooklynite character, then called "John L.C. Sivoney," on radio's The Jack Benny Program; his wider exposure on Gleason's show resulted in the release of his recordings of "old standards" on the ABC-Paramount record label.) Frank Fontaine (19 April 1920 – 4 August 1978) was a American comedian and singer. ... Top Cat is a Hanna-Barbera prime time animated television series which ran from September 27, 1961 to April 18, 1962 for a run of 30 episodes on the ABC network on Wednesdays. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... ABC Records started in 1955 as ABC-Paramount Records, the recording arm of American Broadcasting-Paramount Theatres. ...


Gleason also revived The Honeymooners, first with Sue Ane Langdon and then with Sheila MacRae as Alice and with Jane Kean as Trixie. By 1964, Gleason had moved the production from New York to Miami Beach, reportedly because he liked the year-round access to the golf course at nearby Inverrary, where he built his final home. His closing line became, almost invariably, "As always, the Miami Beach audience is the greatest audience in the world!" In 1966, he finally abandoned the American Scene Magazine format and converted the show into a standard variety hour with guest performers. Sue Ane Langdon (born March 8, 1936 in Paterson, New Jersey, USA) is an actor best known for her performances in two Elvis Presley movies, Roustabout and Frankie and Johnny, and a starring tole in the TV series Arnie, a role that won her a Golden Globe Award for Best... Sheila MacRae (born Sheila Margaret Stephens on September 24, 1924, in London, England) is an actress and author. ... Jane Kean (b. ... This article is about the state. ... Miami Beach is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ...


Gleason kicked off the 1966–67 season with new, color episodes of The Honeymooners. Art Carney returned as Ed Norton, with Sheila MacRae as Alice and Jane Kean as Trixie. The stories were remakes of the 1950s "world tour" episodes, in which Kramden and Norton win a slogan contest and take their wives to international destinations. Each of the nine episodes was a full-scale musical comedy, with Gleason and company performing original songs by Lyn Duddy and Jerry Bresler. Occasionally, the Gleason hour would be devoted to musicals with a single theme (a college comedy, a political satire, etc.), with the stars abandoning their Honeymooners roles for different (and sometimes seriocomic) character roles.


This was the format of the show until its cancellation in 1970, except for the 1968–69 season, which had no hour-long Honeymooners episodes. In that season, The Honeymooners—as in the beginning—was presented only in short sketches.


At first, the musicals pushed Gleason back into the top five ratings, but it wasn't long before audiences began declining. The reasons varied, from MacRae and Kean being seen as subpar in relation to Audrey Meadows and Joyce Randolph (with opportunities for comparison heightened by the expanding syndication of the Classic 39) to increasing recycling of old Honeymooners plots into new musical settings. In the last original Honeymooners episode aired on CBS, "Operation Protest," Ralph encounters the youth-protest movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. This article is about the broadcast network. ...


According to Metz, Gleason, who had signed a deal in the 1950s that included a guaranteed $100,000 annual payment for 20 years even if he never went on the air, wanted The Honeymooners to be just a portion of his format, but CBS wanted another season of nothing but The Honeymooners. The network had just canceled mainstay variety shows hosted by Red Skelton and Ed Sullivan because they had become too expensive to produce and attracted (in the executives' estimation) too old an audience. Gleason simply stopped doing the show by 1970 and finally left CBS when his contract expired. As Metz noted, Gleason was "anxious" to get a deal "more to his liking than another year of The Honeymooners." Richard Bernard Red Skelton (July 18, 1913 – September 17, 1997) was an American comedian whose greatest impact — in a career which began as a teen circus clown and graduated to vaudeville, Broadway, MGM films, and radio — began when he reached television stardom with The Red Skelton Show (NBC, 1951–1952... For other persons named Edward Sullivan, see Edward Sullivan (disambiguation). ...


Dramatic Gleason

Gleason had a dramatic side that the comic pathos of the Poor Soul often hinted at. He earned acclaim for live television drama performances in The Laugh Maker on CBS' Studio One (where he played a semiautobiographical role as fictional TV comedian Jerry Giles) and in William Saroyan's The Time of Your Life, also for CBS as an episode of the legendary anthology Playhouse 90. Studio One was an American dramatic television anthology series, sponsored by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. ... William Saroyan (Armenian: , IPA: ) (August 31, 1908, Fresno, California - May 18, 1981, Fresno, California) was an American author. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Playhouse 90 is the name of a 90-minute long dramatic television series that ran on CBS from 1956 to 1961. ...


But he won acclaim plus an award nomination for his portrayal of Minnesota Fats in the 1961 Paul Newman movie The Hustler, in which Gleason (who had hustled pool growing up in Brooklyn) made his own pool shots. He earned an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor for the role. He was also well-received as a beleaguered boxing manager in the movie version of Rod Serling's Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962), which also featured Anthony Quinn, Mickey Rooney, and (under his birth name, Cassius Clay) Muhammad Ali. Gleason also played a world-weary Army sergeant, with Steve McQueen supporting him as a Gomer Pyle-like private and Tuesday Weld as his love interest, in Soldier in the Rain (1962). He wrote, produced, and starred in his own film, Gigot, a notorious box office disaster in 1962, in which he plays a poor, mute janitor who befriends and rescues a prostitute and her small daughter (the film was directed by Gene Kelly). He played the lead in the Otto Preminger all-star flop Skidoo (1968), costarring Groucho Marx, in which Gleason's character and half the cast is imprisoned in Alcatraz and trips on LSD (including the guards, played by Slim Pickens, Harry Nilsson, and Fred Clark). Three years later, William Friedkin wanted to cast Gleason as "Popeye" Doyle in The French Connection (Friedkin's second choice after Paul Newman); but between Gigot and Skidoo, the studio refused to offer Gleason the lead in the film, even though he wanted to play it. Instead, that year Gleason wound up in How to Commit Marriage (1969) with Bob Hope and the movie version of Woody Allen's play Don't Drink the Water (1969), both flops. Rudolph Walter Wanderone Jr. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... The Hustler is a 1961 American drama film. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Rodman Edward Rod Serling (December 25, 1924 – June 28, 1975) was an American screenwriter, most famous for his science fiction anthology television series, The Twilight Zone. ... Requiem for a Heavyweight was originally a 1956 teleplay written by Rod Serling and produced for the live television show Playhouse 90 in 1957. ... For other people named Anthony Quinn see Anthony Quinn (disambiguation) Anthony Quinn (April 21, 1915 – June 3, 2001) was a two-time Academy Award-winning Mexican/American actor, as well as a painter and writer. ... Actor Mickey Rooney speaks at the Pentagon in 2000 during a ceremony honoring the USO. Mickey Rooney (born Joseph Yule, Jr. ... Muhammad Ali-Haj (born January 17, 1942 as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Steve McQueen (disambiguation). ... Gomer Pyle on The Andy Griffith Show Gomer Pyle was the simple-minded gas station attendant and later auto mechanic in the American TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show, played by Jim Nabors. ... Tuesday Weld, born August 27, 1943, is an American film actress. ... Soldier in the Rain is a 1963 poignant drama about an overweight Army sergeant (Jackie Gleason) and a country bumpkin private (Steve McQueen in an extremely uncharacteristic and animated comedic performance as a pre-Gomer Pyle country bumpkin). ... Gigot was an American motion picture released in 1962 by 20th Century Fox. ... Otto Ludwig Preminger (December 5, 1906 – April 23, 1986) was a film director. ... Skidoo is the title of a 1968 comedy film, directed by Otto Preminger, and released by Paramount Pictures, with storyline by Doran William Cannon. ... Groucho redirects here. ... Alcatraz Island is located in the middle of San Francisco Bay in California. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Slim Pickens riding the bomb in the movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Louis Bert Lindley, Jr. ... Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist, and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Clark in his film debut, The Unsuspected (1947) Frederick Leonard Clark (born March 19, 1914; died December 5, 1968) was an American film character actor. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... Popeye Doyle is a fictional New York City police detective portrayed by actor Gene Hackman in the movie The French Connection. ... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood crime film directed by William Friedkin. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... How to Commit Marriage is a 1969 comedy featuring Bob Hope and Jackie Gleason in their only movie together. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ...


More than a decade passed before Gleason had another hit film. Then, he turned up as vulgar sheriff Buford T. Justice in the popular Smokey and the Bandit series. (After Burt Reynolds declined to do the third film in the series, Gleason was signed up for a dual role as Smokey and the Bandit—but preview audiences are said to have been confused, and Jerry Reed's role from the first two movies was promptly beefed up to replace Gleason's footage as the Bandit and make up for Reynolds' absence.) Poster showing Jackie Gleason as Sheriff Buford T Justice Sheriff Buford T. Justice is the fictional character played by Jackie Gleason in the movies Smokey and the Bandit (1977), Smokey and the Bandit II (1980) and Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 (1983). ... Smokey and the Bandit is a 1977 movie starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Pat McCormick, Paul Williams, and Mike Henry. ... Burton Leon Reynolds, Jr. ... Smokey and the Bandit Part Three (often refered to by the shorter title Smokey and the Bandit 3) is the 1983 sequel to Smokey and the Bandit and Smokey and the Bandit II starring Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Paul Williams, Pat McCormick, Mike Henry and Colleen Camp. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ...


In the 1980s, Gleason earned positive reviews playing opposite Laurence Olivier in the HBO dramatic two-man special, Mr. Halpern and Mr. Johnson. He also delivered a critically acclaimed performance as an infirm but acerbic and somewhat Archie Bunker-like character in the Tom Hanks comedy-drama Nothing in Common (Gleason had turned down the All in the Family television series in the previous decade). Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM, (IPA: ; 22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Mr. ... Archibald Archie Bunker was a fictional character in the long-running and top-rated American television sitcom All in the Family and its spin-off Archie Bunkers Place. ... Thomas Jeffrey Tom Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American film actor, director, voice-over artist, writer and film producer. ... Nothing in Common is a 1986 comedy-drama film, directed by Garry Marshall and starring Tom Hanks and comedian Jackie Gleason, in his last film performance. ... For other uses, see All in the Family (disambiguation). ...


The Honeymoon wasn't over yet

Gleason did two Jackie Gleason Show specials for CBS after giving up his regular show in the 1970s, including "Honeymooners segments" and a Reginald Van Gleason III sketch in which the gregarious millionaire was shown as a clinical alcoholic. When the CBS deal expired, Gleason signed with NBC, but ideas reportedly came and went before he ended up doing a series of Honeymooners specials for ABC. Art Carney and Audrey Meadows reprised their original roles, but for no clear reason, Jane Kean was cast as Trixie instead of Joyce Randolph. Gleason helmed four of these ABC specials during the mid-1970s. Gleason and Art Carney also made a television movie, Izzy and Moe, which aired on CBS in 1985. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Jane Kean (b. ... Izzy (Isadore) Einstein (1880–1938) and Moe Smith (died 1961) were American policemen during the first years of the alcohol prohibition era (1920–1925). ...


In 1985, three decades after the Classic 39 began filming, Gleason revealed he had carefully preserved kinescopes of his live 1950s programs in a vault for future use—including Honeymooners sketches with Pert Kelton as Alice. These "Lost Episodes," as they came to be called, were initially previewed at the Museum of Television and Radio in New York City, then first aired on the Showtime cable network in 1985 and were later syndicated to local TV stations. They were also released on home video. The term kinescope originally referred to a type of early television picture tube. ... Pert Kelton (1907-1968) was an American vaudeville, movie, and television actress. ... The East Coast branch of The Museum of Television and Radio is located in the heart of Midtown Manhattan in New York City (USA). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the pay TV channel. ...


Some of these include earlier and arguably livelier and fresher versions of exactly the same plotlines later copied for the Classic 39 episodes. One of them, a Christmas holiday episode that was duplicated several years later with Audrey Meadows as Alice, delivered every one of Gleason's best-known characters—Ralph Kramden, the Poor Soul, Reginald Van Gleason, and Joe the Bartender—in and out of the Kramden apartment, the storyline hooking around a wild Christmas party being thrown up the block from the Kramdens' building by Reginald Van Gleason at Joe the Bartender's place. In one Honeymooners segment, Gleason as Kramden was forced to work on a night when he desperately wanted to accompany Alice to a party featuring Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey (who also hosted their own CBS program, Stage Show, produced by Gleason, from 1954 to 1956); typically, Kramden came up with an excuse to not drive his bus and go to the party, only to be discovered by his boss. Tommy Dorsey, in a publicity shot for The Big Apple Tommy Dorsey (November 19, 1905 – November 26, 1956) was an American jazz trombonist and bandleader in the Big Band era. ... James Jimmy Dorsey (February 29, 1904 - June 12, 1957) was a prominent jazz clarinetist, saxophonist and big band leader. ...


Death

Nothing in Common proved to be Gleason's final film role. A six-pack-a-day smoker for years, he was fighting colon cancer, liver cancer, and thrombosed hemorrhoids even while he worked on the film. He was hospitalized at one point in 1986–87, but checked himself out and died quietly at age 71 at his Inverrary home. In the same year, Miami Beach honored his contributions to the city and its tourism by renaming the Miami Beach Auditorium—where he had done his television show after moving to Florida—as the Jackie Gleason Theater of the Performing Arts. Jackie Gleason is interred in an outdoor mausoleum at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Cemetery in Miami, Florida. Below the graceful Roman columns, at the base, is the inscription, "And Away We Go." A smoker is: someone who smokes tobacco or cannabis a deep-sea hydrothermal vents a type of social event at universities a character from the anime One Piece a cooking apparatus that slow-cooks meat with hot, wood smoke See also smoking. ... Colorectal cancer, also called colon cancer or bowel cancer, includes cancerous growths in the colon, rectum and appendix. ... Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, also called hepatoma or hepatocarcinogenesis) is a primary malignancy (cancer) of the liver. ... Miami Beach is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ...


Tributes

Sign welcoming drivers to Brooklyn.
Sign welcoming drivers to Brooklyn.

On June 30, 1988, the Sunset Park Bus Depot in Brooklyn was renamed the Jackie Gleason Bus Depot in honor of the native Brooklynite. (Ralph Kramden worked for the fictitious Gotham Bus Company.) A statue of Gleason as Ralph in his bus driver's uniform was dedicated in August 2000 in New York City by the cable TV channel TV Land. The statue is located at 40th St. and 8th Ave., at the entrance of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey bus terminal. The inscription reads, "Ralph Kramden: New Yorker, Bus Driver, Dreamer," and it was featured briefly in the film World Trade Center. Another such statue stands at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame in North Hollywood, California, showing Gleason in his famous "And a-waay we go!" pose. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 876 KB) Summary Sign by the Brooklyn Bridge, welcoming drivers to Brooklyn. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 876 KB) Summary Sign by the Brooklyn Bridge, welcoming drivers to Brooklyn. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Sunset Park is a neighborhood in the southern Brooklyn section of Brooklyn, New York, USA. The neighborhood is located south of Park Slope and Windsor Terrace, separated by Green-Wood Cemetery and the Prospect Expressway/NY-27, while 65th Street and the Gowanus Expressway/I-278 mark the end of... An 1995 Orion V CNG bus inbound to Jackie Gleason Depot On June 30, 1988 the New York City Transit Authoritys Fifth Avenue Bus Depot in Brooklyn was renamed for native Brooklynite Jackie Gleason who played the character of bus driver Ralph Kramden on The Honeymooners. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... TV Land (originally Nick at Nites TV Land) is an American cable television network launched April 29, 1996. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... World Trade Center is a dramatic film based on the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center towers of New York City(NY), USA, released by Paramount Pictures on August 9, 2006. ... The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (ATAS) is the organization which awards the Emmys. ... North Hollywood is a district in the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles, California. ...


Local signs on the Brooklyn Bridge, which indicate to the driver that they are entering Brooklyn, have the Gleason phrase "How Sweet It Is!" as part of the sign. For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ...


A city park with racquetball and basketball courts (and a children's playground) near his home in Inverrary, Florida was named "Jackie Gleason Park."


A television movie called Gleason was aired by CBS on October 13, 2002, taking a deeper look into Gleason's life; it took liberties with some of the Gleason story, but featured his troubled home life, a side of Gleason few really saw. He had two daughters by his first wife (Gleason's daughter Linda is the mother of actor Jason Patric); they divorced, and Gleason endured a brief second marriage before finding a happy union with his third wife, June Taylor's sister Marilyn. The film also showed backstage scenes from his best-known work. Brad Garrett, from Everybody Loves Raymond, portrayed Gleason after Mark Addy had to drop out. Garrett was effectively made up to resemble Gleason in his prime. His height (6′8″, about eight inches taller than Gleason) created some logistical problems on the sets, which had to be specially made so that Garrett did not tower over everyone else. Also, cast members wore platform shoes when standing next to Garrett; the shoes can be seen in one shot during a Honeymooners sequence on Alice. is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Roger Ebert, Peter OToole, and Jason Patric at the 2004 Savannah Film Festival. ... Brad Garrett (born April 14, 1960) is an American television/voice actor and stand-up comedian. ... Everybody Loves Raymond is an Emmy Award-winning American television sitcom that originally ran on CBS from September 13, 1996 to May 16, 2005. ... Mark Addy (born January 14, 1964 in York, England) is a British actor. ...


In 2003, after an absence of more than thirty years, the color, musical versions of The Honeymooners from the 1960s Jackie Gleason Show in Miami Beach were returned to television over the Good Life TV (now AmericanLife TV) cable network. In 2005, a movie version of The Honeymooners appeared in theatres, with a twist: a primarily African-American cast, headed by Cedric the Entertainer. (There had been reports a few years earlier that Roseanne costar John Goodman would bring The Honeymooners to film, playing Ralph, but these plans never materialized.) This version, however, bore only a passing resemblance to Gleason's original series and was widely panned by critics. For the 2005 film, see The Honeymooners (film). ... Miami Beach is a city located in Miami-Dade County, Florida. ... Promotional poster for The Honeymooners The Honeymooners is a 2005 comedy film, directed by John Schultz. ... Cedric the Entertainer (born Cedric Antonio Kyles on April 24, 1964) is an American actor and comedian. ... Jackie Harris redirects here. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Goodman (disambiguation). ...


Gleason and UFOs

Gleason was very interested in reports of unidentified flying objects, and even had a house built in the shape of one. During the 1950s, he was a semiregular guest on the paranormal-themed overnight radio show hosted by John Nebel, and wrote the introduction to Donald Bain's biography of Nebel.[2] Like Nebel, Gleason generally seemed like a curious skeptic. According to respected UFO researcher Jerome Clark, UFO redirects here. ... Long John Nebel (1911-1978) (born John Zimmerman in Chicago, he adopted his radio name, Long John Nebel from the surname of his stepmother, Knebel) was a talk radio show host. ... Skepticism (Commonwealth spelling: Scepticism) can mean: Philosophical skepticism - a philosophical position in which people choose to critically examine whether the knowledge and perceptions that they have are actually true, and whether or not one can ever be said to have absolutely true knowledge; or Scientific skepticism - a scientific, or practical... Jerome Clark (1946 - ) is an American researcher and writer, specializing in unidentified flying objects and other anomalous phenomena; he is also a songwriter of some note. ...

"Jackie Gleason was indeed a UFO buff. He also had a keen interest in psychic phenomena. His views, while sympathetic, were also hardheaded, and he was not a credulous enthusiast."[3]

According to ufologist Timothy Good (in his books Alien Liaison and Alien Contact), after Gleason's death, his wife reported that one day in 1973, Gleason had come home extremely shaken. He confided to her that because of Gleason's interest in UFOs, U.S. President Richard Nixon, who was a friend of his, had arranged for him to view bodies of extraterrestrials at Homestead Air Force Base, Florida under conditions of extreme secrecy. Gleason had found the experience very troubling. Edgar Cayce (1877 – 1945) was one of the best-known American psychics of the 20th century and made many highly publicized predictions. ... Timothy Good is a leading British researcher and writer on UFOs, and a former professional violinist. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Homestead Air Force Base, located 22 miles SSW of Miami, Florida (25 29 31. ...


Gleason was an emphatic Republican and personal friend of U.S. President Richard M. Nixon, who had a vacation home near Gleason's in Florida. The two shared an interest in golfing and in the importance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. GOP redirects here. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ...


Work

Television

Stage productions

William Bendix as Chester A. Riley The Life of Riley, with William Bendix in the title role, was a popular radio situation comedy series of the 1940s that was adapted into a 1949 feature film and continued as a long-running television series during the 1950s. ... The Jackie Gleason Show was a popular television variety show that starred Jackie Gleason and ran in a variety of incarnations, from 1952 to 1970. ... The Jackie Gleason Show was a popular television variety show that starred Jackie Gleason and ran in a variety of incarnations, from 1952 to 1970. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Youre in the Picture was an American television game show that aired on CBS for only one true episode, on January 20, 1961 (the same day John F. Kennedy was sworn in as 35th President of the United States). ... Mr. ... Izzy (Isadore) Einstein (1880–1938) and Moe Smith (died 1961) were American policemen during the first years of the alcohol prohibition era (1920–1925). ... Jackie Gleason is at left in this Al Hirschfeld caricature used to promote Follow the Girls Advertisement for the West End production Follow the Girls is a musical with a book by Guy Bolton and Eddie Davis and music and lyrics by Dan Shapiro, Milton Pascal, and Phil Charig. ... Take Me Along Sam Shubert Theatre Opened: Thursday, October 22, 1959 Producer: David Merrick Director: Peter Glenville Music and Lyrics: Bob Merrill Book: Joseph Stein and Robert Russell Original NY production Musical based on Ah, Wilderness! Nat Miller - Walter Pidgeon Essie Miller - Una Merkel Art Miller - James Cresson Richard Miller...

Filmography

Navy Blues was the fourth album by Canadian rock band Sloan. ... Tramp, Tramp, Tramp is a 1926 film starring Harry Langdon and Joan Crawford. ... Larceny, Inc. ... Orchestra Wives was the second and last film to feature The Glenn Miller Orchestra. ... Springtime in the Rockies is a Technicolor musical comedy film released by Twentieth Century Fox in 1942. ... The Hustler is a 1961 American drama film. ... Gigot was an American motion picture released in 1962 by 20th Century Fox. ... Requiem for a Heavyweight was originally a 1956 teleplay written by Rod Serling and produced for the live television show Playhouse 90 in 1957. ... Papas Delicate Condition is a 1963 comedy film starring Jackie Gleason and Glynis Johns. ... Soldier in the Rain is a 1963 poignant drama about an overweight Army sergeant (Jackie Gleason) and a country bumpkin private (Steve McQueen in an extremely uncharacteristic and animated comedic performance as a pre-Gomer Pyle country bumpkin). ... Skidoo is the title of a 1968 comedy film, directed by Otto Preminger, and released by Paramount Pictures, with storyline by Doran William Cannon. ... How to Commit Marriage is a 1969 comedy featuring Bob Hope and Jackie Gleason in their only movie together. ... Smokey and the Bandit is a 1977 movie starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Pat McCormick, Paul Williams, and Mike Henry. ... Smokey and the Bandit II is a film released on August 15, 1980 in the United States, January 1, 1981 in Australia, January 22, 1981 in West Germany, January 30, 1981 in Sweden, February 7, 1981 in Norway, and March 27, 1981 in Finland. ... The Toy is a 1982 comedy film starring Richard Pryor, Jackie Gleason, Ned Beatty and Scott Schwartz. ... Smokey and the Bandit Part Three (often refered to by the shorter title Smokey and the Bandit 3) is the 1983 sequel to Smokey and the Bandit and Smokey and the Bandit II starring Jackie Gleason, Jerry Reed, Paul Williams, Pat McCormick, Mike Henry and Colleen Camp. ... Nothing in Common is a 1986 comedy-drama film, directed by Garry Marshall and starring Tom Hanks and comedian Jackie Gleason, in his last film performance. ...

Discography

  • Music for Lovers Only (1953)
  • Music, Martinis and Memories (1954)
  • Music to Make You Misty (1954)
  • Tawny (1954)
  • Lover's Rhapsody (1955)
  • And Awaaay We Go! (1955)
  • Romantic Jazz (1955)
  • Music to Remember Her (1955)
  • Lonesome Echo (1955)
  • Music to Change Her Mind (1956)
  • Night Winds (1956)
  • Merry Christmas (1956)
  • Music for the Love Hours (1957)
  • Velvet Brass (1957)
  • "Oooo!" (1957)
  • The Torch with the Blue Flame (1958)
  • Riff Jazz (1958)
  • Rebound (1959)
  • That Moment (1959)
  • Aphrodisia (1960)
  • Opiate d'Amour (1960)
  • Lazy Lively Lovely (1961)
  • The Gentle Touch (1961)
  • A Lover's Portfolio (1962)
  • Love, Embers and Flame (1962)
  • Champagne, Candlelight and Kisses (1963)
  • Movie Themes for Lovers Only (1963)
  • Today's Romantic Hits for Lovers Only (1963)
  • Today's Romantic Hits for Lovers Only, Vol. 2 (1964)
  • Last Dance for Lovers Only (1964)
  • Silk 'n' Brass (1965)
  • Music from Around the World for Lovers Only (1966)
  • How Sweet It Is for Lovers (1966)
  • A Taste of Brass for Lovers Only (1967)
  • 'Tis the Season (1967)
  • The Best of Jackie Gleason (1968)
  • Doublin' in Brass (1968)
  • White Christmas
  • All I Want For Christmas (1969)
  • The Best of Jackie Gleason, Vol. 2 (1969)
  • The Now Sound (1969)
  • Romeo and Juliet (1970)
  • Come Saturday Morning (1970)
  • Words of Love (1971)

Further reading

  • William A. Henry III, The Great One: The Life and Legend of Jackie Gleason (New York: Doubleday, 1992).
  • Robert Metz, CBS: Reflections in a Bloodshot Eye (New York, 1975).

References

  1. ^ Jackie Gleason Biography (1916-1987)
  2. ^ Bain, Donald, Long John Nebel: radio talk king, master salesman, and magnificent charlatan, New York: Macmillan, ISBN 0025059505
  3. ^ http://www.virtuallystrange.net/ufo/updates/2002/oct/m10-002.shtml

External links

Persondata
NAME Gleason, Jackie
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Gleason, Herbert John
SHORT DESCRIPTION comedian, actor, and musician
DATE OF BIRTH 1916-02-26
PLACE OF BIRTH Bushwick, Brooklyn, New York
DATE OF DEATH 1987-6-24
PLACE OF DEATH Lauderhill, Florida
For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... Bushwick is a neighborhood in the northeastern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... This article is about the state. ... Lauderhill is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Gleason, Jackie (1263 words)
Jackie Gleason must be counted among Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, and Red Skelton in the small group of creative comedy-variety stars who dominated, and to some degree invented, early television.
The Gleason style was utterly suited to 1950s comedy-variety: the vaudeville trappings, including a live audience; the emphasis on slapstick, constant close-ups, flout segues, splintered segments and so on.
Gleason repackaged the most popular feature of his show, The Honeymooners, into a 30-minute sitcom, while the second half of the hour was contracted to the Dorsey Brothers for a big-band musical program.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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