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Encyclopedia > Jack and the Beanstalk
"Fee-fi-fo-fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman."Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel
"Fee-fi-fo-fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman."
Illustration by Arthur Rackham from a 1918 English Fairy Tales, by Flora Annie Steel

Jack and the Beanstalk is an English fairy tale, closely associated with the tale of Jack the Giant Killer. It is known under a number of versions. Benjamin Tabart recorded the oldest known one in 1807, but Joseph Jacobs popularized it in English Fairy Tales (1890)[1]. Jacobs's version is most commonly reprinted today and is believed to more closely adhere to the oral versions than Tabart's, because it lacks the moralizing of that version.[2] The story was made into a play by Charles Ludlam. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (558x800, 108 KB) Summary c:Jack and the Beanstalk Giant - Project Gutenberg eText 17034 Fee-fi-fo-fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (558x800, 108 KB) Summary c:Jack and the Beanstalk Giant - Project Gutenberg eText 17034 Fee-fi-fo-fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman. ... An illustration from Alices Adventures in Wonderland Arthur Rackham (September 19, 1867 – September 6, 1939) was a prolific English book illustrator. ... Flora Annie Steel (April 2, 1847-1929) was an English writer. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... A fairy tale is a story, either told to children or as if told to children, concerning the adventures of mythical characters such as fairies, goblins, elves, trolls, giants, and others. ... Jack the Giant Killer is a fairy tale. ... Joseph Jacobs (1854, Australia - 1916) was a British literary historian. ... Charles Ludlam (April 12, 1943 in Floral Park, New York - May 28, 1987) was an American actor and playwright. ...

Contents

Plot synopsis

Jack was a poor boy whose lack of common sense often drove his widowed mother to despair. One day she sent him to the market to sell their last and only possession, a cow. But along the way, Jack met a stranger who offered to trade it for five "Magic fantasy magic beans." Thrilled at the prospect of owning magic beans, Jack made the deal without hesitation. Alas, his mother turned out to be less than thrilled when he arrived back home. She threw the beans straight out of the window and sent Jack to bed without dinner. Overnight however, the seeds grew into a gigantic beanstalk. It reached so far into the heavens, the top went completely out of sight. Eager as the young boy was, Jack immediately decided to climb the plant and arrived in a land high up in the clouds, the home of the Giant giant. When he broke into the giant's castle, the giant quickly sensed a human was near:

Fee! Fie! Foe! Fum!
I smell the blood of an Englishman.
Be he 'live, or be he dead,
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.

However, Jack was saved by the giant's wife, and as he escaped from the palace, he took some gold coins with him. Back home, the boy and his mother celebrated their newfound fortune. But their luck did not last, and Jack climbed the beanstalk once more. This time he stole a Golden hen which laid golden eggs. Again he was saved by the giant's wife. He went down the ladder and showed the chicken to his mother, and the two lived happily on the proceedings from the hen's eggs.


Eventually, Jack grew bored and resolved to climb the beanstalk a Rule of three time. This time, he stole a magical harp] that sang by itself. The instrument did not appreciate being stolen and called out to the giant for help. The giant chased Jack down the beanstalk, but luckily the boy got to the ground before the giant did. Jack immediately chopped it down with an axe. The giant fell to earth, hitting the ground so hard that it split, pulling the beanstalk down with him.


The origin of Jack and the Beanstalk is unknown, although the author was almost certainly British or German.[citation needed] The earliest printed edition which has survived is the 1807 book The History of Jack and the Bean-Stalk, printed by Benjamin Tabart, although the story was already in existence sometime before this, as a burlesque of the story entitled The Story of Jack Spriggins and the Enchanted Bean was included in the 1734 second edition of Round About Our Coal-Fire. Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... In literary criticism, the term burlesque is employed as a term in genre criticism, to describe any imitative work that derives humor from an incongruous contrast between style and subject. ... Events January 8 - Premiere of George Frideric Handels opera Ariodante at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. ...


In the usual version of the tale, the giant is unnamed, but many plays based on the story name him as Blunderbore; a giant of that name also appears in Jack the Giant-Killer. Jack the Giant Killer is a fairy tale. ...


The beanstalk is reminiscent of the ancient Saxon belief in a World tree connecting earth to heaven. In certain Indo-European religions there was a belief in a world tree, such as Yggdrasil, in Norse mythology, an Oak in Slavic mythology and in Hinduism, a banyan tree. ...


The giant's "Fee! Fie! Foe! Fum!" was included in William Shakespeare's King Lear.[3] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is based on the legend of King Lear, a legendary king of Britain, and is considered to be one of William Shakespeares greatest tragedies. ...


Variants

Other tales of this type include the Italian Thirteenth and the Greek How the Dragon was Tricked. Thirteenth is an Italian fairy tale collected by Thomas Frederick Crane in Italian Popular Tales. ... How the Dragon was Tricked is a Greek fairy tale collected by J. G. von Hahn in Griechtsche und Albanesische Marchen. ...


The Brothers Grimm drew analogies between this tale and the German The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs, where the devil's mother or grandmother acted much like the wife in this tale: a female figure protecting the child from the evil male figure.[4] For information about the other uses of the name, see Brothers Grimm (disambiguation). ... The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs is a German fairy tale collected by the Brothers Grimm, tale number 29. ...


The tale is unusual in that the hero, although grown, does not marry at the end of it but returns to his mother; this is found in few other tales, although some, such as some variants of Vasilissa the Beautiful, do feature it.[5] Ivan Bilibins illustration of the red rider from Vasilissa the Beautiful. ...


One of the many retellings of the tale appears in A Book of Giants and A Choice of Magic by Ruth Manning-Sanders. A Book of Giants is a 1963 anthology of 13 fairy tales from Europe that have been collected and retold by Ruth Manning-Sanders. ... A Choice of Magic is a 1971 anthology of 32 fairy tales from around the world that have been collected and retold by Ruth Manning-Sanders. ... Ruth Manning-Sanders (born 1895 in Swansea, Wales; died October 12, 1988, in Penzance, England) was a poet and author who was perhaps best known for her series of childrens books in which she collected and retold fairy tales from all over the world. ...


Controversies

The story portrays a hero unscrupulously hiding in a man's house, playing on his wife's sympathies in order to rob and finally murder the owner of the house. In Tabart's version, a fairy woman explains to Jack that the giant had robbed and killed his father, thus transforming the acts into justice.[6]


Jacobs dropped the justification on the grounds that it had not been in the version he had heard as a child, and because children knew that robbery and murder were wrong without being told so by a fairy tale.[7]


Many modern interpretations have followed Tabart and painted the giant as a villain, terrorizing smaller folk and often stealing items of value, so that Jack becomes a legitimate protagonist. For example, the 1952 film starring Abbott and Costello blames the giant for Jack's ill fortunes and impoverishment, as he has been stealing food and wealth from the smaller folk of the lands below his home, including the hen that lays golden eggs, which in this version originally belonged to Jack's family. In other versions it is implied that the giant had stolen the hen and the harp from Jack's father. And since Jack's father neither appears in the story nor is he mentioned, it is often speculated that the giant murdered him. And thus, Jack's killing the giant is not only self-defense, but also an act of divine vengeance. Theatrical Poster Jack & the Beanstalk is a 1952 family comedy starring Abbott and Costello (Bud Abbott and Lou Costello). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Psychoanalytical interpretation

In The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales, Freudian psychoanalyst Bruno Bettelheim contends that the story of Jack and the beanstalk symbolizes an adolescent male's "giving up relying on oral satisfaction. . . and replacing them with phallic satisfaction," declaring that Jack's climbing of the beanstalk "symbolizes not only the 'magic' power of the phallus to rise, but also a boy's feelings connected to masturbation" because it shows how the boy "fears that his desire to become sexually active amounts to stealing parental powers and prerogatives." Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Psychoanalysis is a family of psychological theories and methods based on the work of Sigmund Freud. ... Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was an Austrian-born American writer and child psychologist. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Woman masturbating, 1913 drawing by Gustav Klimt. ...


Film adaptations

Walt Disney made a short of the same name in 1922, and a separate version entitled Mickey and the Beanstalk in 1947 as part of Fun and Fancy Free. This adaptation of the story put Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and Goofy in the role of Jack. Mickey, Donald and Goofy live in a place called "Happy Valley" which is plagued by a severe drought, and they have nothing to eat except one loaf of bread. Mickey trades in the cow (which Donald was going to kill for food) for the magic beans. Donald throws the beans out the window in a fit of rage, and the beanstalk sprouts. In the magical kingdom, Mickey, Donald and Goofy help themselves to a sumptuous feast. This rouses the ire of the giant (named "Willy" in this version), who captures Donald and Goofy and locks them in a box with a singing golden harp, and it's up to Mickey to find the keys to unlock the box and rescue them. The story villainizes the giant by blaming Happy Valley's hard times on Willy's theft of the magic harp, whose song kept the land prosperous; unlike the harp of the original tale, this magic harp wants to be rescued from the giant, and the hapless heroes return her to her rightful place and Happy Valley to its former glory. This version of the fairy tale was narrated by Edgar Bergen. For the company founded by Disney, see The Walt Disney Company. ... Fun and Fancy Free (first released on September 27, 1947) is a feature film produced by Walt Disney Studios and released by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fun and Fancy Free (first released on September 27, 1947) is a feature film produced by Walt Disney and released by RKO Radio Pictures. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... Donald Duck is an animated cartoon and comic-book character from Walt Disney Productions. ... It has been suggested that Goofy holler be merged into this article or section. ... The harp is a stringed instrument which has the plane of its strings positioned perpendicular to the soundboard. ... Sam Bermans caricature of Charlie McCarthy and Edgar Bergen for 1947 NBC promotion book Edgar John Bergen (February 16, 1903 – September 30, 1978) was an American actor and radio performer, best known as a ventriloquist. ...


Warner Bros. adapted the story into three Merrie Melodies cartoons. Friz Freleng directed Jack-Wabbit and the Beanstalk (1943), Chuck Jones directed Beanstalk Bunny (1955), and Freleng directed Tweety and the Beanstalk (1957). Warner Bros. ... Merrie Melodies end title Merrie Melodies is the name of a series of animated cartoons distributed by Warner Bros. ... Isadore Friz Freleng (August 21, 1906[1]–May 26, 1995) was an animator, cartoonist, director, and producer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... Jack-Wabbit and the Beanstalk is a 1943 Warner Bros. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chuck Jones in 1976 Charles Martin Chuck Jones (September 21, 1912 – February 22, 2002) was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Tweety and the Beanstalk is a 1957 Warner Bros. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


Gisaburo Sugii directed a feature-length Japanese anime telling of the story of Jack and the Beanstalk in 1974, titled Jack to Mame no Ki. The film, a musical, was produced by Group TAC and released by Nippon Herald. The writers introduced a few new characters, including Jack's comic-relief dog, Crosby, and Margaret, a beautiful princess engaged to be married to the giant (named "Tulip" in this version) due to a spell being cast over her by the giant's mother (an evil witch). Jack, however, develops a crush on Margaret, and one of his aims in returning to the magic kingdom is to rescue her. The film was dubbed into English, with legendary voice talent Billie Lou Watt voicing Jack, and received a very limited run in U.S. theaters in 1976. It was later released on VHS (now out of print) and aired several times on HBO in the 1980s. However, it is now available on DVD with both English and Japanese dialogue. Gisaburō Sugii ) is an anime director and Nihonga artist born August 20, 1940 in Numazu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... Group TAC (株式会社グループ・タック Kabushiki Kaisha Gurūpu · Takku) is an animation and computer graphics studio located in Shibuya, Tokyo, Japan and founded in 1968. ... Billie Lou Watt (June 22, 1924 - September 7, 2001) was an actress in theater and television, including several voice acting roles for commercials and animated series. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is the premium television programming subsidiary of Time Warner. ...


Books

Crazy Jack by Donna Jo Napoli
Jack of Kinrowan by Charles de Lint
Jack and the Beanstalk by E. Nesbit, illustrated by Matt Tavares Donna Jo Napoli is an author of childrens and young adult books, as well as a prominent linguist with work in syntax, phonetics, phonology, morphology, historical and comparative linguistics, Romance studies, structure of Japanese, structure of American Sign Language, poetics, writing for ESL students, and mathematical and linguistic analysis...


Other Media

In Edward Eager's book Knight's Castle, through the use of magic a modern boy named Jack is able to enter a toy castle with his sister and cousins. When he encounters the inhabitants (his toy knight figurine and the girls' dolls who have come to life), upon learning his name they draw back in terror and ask "Not the Giant Killer?" This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Edward Eager attended Harvard University, was a childhood fan of L. Frank Baums Oz series, and started writing childrens books when he could not find stories he wanted to read to his own young son. ... A teddy bear A toy is an object used in play. ... Pierrefonds Castle, France. ...


The story is the basis of the similarly titled traditional British Pantomime, wherein the Giant is certainly a villain, Jack's mother the Dame and Jack the Principle Boy. The Christmas Pantomime colour lithograph bookcover, 1890 Pantomime (informally, panto) refers to a theatrical genre, traditionally found in Great Britain, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and Ireland, which is usually performed around the Christmas and New Year holiday season. ...


Jack of Jack and the Beanstalk is the protagonist of the comic book Jack of Fables, a spin-off of Fables which also features other elements from the story such as giant beanstalks and giants living in the clouds. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Jack of Fables is a spin off of the comic Fables. ... Fables is a Vertigo comic book series created and written by Bill Willingham. ...


DI Jack Spratt of the Nursery Crimes Division from the book The Big Over Easy by Jasper Fforde feels a strange impulse to climb the giant beanstalk that was grown in his mother's yard after she threw out the magic beans he had traded for her Stubbs painting of a cow. He is also thought to be a giant killer though out of the four only one was technically a giant, the others were just very tall. All the killings were in self-defense. The Big Over Easy is a novel written by Jasper Fforde and published in 2005. ... Jasper Fforde (born in London on 11 January 1961) is a novelist and aviator living in Wales. ... A self portrait by George Stubbs George Stubbs (born in Liverpool on August 25, 1724 – died in London July 10, 1806) was a British painter, best known for his paintings of horses. ...


Roald Dahl rewrote the story in a more modern and gruesome way in his book Revolting Rhymes (1982). The story of Jack and the Beanstalk is also featured in Dahl's The BFG, in which the evil giants are all afraid of the "giant-killer" Jack, who is said to kill giants with his fearsome beanstalk. Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (13 September 1916 – 23 November 1990) was a Welsh novelist, short story author and screenwriter of Norwegian parentage, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Revolting Rhymes book cover Revolting Rhymes is a collection of Roald Dahl poems that re-interpret popular fairy tales. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Image:BfgCover. ...


In the Crash Tag Team Racing game, a track is named " Track and the Beanstalk ". Crash Tag Team Racing, released in Japan as Crash Bandicoot: Gatchanko World ) is a racing game for three of the four sixth generation video game consoles and the PlayStation Portable. ...


Peter Combe rewrote the story in an upbeat song ('80s '90s?) Peter Combe was a popular Australian childrens musical performer in the 1980s and 1990s. ...


An episode of the BBC television series The Big Knights retold the story with the show's human protagonists as the "giants" to a race of tiny people living in their garden. The British Broadcasting Company Ltd was a British commercial company formed on October 18, 1922 by British and American electrical companies doing business in the United Kingdom. ... The Big Knights was an animated television programme on BBC1. ...


An episode of The Super Mario Bros. Super Show, titled "Mario and the Beanstalk", does a retelling with Bowser as the giant (no explanation as to how he becomes a giant). Mario and the Beanstalk is the seventh animated episode of As the title suggests, it is an adaptation of the fable Jack and the Beanstalk. ... Bowser may mean: Bowser, British Columbia, an unincorporated community on Vancouver Island Bowser and Blue Bowser and Blitz from King Bowser, a Nintendo character The above characters enhanced form, Giga Bowser The above characters youngest apparent son, Bowser, Jr. ...


Garfield and Friends parodied the story with a U.S. Acres segment titled "Jack II: The Rest of the Story". After Orson reads the original story to them, Booker, Sheldon, Roy, and Wade write up a satirical sequel patching up plot holes they noticed. Garfield and Friends is an American animated television series based on the popular comic strip Garfield by Jim Davis. ... U.S. Acres (known as Orsons Farm outside the United States) is a comic strip that ran from 1986 to 1989 created by Jim Davis, author of the popular comic strip Garfield. ...


In the Magic School Bus episode "Gets Planted", the class put on a school production of Jack and the Beanstalk, Phoebe starring as the beanstalk after Ms. Frizzle turned her into a bean plant. The Magic School Bus is a series of books intended to teach scientific concepts to children. ... Valerie Felicity Frizzle is a fictional character in The Magic School Bus and Ms. ...


An episode of The Goodies, entitled "The Goodies and the Beanstalk" is a retelling of the tale, containing a spoof of the game show It's a Knockout and Tim, Graeme and Bill's own rendition of the song "Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?" There are also geese and hens that lay gold eggs and even gold bars, and the giant turns out to be only the same size as the Goodies! This article discusses the Goodies trio and the origins of their comedy TV series For information about the television series, see The Goodies (TV series) The Goodies are a trio of British comedians (Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-Taylor and Bill Oddie), who created, wrote, and starred in a surreal British... The Goodies and the Beanstalk is an episode of the British comedy television series The Goodies. ... Its a Knockout was a popular British television gameshow that ran from 1966 to 1982, featuring teams in outlandish costumes (often large latex suits) competing to complete bizarre tasks in absurd games. ...


Stephen Sondheim's musical Into the Woods features Jack along with several other fairy-tale characters. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Into the Woods is an award-winning musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ...


References

  1. ^ Joseph Jacobs, "Jack and the Beanstalk", English Fairy Tales
  2. ^ Maria Tatar, p 132, The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales, ISBN 0-393-05163-3
  3. ^ Maria Tatar, p 136, The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales, ISBN 0-393-05163-3
  4. ^ Jacob and Wilheim Grimm, Grimm's Fairy Tales, "The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs"
  5. ^ Maria Tatar, Off with Their Heads! p. 199 ISBN 0-691-06943-3
  6. ^ Maria Tatar, Off with Their Heads! p. 198 ISBN 0-691-06943-3
  7. ^ Joseph Jacobs, English Fairy Tales, Notes to "Jack and the Beanstalk"

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jack and the Beanstalk (5702 words)
Jack and his mother were very poor and lived in a small shack, but Jack loved his mother and his mother loved him and the warmth of their affection for each other made the shack seem to them sometimes a little nicer than it was.
Jack went outside and covered the seeds with soil, but whether he was burying that last dashed hope, or instead tending his own hurt by ensuring the beans had a chance to grow and produce the hopeful life of a vine out of their dormant state, even he didn't know.
Jack climbed out of the oven, softly tip-toed to where the hen was, and picking her up he fled the castle as fast as he could and ran to the beanstalk which he descended as quickly as he dared for he had only one hand free, the hen tucked under his other arm.
SurLaLune Fairy Tales: The Annotated Jack and the Beanstalk (2402 words)
So Jack went upstairs to his little room in the attic, and sad and sorry he was, to be sure, as much for his mother’s sake, as for the loss of his supper.
Jack ran as fast as he could, and the ogre came rushing after, and would soon have caught him only Jack had a start and dodged him a bit and knew where he was going.
When he got to the beanstalk the ogre was not more than twenty yards away when suddenly he saw Jack disappear like, and when he came to the end of the road he saw Jack underneath climbing down for dear life.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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