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Encyclopedia > Jack Youngblood
Jack Youngblood
Youngblood giving HOF acceptance speech.
Position(s):
Defensive End
Jersey #(s):
85
Born: January 26, 1950 (1950-01-26) (age 57)
Flag of Florida Jacksonville, Florida
Career Information
Year(s): 1971-1984
NFL Draft: 1971 / Round: 1 / Pick: 20
College: Florida
Professional Teams
Career Stats
Sacks     151.5
Games     202
Safeties     2
Stats at NFL.com
Career Highlights and Awards

Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams Records: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 368 × 503 pixelsFull resolution (368 × 503 pixel, file size: 108 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I personnally took this photo I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A diagram showing typical football positions In American football, each team has 11 players on the field at one time. ... Defensive end is the name of a defensive position in the sport of American football. ... In team sports, the squad number, jersey number, sweater number, or uniform number is the number worn on a players outfit. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Florida. ... “Jacksonville” redirects here. ... In an organised sports league, a season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session. ... The 1971 NFL season was the 52nd regular season of the National Football League. ... The 1984 NFL season was the 65th regular season of the National Football League. ... The NFL Draft (officially the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting[1]) is an annual sports draft in which National Football League (NFL) teams take turns, through seven rounds[2], selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players. ... The 1971 NFL Draft was held on January 28-29, 1971 // Round One Hall of Famers John Riggins, RB, Kansas - taken 1st round, 6th overall by the New York Jets. ... This is a list of athletic conferences of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ... The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... The St. ... The 1971 NFL season was the 52nd regular season of the National Football League. ... The 1984 NFL season was the 65th regular season of the National Football League. ... Vanderbilt Quarterback Jay Cutler is sacked by U.S. Naval Academy Midshipman 2nd Class Jeremy Chase. ... A safety or safety touch, is a type of score in American football and Canadian football where a defensive team gains two points when the offensive team is tackled or loses possession in their own end zone. ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... The 1974 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 20, 1974 at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. ... The 1975 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 20, 1975 at Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. ... The 1976 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 26, 1976 at Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The 1977 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 17, 1977 at Kingdome in Seattle, Washington. ... The 1978 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 23, 1978 at Tampa Stadium in Tampa Bay, Florida. ... The 1979 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 29, 1979 at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. ... The 1980 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl was played on January 27, 1980 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. ... This is a list of all NFL players who have had outstanding performances throughout the 1970s and have been compiled onto this fantasy group. ... From 1955 - 1996 The United Press International has given two annual Rookie of the Year Awards to NFL-NFC American football players and AFL-AFC american football players. ... City St. ... City St. ... The Gator Football Ring of Honor is a ring on the displayed on the North Endzone façade of Ben Hill Griffin Stadium displaying the names of the players and coaches who have contributed greatly to the Florida Gators football team. ... City St. ...

  • 201 Consecutive Games Played
  • 8.5 Career Sacks in the Playoffs
  • 17 Playoff Starts
  • 2 Career safeties (tied)
  • 2nd Most Career Sacks with 151.5
  • 2nd most Career Blocked Kicks with 8
Pro Football Hall of Fame
College Hall of Fame

Herbert Jackson Youngblood III (born January 26, 1950 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a former American football defensive end who played for the Los Angeles Rams. Inducted to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001, he was just the third native Floridian to be elected. Son of Herbert J. and Kay Youngblood, he has two sisters, Paula and Lynn. His wife is Barbara and has a son, Robert (who played soccer at University of West Florida).[1] He resides in Orlando, Florida and enjoys sharing his home with the family pets——a 19-year old golden retriever named Jake, and rescued cats Mickey and Scallie. is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Jacksonville” redirects here. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Defensive end is the name of a defensive position in the sport of American football. ... City St. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... This article is about the school. ... Nickname: Location in Orange County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange Government  - Mayor Buddy Dyer (D) Area  - City 101 sq mi (261. ...

Contents

Los Angeles Rams 1971-84

Youngblood was drafted from the University of Florida by the Rams in the first round (20th pick overall) of the 1971 NFL Draft; he was chosen as an All-Pro five times (1974, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979) during his 14 years with the team and was All-NFC seven times. In his rookie season, 1971, he was named All-Rookie by Football Digest. He is noted for his unique combination of strength (bench pressed 450 pounds), speed (4.65 in the 40-yard dash),[2] and quickness(1.6 in the 10 yard-dash).[3] The University of Florida (Florida, UFL, or UF) is a public land-grant, research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... The NFL Draft (officially the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting[1]) is an annual sports draft in which National Football League (NFL) teams take turns, through seven rounds[2], selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players. ... Football Digest is a sports magazine for fans interested in professional football, with in-depth coverage of the National Football League. ...


Named by Yahoo writer Charles Robinson as the best-ever player taken in the 20th slot of the 1st round of the NFL draft[4] calling Youngblood "the essence of today's defensive end——a mixture of strength, toughness and speed that few ends boasted in the 1970s." Yahoo! - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


In addition to his 5 All-Pro season and 7 All-NFC seasons, Youngblood was second-team All-Pro in 1973, 1977, and 1980 and was second-team All-NFC in 1973 and 1984 and in addition to his seven pro bowls he was a first alternate in 1984, his final season. Was voted the Rams Outstanding Defensive Linemen by the Ram's Alumni in 1973, 1975-76, 1978-81, and 1983-84.


He is most famous for playing the entire 1979-1980 playoffs (including the 1980 Super Bowl) with a fractured left fibula.[5] He also played in the 1980 Pro Bowl with the injured leg, a week after the Super Bowl. In the playoffs Youngblood sacked Roger Staubach near the sideline in the waning moments of the divisional playoff game versus the Dallas Cowboys[6]. Playing with the cracked leg was noted by Sports Illustrated in their Top 10 list of athletes playing in pain.[7] For that and other achievements Jack was dubbed the "John Wayne of football" by Jim Hanifan[8] and echoed by Hall of Fame coach, John Madden.[9] Hurbert Mizell of the St. Petersburg Times was more terse writing that, "Jack Youngblood of the Rams was something beyond heroic. Bordering on maniacal"[10]. In 2004 Sports Illustrated listed Youngblood's playing with the fractured fibula on its Top ten list of athletes playing in pain.[11] Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... For other uses see fibula (disambiguation) The fibula or calf bone is a bone placed on the lateral side of the tibia, with which it is connected above and below. ... In professional American football, the Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). ... Roger Thomas Staubach (born February 5, 1942 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a businessman, Heisman Trophy winner and former American professional football player where he was the quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys for most of the 1970s during their reign as Americas Team. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division...


Despite that and numerous other injuries, Youngblood played in 201 consecutive games, a Rams team record; and only missed 1 game in his 14 year NFL career. He played in seven straight Pro Bowls, 5 NFC Championships, and one Super Bowl. He was also the Rams defensive captain from 1977 through 1984 and was voted the Dan Reeves award 3 times, which is awarded to the team's MVP. He had an uncredited 151.5 career sacks and led the Rams in sacks nine times despite playing first in assistant Coach Ray Malavasi's stop-the-run-first defensive scheme and then in his final two seasons in Defensive Coordinator Fritz Shurmer's 3-4 two-gap scheme which limited some pass rush opportunities to make sure the opponent's running game was handled. [12] The Pro Bowl is the National Football Leagues All-Star game. ... Dan Reeves (born January 19, 1944) is a former American football player and head coach. ... In American sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ...


In a December, 1975, 35-23 playoff win over the St. Louis Cardinals, Youngblood executed one of the all-time outstanding plays by a Rams defender. He pass-rushed Hall of Famer Dan Dierdorf off the line, penetrated, then tipped and intercepted a pass by Jim Hart, returning the interception 47 yards for a touchdown. Later in the game, Jack forced a fumble that was recovered by Fred Dryer, blocked an extra point attempt and sacked Hart to stop a Cardinal drive. Daniel Lee Dierdorf (born June 29, 1949) is a former American football player and current television sportscaster. ... James Warren Hart (born April 29, 1944 in Evanston, Illinois) was an American football quarterback in the NFL for the St. ... John Frederick Fred Dryer (born July 6, 1946 in Hawthorne, California), is the son of the late Charles F. Dryer and Genevieve Nell Clark and is an American actor and former football defensive end in the NFL. He is also known for co-starring in 1980s television show Hunter with...


His streak of consecutive games played ended in week 15 of the 1984 season, when Youngblood had to sit out his first football game since being a collegiate player in 1970. He had suffered a ruptured disc in his lower back a week earlier. Despite the injury, he returned for the season finale against the 49ers and the playoffs. He attributed his ability to play to a series of back adjustments that allowed him more freedom of movement, even though team doctors told Jack he was out for the season and needed surgery[13]. He was voted the Rams' recipient of the 1984 Ed Block Courage Award[14] by "representing everything that is positive about professional football and serving as an inspiration in their locker rooms being a positive role model in his communities". The award also has an overcoming injury and/or tragedy aspect.


Youngblood was also honored as the NFC Defensive Player of the Year by United Press International in 1975 and Pro Football Weekly named Youngblood the NFL defensive lineman of the year. He repeated his NFC Defensive Player of the Year Award in 1976. Youngblood was also on the 1984 All-Madden team and was chosen by John Madden as the player who most exemplified the All-Madden team.[15] From 1955 - 1996 The United Press International has given two annual Rookie of the Year Awards to NFL-NFC American football players and AFL-AFC american football players. ... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ... Pro Football Weekly (sometimes shortened to PFW) is a popular American sports magazine, founded in 1967, that covers the National Football League. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Madden. ...


In 1997 Madden also selected Youngblood to his All-time Super Bowl team. In 2000, Sports Illustrated ranked Youngblood as #4 in its list of the greatest pass rushers of all-time, behind only Deacon Jones, Reggie White and Lawrence Taylor.[16] Named by writer Roy Williams of the Philadelphia Sun as one of the top 5 defensive ends of all time[17] The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... David D. Deacon Jones (born December 9, 1938) nicknamed Secretary of Defense is an American athlete and actor. ... Reginald Howard Reggie White (December 19, 1961 – December 26, 2004) was a professional American football player. ... Lawrence Julius Taylor (born February 4, 1959, in Williamsburg, Virginia), commonly referred to as LT, is a retired Hall of Fame American football player. ...


"Jack Youngblood was a terror. He had a lot of heart; he played hard, he played tough, and he was as quick as a hiccup. He was on the small side but he had great pass rush moves, just a hellacious player."[18]
Hall of Fame tackle Art Shell

During his career, Jack won the respect of both teammates and opponents. Dan Dierdorf, a Hall of Fame tackle, said that Youngblood was "by far the toughest opponent I faced in my career",[19] a thought echoed by Viking Hall of Fame tackle Ron Yary.[20] Other NFL greats such as Hall of Fame tackles Bob Brown[21] and Rayfield Wright, [22] rank Jack among the top players they faced.[23]. Arthur Art Shell (born November 26, 1946 in Charleston, South Carolina, USA) is a former American football player in the National Football League (NFL) and two-time former head coach of the Oakland Raiders. ... Daniel Lee Dierdorf (born June 29, 1949) is a former American football player and current television sportscaster. ... Anthony Ronald Ron Yary (born July 16, 1946) in Chicago, IL, and was a former professional American football player and member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ... For other uses, see Bob Brown (disambiguation). ... Rayfield Wright (born in August 23, 1945 in Griffin, Georgia) is a former American football player for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. ...


Opposing quarterbacks also ranked Youngblood highly, with two of them, Fran Tarkenton and Roger Staubach, stating that Jack was the top defensive lineman they faced in their careers.[24] Hall of Fame defensive tackle Merlin Olsen paid Youngblood the highest compliment by stating that Jack was the "perfect defensive end".[25] Francis Asbury Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940) is a former American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive. ... Roger Thomas Staubach (born February 5, 1942 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a businessman, Heisman Trophy winner and former American professional football player where he was the quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys for most of the 1970s during their reign as Americas Team. ... Merlin Jay Olsen (born September 15, 1940) is an American former National Football League player and actor. ...


Running backs, too entered the chorus, “I remember bouncing off Jack Youngblood and it was just like a pillar of strength over there on the defense,” Rocky Bleier recalled. “Jack played hurt, he played tough, and he was a great opponent.”[26] Robert Rocky Bleier (born March 5, 1946 in Appleton, Wisconsin, Wisconsin) is a former National Football League fullback who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1968 and from 1971 to 1980. ...


Youngblood's style of play and ability to play hurt brought many notations in NFL lore, in 1996 NFL Films named him to their list of the 100 Toughest Players of All-Time and in 2006 NFL writer Neil Reynolds featured Youngblood in his 2006 book "Pain Gang"[27] in which Reynolds names Youngblood as one of the 50 Toughest players of All-Time. In between, Blitz magazine, The Sporting News, Football Digest, and Sport magazine along with others have singled Youngblood out as one of the toughest and/or one of the hardest hitting players of all-time. Is currently featured on New York Jets TV as an All-time tough guy along with players like Dick Butkus, Jack Lambert and others.[28] City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Richard Marvin Butkus (born December 9, 1942) is a former American football player, widely regarded as the greatest linebacker of his generation and one of the best football players of all time. ... John Harold Lambert (July 8, 1952, Mantua, Ohio), considered to be one of the greatest NFL linebackers in history, played football with Kent State, winning two-year All-Mid American Conference linebacker honors. ...


To all the praise, the ever humble Youngblood responded, "I don't consider myself tough, I consider myself a nut for some of the things I did".[29] Youngblood concluded, "I wasn’t the biggest guy, I certainly wasn’t the strongest and I wasn’t the fastest either. But I think one of my biggest assets was that I had an undeniable determination to be the best that has ever put his hand on the ground, I had a genuine desire to be great."[30]


When Jack retired in August, 1985, he made this statement at the press conference, "Pride, digity, respect and honor is how I want my career to be remembered". Youngblood repeated the those sentiments in the HOF acceptance speech by stating, "I didn't sack the quarterback every time I rushed the passer. I didn't make every tackle for a loss. I guess——no one could. But, it wasn't because I didn't have the passion to, the desire to. I hope that that showed."[31]


He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2001 along with Ron Yary, Lynn Swann, Jackie Slater, Mike Munchak, Marv Levy, and Nick Buoniconti.[32] Later that year He was honored in the St. Louis Rams Ring of Fame, along with Jackie Slater[33] The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthony Ronald Ron Yary (born July 16, 1946) in Chicago, IL, and was a former professional American football player and member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... Jackie Ray Slater (born May 27, 1954, Jackson, Mississippi) is a former American Football Offensive Tackle who played his entire career with the Los Angeles Rams franchise. ... Michael Anthony Munchak (born March 6, 1960, Scranton, Pennsylvania) is a former American Football guard who played for the Houston Oilers. ... Marvin Daniel Levy (born August 3, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois) is currently the General Manager and Vice President of Football Operations for the Buffalo Bills. ... Nicholas Anthony Buoniconti is a former AFL and NFL Hall of Fame linebacker, who played for the Boston Patriots and Miami Dolphins. ... City St. ...


Was the Rams' NFLPA representative from 1975-78. Served on the NFLPA executive committee from 1975 to 1977. Was voted Orange County, CA, Sportsman of the Year in 1983 and was roasted by former teammates Deacon Jones, Merlin Olsen, Pat Haden, and his coach John Robinson as part of the honor. Member of the Los Angeles Rams 50th Anniversary Team, 1985, and the Ram All-Century Team chosen after the 1999 season. The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, is the labor union of players in footballs National Football League. ... Orange County, California is a major region in the Greater Los Angeles Area of Southern California. ... David D. Deacon Jones (born December 9, 1938) nicknamed Secretary of Defense is an American athlete and actor. ... Merlin Jay Olsen (born September 15, 1940) is an American former National Football League player and actor. ... Pat Haden (born January 23, 1953 in Westbury, New York) played quarterback for the National Football League Los Angeles Rams from 1976 to 1981. ... Several notable individuals have been named John Robinson: Bishop John Robinson, persons named John Robinson who also happened to be Bishops John Robinson (1576-1625), organized Mayflower voyage John Robinson (1615-1680), English MP John Robinson (1650-1723), English diplomat; later Bishop of Bristol from 1710 and Lord Privy Seal...


University of Florida 1967-71

At the University of Florida Jack earned a B.S. degree in Finance, was a member of ATO (Alpha Tau Omega), and a three-year varsity letterman. In 1970 we was voted All-American[34] , while leading team with 10 sacks. Additionally, he was a finalist for the Outland Trophy following the 1970 campaign[35] and was voted the 1970 SEC Lineman of the year. Was also voted as the state of Florida Outstanding Collegiate football player for 1970. Still regarded as the best defensive lineman in Gator history as well as one of the top five players in The University of Florida's football program.[36] ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... Football Writers Association logo The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best United States college football interior lineman. ...


Time magazine chose him for their 1970 All-America Team and wrote, "Deceptively fast for his size, he reads screens and swing passes so adroitly that he intimidates quarterbacks by his mere presence." [37] His coach Doug Dickey told The Sporting News, "He is difficult to move when you run at him, has the speed an agility to pursue down the line of scrimmige, and the strength and quickness to rush the passer". One experienced Florida writer still agrees stating, "Youngblood has to be viewed as one of the top five Gators ever. A phenomenal pass rusher". [38] Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ...

"My sophomore year, we were in Tallahassee and I ran a reverse very early in the game, and I remember being nailed by Jack Youngblood. I remember watching the ball being pitched to me and thinking, when the ball was about halfway, that it was kind of race to see whether he was going to get to the ball first or me. He was foaming at the mouth. I still have nightmares from the hit he gave me." [39]
Florida State WR Barry Smith

Named to the SEC All-Conference team in 1970, which ended three winning seasons while at Florida. Entered the school at 195 pounds and put on 10 pounds a year through weight-lifting, finishing around 245 pounds. Was the 1970 recipient of the Forrest K. (Fergie) Ferguson Award, which goes the senior who displays outstanding leadership, character, and courage[40]. The Forrest K. (Fergie) Ferguson Award is given by the University of Florida football coaches to the senior on the team that displays leadership, character, and courage. ...


His performance in the Florida/Georgia (UGA) rivalry earned him a spot in the Florida-Georgia game Hall of Fame as well. In 1970 Younbglood pulled off one of the greatest plays in Florida history. At the time of the play Florida trailed Georgia, 17-10, and the Georgia offense had driven to Florida's 1-yard line. Youngblood stopped a Georgia running back short of the goal line and forced him to fumble and then recovered the loose ball beginning a rally that gained a come-from-behind 24-17 victory in what is known as "The World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party".[41] The Worlds Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party is a common name for the annual college football game between the University of Florida Gators and the University of Georgia Bulldogs, one of the great rivalries in college football; it is officially known as the Georgia-Florida/Florida-Georgia Game (switching every...


In 1969 Jack was part of a 9-1-1 Gator team that upset the University of Tennessee Volunteers in the Gator Bowl in Ray Graves's final game as coach at Florida. Jack first gained national notice after an October 4, 1969, 5-sack performance 21-6 win versus instate rival Florida State University. Set school record for sacks (14) in 1969 and finished his Gator career with 29 quarterback sacks. The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... For the stadium, see Gator Bowl Stadium. ... Ray Graves (born December 31, 1918) a native of Knoxville, Tennessee and an alumnus of the University of Tennessee, was a former head coach of the University of Florida football team. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[8] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ...


As a sophomore in 1968, Youngblood played defensive end and defensive tackle while also handling the kicking chores for the Gators, kicking a career-long 42-yard field goal to provide the three point winning margin in his first collegiate game which was against the Air Force Academy. Air Force Academy can refer to. ...


After his college career Youngblood played in the Senior Bowl in Mobile, AL, and recorded 4 sacks [42]. He was named the Outstanding Lineman of the Game and in 1989 was voted into the Senior Bowl Hall of Fame.[43] Other notable members of the Senior Bowl Hall of Fame include Joe Greene, Joe Namath, Michael Strahan, Franco Harris. Youngblood also played the College All-Star game in Chicago the following summer before reporting to the Rams in Canton, Ohio, for the Hall of Fame game. Additionally he was voted a member of the 50th Anniversary Senior Bowl All-Time Team in 1999.[44] The Senior Bowl is an all-star college football exhibition game usually played either at or towards the end of the college football season in January. ... Charles Edward Greene, known as Mean Joe Greene (born September 24, 1946), is a former all-pro American football defensive tackle who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the NFL. Throughout the early 1970s he quickly developed into the most dominant defensive player the NFL had ever seen. ... Joseph William Namath (born May 31, 1943), also known as Broadway Joe, was an American football Hall of Fame quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League during the 1960s and 1970s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Franco Harris (b. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Senior Bowl is an all-star college football exhibition game usually played either at or towards the end of the college football season in January. ...


For his achievements he was selected to the All-Time SEC team in 1983. He was also voted to the All-SEC Quarter-Century Team (1950-74) as well as being voted to the 25-year All-SEC teams which spanned from the 1961 through the 1985 seasons[45]. He was also voted best Defensive end in SEC for the years 1960-85.[46] Additionally, he was voted to the SEC All-Decade team for the 1970s.[47]


Named to the All-Time Florida Gator teams both in 1983 and in 1999 as well as the 100-year Anniversary Gator Team in 2006. [48] Youngblood is regarded as best defensive end in Gator history despite producing NFL stars like Trace Armstrong, Kevin Carter, Jevon Kearse, and Alex Brown.[49] Raymond Lester Armstrong, III (born October 5, 1965 in Bethesda, Maryland) is a former American Football defensive End who was a first-round draft pick in 1989. ... Jevon Kearse (born September 3, 1976, in Fort Myers, Florida) is an American football player who currently plays Defensive end for the Philadelphia Eagles of the NFL. Due to his rare athleticism and threatening style of play, he is known throughout the league as “The Freak”. His cousin, Phillip Buchanon... Alex Brown may refer to: Alex Brown (rugby player) (born 1979), rugby union player Alex Brown (football player) (born 1979), American football player Alex Brown (musician) Alex Brown (Worlds Greatest), VS Technical Player Alex Brown (Football Player) (born 1989), Bushy FC Midfielder Alex Brown (Famous American Banker)Self Made...


Jack received college football's highest honor by being elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992 along with collegiate greats Earl Banks, Ron Johnson, Jim Lynch, Lou Michaels, Larry Morris, Craig Morton, Bob Odell, Lloyd Phillips, John Ralston, Howard Twilley, Jim Weatherall, Art Weiner. College Football Hall of Fame front. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Lou Michaels was an American football player who was a standout defensive lineman for the University of Kentucky Wildcats and later for the Baltimore Colts of the National Football League. ... Lawrence Morris (born December 10, 1933 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a retired American football linebacker. ... Craig Morton Larry Craig Morton (born February 5, 1943) was a quarterback in the National Football League for three teams: the Dallas Cowboys, the New York Giants and the Denver Broncos. ... John Ralston, a graduate of the University of California, played linebacker on two Cal Rose Bowl teams before earning his physical education Academic degree in 1951. ... Howard James Twilley, (born December 25, 1943 in Houston, Texas, USA), is a former professional American football wide receiver with the Miami Dolphins. ...


In 1995 Jack was voted one of the SEC Football Legends and was presented at the SEC championship game in Atlanta along with Harry Gilmer, Alabama; Joe Ferguson, Arkansas; Tucker Frederickson, Auburn; Fran Tarkenton, Georgia; Derrick Ramsey, Kentucky; Dalton Hilliard, LSU; Barney Poole, Ole Miss; Jimmy Webb, Miss. State; Alex Hawkins, South Carolina; Doug Atkins, Tennessee; and Bob Asher, Vanderbilt.[50] SEC Football legends logo SEC Football Legends is an annual award program of the Southeastern Conference designed to honor outstanding former college football players from each of the conferences twelve member institutions. ... Joe Ferguson is a former professional quarterback in the National Football League. ... Ivan Charles Tucker Frederickson (born January 12, 1943 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida) was a running back for the New York Giants of the NFL. Frederickson attended Auburn University, and was a two-way player with the Tigers football team (averaging 4. ... Francis Asbury Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940) is a former American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive. ... Derrick Ramsey (born December 23, 1956 in Hastings, Florida) is a former professional American football player who played tight end for five seasons for the Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, New England Patriots, and Detroit Lions. ... Dalton Hilliard (born April 5, 1964 in Patterson, Louisiana) was an American football running back for the New Orleans Saints of the NFL. He played for the NFC in the 1989 Pro Bowl. ... Douglas Leon Atkins (Born May 8, 1930, in Humboldt, Tennessee) is a former American Football defensive end who played for the Cleveland Browns, Chicago Bears and the New Orleans Saints. ...


Youngblood received one of the 1996 NCAA Silver Anniversary Awards, along with Marty Liquori, Thomas Lewis Lyons, Cliff Meely, Kurt L. Schmoke and Joe Theismann, for distinguishing himself as a former NCAA student-athlete. . ... Martin Marty Liquori (born 11 September 1949) is an American middle distance athlete. ... Thomas Lewis Tommy Lyons (born August 7, 1948 in Atlanta, Georgia) was a football player for the University of Georgia and the Denver Broncos. ... Kurt L. Schmoke (born December 1, 1949) is a Democratic politician and was mayor of Baltimore, Maryland. ... Joseph Robert Theismann (born September 9, 1949 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA), is a former American football quarterback in the NFL. He was born to an Austrian father, Joseph John Theismann and a Hungarian mother, Olga Tobias and was raised in South River, New Jersey. ...


In the Fall of 1999, Jack was named to the Sports Illustrated NCAA Football All-Century Team [51] as one of only six defensive ends named to the squad. The others: Michigan State's Bubba Smith, Pitt's Hugh Green, Golden Domers Leon Hart and Ross Browner, and Florida State's Peter Boulware. Charles Aaron Bubba Smith (born February 28, 1945 in Orange, Texas) is an American actor and former athlete. ... Hugh Carleton Greene was Director-General of the BBC from 1960 to 1969, and is generally credited with modernising an organisation that had fallen behind in the wake of the launch of ITV in 1955. ... Leon Joseph Hart (November 2, 1928–September 24, 2002) was an American football tight end and defensive end. ... Ross Browner (born March 22, 1954) was an American football player. ... Peter Boulware (born December 18, 1974 in Columbia, South Carolina) is a former American football linebacker who played for the Baltimore Ravens. ...


In 1996 Jack was voted to the Florida Sports Hall of Fame which features all great althetes who played college of professional athletics and have a Florida connection. Fellow Ram defensive end Deacon Jones (from near Orlando) was voted in a decade earlier. Youngblood's election to the University of Florida Hall of Fame follow five years later, in 2001. Florida Sports Hall of Fame Originally in Lake City, FL, is in the process of finding a home. ... David D. Deacon Jones (born December 9, 1938) nicknamed Secretary of Defense is an American athlete and actor. ...


On September 30, 2006, Youngblood was among the first four Gator legends to be inducted into the Florida Football Ring of Honor,[52] alongside Steve Spurrier, Danny Wuerffel, and Emmitt Smith. is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ... Danny Carl Wuerffel (Born:May 27, 1974 in Pensacola, Florida) is an American football player who won the 1996 Heisman Trophy while playing quarterback at the University of Florida under coach Steve Spurrier. ... Emmitt James Smith III (born May 15, 1969 in Pensacola, Florida) is a former American football player, who played for the Dallas Cowboys and Arizona Cardinals. ...


Named by one SEC publication as the Top All-Time SEC Defensive of All-Time.[53] Also named by the Birmingham News as one of the Top 10 defensive lineman in SEC history,[54], ranking with SEC greats as Reggie White, Doug Atkins, and Bill Stanfill. In addition is one of the three finalists in the fan voting as the top defensive lineman in history of the Southeastern Conference (along with Stanfill, and Eric Curry of Alabama)[55], voting will conclude at the end of November, 2007. Reginald Howard Reggie White (December 19, 1961 – December 26, 2004) was a professional American football player. ... Douglas Leon Atkins (Born May 8, 1930, in Humboldt, Tennessee) is a former American Football defensive end who played for the Cleveland Browns, Chicago Bears and the New Orleans Saints. ... William Thomas Stanfill (born January 13, 1947) is a former defensive end for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ...


Monticello-Jefferson County High 1963-67

Youngblood attended Monticello-Jefferson County High School, Monticello, FL, graduating in 1967. As an offensive lineman and linebacker, Jack was 6'-4", 195 pound two-way starter and team captain of the Brent Hall coached 10-1-1 state champion M-JC Tigers, earning All-State honors in 1966. He was also All-Big Bend, All-Conference and the Big Bend Linemen of the Year and the Outstanding Lineman for the Tigers that season while leading a defense that shut-out seven opponents and allowed only ten touchdowns in 12 games, including the state playoffs. Youngblood also played basketball at M-JC High as well as participating in 4-H, Student Council and Key Club, International, while also being a four-year letterman in football. Was named to the State of Florida's All-Time High school football team by Sports Illustrated in 1989. In November, 2007, was voted to the Flordia State Athletic Association's All-Century High School football squad.[56] Monticello is a city located in Jefferson County, Florida. ... Key Club International is the oldest and largest service program for high school students. ...


Post NFL Career 1985-present

Partnered with L.A. Rams teammate Larry Brooks to open "The Wild Bunch" in 1980, a western clothing store that featured high-end western wear, including cowboy boots, cowboy hats, silver belt buckles, jeans, and all else country. Lawrence Lee Brooks, Sr. ...


Jack Youngblood appeared in two TV movies: C.A.T. Squad in 1986 and C.A.T. Squad: Python Wolf in 1988. Youngblood played a Secret Service agent in the "Counter Assault Technical Squad" named John Sommers who was the "best weapons and munitions man in the business" and who was a fine secret service agent but hated big cities like Washington and New York and thus was banished to Alaska. In the plot line of the movies "John Sommers" also was a member of the Air Force Reserve who piloted SR-71 spyplane.[57] Youngblood was nominated for an Emmy award for best supporting actor for his work in Python Wolf. In these films Youngblood starred along with Joe Cortese[58] , Steve James [59] , and Deborah Van Valkenburgh[60]. Both movies were directed by William Friedkin who is most noted for directing The Exorcist, The French Connection, and the Boys in the Band. The Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) is a major command (MAJCOM) of the U.S. Air Force with its headquarters at Robins AFB, Georgia United States. ... The Lockheed SR-71, unofficially known as the Blackbird, is a long-range, advanced, strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft by Lockheeds Skunk works, which was also responsible for the U-2 and many other advanced aircraft. ... Steve James can refer to multiple people. ... Deborah Van Valkenburgh is an American actress. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted... The French Connection is a 1971 Hollywood film directed by William Friedkin. ... The Boys in the Band is the title of a play by Mart Crowley which for the first time truly and honestly dealt with the lives of contemporary homosexuals. ...


Youngblood, in 1987, was voted to the Orange County (California) Sports Hall of Fame along with Pat McCormick, Ann Meyers and Cap Sheue.[61] Ann Elizabeth Meyers (born March 26, 1955 in San Diego, California) is a distinguished figure in the history of womens basketball and sports journalism. ...


In 1988 Jack authored (with Joel Engle) his autobiography entitled, "Blood". The book outlined Youngblood's drive and passion for professional football and reviewed his career, his injuries, his successes and failures on the football field. It was favorably reviewed by Publishers Weekly as "an unusual sports book". [62] The Orange County Register's John Hall wrote about the work, "a bloody good book. Hardly just another jock diary".[63] Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ...


After his retirement, Youngblood worked in Player relations and Marketing for the Los Angeles Rams from 1985-91 and served as the Rams' color analyst for the Rams Radio Network from 1987-91. In 1985-86 he also was a reporter and co-host for ESPN's Game Day show, alongside Chris Berman. Was succeeded by current co-host, Tom Jackson in 1987. In 1988 he auditioned for CBS's NFL Today along with Dick Butkus, Lyle Alzado, and Gary Fencik, with Butkus being hired to fill the co-host slot. Christopher (Boomer) James Berman (born May 10, 1955, in Greenwich, Connecticut) is a sportscaster, who anchors SportsCenter, Monday Night Countdown, Sunday NFL Countdown, Baseball Tonight, U.S. Open golf, and other programming on ESPN. He joined ESPN a month after its founding and has been with the network since. ... Tom Jackson is also a Canadian film and television actor and singer. ... Richard Marvin Butkus (born December 9, 1942) is a former American football player, widely regarded as the greatest linebacker of his generation and one of the best football players of all time. ... Lyle Alzado (April 3, 1949 – May 14, 1992) was a NFL football player most famous for his intense and intimidating style of play. ... Gary Fencik is an American football player. ...


Youngblood moved to the World League of American Football as the Director of Marketing for the Sacramento Surge in 1992. In his season with the Surge won the World Bowl in 1992, the only American team to do so. He moved to the Sacramento Gold Miners of the Canadian Football League in 1993. During his tenure at the Gold Miners, the club became the first U.S. team to play in the CFL as well the first to play, win, and host a CFL team, while setting a CFL record for most wins by an expansion CFL team (since broken). He also served as a color analyst for the both the Surge and the Gold Miners radio networks and hosted a sports radio talk show from in Sacramento. The World League of American Football (WLAF) was founded in 1990 with support from the NFL to play semi-professional American Football in North America, Europe and later maybe Asia. ... Year Founded 1991 Year Retired 1992 City Sacramento, California Team Colors Green, Yellow Franchise W-L-T Record Regular Season: 11-9 Postseason: 2-0 Championships World Bowls (1) World Bowl II (1992) The Sacramento Surge was a professional American football team that played in the WLAF in 1991 and... The World Bowl is the American football Championship game of the NFL Europe, similar to the Super Bowl of the NFL. When the NFL Europe was founded in 1991 as World League of American Football (WLAF), with teams in North America and Europe as well as expansion plans for Asia... The Sacramento Gold Miners were a Canadian football team based in Sacramento, California. ... CFL redirects here. ...


In 1995 he returned to his native Florida as Vice-President and General Manager, then later as President, of the Orlando Predators of the Arena Football League leaving in 1998. While president of the Predators he served as an alternate on the AFL’s Board of Directors. He was a member of the league's expansion and relocation committee and the drug awareness committee. One of his major projects with the Predators was taking the AFL team public. It is now traded under symbol PRED on the NASDAQ exchange. In 1998 the club won its first Arena League championship in 1998 beating the favored Tampa Bay Storm. In 1999 he began to work for the Arena league office as a liaison to the National Football League and served as a Special Consultant to the Arena Football League and arenafootball2. Conference National Division Southern Year founded 1991 Home arena Hummer Field at Amway Arena City, State Orlando, Florida Head Coach Jay Gruden ArenaBowl championships 2: 1998, 2000 Conference titles 1: 2006 Division titles 7: 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2006 Wild Card berths 8: 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2001... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... Date August 23, 1998 Arena St. ... Conference National Division Southern Year founded 1987 Home arena St. ... NFL redirects here. ... af2 (short for arenafootball2) is the name of the Arena Football Leagues minor league, which started play in 2000. ...


In 1999 Sports Illustrated named Jack to its list of the 50 Greatest Sports Figures in the state of Florida's history.[64]


Among the numerous charitable activities Youngblood was involved in were the 1974 NFL-USO tour to Viet-Nam and Southeast Asia. In 1977 he was the United Way spokesman for the Rams and was the club's Man of the Year nominee in 1975 and 1983. In April, 2007, Youngblood was inducted into the NFL Alumni Association’s prestigious Order of the Leather Helmet, which is the highest award for the NFL Alumni given to those "who make a lasting impression on the game". Jack has also been an Ambassador for Child Help USA, an organization benefiting abused children[65]. The Socialist Republic of Vietnam is a country in Southeast Asia. ... The United Way of America is a coalition of charitable organizations in the United States that have traditionally pooled efforts in fundraising. ... The NFL Alumni is an organization based in Ft. ...


In his final 13 years in (1979-91) Los Angeles he sponsored a celebrity golf tournament for the John Tracy Clinic for Deaf Children[66] and was active with programs at the Children's Hospital for Orange County. He was named the Orange County "Sportsman of the Year" by the Children's Hospital of Orange County in 1987. The award is presented annually to an accomplished athlete for his or her work for CHOC and the community.


Orange County Youth Sports Foundation celebrated the accomplishments of Youngblood in 1983 with the focus of the award being to recognize Jack's accomplishments and sportsmanship over his career that "served as an example for us and our children".[67] Others who have been honored at an annual dinner have been Peter Uberroth, Edwin Moses, Jerry West, Carson Palmer, Bill Walsh, Matt Leinart among many others. Ueberroth (front right) watches President Ronald Reagan throw the first pitch prior to a game. ... Edwin Corley Moses (born in Dayton, Ohio August 31, 1955) is an American track and field athlete who won gold medals in the 400-meter hurdles at the 1976 and 1984 Summer Olympics. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Carson Palmer (born December 27, 1979 in Fresno, California), is an American football quarterback for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League. ... William Ernest Bill Walsh (November 30, 1931 – July 30, 2007) was an American head football coach of the San Francisco 49ers and Stanford University, and popularized the West Coast Offense. ... Matthew Stephen Leinart (born May 11, 1983 in Santa Ana, California) is an American football quarterback (QB) for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League. ...


Other sponsorships and advertising ventures were a Miller Lite TV commercial in 1985 and Honda Power machines in 1985. He also had print ads for Pro Tron Weights, regional ad, 1984, Dan Post Handcrafted Boots, national print ad 1986, Cal-Gym, national print ad, 1986, and was a national spokesman for Protastonin in 2001. In the mid-1980s he also modeled Munsingwear briefs in a series of magazine and billboard ads. Miller Lite is the name of a popular pilsner beer sold by Miller Brewing Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin with a 4. ... This article is about the Japanese motor corporation. ...


In the 1980s, in the first decade of ESPN, Youngblood was a regular guest on Star-Shot (1988), Sportslook (1984, 86, 88) and Great Outdoors (1989) programs. In 2000 Youngblood was hired as the co-host for Wall-Mart's Great Outdoors (with Bert Jones) and served in that capacity through 2003. ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Bertram Hays Jones (born September 7, 1951 in Ruston, Louisiana) is a former LSU and NFL quarterback who played for the Baltimore Colts and, briefly, the Los Angeles Rams. ...


Since 2001 Jack has been the St. Louis Rams host for the Taste of the NFL charity event [68], a dinner held annually at the Super Bowl to raise funds for America's Second Harvest-The Nation's Foodbank Network.[69]


Currently, Jack Youngblood is a Division President of Dave Liles Ethanol Fuels[70] which produces a fuel additive that purports to boost octane, clean fuel systems, and help the environment by reducing engine emissions and being completely biodegradable.[71]


Throughout his NFL career and after Jack has been a skilled public speaker being sought after by corporate, athletic, and Christian groups due to his activity and success in those arenas. He also attends hunting, fishing and golf outings when associated with a good cause.[72] He also is active in the Orlando chapter of Young Life, a nationwide organization[73] whose goals include attempting to mentor young men and women in the Christian faith[74] . Jack's wife, Barbara Youngblood, serves on the Executive Committee for Young Life for the Orlando Chapter. Young Life is the name of a Christian non-denominational parachurch organization based in Colorado Springs, but more commonly refers to the outreach arm of the organization directed towards high school students, as the other groups operate under different names and mandates, including: WyldLife - directed towards middle school children Urban...


Youngblood serves on the Honorary Advisory Board of the St. Louis Rams [75] along with notables like Bill Cosby, August A. Busch III, Jonathan Winters, Dick Gephardt, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, and Stan Musial, Maxine Waters, Dr. Toby Freedman, et al. Former members of the Rams Advisory Board, created in 1981, include, Lord David Westbury, former Ram and Evangelist Rosey Grier, Maureen Reagan, Henry Mancini, Bob Hope, Danny Thomas, Jane Upton Bell, former President Gerald Ford among others. William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... Jackie Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked amongst the all-time greatest heptathletes. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Maxine Waters (born Maxine Moore Carr on August 15, 1938) has served as a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1991, representing the 35th District of California (map). ... Roosevelt Rosey Grier (born July 14, 1932 in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Cuthbert, Georgia), a star athlete at Roselle High School(NJ), is an American football player, actor, and Christian minister. ... Maureen Elizabeth Reagan Revell (January 4, 1941 – August 8, 2001) was the daughter of former President Ronald Reagan and his first wife, Jane Wyman. ... Henry Mancini (April 16, 1924 – June 14, 1994), was an Academy Award winning American composer, conductor and arranger. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Danny Thomas (January 6, 1914 - February 6, 1991) was an American nightclub comedian and television and film actor of Lebanese Maronite Catholic descent. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ...


Prior to every season Youngblood is one of the University of Florida legends current Gator coach Urban Meyer calls in to create what he calls "The Gator Experience" to affirm traditions and to motivate his current UF teams.[76] Urban Meyer (born July 10, 1964 in Ashtabula, Ohio) is currently the head football coach at the University of Florida. ...


Honored as a "Sack Master" by the Deacon Jones Foundation[77] in November, 2007. He will be honored with the late Reggie White, Deacon Jones, and Kevin Greene. Says Hall of Famer Deacon Jones, "I'm very proud to take the lead in finally paying homage to these angry men".[78] "Don't get me wrong about the "angry men" thing," Jones adds. "These are all good guys, but you've got to be angry when you go out on the field and do what we do. And, it's about time they were recognized for it." David D. Deacon Jones (born December 9, 1938) nicknamed Secretary of Defense is an American athlete and actor. ... Reginald Howard Reggie White (December 19, 1961 – December 26, 2004) was a professional American football player. ... David D. Deacon Jones (born December 9, 1938) nicknamed Secretary of Defense is an American athlete and actor. ... Kevin Darwin Greene (born July 31, 1962 in Schenectady, New York) is a former American football linebacker who played in the NFL for 15 years and who retired after the 1999 NFL season. ...


Notes

  • In the late-1960s tested (or was tested on) a thick, syrup-like drink called Gatorade, a beverage created by Doctors Robert Cade and Dana Shires, designed to help Gator athletes who had to practice and play in Central Florida heat.
  • In 1986 He participated the Hands Across America, an event to end hunger in the United States. Other NFL stars including Walter Payton and Tony Dorsett were also in the hand-holding line.
  • A game-used Jack Youngblood jersey sold for $6565 in a July, 2006, online auction.[79]
  • Was listed by Fox News' Mike Straka as having one of the NFL's "Great names".[80]
  • In 2007 Sports Illustrated named Youngblood the greatest professional athlete to wear the uniform number 85.[81] Youngblood was also given the same honor in the 2004 book Right on the Numbers by Nino Frostino,[82] and the Best Athletes by the Number blog.[83]
  • One of Jack biggest fans, David G. Lewber, passed away on June 28, 2007. Mr. Lewber was buried in his autographed Jack Youngblood jersey a week later on July 3, 2007.[84]

Gatoradeis a non-carbonated sports drink marketed by the Quaker Oats Company, a division of PepsiCo. ... Hands Across America was a benefit event staged on May 25, 1986 in which millions of people held hands in a human chain for fifteen minutes along a path across the continental United States. ... The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, is the labor union of players in footballs National Football League. ... Ronald Vincent Jaws Jaworski (born March 23, 1951 in Lackawanna, New York) is a former American football player and currently an NFL analyst on ESPN. He is referred as the King of Tape Breakdown with his ability to break down plays. ... Daryl Moose Johnston (born February 10, 1966) is a former National Football League fullback who played his entire career with the Dallas Cowboys from (1989-1999). ... Francis Asbury Tarkenton (born February 3, 1940) is a former American football player, TV personality, and computer software executive. ... Not to be confused with explosives forensic expert Thomas Thurman. ... Edward T. McCaffrey (born August 17, 1968 in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania) is a former American football wide receiver who played for the New York Giants (1991-1993), San Francisco 49ers (1994) and the Denver Broncos (1995-2003) of the NFL. // McCaffrey played high school football at Allentown Central Catholic High School... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ...

Gallery

External links


Preceded by
Lesley Bush
Larry Echohawk
Kwaku Ohene-Frempong
Bob Lanier
Mike Phipps
Mike Reid
Silver Anniversary Awards (NCAA)
Class of 1996
Marty Liquori
Thomas Lewis Lyons
Cliff Meely
Kurt L. Schmoke
Joe Theismann
Jack Youngblood
Succeeded by
Tommy Casanova
Jack Ford
David Joyner
Edward B. Rust Jr.
James Tedisco
Herb Washington

Robert Jerry Lanier (born September 10, 1948 in Buffalo, New York) was a professional basketball player for the Detroit Pistons and Milwaukee Bucks of the NBA. He played collegiately at St. ... Michael Elston Phipps (born January 19, 1947) was an football quarterback who played collegiately for the Purdue University Boilermakers (1967-1969), and professionally for both the Cleveland Browns (1970-1976) and Chicago Bears (1977-1981). ... Michael Barry Reid (born May 24, 1947 in Altoona, Pennsylvania) is a retired professional American football defensive lineman and Grammy Award winning songwriter. ... The Silver Anniversary Awards are given each year by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to recognize six distinguished former student-athletes on their 25th anniversary as college graduates. ... Martin Marty Liquori (born 11 September 1949) is an American middle distance athlete. ... Thomas Lewis Tommy Lyons (born August 7, 1948 in Atlanta, Georgia) was a football player for the University of Georgia and the Denver Broncos. ... Kurt L. Schmoke (born December 1, 1949) is a Democratic politician and was mayor of Baltimore, Maryland. ... Joseph Robert Theismann (born September 9, 1949 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA), is a former American football quarterback in the NFL. He was born to an Austrian father, Joseph John Theismann and a Hungarian mother, Olga Tobias and was raised in South River, New Jersey. ... Tommy Casanova played football for LSU and for the Cincinnati Bengals. ... Jack Ford is currently the co-anchor of Courtside, the afternoon program on Court TV, alongside Ashleigh Banfield. ... Edward B. Rust Jr. ... James Tedisco represents District 110 in the New York State Assembly, which consists of portions of the city of Schenectady, as well as the City of Saratoga Springs, Ballston, Galway, Milton, and Glenville, among other communities located in Upstate New York. ... Herbert Lee (Hurricane Herb) Washington (born November 16, 1951 in Belzoni, Mississippi) became one of the worlds most celebrated sprinters as a student-athlete at Michigan State University. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Jack Youngblood - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (264 words)
Herbert Jackson Youngblood III (born January 26, 1950, Jacksonville, Florida) is a former American football defensive end who played for the Los Angeles Rams.
He was drafted out of the University of Florida by the Rams in the first round (20th pick overall) of the 1971 NFL Draft; he was chosen as an All-Pro five times during his 14 years with the team and was All-NFC seven times.
Roger Staubach, Fran Tarkenton, and Dan Dierdorf have all said that Jack Youngblood was the best defensive player they ever faced.
Member - Pro Football Hall of Fame (365 words)
Youngblood divided his playing time with Fred Dryer that year and then took over as the starting left defensive end in his third campaign in 1973.
Youngblood, who was born January 26, 1950, in Jacksonville, Florida, was rugged, determined, a dominant defender and the Rams’ perennial quarterback sack leader.
Youngblood recorded one sack, one forced fumble, one blocked extra-point attempt and returned an interception 47 yards for a touchdown.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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